Sample records for al nm albuquerque

  1. ZERH Training: Albuquerque, NM | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, 2014 1:00PM to 5:00PM MST Doc Savage Supply 600 Candelaria Rd. NE Albuquerque, New Mexico The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home is a high performance home which is so energy...

  2. albuquerque nm 1st: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  3. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study, this 3DVAR analysis method is adapted to perform multiple Doppler wind analysis for CASA radars, together

  4. Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25 #12;Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013 Paper 6722 DRAGON5: Designing Computational Schemes Dedicated to Fission Nuclear Reactors

  5. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131 and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716 Steven Letendre Green Mountain College One College Circle Poultney, VT 05764 and Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Donald W

  6. EA-1906: Operations, Consolidation, and Upgrades at the Office of Secure Transportation Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates environmental impacts associated with the siting and construction of several proposed buildings, including a new vehicle maintenance facility and mobile equipment maintenance building (and their support structures) at the Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM.

  7. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 technologies, like photovoltaics (PV), can offer additional benefits to electric utility companies utility company to defer investments in upgrading transmission and distribution facilities, among other

  8. Project DEEP STEAM: fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel, Albuquerque, NM, November 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, R.L.; Donaldson, A.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Hart, C.M.; Johnson, D.R.; Mulac, A.J.; Wayland, J.R.; Weirick, L.J.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourth Project DEEP STEAM Technical Advisory Panel Meeting was held on 5 and 6 November 1980 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to review the status of project DEEP STEAM. This Proceedings, following the order of the meeting, is divided into five main sections: the injection string modification program, the downhole steam generator program, supporting activities, field testing, and the Advisory Panel recommendations and discussion. Each of the 17 presentations is summarized, and a final Discussion section has been added, when needed, for inclusion of comments and replies related to specific presentations. Finally, the Advisory Panel recommendations and the ensuing discussion are summarized in the closing section.

  9. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diver, Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  10. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ewsuk, Kevin G. (Albuquerque, NM); Arguello, Jr., Jose G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of designing a primary geometry, such as for a forming die, to be used in a powder pressing application by using a combination of axisymmetric geometric shapes, transition radii, and transition spaces to simulate the geometry where the shapes can be selected from a predetermined list or menu of axisymmetric shapes and then developing a finite element mesh to represent the geometry. This mesh, along with material properties of the component to be designed and powder, is input to a standard deformation finite element code to evaluate the deformation characteristics of the component being designed. The user can develop the geometry interactively with a computer interface in minutes and execute a complete analysis of the deformation characteristics of the simulated component geometry.

  11. The University of New Mexico MSC01 1220 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Phone 505.277.6947 Fax 505.277.2321 www.unm.edu MEMORANDUMMEMORANDUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    The University of New Mexico · MSC01 1220 · 1 University of New Mexico · Albuquerque, NM 87131 a balanced approach to long-term sustainability. The changes should result in 100.7% funding in 2043 retirees until the fund is 100% funded. · The COLA reduction is based on the median retirement annuity

  12. The NNSA Albuquerque Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Albuquerque Complex Transition Site National Nuclear Security Administration - Service Center Internet Site Skip to Content Click to make text smaller Click to make text larger...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM Case study of a New Mexico-based home builder who has built more DOE Zero Energy Ready certified homes than...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: the Albuquerque Explora Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Albuquerque Explora Science Museum Two Sandia Leaders Elected American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellows On December 15, 2014, in Climate, Energy,...

  15. Albuquerque trio wins Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, adefault SignYearYearAlbuquerque

  16. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250?nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehnke, Frank, E-mail: mehnke@physik.tu-berlin.de; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim [Technische Universitt Berlin, Institut fr Festkrperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fr Hchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Technische Universitt Berlin, Institut fr Festkrperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fr Hchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250?nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246?nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235?nm and 263?nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234?nm with 14.5??W integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2?A/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Albuquerque Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. These integrated program summaries include: Volatile Organic Compounds in Non-Arid Soils, Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils, Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration, Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology, In Situ Remediation, Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration, Underground Storage Tank, Efficient Separations and Processing, Mixed Waste Integrated Program, Rocky Flats Compliance Program, Pollution Prevention Program, Innovation Investment Area, and Robotics Technology.

  18. albuquerque nm usa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which for the Ashtech G12TM and NovAtel PowerPack OEM2 (with special Precise Velocity (PV) firmware) receivers. In order Calgary, University of 82 Proc. ASPE, Precision...

  19. Michael S. Grumbine 1319 Bernardo Court NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    improvement. Knowledge of electronics design, software development, mechanical packaging, testing@yahoo.com Senior engineering and program manager and technical leader with proven experience in the development through its lifecycle of concept, design, prototype, test, manufacture and customer support. Strong focus

  20. David Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States) USDOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTNTopL.David PaulScale

  1. Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014FacilitiesSheet2February28Federal|

  2. Cavity design for improved electrical injection in InAlGaP/AlGaAs visible (639--661 nm) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Lott, J.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (United States))

    1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical cavity design for improved electrical injection in visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes employing an InGaP/InAlGaP strained quantum-well active optical cavity and AlAs/Al[sub 0.5]Ga[sub 0.5]As distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) is described. The cavity design was determined by measuring the lasing threshold current density of visible edge-emitting laser diodes with AlAs/Al[sub 0.5]Ga[sub 0.5]As DBR cladding layers. By inserting InAlP spacer layers between the active region and the DBR cladding, significant improvement in the performance of the edge-emitting lasers was achieved. This approach was then applied to the design of visible VCSEL diodes, and resulted in the first demonstration of room-temperature electrically injected lasing, over the wavelength range 639--661 nm. The visible VCSELs, with a diameter of 20 [mu]m, exhibit pulsed output power of 3.4 mW at 650 nm, and continue to lase at a duty cycle of 40%. The threshold current was 30 mA, with a low threshold voltage (2.7 V) and low series resistance ([lt]15 [Omega]).

  3. MagViz Bottled Liquid Scanner at Albuquerque International Sunport

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Surko, Stephen; Dennis, Steve; Espy, Michelle

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The next-generation bottled liquid scanner, MagViz BLS, is demonstrated at the Albuquerque International Sunport, New Mexico

  4. Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

  5. albuquerque operations office: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the TFTR vacuum 34 18 th IEEENPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 --29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: 18 th IEEENPSS...

  6. albuquerque convention center: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In regards Santhanam, Balu 12 IEEENPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: 18 th IEEENPSS...

  7. New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New airport liquid analysis system New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque International Sunport A new tool that distinguishes potential-threat liquids...

  8. Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting 625-nm laser upon optical pumping of an InGaP/AlGaInP nanostructure with a Bragg mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Lavrushin, B M; Skasyrsky, Yan K [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tiberi, M D [Principia Light Works Inc., Woodland Hills, CA (United States)

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed lasing is obtained in a multilayer quantum-well InGaP/AlGaInP structure in a cavity with an external mirror and a Bragg AlAs/AlGaAs mirror pumped by the 532-nm second harmonic from a diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Lasing is obtained at the TEM{sub 00} fundamental transverse mode of the cavity at a wavelength of 625 nm. The pulse beam power was 3.1 W and the radiation divergence achieved a diffraction limit of 10-12 mrad for 5-ns pulses with a repetition rate of 6 kHz. (lasers)

  9. November 13-15, 2006 17th TOFE, Albuquerque 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. Ren

    November 13-15, 2006 17th TOFE, Albuquerque 1 HAPL A Self-Cooled Liquid Breeder Blanket for a Laser-15, 2006 17th TOFE, Albuquerque 3 HAPL The HAPL Program Aims at Developing IFE Based on Lasers, Direct of laser ports Maintenance performed from the top by removing the upper shield and the blanket modules

  10. Synthesis and characterization of 10?nm thick piezoelectric AlN films with high c-axis orientation for miniaturized nanoelectromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaghloul, Usama, E-mail: uzheiba@andrew.cmu.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Microelectronics Department, Electronics Research Institute, 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Piazza, Gianluca [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling of piezoelectric nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is challenged by the synthesis of ultrathin and high quality piezoelectric films on very thin electrodes. We report the synthesis and characterization of the thinnest piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) films (10?nm) ever deposited on ultrathin platinum layers (25?nm) using reactive sputtering. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and fast Fourier transform analyses confirmed the proper crystal orientation, fine columnar texture, and the continuous lattice structure within individual grains in the deposited AlN nanometer thick films. The average extracted d{sub 31} piezoelectric coefficient for the synthesized films is ?1.73 pC/N, which is comparable to the reported values for micron thick and highly c-axis oriented AlN films. The 10?nm AlN films were employed to demonstrate two different types of optimized piezoelectric nanoactuators. The unimorph actuators exhibit vertical displacements as large as 1.1??m at 0.7?V for 25??m long and 30?nm thick beams. These results have a great potential to realize miniaturized NEMS relays with extremely low voltage, high frequency resonators, and ultrasensitive sensors.

  11. Nonlinear absorption and optical strength of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the wavelength of 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Nikolai V; Sergeev, P B [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Reiterov, V M [All-Russian Scientific Centre 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute', St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was made of the dependence of the transmission of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples on the intensity of KrF-laser radiation ({lambda} = 248 nm) pulses of 85 ns duration. The two-photon absorption coefficients were found at {lambda} = 248 nm and their values for these two crystals were 0.5 {+-} 0.2 and 2 {+-} 1 cm Gw{sup -1}. The surface and bulk laser breakdown thresholds were determined for these samples. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm 0.4 0.35 In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic-mail:ykwon@snu.ac.kr) Abstract -- In this work, we demonstrate a compact 77GHz single-chip transceiver for an automotive radar at the transmitter and a 5dB conversion gain at the receiver. Index Terms -- Automotive radar, 77GHz, MHEMT, MMIC

  13. Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

  14. 18 th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 --29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    18 th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 -- 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico System Configuration A ~ 600 gram TFTR limiter tile (Fig. 1.) which

  15. IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    18 th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico measured from tiles collected from a similar location in the TFTR vacuum

  16. IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    18 th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico System Configuration A ~ 600 gram TFTR limiter tile (Fig. 1.) which

  17. 18 th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 --29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    18 th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering October 25 -- 29, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1999, Albuquerque, New Mexico measured from tiles collected from a similar location in the TFTR vacuum

  18. 1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D. [eds.] [eds.; Sanchez, R.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

  19. Visible (657 nm) InGaP/InAlGaP strained quantum well vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Bryan, R.P.; Lott, J.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (United States)); Olbright, G.R. (Photonics Research, Inc., Broomfield, Colorado 80021 (United States))

    1992-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first visible (657 nm) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The photopumped undoped structure was grown using low-pressure metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy in a single-growth sequence on misoriented GaAs substrates. The optical cavity consists of an In{sub 0.54}Ga{sub 0.46}P/In{sub 0.48}(Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.52} P strained quantum-well active region and a lattice-matched In{sub 0.48}(Al{sub {ital y}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital y}}){sub 0.52} P (0.7{le}{ital y}{le}1.0) graded spacer region, while the distributed Bragg reflectors are composed of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/AlAs quarter-wave stacks. Room-temperature optically pumped lasing was achieved with a very low-threshold power, clearly demonstrating the viability of this new technology. These results provide the foundation for visible semiconductor laser-diode arrays for a number of applications including laser projection displays, holographic memories, and plastic fiber communication.

  20. Comparing Approaches to Locating Boreholes in Spatially Heterogeneous Aquifers Sean A. McKenna, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenna, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Abstract Limited sampling of an aquifer

  1. albuquerque nm 08mar01: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which for the Ashtech G12TM and NovAtel PowerPack OEM2 (with special Precise Velocity (PV) firmware) receivers. In order Calgary, University of 49 IEEENPSS Symposium on Fusion...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque nm measurement Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 33 A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER Summary: and Wildlife...

  3. 2009 fault tolerance for extreme-scale computing workshop, Albuquerque, NM - March 19-20, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, D. S.; Daly, J.; DeBardeleben, N.; Elnozahy, M.; Kramer, B.; Lathrop, S.; Nystrom, N.; Milfeld, K.; Sanielevici, S.; Scott, S.; Votta, L.; Louisiana State Univ.; Center for Exceptional Computing; LANL; IBM; Univ. of Illinois; Shodor Foundation; Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center; Texas Advanced Computing Center; ORNL; Sun Microsystems

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the third in a series of petascale workshops co-sponsored by Blue Waters and TeraGrid to address challenges and opportunities for making effective use of emerging extreme-scale computing. This workshop was held to discuss fault tolerance on large systems for running large, possibly long-running applications. The main point of the workshop was to have systems people, middleware people (including fault-tolerance experts), and applications people talk about the issues and figure out what needs to be done, mostly at the middleware and application levels, to run such applications on the emerging petascale systems, without having faults cause large numbers of application failures. The workshop found that there is considerable interest in fault tolerance, resilience, and reliability of high-performance computing (HPC) systems in general, at all levels of HPC. The only way to recover from faults is through the use of some redundancy, either in space or in time. Redundancy in time, in the form of writing checkpoints to disk and restarting at the most recent checkpoint after a fault that cause an application to crash/halt, is the most common tool used in applications today, but there are questions about how long this can continue to be a good solution as systems and memories grow faster than I/O bandwidth to disk. There is interest in both modifications to this, such as checkpoints to memory, partial checkpoints, and message logging, and alternative ideas, such as in-memory recovery using residues. We believe that systematic exploration of these ideas holds the most promise for the scientific applications community. Fault tolerance has been an issue of discussion in the HPC community for at least the past 10 years; but much like other issues, the community has managed to put off addressing it during this period. There is a growing recognition that as systems continue to grow to petascale and beyond, the field is approaching the point where we don't have any choice but to address this through R&D efforts.

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |New Technology forDepartment ofNewCountry

  5. DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Palo Duro Homes, Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department of Energy -StateOffshoreFuel Cycle | DepartmentInnovation |Palo

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustom Home |RIProduction HomeDepartment

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Palo Duro Homes, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials | DepartmentEnergyNew Town

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 ChairsEnergy DOEHeatEnergyInc.,| Department

  9. Michaela G. Farr and Joshua S. Stein Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess used in mining -MODERN GRIDStewart!Spatial

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - How To Do Business with DOE Albuquerque...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Networking Event Albuquerque, New Mexico February 1, 2012 Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business...

  11. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  12. 1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B. [eds.] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  13. 2820 Inorg. Chem. 1988, 27, 2820-2825 Contribution from the Fuel Sciences Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, and Institut de Chimie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de

  14. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and injuries that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque (SNL-AL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at SNL-AL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The annual report for 1995 has been redesigned from reports for previous years. Most of the information in the previous reports is also in this report, but some material now appears in the appendices instead of the main body of the report. The information presented in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site and the appendices provide more detail. A new section of the report presents trends in health over time. The Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories have been expanded with more examples of diagnoses to illustrate the content of each category. The data presented here apply only to SNL-AL. The DOE sites are varied, so comparisons of SNL-AL with other DOE sites should be made with caution. It is important to keep in mind that many factors can affect the completeness and accuracy of health information collected at the sites as well as affect patterns of illness and injury observed.

  15. Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SandiaNew Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2030. Zero Waste is generally accepted to mean greater than 90% of waste...

  16. Sub-250?nm low-threshold deep-ultraviolet AlGaN-based heterostructure laser employing HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Tsung-Ting; Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Mahbub Satter, Md.; Li, Xiao-Hang; Lochner, Zachary; Douglas Yoder, P.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Shen, Shyh-Chiang, E-mail: shyh.shen@ece.gatech.edu; Ryou, Jae-Hyun [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Fischer, Alec M.; Wei, Yong; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a sub-250-nm, optically pumped, deep-ultraviolet laser using an Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N-based multi-quantum-well structure grown on a bulk Al-polar c-plane AlN substrate. TE-polarization-dominant lasing action was observed at room temperature with a threshold pumping power density of 250?kW/cm{sup 2}. After employing high-reflectivity SiO{sub 2}/HfO{sub 2} dielectric mirrors on both facets, the threshold pumping power density was further reduced to 180?kW/cm{sup 2}. The internal loss and threshold modal gain can be calculated as 2?cm{sup ?1} and 10.9?cm{sup ?1}, respectively.

  17. Highly reliable InGaP/InGaAlP visible light emitting inner stripe lasers with 667 nm lasing wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuda, H.; Ishikawa, M.; Shiozawa, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Itaya, K.; Nitta, K.; Hatakoshi, G.; Kokubun, Y.; Uematsu, Y.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to obtain highly reliable InGaP/InGaAlP inner stripe (IS) lasers, the authors have clarified the relation between the maximum CW operation temperature and other laser characteristics, such as the pulsed threshold current, characteristic temperature, series resistance, and thermal resistance. The Al composition of the cladding layer, the carrier concentration of the p-cladding layer, and the thicknesses of the active layer and cladding layer have been optimized. It was found that an Al composition of 0.7 was the most suitable for the cladding layer, and the optimized carrier concentration was 4 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/. A maximum temperature of 90/sup 0/C was obtained for a 0.1 /mu/m active layer thickness and a 0.6 /mu/m cladding layer thickness. This is the highest value for InGaP/InGaAlP IS lasers, to our knowledge. In the case of a 0.06 /mu/m active layer thickness and a 0.8 /mu/m cladding layer thickness, a maximum temperature of 75/sup 0/C was obtained. IS lasers with facet coating have been stably operating for more than 8000 h at 40/sup 0/C and 3 mW and for more than 4000 h at 50/sup 0/C and 3 mW.

  18. conductivity of Santa Fe Group aquifer systemsediments from the 98th Street core hole. Albuquerque. New Mexico: New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haneberg, William C.

    systemsediments from the 98th Street core hole. Albuquerque. New Mexico: New Mexico Geology. Vol. 20, pp. 14 Grande Basin, proceedings of the 39th Annual New Mexico Water Conference, Albuquerque. New Mexico. November 3-4.1994: New Mexico Water Re- sources Research Insitute Report No. 200, pp. 37-55. HEYWOOD, C

  19. Verification Survey of Rooms 113, 114, and 208 of the Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.J. Vitkus

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the verification survey were to confirm that accessible surfaces of the three laboratories meet the DOEs established criteria for residual contamination. Drain pipes and ductwork were not included within the survey scope.

  20. ARR/18th SOFE Presentation, Albuquerque, NM, October 1999 SiC/SiC Composite for an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. Ren

    performance, high temperature blanket system - Self cooled or dual coolant (He for FW) - LiPb and Li 1999 Input Parameters Power - Max. Heat Load = 1.5 x ARIES-RS - Total Fusion Power Same as ARIES Maximum Surface Heat Flux (MW/m2 ) 0.71 Average Surface Heat Flux (MW/m2 ) 0.6 Power to the Divertor (MW

  1. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Most DOE Energy Ready Homes Built, Albuquerque, NM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero EnergyExtremeTownPalo Duro

  2. Computer Science Department, University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Phone: 505 277-3112 Fax: 505 277-6927 http://www.cs.unm.edu/~hollan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Kevin

    UNM NYU Computer Science Department, University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Phone;UNM NYU Computer Science Department, University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Phone: 505 NYU Computer Science Department, University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Phone: 505 277

  3. 1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, C.H. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duncan, D. [ed.] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, R. [Jobs Plus, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of this mission, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Center at SNL/NM conducts extensive environmental monitoring, surveillance, and compliance activities to assist SNL`s line organizations in meeting all applicable environmental regulations applicable to the site including those regulating radiological and nonradiological effluents and emissions. Also herein are included, the status of environmental programs that direct and manage activities such as terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring; hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental restoration (ER); oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection.

  4. 2003 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque. The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. Albuquerque ROCKYMOUNTAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Shiprock Saint Johns Clifton Tularosa Hobbs Brownfield Douglas Dalhart El Paso 108° 106° 104° 37° 36° 35

  6. The University of New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico. Albuquerque is an ethnically diverse city of half a million residents that has been listed among the smartest U.S. cities and best

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    The University of New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico for hiking, biking, rock climbing and skiing. Photo credit: Tom Brahl Photo The University of New Mexico is the premier research university in the state of New Mexico. UNM is a Carnegie Very High Research Activity

  7. High performance 70 nm In0.8GaP/In0.4AlAs/In0.35GaAs Metamorphic HEMT With Pd Schottky Contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    contacts, due to low diffusivity with InGaP of Pd as well as its high SBH [9], the distance between Schottky contact due to its low diffusion of Pd to InGaP. The fabricated 70 nm MHEMT's with Pd Schottky

  8. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy for Environmental Restoration Program, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. (International Technology Corp., Englewood, CO (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses an overall strategy for complying with DOE Order 5400.4 which directs that DOE offices and facilities integrate the procedural and documentation requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) wherever practical and appropriate. Integration of NEPA and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) processes is emphasized because RCRA applies to most of the potential release sites at SNL, Albuquerque. NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA precesses are comparatively analyzed and special integration issues are discussed. Three integration strategy options are evaluated and scheduling and budgeting needs are identified. An annotated outline of an integrated project- or site-specific NEPA/RCRA RFI/CMS EIS or EA is included as an appendix.

  9. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students' expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  10. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students` expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  11. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

  12. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  13. Office of the Vice President for Health Sciences Health Sciences and Services Bldg. Albuquerque, NM 87131-5001 Phone (505) 272-5849 Fax (505) 272-3601

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    direction, existing space needs and facility conditions, alternate building development strategies were and private partners to create an environment where students pursue excellence, where innovative research, Physical Plant Department Jeff Easton Chief Executive Officer, Lobo Energy,Inc. Larry Schuster Engineer

  14. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, April 21-27 1997, Albuquerque, NM. The Dynamics of an Articulated Forestry Machine and its Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos

    of complexity are devel- oped to help in designing an effective coordinated controller in Cartesian spaceProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, April 21-27 1997 base degrees-of-freedom due to the machine's compliant tires. Techniques and experiments designed

  15. Structural Safety and Reliability, Corotis et al. (eds), 2001 Swets & Zeitlinger, ISBN 90 5809 197 X Moment-based fatigue load models for wind energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    197 X 1 Moment-based fatigue load models for wind energy systems Steven R. Winterstein & LeRoy M. Veers Sandia National Laboratories, Wind Energy Technology Department, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0708 Keywords: load models, fatigue loads, wind energy, non-Gaussian, moment-based models, long- term, short

  16. Ag-Al2O3 Catalyst HC-SCR: Performance with Light Alcohols and Other

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NM - Building America Top Innovation |Department

  17. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albuquerque, NM 87185 Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium Washington, DC October 11-12, 2005 indirect-drive Ignition 2038 2024 2018 2012 2008 2004 1999 FI ZR (26 MA) Z (18 MA) NIF Year Single-shot, NNSA/DP Repetitive for IFE, VOIFE/OFES Z-Pinch IFE target design $2M /year Z-Pinch IFE target fab

  18. Passively modelocked 832 nm vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    , focused into an optical spot with dimensions of 100 ? 200 mm. The SESAM consisted of an AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As DBR, a spacer layer of GaAs0.75P0.25, a 4.8 nm GaAs quantum well and a 2 nm-thick capping layer of Ga

  19. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's mission, the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist SNL's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, State, and Federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report for calendar year 1998 (CY98) summarizes the compliance status of environmental regulations applicable to SNL site operations. Environmental program activities include terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental remediation; oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990).

  20. Evaluation of machine guarding pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, December 9, 1991--December 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted December 9--13 at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the first pilot course taught. Additionally, this report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Included is a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  1. Evaluation of machine guarding pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, December 9, 1991--December 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted December 9--13 at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the first pilot course taught. Additionally, this report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Included is a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc., Albuquerque,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | DepartmentProduction HomeNM,

  3. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Calendar year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agogino, Karen [USDOE, NNSA/SSO; Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned/contractor-operated facility. Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporations environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2007. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2007).

  5. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National...

  6. Electron mobility enhancement in AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with InGaN nanogrooves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improve the room-temperature carrier mobility in wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures, which is limited consider a narrow groove made of InxGa1-xN with small In content x inside a wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heteroN 2 nm /GaN 3 nm /AlN 3 nm . A well-known feature of wurtzite heterostructures is a strong buit

  7. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  8. Determination of hydraulic conductivities of low permeability materials in the Sierra Ladrones Formation, Albuquerque basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Planert, C.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low permeability materials in the Sierra Ladrones Formation were sampled and analyzed to determine their hydraulic conductivities using the falling head centrifugation method (fc) as described by Nimmo et al. (1991). The method is similar to the traditional falling head method, only it uses greatly increased centrifugal forces, allowing measurements to make in a relatively short amount of time. Using these measurements, variations in saturated hydraulic conductivities between different sediment types were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Sampling resulted in useable data chiefly from the clay and silt facies of the formation. The range of conductivities determined are representative of brown and red clays, and silts which make up the overbank deposits of this region. Hydraulic conductivities for these overbank fines were found to range from approximately log K = {minus}9 m/s to log K = {minus}7 m/s. The upper measurement limit of the centrifuge apparatus was determined to be approximately 1.43 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m/s and the lower limit was approximately 7.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m/s.

  9. Albuquerque Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it !D;rC. 1.'_I%r

  10. Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

  11. The Western States: Profound Diversity But Severe Segregation for Latino Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kucsera, John; Flaxman, Greg

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, CA Albuquerque, NM Stockton,Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, CA Albuquerque, NM Stockton,Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, CA Albuquerque, NM Stockton,

  12. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  13. I I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Peery Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM Prof. M.S. Ingber University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM Abstract Velocity boundary conditions for the vorticity form of the...

  14. InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBO = 3.4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBOGaAs base and a 75 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. These devices exhibit collector thickness for any HBT. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector

  15. The University of New Mexico MSC05 3345 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Phone 505.277.5824 Fax 505.277.5544 www.unm.edu Division of Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    be accessed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by logging on to https://my.unm.edu. Changes made during Open insurance plans. Starting July 2010, the Division of Human Resources will contract an external company

  16. Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOTSON,PATRICK WELLS; GALLOWAY,ROBERT B.; JOHNSON JR,CARL EDWARD

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987. These materials were used in the development and testing of nuclear weapon designs. The CWLF is being remediated by the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project pursuant to regulations of the New Mexico Environment Department. A goal of the CWLF project is to maximize the amount of excavated materials that can be demilitarized and recycled. However, some of these materials are radioactively contaminated and, if they cannot be decontaminated, are destined to require disposal as radioactive waste. Five major radioactive waste streams have been designated on the CWLF project, including: unclassified soft radioactive waste--consists of soft, compatible trash such as paper, plastic, and plywood; unclassified solid radioactive waste--includes scrap metal, other unclassified hardware items, and soil; unclassified mixed waste--contains the same materials as unclassified soft or solid radioactive waste, but also contains one or more Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents; classified radioactive waste--consists of classified artifacts, usually weapons components, that contain only radioactive contaminants; and classified mixed waste--comprises radioactive classified material that also contains RCRA constituents. These waste streams contain a variety of radionuclides that exist both as surface contamination and as sealed sources. To characterize these wastes, the CWLF project's waste management team is relying on data obtained from direct measurement of radionuclide activity content to the maximum extent possible and, in cases where direct measurement is not technically feasible, from accumulated PK of the excavated materials.

  17. Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies Hadi with chip power reduc- tions. This paper examines how well process technology and mi- croarchitecture delivered on this assumption. This paper evalu- ates power and performance of native and Java workloads

  18. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transition 795-nm rubidium laser," Opt. Lett. 32, 2423- S.transition 795- nm rubidium laser using 3 He buffer gas",transition 795-nm Rubidium laser with He buffer gas" (

  19. Comparison of regularizations of vortex sheet motion Monika Nitsche a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasny, Robert

    , Robert Krasny c a University of New Mexico, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Albuquerque, NM

  20. 28-nm laser damage testing of LIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltyn, S.R.; Newman, B.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested several samples of LIF, both single crystal and press forged, for damage resistance to 10-ns 248-nm pulses at 35 pps. The damage thresholds - the highest levels at which no damage could be produced - ranged from 4 to 6 J/cm/sup 2/ although some test sites survived irradiation at approx. 30 J/cm/sup 2/. We observed that bulk damage is the primary failure mechanism in single crystal and press forged samples and that both types exhibit the same resistance to laser damage.

  1. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND97-2426 Unlimited Release UC-705 Penetration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A-220 Albuquerque NM 871 10 Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated...

  2. Excerpts from the FAPAC Constitution and Bylaws Modified and...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Locations Albuquerque Complex Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM Constitution And Bylaws Excerpts from the FAPAC...

  3. 244-nm imaging interferometric lithography A. Frauenglass, S. Smolev,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    , decreased feature size and improved circuit design. The National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. Brueck Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 in lithographic pattern definition, enabling the continuous increase in the functionality and speed of integrated

  4. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  5. Electron density and currents of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bairamis, A.; Zervos, Ch.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally, and the effects of the AlN barrier and GaN buffer layer thicknesses on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and transport properties have been evaluated. HEMT structures consisting of [300?nm GaN/ 200?nm AlN] buffer layer on sapphire were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and exhibited a remarkable agreement with the theoretical calculations, suggesting a negligible influence of the crystalline defects that increase near the heteroepitaxial interface. The 2DEG density varied from 6.8??10{sup 12} to 2.1 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} as the AlN barrier thickness increased from 2.2 to 4.5?nm, while a 4.5?nm AlN barrier would result to 3.1??10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} on a GaN buffer layer. The 3.0?nm AlN barrier structure exhibited the highest 2DEG mobility of 900?cm{sup 2}/Vs for a density of 1.3??10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2}. The results were also confirmed by the performance of 1??m gate-length transistors. The scaling of AlN barrier thickness from 1.5?nm to 4.5?nm could modify the drain-source saturation current, for zero gate-source voltage, from zero (normally off condition) to 0.63?A/mm. The maximum drain-source current was 1.1?A/mm for AlN barrier thickness of 3.0?nm and 3.7?nm, and the maximum extrinsic transconductance was 320 mS/mm for 3.0?nm AlN barrier.

  6. The transition from amorphous to crystalline in Al/Zr multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong Qi; Zhang Zhong; Ma Shuang; Qi Runze; Li Jia; Wang Zhanshan [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-Structured Materials, Institute of Precision Optical Engineering, Department of Physics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Le Guen, Karine; Andre, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matiere et Rayonnement, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The amorphous-to-crystalline transition in Al(1.0%wtSi)/Zr and Al(Pure)/Zr multilayers grown by direct-current magnetron sputtering system has been characterized over a range of Al layer thicknesses (1.0-5.0 nm) by using a series of complementary measurements including grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Al layer thickness transition exhibits the Si doped in Al could not only disfavor the crystallization of Al but also influence the changing trends of surface roughness and diffraction peak position of phase Al<111>. An interesting feature of the presence of Si in Al layer is that Si could influence the transition process in Al(1%wtSi) layer, in which the critical thickness (1.6 nm) of Al(Pure) layer in Al(Pure)/Zr shifts to 1.8 nm of Al(1.0%wtSi) layer in Al(1.0%wtSi)/Zr multilayer. We also found that the Zr-on-Al interlayer is wider than the Al-on-Zr interlayer in both systems, and the Al layers do not have specific crystal orientation in the directions vertical to the layer from selected area electron diffraction patterns below the thickness (3.0 nm) of Al layers. Above the thickness (3.0 nm) of Al layers, the Al layers are highly oriented in Al<111>, so that the transformation from asymmetrical to symmetrical interlayers can be observed. Based on the analysis of all measurements, we build up a model with four steps, which could explain the Al layer thickness transition process in terms of a critical thickness for the nucleation of Al(Pure) and Al(1%wtSi) crystallites.

  7. Albuquerque duo wins Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge Erika DeBenedictis and Tony Huang captured the top prize during the 2008 New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge award ceremony. April 22, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  8. Albuquerque duo wins Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, adefault SignYearYear

  9. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS Spectrum PrintALS

  10. Reviw Al

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 JuneReviw Al now ..

  11. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals New StateALS

  12. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALSUsers'ALS

  13. AL. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( , . /'-AL.

  14. June 15, 2004 / Vol. 29, No. 12 / OPTICS LETTERS 1357 Highly coherent light at 13 nm generated by use of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Randy

    , and in developing new types of nano- probe. However, many EUV sources, such as synchrotrons and undulators1 and high Bartels et al. demonstrated that EUV light produced by HHG in gas-filled hollow waveguides exhibits full spatial coherence at wavelengths around 30 nm.3 The extended propagation length in the hollow

  15. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wei, E-mail: wguo2@ncsu.edu; Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramn; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji [HexaTech, Inc., 991 Aviation Pkwy, Suite 800, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560 (United States); Gerhold, Michael [Engineering Science Directorate, Army Research Office, P.O. BOX 12211, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27703 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical gain spectra for ?250?nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150?kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8?nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 5060?cm{sup ?1} when pumped at 1?MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280?nm laser diodes.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - WAPA Transmission Developments in NM ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM, CO, WY, KS, ND, UT, SD & ID Tasked with planning and financing of transmission lines within their respective states RETA has the additional requirement that 30% of...

  17. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  18. Local stress-induced effects on AlGaAs/AlOx oxidation front shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chouchane, F.; Almuneau, G., E-mail: almuneau@laas.fr; Arnoult, A.; Lacoste, G.; Fontaine, C. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Cherkashin, N. [Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, CEMES, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The lateral oxidation of thick AlGaAs layers (>500?nm) is studied. An uncommon shape of the oxide tip is evidenced and attributed to the embedded stress distribution, inherent to the oxidation reaction. Experimental and numerical studies of the internal strain in oxidized Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs structures were carried out by dark-field electron holography and finite element methods. A mapping of the strain distribution around the AlGaAs/oxide interface demonstrates the main role of internal stress on the shaping of the oxide front. These results demonstrate the high relevance of strain in oxide-confined III-V devices, in particular, with over-500-nm thick AlOx confinement layers.

  19. RF power potential of 45 nm CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Christopher

    This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS devices with varying device widths and layouts. We find that 45 nm CMOS can deliver a peak output power density of around 140 mW/mm with ...

  20. New Materials for 157 nm Photoresists: Characterization and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    . The current Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) Roadmap indicates the 100 nm technology node will be reached by 2005; however, many semiconductor manufacturers foresee the need for a technology enabling 100 by 2005. Therefore, 157 nm lithography is viewed as a potential bridge across the gap between optical

  1. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Anions at 118.2 nm: Observation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at 118.2 nm (10.488 eV) by tripling the third harmonic output (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser in a XeAr cell. Our study focuses on a set of...

  2. Free carrier accumulation at cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions Q. Y. Wei,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    ) substrate,7 with GaN and AlGaN layer thickness of 600 nm and 30 nm, respectively. The layer thicknessFree carrier accumulation at cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions Q. Y. Wei,1 T. Li,1 J. Y. Huang,1 F. A (Received 24 February 2012; accepted 19 March 2012; published online 3 April 2012) Cubic Al0.3Ga0.7N/GaN

  3. Gate-Recessed InAlN/GaN HEMTs on SiC Substrate With Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] Passivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Shiping

    We studied submicrometer (L[subscript G] = 0.15-0.25 ¿m) gate-recessed InAlN/AlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on SiC substrates with 25-nm Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] passivation. The combination of ...

  4. Corrosion-resistant multilayer coatings for the 28-75 nm wavelength region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Fernandez-Perea, M; Al, E T

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion has prevented use of SiC/Mg multilayers in applications requiring good lifetime stability. We have developed Al-based barrier layers that dramatically reduce corrosion, while preserving high reflectance and low stress. The aforementioned advances may enable the implementation of corrosion-resistant, high-performance SiC/Mg coatings in the 28-75 nm region in applications such as tabletop EUV/soft x-ray laser sources and solar physics telescopes. Further study and optimization of corrosion barrier structures and coating designs is underway.

  5. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-a Reliable Diode-Pumped Hydrocarbon-Free 795-nm Rubidiumand R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-

  6. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic:From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  7. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  8. 60nm collector InGaAs/InP Type-I DHBTs demonstrating 660 GHz f , BVCEO = 2.5V, and BVCBO = 2.7V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    60nm collector InGaAs/InP Type-I DHBTs demonstrating 660 GHz f , BVCEO = 2.5V, and BVCBO = 2.7VGaAs base and a 60 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. Devices employing a 400. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector electron transit times, and the base-collector

  9. Ultraviolet photoluminescence from Gd-implanted AlN epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavada, J. M.; Nepal, N.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Brown, E.; Hoemmerich, U.; Hite, J.; Thaler, G. T.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.; Gwilliam, R. [U.S. Army Research Office, Durham, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601 (United States); Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Surrey Ion Beam Center, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep ultraviolet emission from gadolinium (Gd)-implanted AlN thin films has been observed using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The AlN epilayers were ion implanted with Gd to a total dose of {approx}6x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Using the output at 197 nm from a quadrupled Ti:sapphire laser, narrow PL emission was observed at 318 nm, characteristic of the trivalent Gd ion. A broader emission band, also centered at 318 nm, was measured with excitation at 263 nm. The PL emission intensity decreased by less than a factor of 3 over the sample temperature range of 10-300 K and decay transients were of the order of nanoseconds.

  10. Broadband superluminescent diodes with bell-shaped spectra emitting in the range from 800 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreeva, E V; Il'ichenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Lapin, P I [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company 'M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum-well superluminescent diodes (SLD) with extremely thin active (AlGa)As and (InGa)As layers and centre wavelengths about 810, 840, 860 and 880 nm are experimentally studied. Their emission spectrum possesses the shape close to Gaussian, its FWHM being 30 60 nm depending on the length of the active channel and the level of pumping. Under cw injection, the output power of light-emitting modules based on such SLDs can amount to 1.0 25 mW at the output of a single-mode fibre. It is demonstrated that the operation lifetime of these devices exceeds 30000 hours. Based on the light-emitting modules the prototypes of combined BroadLighter series light sources are implemented having a bell-shaped spectrum with the width up to 100 nm. (optical radiation sources)

  11. Single-frequency 1559-nm erbium-doped fiber laser pumped by a 650-nm semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, C. Randy [Lucent Technologies, Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733-0400 (United States)] Mizrahi, V. [Cienna Corporation, Hanover, Maryland 21076 (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-frequency laser with a 2-cm-length erbium-doped fiber and fiber-grating coupler mirrors was operated successfully with a 650-nm semiconductor pump laser. Laser pump threshold was 0.91-mW and 34-{mu}W output power at 1559 nm was obtained for 6-mW pump power. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  12. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405?nm radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L. [Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pianetta, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10?A/cm{sup 2} yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20?nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9?Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10?W/cm{sup 2}) of 257?nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405?nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405?nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1?keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 1001000?nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50?h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405?nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc.,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Palo Duro Homes Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  14. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  15. Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels and Zhaoning Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels Han Caoa) and Zhaoning Yu Nanostructure wafers . The nanofluidic channels were further narrowed and sealed by techniques that are based- tremely small nanofluidic structures need to be fabricated and used as matrices for the manipulation

  16. NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009-Transferring from New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2010 NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009- 2010 11/9/2010 Transferring from New Mexico Junior College to the University of New Mexico #12;NMJC Course UNM Equivalent Important UNM Phone Numbers................................................................................................... http://advisement.unm.edu/ The University of New Mexico and New Mexico Junior College work closely

  17. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant uncertainty existed about the quantum efficiency at 1550 nm the necessary operating temperature. This project has resulted in several conclusions after fabrication and measurement of the proposed structures. We have successfully demonstrated the Ge/Si proof-of-concept in producing high analog gain in a silicon region while absorbing in a Ge region. This has included significant Ge processing infrastructure development at Sandia. However, sensitivity is limited at low temperatures due to high dark currents that we ascribe to tunneling. This leaves remaining uncertainty about whether this structure can achieve the desired performance with further development. GM detection in InGaAs/InAlAs, Ge/Si, Si and pure Ge devices fabricated at Sandia was shown to overcome gain noise challenges, which represents critical learning that will enable Sandia to respond to future single photon detection needs. However, challenges to the operation of these devices in GM remain. The InAlAs multiplication region was not found to be significantly superior to current InP regions for GM, however, improved multiplication region design of InGaAs/InP APDs has been highlighted. For Ge GM detectors it still remains unclear whether an optimal trade-off of parameters can achieve the necessary sensitivity at 1550 nm. To further examine these remaining questions, as well as other application spaces for these technologies, funding for an Intelligence Community post-doc was awarded this year.

  18. Parallel Hypergraph Partitioning for Scientific Computing Karen D. Devine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisseling, Rob

    University Dept. of Discrete Algorithms and Math. Dept. of Mathemathics Albuquerque, NM 87185-1111, USA 3508

  19. Fabrication of Sub-10-nm Silicon Nanowire Arrays by Size Reduction Lithography Yang-Kyu Choi, Ji Zhu,, Jeff Grunes,, Jeffrey Bokor, and Gabor. A. Somorjai*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokor, Jeffrey

    systems. Introduction The fabrication of nanoscale patterns with dimensions of 10 nm or less has been and space dimensions" from polysilicon (polycrystalline silicon) and a metal oxide by etching one et al. carried out what they called "spacer lithography" to produce electronic devices in silicon

  20. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  1. Optically pumped cerium-doped LiSrAlF{sub 6} and LiCaAlF{sub 6}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ce{sup 3+}-doped LiSrAlF{sub 6} crystals are pumped by ultraviolet light which is polarized along the c axis of the crystals to effectively energize the laser system. In one embodiment, the polarized fourth harmonic light output from a conventional Nd:YAG laser operating at 266 nm is arranged to pump Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} with the pump light polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} crystal may be placed in a laser cavity for generating tunable coherent ultraviolet radiation in the range of 280-320 nm. Additionally, Ce-doped crystals possessing the LiSrAlF{sub 6} type of chemical formula, e.g. Ce-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} and LiSrGaF{sub 6}, can be used. Alternative pump sources include an ultraviolet-capable krypton or argon laser, or ultraviolet emitting flashlamps. The polarization of the pump light will impact operation. The laser system will operate efficiently when light in the 280-320 nm gain region is injected or recirculated in the system such that the beam is also polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} laser system can be configured to generate ultrashort pulses, and it may be used to pump other devices, such as an optical parametric oscillator. 10 figs.

  2. Optically pumped cerium-doped LiSrAlF.sub.6 and LiCaAlF.sub.6

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Christopher D. (Livermore, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ce.sup.3+ -doped LiSrAlF.sub.6 crystals are pumped by ultraviolet light which is polarized along the c axis of the crystals to effectively energize the laser system. In one embodiment, the polarized fourth harmonic light output from a conventional Nd:YAG laser operating at 266 nm is arranged to pump Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 with the pump light polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 crystal may be placed in a laser cavity for generating tunable coherent ultraviolet radiation in the range of 280-320 nm. Additionally, Ce-doped crystals possessing the LiSrAlF.sub.6 type of chemical formula, e.g. Ce-doped LiCaAlF.sub.6 and LiSrGaF.sub.6, can be used. Alternative pump sources include an ultraviolet-capable krypton or argon laser, or ultraviolet emitting flashlamps. The polarization of the pump light will impact operation. The laser system will operate efficiently when light in the 280-320 nm gain region is injected or recirculated in the system such that the beam is also polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 laser system can be configured to generate ultrashort pulses, and it may be used to pump other devices, such as an optical parametric oscillator.

  3. Sub-30 nm InAs Quantum-Well MOSFETs with Self-aligned Metal Contacts and Sub-1 nm EOT HfO2 Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    performance, ability to harmoniously scale down to sub-30 nm gate length dimensions and CMOS. MOSFETs with gate length dimensions in the 20-30 nm range and outstanding electrical characteristics that yields an undercut spacer is etched through highly

  4. Intermetallic compound formation at Cu-Al wire bond interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, In-Tae; Young Jung, Dae [Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Chen, William T.; Du Yong [Advanced Semiconductor Engineering Inc., 1255 E Arques Ave, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and evolution at Cu-Al wire bond interface were studied using focused ion beam /scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED) and structure factor (SF) calculation. It was found that discrete IMC patches were formed at the Cu/Al interface in as-packaged state and they grew toward Al pad after high temperature storage (HTS) environment at 150 Degree-Sign C. TEM/EDS and NBED results combined with SF calculation revealed the evidence of metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} IMC phase (tetragonal, space group: I4m2, a = 0.404 nm, c= 0.580 nm) formed at Cu/Al interfaces in both of the as-packaged and the post-HTS samples. Two feasible mechanisms for the formation of the metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} phase are discussed based on (1) non-equilibrium cooling of wire bond that is attributed to highly short bonding process time and (2) the epitaxial relationships between Cu and {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2}, which can minimize lattice mismatch for {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} to grow on Cu.

  5. Electrical and dielectric properties of polyanilineAl2O3 nanocomposites derived from various Al2O3 nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    storage devices.10 Nanomaterials are one kind of materials that have sizes smaller than 100 nm in at least nanostructures Jiahua Zhu,a Suying Wei,b Lei Zhang,a Yuanbing Mao,c Jongeun Ryu,d Neel Haldolaarachchige,e David03908j Four Al2O3 nanostructures (i.e. nanofiber, nanoplatelet, nanorod and nanoflake) have been

  6. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c <NM-f

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c <NM-fg

  9. NM Underground Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLC JumpNF- Review ofNM

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a < RAPID‎ | RoadmapNM-a

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-a <caacNM-b

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-acCA-bfID-aNM-a

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-acCA-bfID-aNM-ac

  14. GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric Power Company NM LLC

  15. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of Propargyl Radicals at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncher, S.J.; Moore, D.T.; Sveum, N.E.; Neumark, D.M.

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of propargyl radical, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, and its perdeuterated isotopolog was investigated using photofragment translational spectroscopy. Propargyl radicals were produced by 193 nm photolysis of allene entrained in a molecular beam expansion, and then photodissociated at 248 nm. photofragment time-of-flight spectra were measured at a series of laboratory angles using electron impact ionization coupled to a mass spectrometer. Data for ion masses corresponding to C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 3}{sup +}, and the analogous deuterated species show that both H and H{sub 2} loss occur. The translational energy distributions for these processes have average values = 5.7 and 15.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and are consistent with dissociation on the ground state following internal conversion, with no exit barrier for H loss but a tight transition state for H{sub 2} loss. The translational energy distribution for H atom loss is similar to that in previous work on propargyl in which the H atom, rather than the heavy fragment, was detected. The branching ratio for H loss/H{sub 2} loss was determined to be 97.6/2.4 {+-} 1.2, in good agreement with RRKM results.

  16. The influence of the AlN barrier thickness on the polarization Coulomb field scattering in AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Yuanjie; Feng, Zhihong, E-mail: ga917vv@163.com; Gu, Guodong; Han, Tingting; Yin, Jiayun; Liu, Bo; Cai, Shujun [National Key Laboratory of Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), Hebei Semiconductor Research Institute, Shijiazhuang 050051 (China); Lin, Zhaojun; Ji, Ziwu; Zhao, Jingtao [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron mobility scattering mechanisms in AlN/GaN heterostuctures with 3?nm and 6?nm AlN barrier thicknesses were investigated by temperature-dependent Hall measurements. The effect of interface roughness (IFR) scattering on the electron mobility was found to be enhanced by increasing AlN barrier thickness. Moreover, using the measured capacitance-voltage and current-voltage characteristics of the fabricated heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) with different Schottky areas on the two heterostuctures, the variations of electron mobility with different gate biases were investigated. Due to enhanced IFR scattering, the influence of polarization Coulomb field (PCF) scattering on electron mobility was found to decrease with increasing AlN barrier layer thickness. However, the PCF scattering remained an important scattering mechanism in the AlN/GaN HFETs.

  17. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  18. High power terahertz generation using 1550?nm plasmonic photomixers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Christopher W. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Preu, Sascha [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University Darmstadt, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1550?nm plasmonic photomixer operating under pumping duty cycles below 10%, which offers significantly higher terahertz radiation power levels compared to previously demonstrated photomixers. The record-high terahertz radiation powers are enabled by enhancing the device quantum efficiency through use of plasmonic contact electrodes, and by mitigating thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels through use of a low duty cycle optical pump. The repetition rate of the optical pump can be specifically selected at a given pump duty cycle to control the spectral linewidth of the generated terahertz radiation. At an average optical pump power of 150 mW with a pump modulation frequency of 1 MHz and pump duty cycle of 2%, we demonstrate up to 0.8 mW radiation power at 1 THz, within each continuous wave radiation cycle.

  19. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Shih-Huang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  20. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  1. Compression-induced stacking fault tetrahedra around He bubbles in Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Jian-Li, E-mail: shao-jianli@iapcm.ac.cn; Wang, Pei; He, An-Min [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Classic molecular dynamics methods are used to simulate the uniform compression process of the fcc Al containing He bubbles. The formation of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) during the collapse of He bubbles is found, and their dependence on the initial He bubble size (0.66?nm in diameter) is presented. Our simulations indicate only elastic deformation in the samples for the He bubble size not more than 2?nm. Instead, increasing the He bubble size, we detect several small SFTs forming on the surface of the He bubble (3?nm), as well as the two intercrossed SFTs around the He bubbles (46?nm). All these SFTs are observed to be stable under further compression, though there may appear some SF networks outside the SFTs (56?nm). Furthermore, the dynamic analysis on the SFTs shows that the yield pressure keeps a near-linear increase with the initial He bubble pressure, and the potential energy of Al atoms inside the SFTs is lower than outside because of their gliding inwards. In addition, the pressure increments of 26?nm He bubbles with strain are less than that of Al, which just provides the opportunity for the He bubble collapse and the SFTs formation. Note that the current work only focuses on the case that the number ratio between He atoms and Al vacancies is 1:1.

  2. Draft Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Jemez Road, Los Alamos, NM 87545, Phone: (505) 667-5809. NNSA Service Center, Zimmerman Library, Government Documents, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, Phone:...

  3. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    made with the XM-1's current 25-nm MZP, the new MZP was able to obtain sharp images of lines a mere 15 nm apart-where the older zone plate had seen only a featureless field of...

  4. header for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    new radiation damage mechanisms in previously accepted optical materials. For 157 nm pellicles, newheader for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV Absorbance With the introduction of 157 nm as the next optical lithography wavelength, the need for new pellicle and photoresist

  5. Microstructure of compositionally modulated InAlAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twesten, R.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Lee, S.R.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have observed spontaneous, lateral composition modulation in tensile InAlAs alloy films grown as short-period superlattices on InP (001). They have analyzed these films using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray reciprocal space mapping, and polarized photoluminescence spectroscopy. They find the growth front is nonplanar, exhibiting {approximately} 2 nm deep cusps aligned with the In-rich regions of the compositionally modulated films. In addition to the measured 15 nm wavelength modulation in the [110] direction, a modulation of 30 nm wavelength is seen in the orthogonal [1{bar 1}0] direction. The photoluminescence from the modulated layer is strongly polarized and red shifted by 0.22 eV.

  6. Twistorial constructions of special Riemannian Rui Albuquerque

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albuquerque, Rui

    is called hyperkähler if its holon- omy is in Sp(n). In this case we may construct a global quaternionic

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. water supply and demand and explored potential "transformational" solutions from the perspectives of technology and policy (or both) and discussed ... Last Updated: October...

  8. Albuquerque Roundtable Summary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a16-17, 201529,VulnerabilitiesAlamoThis projectsession

  9. Albuquerque Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become

  10. Albuquerque Technology Incubator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand TelephoneAlbemarle County,Albro

  11. Optical microcavities and enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmott, T. W. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) occur when a non-destructive dielectric breakdown of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes, electroforming, results in the development of a filamentary region in which current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit voltage-controlled negative resistance. The temperature dependence of I-V curves, EM, and, particularly, EL of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12?nm and 30?nm, has been studied. Two filters, a long-pass (LP) filter with transmission of photons with energies less than 3.0?eV and a short-pass (SP) filter with photon transmission between 3.0 and 4.0?eV, have been used to characterize EL. The voltage threshold for EL with the LP filter, V{sub LP}, is ?1.5?V. V{sub LP} is nearly independent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and of temperature and is 0.30.6?V less than the threshold voltage for EL for the SP filter, V{sub SP}. EL intensity is primarily between 1.8 and 3.0?eV when the bias voltage, V{sub S} ? 7?V. EL in the thinnest diodes is enhanced compared to EL in thicker diodes. For increasing V{sub S}, for diodes with the smallest Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses, there is a maximum EL intensity, L{sub MX}, at a voltage, V{sub LMX}, followed by a decrease to a plateau. L{sub MX} and EL intensity at 4.0?V in the plateau region depend exponentially on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. The ratio of L{sub MX} at 295?K for a diode with 12?nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to L{sub MX} for a diode with 25?nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is ?140. The ratio of EL intensity with the LP filter to EL intensity with the SP filter, LP/SP, varies between ?3 and ?35; it depends on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and V{sub S}. Enhanced EL is attributed to the increase of the spontaneous emission rate of a dipole in a non-resonant optical microcavity. EL photons interact with the Ag and Al films to create surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the metal-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. SPPs generate large electromagnetic fields in the filamentary region of the electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diode, which then acts as an optical microcavity. A model is proposed for electronic processes in electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes.

  12. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  13. Optical Characteristic and Numerical Study of Gold Nanoparticles on Al2O3 coated Gold Film for Tunable Plasmonic Sensing Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    Optical Characteristic and Numerical Study of Gold Nanoparticles on Al2O3 coated Gold Film nanoparticles on aluminum oxide (Al2O3) coated gold films with various oxide thicknesses. Dark-field scattering an investigation of the plasmon resonances of 60 nm diameter gold nanoparticles on Al2O3 coated gold film

  14. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 ?m active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  15. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Wednesday, 22 October 2014 11:43 Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process...

  16. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory PrintALS

  17. ALS User Meeting Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALS TechniqueALS

  18. Two-dimensional electron gases in strained quantum wells for AlN/GaN/AlN double heterostructure field-effect transistors on AlN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guowang; Song, Bo; Ganguly, Satyaki; Zhu, Mingda; Wang, Ronghua; Yan, Xiaodong; Verma, Jai; Protasenko, Vladimir; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep, E-mail: djena@nd.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Double heterostructures of strained GaN quantum wells (QWs) sandwiched between relaxed AlN layers provide a platform to investigate the quantum-confined electronic and optical properties of the wells. The growth of AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with varying GaN quantum well thicknesses on AlN by plasma molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is reported. Photoluminescence spectra provide the optical signature of the thin GaN QWs. Reciprocal space mapping in X-ray diffraction shows that a GaN layer as thick as ?28 nm is compressively strained to the AlN layer underneath. The density of the polarization-induced two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the undoped heterostructures increases with the GaN QW thickness, reaching ?2.5??10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}. This provides a way to tune the 2DEG channel density without changing the thickness of the top barrier layer. Electron mobilities less than ?400 cm{sup 2}/Vs are observed, leaving ample room for improvement. Nevertheless, owing to the high 2DEG density, strained GaN QW field-effect transistors with MBE regrown ohmic contacts exhibit an on-current density ?1.4?A/mm, a transconductance ?280 mS/mm, and a cut off frequency f{sub T}?104?GHz for a 100-nm-gate-length device. These observations indicate high potential for high-speed radio frequency and high voltage applications that stand to benefit from the extreme-bandgap and high thermal conductivity of AlN.

  19. Methotrexate intercalated ZnAl-layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Manjusha; Dasgupta, Sudip; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chakraborty, Jui, E-mail: jui@cgcri.res.in [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ghosh, Swapankumar, E-mail: swapankumar.ghosh2@mail.dcu.ie [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), CSIR, Trivandrum 695019 (India); Mitra, Manoj K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Basu, Debabrata [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The anticancerous drug methotrexate (MTX) has been intercalated into an ZnAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) using an anion exchange technique to produce LDH-MTX hybrids having particle sizes in the range of 100-300 nm. X-ray diffraction studies revealed increases in the basal spacings of ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrid on MTX intercalation. This was corroborated by the transmission electron micrographs, which showed an increase in average interlayer spacing from 8.9 A in pristine LDH to 21.3 A in LDH-MTX hybrid. Thermogravimetric analyses showed an increase in the decomposition temperature for the MTX molecule in the LDH-MTX hybrid indicating enhanced thermal stability of the drug molecule in the LDH nanovehicle. The cumulative release profile of MTX from ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrids in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 was successfully sustained for 48 h following Rigter-Peppas model release kinetics via diffusion. - Graphical abstract: ZnAl-layered double hydroxide intercalated with methotrexate ({approx}34% loading) promises the possibility of use of ZnAl-LDH material as drug carrier and in controlled delivery. Highlights: > ZnAl-layered double hydroxide methotrexate nanohybrid has been synthesized. > XRD and TEM studies on nanohybrid revealed successful intercalation of methotrexate. > TG and CHN analyses showed {approx}34 wt% of methotrexate loading into the nanohybrid. > Possibility of use of ZnAl-LDH material as drug carrier and in delivery.

  20. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 12 nm Resolution Fresnel Zone Plate Lens based Soft X-raynanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. Theoptical performance of Fresnel zone plate lens based imaging

  1. Smith et al Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    Smith et al 1 Supporting Information for Smith et al. 2006, PLoS Computational Biology 2:e161-hyperpallium apicale; HF-hippocampal formation, and M-mesopallium. #12;Smith et al 2 FigureS2,nolinkswerefoundbetweenelectrodesindifferentbirds,andnolinkswerefoundintothesoundstimulusvariable. CombinedAnalysisofAllBirds'ElectrodesPlusSound #12;Smith et al 3 Analysis of Data from Subsections

  2. Amber-green light-emitting diodes using order-disorder Al[subscript x]In[subscript 1?x]P heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Theresa M.

    We demonstrate amber-green emission from Al[subscript x]In[subscript 1 x]P light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with luminescence peaked at 566?nm and 600?nm. The LEDs are metamorphically grown on GaAs substrates via a graded ...

  3. Abstract of paper presented at the 2001 43rd Electronic Materials Conference (Notre Dame, IN, June 27-29, 2001) Properties of InAlP Native Oxides Supporting MOS Inversion-layer Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -V MOS applications.[1],[2] Two ~63 nm thick InAlP films, both with and without a 10 nm InGaP oxidation front stopping within the InAlP just above the underlying interface in samples with or without an InGaPAs oxidation. Finally, TEM imaging shows that InAlP oxides on structures with the InGaP barrier layer have much

  4. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Luque, Antonio [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021, Russia and Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  5. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces in high-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of Al on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) annealed in high-pressure hydrogen at 100C exhibit surface Pb nanowire growth. Wire diameter is approximately 80 nm and length can exceed 100 microns. Based on microstructural analysis using electron microscopy and ion scattering, a vapor-solid scheme with hydrogen as a carrier gas was proposed as a growth mechanism. We expect that these observations may lead to controlled Pb nanowires growth through pattering of the Al film.

  6. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  7. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  8. Enhanced production of coherent pulsed radiation at 125 nm: the route towards a tabletop VUV laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    surface with a 50-mm quartz lens. The VUV signal is measured by a calibrated CsI solar efficiency. Since deposition of opaque Hg on windows is an issue, very complex cell geometries have been to produce coherent 125-nm light with a single dye laser at 625.7 nm using a room-temperature Hg cell [3]. We

  9. A 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    simulation. A. Transistor Layout Caracterisation The size of the transistor depends on the maximum powerA 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier Sofiane Aloui, Eric Kerherv IMS-CNRS University of Toulouse Toulouse, France plana@laas.fr Abstract--A 65nm CMOS, 60GHz fully integrated power

  10. Coherence and Linewidth Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, W.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bandwidth for a single-pass FEL amplifier initiated by SASE.Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W.M. Fawley, A.M. Sessler,Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W. M. Fawley and A. M.

  11. Magnetization switching in 70-nm-wide pseudo-spin-valve nanoelements Xiaobin Zhua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    Fe, respectively, in this case separated by a spacer layer. The individual elements have dimensions of 70 nm 550 nm with submicron or deep- submicron dimensions.4,5 These PSV or MTJ elements con- sist of asymmetric sandwiches is magnetically hard. For elements with micron-scale dimensions, interactions between the layers can lead

  12. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL.AFTFutureALPES20thALS

  13. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory Print

  14. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory

  15. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALSALS

  16. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALSALSALS

  17. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS

  18. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years ofAA-Z Index A B ALS

  19. About the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcome toAboutAboutUs About UsAboutALS

  20. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications Group Print

  1. ALS Postdoctoral Fellowship Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS

  2. ALS User Meeting Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALS

  3. ALS in the News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS RevealsALS

  4. 2013 ALS User Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004AugustApril 2013 Wed,SeptemberNovember33 ALS

  5. Access to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME -ToggleAccess to the ALS Print

  6. Investigation of Strain in AlGaN/GaN Multi Quantum Wells by Complementary Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraju, G.; Sathish, N.; Pathak, A. P. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Central University (P.0), Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Dhamodaran, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, IIT P O, Kanpur UP 208016 (India); Gaca, J.; Wojcik, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 01-919 Warsaw, ul. Wolczynska 133 (Poland); Turos, A. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 01-919 Warsaw, ul. Wolczynska 133 (Poland); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk/Otwock, Warsaw (Poland); Arora, B. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai-400 005 (India)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}N(12 nm)/GaN (13 nm) Multi Quantum Wells of 15 periods are grown on sapphire by MOCVD technique. GaN/AlN, each of thickness 200 nm and 20 nm respectively, are used as buffer layers between substrate and epilayer to incorporate the strain in epilayers. It is a well established technique to engineer the band gap in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N by adjusting alloy composition. These samples are used in visible and UV light emitters. In the present study, we employ a photoluminescence technique to estimate the composition and luminescence peak positions of AlGaN and GaN. Crystallinity and quality of interfaces have been studied by Rocking curve scan. The Threading Dislocations formed at the GaN buffer layer travel across the entire layers to the surface to form good quality films. Photo-luminescence results show a very sharp GaN peak at 3.4 eV, as observed and reported by others, which shows that samples are free from point defects.

  7. Nanotechnology is defined as materi-als and systems ranging from 1 to 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Nanotechnology is defined as materi- als and systems ranging from 1 to 100 nm which exhibit novel in the potentially revo- lutionary impacts that nanotechnology has to offer clinical medicine, particu- larly oncology. Numerous proof of concept appli- cations of nanotechnology have been described for high impact

  8. BOLETN OFICIAL DEL ESTADO Nm. 215 Sbado 7 de septiembre de 2013 Sec. III. Pg. 65237

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    actividades de investigacin e innovacin al servicio de la ciudadana, del bienestar social y de un

  9. Solid state phase equilibria and intermetallic compounds of the Al-Cr-Ho system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Mingjun [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China) [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Co., Ltd., Liuzhou, Guangxi 545007 (China); Zhan, Yongzhong, E-mail: zyzmatres@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)] [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C were experimentally investigated. The phase relations at 500 Degree-Sign C are governed by 14 three-phase regions, 29 two-phase regions and 15 single-phase regions. The existences of 10 binary compounds and 2 ternary phases have been confirmed. Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 2}, Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 17}Ho{sub 2} were not found at 500 Degree-Sign C. Crystal structures of Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho were determined by the Rietveld X-ray powder data refinement. Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} was found to exhibit cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m (no. 217) and lattice parameters a=0.9107(5) nm. Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} structure type with space group I4/mmm (no. 139) and lattice parameters a=0.8909(4) nm, c=0.5120(5) nm. It is concluded that the obtained Al{sub 4}Cr phase in this work should be {mu}-Al{sub 4}Cr by comparing with XRD pattern of the hexagonal {mu}-Al{sub 4}Mn compound. - Graphical abstract: The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Cr-Ho system has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} has cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} type with space group I4/mmm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 4}Cr phase is {mu}-type at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  10. Infrared photorefractive passive phase conjugation with BaTiO/sub 3/: Demonstrations with GaAlAs and 1. 09-. mu. m Ar/sup +/ lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin-Golomb, M.; Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1985-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report photorefractive passive phase conjugation of GaAlAs laser radiation at 815--865 nm and Ar/sup +/ laser radiation at 1090 nm. A ring passive phase conjugate mirror was used with BaTiO/sub 3/ as the real-time holographic gain medium. With GaAlAs lasers phase conjugate reflectivities of up to 16% uncorrected for Fresnel losses were recorded. Effects of the strong associated feedback to the laser and attempts at mode locking are described. At 1090 nm the reflectivity remains approximately the same, but with a significantly longer time constant.

  11. Development and status of the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan or I love that mobile unit of mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bounini, L. [USDOE Grand Junction Project Office, CO (United States); Williams, M. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States); Zygmunt, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine Department of Energy (DOE) sites reporting to the Albuquerque Office (AL) have mixed waste that is chemically hazardous and radioactive. The hazardous waste regulations require the chemical portion of mixed waste to be to be treated to certain standards. The total volume of low-level mixed waste at the nine sites is equivalent to 7,000 drums, with individual site volumes ranging from 1 gallon of waste at the Pinellas Plant to 4,500 drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Nearly all the sites have a diversity of wastes requiring a diversity of treatment processes. Treatment capacity does not exist for much of this waste, and it would be expensive for each site to build the diversity of treatment processes needed to treat its own wastes. DOE-AL assembled a team that developed the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan that uses the resources of the nine sites to treat the waste at the sites. Work on the plan started in October 1993, and the plan was finalized in March 1994. The plan uses commercial treatment, treatability studies, and mobile treatment units. The plan specifies treatment technologies that will be built as mobile treatment units to be moved from site to site. Mobile units include bench-top units for very small volumes and treatability studies, drum-size units that treat one drum per day, and skid-size units that handle multiple drum volumes. After the tools needed to treat the wastes were determined, the sites were assigned to provide part of the treatment capacity using their own resources and expertise. The sites are making progress on treatability studies, commercial treatment, and mobile treatment design and fabrication. To date, this is the only plan for treating waste that brings the resources of several DOE sites together to treat mixed waste. It is the only program actively planning to use mobile treatment coordinated between DOE sites.

  12. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at a wavelength of 940 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W J; You, L X; He, Y H; Zhang, L; Liu, X Y; Yang, X Y; Wu, J J; Guo, Q; Chen, S J; Wang, Z; Xie, X M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop single-photon detectors comprising single-mode fiber-coupled superconducting nanowires, with high system detection efficiencies at a wavelength of 940 nm. The detector comprises a 6.5-nm-thick, 110-nm-wide NbN nanowire meander fabricated onto a Si substrate with a distributed Bragg reflector for enhancing the optical absorptance. We demonstrate that, via the design of a low filling factor (1/3) and active area ({\\Phi} = 10 {\\mu}m), the system reaches a detection efficiency of ~60% with a dark count rate of 10 Hz, a recovery time <12 ns, and a timing jitter of ~50 ps.

  13. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  14. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  15. Optical system for Argus 355-nm 90-mm aperture target-illumination experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.C.; Boyd, R.; Hermes, G.; Hildum, J.S.; Linford, G.; Martin, W.E.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of laser alignment, crystal tuning, target alignment, and laser beam diagnosis are provided by this optical system. Initial setup and preshot alignment techniques are discussed. Layout and operation are contrasted with the 532 nm target experiments.

  16. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 18, 2014 Los Alamos to partner with Toshiba to remotely and safely peer inside nuclear reactors LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory today...

  17. Switching of 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses using a compact PMN-PT modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adany, Peter; Price, E. Shane; Johnson, Carey K.; Zhang, Run; Hui, Rongqing

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A voltage-controlled birefringent cell based on ceramic PMN-PT material is used to enable fast intensity modulation of femtosecond laser pulses in the 800 nm wavelength window. The birefringent cell based on a PMN-PT ...

  18. Sub-10-nm electron-beam lithography for templated placement of colloidal quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfrinato, Vitor Riseti

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the investigation of resolution limits of electron-beam lithography (EBL) at the sub-10-nm scale. EBL patterning was investigated at low electron energy (2 keV) in a converted scanning electron microscope ...

  19. Sub-20nm substrate patterning using a self-assembled nanocrystal template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Ryan C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hexagonally close-packed monolayer of lead selenide quantum dots is presented as a template for patterning with a tunable resolution from 2 to 20nm. Spin-casting and micro-contact printing are resolved as methods of ...

  20. Comprehensive inverse modeling for the study of carrier transport models in sub-50nm MOSFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djomehri, Ihsan Jahed, 1976-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct quantitative 2-D characterization of sub-50 nm MOSFETs continues to be elusive. This research develops a comprehensive indirect inverse modeling technique for extracting 2-D device topology using combined log(I)-V ...

  1. Carbon nanotube assisted formation of sub-50 nm polymeric nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia-Hua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel processing method was developed for sub-50 nm structures by integrating quantum dots (QDs) on patterned polymer substrates. Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMa) was prepared by the initiated chemical vapor ...

  2. Timing performance of 30-nm-wide superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafi, Faraz

    We investigated the timing jitter of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs, also referred to as cascade-switching superconducting single-photon detectors) based on 30-nm-wide nanowires. At bias currents ...

  3. BOSQUE REACH ARROYO DE LAS CAAS TO SOUTH BOUNDARY BOSQUE DEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    with funding from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in Albuquerque, NM, via U.S. Forest Service Contract: 07-JV

  4. Two Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    event in Albuquerque LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 26, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Group and the Quality and Performance...

  5. TEC Information Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    External Coordination Working Group Information Security E. Ralph Smith, Manager Institutional Programs April 22, 2004 Albuquerque, NM WIPP * Open communications * Notifications *...

  6. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-0351 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0351 Phone: (505) 844-1071 Fax: (505) 844-4394 E

  7. Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-0351 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0351 Phone: (505) 844-6385 Fax: (505) 844-4394 E

  8. Paper Title (use style: paper title)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract- High penetrations of PV on the distribution system can impact the operation of the grid and may require...

  9. Iterative Assembly of Helical Proteins by Optimal Hydrophobic Packing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutsias, Evangelos

    , University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA 3Present address: Physical Biosciences Division generates an ensemble of viable interconnecting loops. After energy minimization and clustering, we use

  10. Other Participants 1991 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Laboratory Lab Team, Rocky Flats Lab Team, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Lab Team, Solar Energy Research Institute La Cueva High School , Albuquerque , NM Lake Forest High...

  11. EIS-0283-S2-Summary-2012.pdf

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    88220 (575) 234-7348 DOE Public Reading Room Government Information Department Zimmerman LibraryUniversity of New Mexico 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 (505)...

  12. SAND2013-3790

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bridges University of New Mexico Department of Computer Science Mail stop: MSC01 1130 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Abstract Increased HPC capability...

  13. A Computational Study of the Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185-1124, USA C. Eric Lynch and Marilyn J. Smith Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332-0150, USA This work...

  14. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Service Center (NNSASC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the NNSA Service Center (Albuquerque Office, NM).

  15. TOUGH Simulations of the Updegraff's Set of Fluid and Heat Flow Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TN 37831 Tom E. Michener Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab. PO5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 Battelle Memolial lnst. 505 King47906 Dr. Diana J. Holford Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Receives Award for Electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Receives Award for Electronics Stewardship September 19, 2011 electronics stewardship award ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Sandia National Laboratories has received an award for...

  17. Thermodynamics Teacher Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Albuquerque, NM Catherine Norris, Raleigh, NC Don Pruett, Sumner, WA Larry Richards, Eaton, IN Barry Scott, French Camp, CA Regina Sizemore, Letcher, KY Joanne Spaziano,...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model verification 6 Indoor testing (reported at 38 th PVSC) Conducted by CFV Solar Test Laboratory, Inc (Albuquerque, NM) HALM solar simlulator integrated with a...

  19. Which Models Matter: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Models Matter: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for Photovoltaic Power Systems Clifford W. Hansen and Andrew Pohl Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185-1033, USA...

  20. Exercise Design Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA), NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is pleased to announce the EXR231, Exercise Design Laboratory course

  1. Michaela G. Farr and Joshua S. Stein Sandia National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with identical setups located in Albuquerque NM and Orlando, Florida. Index Terms - Photovoltaics, Cooling, Efficiency, Wind Speed. I. INTRODUCTION The performance of a...

  2. Uranium and other heavy metals in the plant-animal-human food chain near abandoned mining sites and structures in an American Indian community in northwestern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel-Nakamura, Christine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Navajo Churchrock mining district. Environmentalpeople and uranium mining. Albuquerque, NM: University of2002). The history of uranium mining and the Navajo people.

  3. Accident Investigation of the December 11, 2013, Integrated Device...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accidental Discharge at the Sandia National Laboratory Site 9920, Albuquerque, NM Accident Investigation of the December 11, 2013, Integrated Device Fireset and Detonator...

  4. 4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm Molecular Writing Resolution", Small, 2005, ASAP. Patent the first "nano-fountain pen" capable of depositing organic ink molecules in patterns as small as 40 nm

  5. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms in an Ultrafine Grained Al-Mg-Sc Alloy Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tammy J. Harrell; Troy D. Topping; Haiming Wen; Tao Hu; JULIE M. SCHOENUNG; ENRIQUE J. LAVERNIA

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additions of Sc to an Al-Mg matrix were investigated, paying particular attention to the influence of Al3Sc precipitates and other dispersoids, as well as grain size, on mechanical behavior. Prior studies have shown that Sc significantly increases the strength of coarse-grained Al-Mg alloys. Prompted by these findings, we hypothesized that it would be of fundamental and technological interest to study the behavior of Sc additions to an ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructure (e.g., 100s nm). Accordingly, we investigated the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of a cryomilled ultrafine grained Al-5Mg-0.4Sc (wt pct) and compared the results to those of an equivalent fine-grained material (FG) produced by powder metallurgy. Experimental materials were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) followed by extrusion or dual mode dynamic forging. Under identical processing conditions, UFG materials generate large Al3Sc precipitates with an average diameter of 154 nm and spaced approximately 1 to 3 m apart, while precipitates in the FG materials have a diameter of 24 nm and are spaced 50 to 200 nm apart. The strengthening mechanisms are calculated for all materials and it is determined that the greatest strengthening contributions for the UFG and FG materials are Mg-O/N dispersion strengthening and precipitate strengthening, respectively.

  6. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process that transforms gas-phase molecules into solid particles like soot and...

  7. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  8. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  9. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Yarrison-Rice, Jan [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Etheridge, Joanne [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Wong, Bryan M. [Materials Chemistry Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  10. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic:From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boyd et al. : Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

  11. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boyd et al. : Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

  12. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane [Plasma Engineering Research Lab (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then scaled to classical microwave breakdown theory after correcting for the multiphoton ionization process for different pressures and good agreement, regarding both pressure dependence and breakdown threshold electric fields, is obtained. The effect of the presence of submicron particles on the 1064 nm breakdown threshold was also investigated. The measurements show that higher breakdown field is required, especially at lower pressures, and in close agreement with classical microwave breakdown theory and measurements in air.

  13. SANDIA REPORT;SF 1075-SUR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM 87110 Smith Engineering Company 2201 San Pedro NE, 4 Suite 200 Albuquerque NM 87110 Smith Engineering Company P.O. Box 2565 Roswell NM 88202-2565 Souder Miller & Associates...

  14. The SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool: learning a the 22-nm node and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Hudyma, Russ; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Montgomery, Warren; Roller, John; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to playa dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET operating as a SEMATECH resist and mask test center. Here we present an update summarizing the latest resist test and characterization results. The relatively small numerical aperture and limited illumination settings expected from 1st generation EUV production tools make resist resolution a critical issue even at the 32-nm node. In this presentation, sub 22 nm half pitch imaging results of EUV resists are reported. We also present contact hole printing at the 30-nm level. Although resist development has progressed relatively well in the areas of resolution and sensitivity, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of system-level contributors to the LER observed from the SEMA TECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  15. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578nm Ytterbium clock transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellini, Giacomo; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Pizzocaro, Marco; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the Ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to a ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic $^{173}$Yb with a < 50 Hz linewidth over 5 minutes, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  16. Efficient infrared thermal emitters based on low-albedo polaritonic meta-Burton Neuner, Chihhui Wu, Gregory Ten Eyck, Michael Sinclair, Igal Brener et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    , New Mexico, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1082, USA (Received 17 September 2012; accepted-engineered tissues,4 and the development of efficient thermoelectric radiation sources. Single-element, spectrally

  17. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, Mara Victoria

    Haddouti Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW (TUM & AUI Alumni) BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultt fr

  18. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, Mara Victoria

    Haddouti Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW) BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultt fr Informatik TUM School

  19. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, Mara Victoria

    Haddouti Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW Alumni) BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultt fr Informatik TUM

  20. A universal low-noise analog receiver baseband in 65-nm CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tekin, Ahmet; Elwan, Hassan; Pedrotti, Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. , et al. (2005). A direct- conversion receiver for DVB-analog design for direct conversion receiver. In Proceedingsof the wide-band direct conversion receiver including the

  1. A high-power 626 nm diode laser system for Beryllium ion trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ball; M. W. Lee; S. D. Gensemer; M. J. Biercuk

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a high-power, frequency-tunable, external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system near 626 nm useful for laser cooling of trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ions. A commercial single-mode laser diode with rated power output of 170 mW at 635 nm is cooled to $\\approx - 31$ C, and a single longitudinal mode is selected via the Littrow configuration. In our setup, involving multiple stages of thermoelectric cooling, we are able to obtain $\\approx$130 mW near 626 nm, sufficient for efficient frequency doubling to the required Doppler cooling wavelengths near 313 nm in ionized Beryllium. In order to improve nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency, we achieve larger useful power via injection locking of a slave laser. In this way the entirety of the slave output power is available for frequency doubling, while analysis may be performed on the master output. We believe that this simple laser system addresses a key need in the ion trapping community and dramatically reduces the cost and complexity associated with Beryllium ion trapping experiments.

  2. Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression Christopher T of this concept. Our laboratory breadboard uses standard, single-mode optical fiber, off-the-shelf fiber-optic IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Transmitter--Single-mode laser 3.2 Transmitter--Single-mode fiber 3.3 Transmitter--Optical

  3. Highly efficient semiconductor optical amplifier for the 820-860-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Uspenskii, Mikhail B; Shishkin, Viktor A [M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-pass optical amplifier with a gain up to 32 dB at a wavelength of 840 nm is developed. Its high reliability is demonstrated at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of efficient application of this amplifier in MOPA systems are presented. (lasers)

  4. Laser amplification at 18. 2 nm in recombining plasma from a laser-irradiated carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Corbett, R.; Hooker, C.J.; Key, M.H.; Kiehn, G.P.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Pert, G.J.; Regan, C.; Rose, S.J.; Sadaat, S.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet laser amplification has been observed for the C VI Balmer-..cap alpha.. transition at 18.2 nm, with use of a novel optical system to irradiate up to 1 cm length of carbon fiber target. The measurements were time resolved and indicated peak single-transit amplification of about 30 times.

  5. A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1 , Anosh Davierwalla2 , David Mann3 IBM, Burlington, VT Abstract -- A linear high output power CMOS direct conversion transmitter for wide?5 QFN. Index Terms -- direct conversion, CMOS, WCDMA, transmitter, third order distortion cancellation

  6. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrtico J. Beltrn 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldn-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrtico J. Beltrn 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Crdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Crdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  7. Performance of a High-Concentration Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier with 100 nm Amplification Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajireza, P.; Shahabuddin, N. S.; Abbasi-Zargaleh, S.; Emami, S. D.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z. [Center for Advanced Devices and Systems, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing demand for higher bandwidth has driven the need for higher Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) channels. One of the requirements to achieve this is a broadband amplifier. This paper reports the performance of a broadband, compact, high-concentration and silica-based erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier optimized to a 2.15 m long erbium-doped fiber with erbium ion concentration of 2000 ppm. The gain spectrum of the amplifier has a measured amplification bandwidth of 100 nm using a 980 nm laser diode with power of 150 mW. This silica-based EDFA shows lower noise figure, higher gain and wider bandwidth in shorter wavelengths compared to Bismuth-based EDFA with higher erbium ion concentration of 3250 ppm at equivalent EDF length. The silica-based EDF shows peak gain at 22 dB and amplification bandwidth between 1520 nm and 1620 nm. The lowest noise figure is 5 dB. The gain is further improved with the implementation of enhanced EDFA configurations.

  8. An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm Kenneth lithography design rules. The proposed microscope features an array of user-selectable Fresnel zoneplate-EUV, Fresnel zoneplate microscope, the AIT has been in the vanguard of high-resolution EUV mask imaging

  9. FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber , DESY, Hamburg, Germany for the VUV-FEL team Abstract The VUV-FEL is a free electron laser user facility being commissioned at DESY. It is based on the TTF-FEL, which was in operation until end of 2002 providing a photon beam for two pilot

  10. 1-10 nM E2 E2 30 E2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawato, Suguru

    076 1. E2 E2 E2 E2 2. E2 E2 2 E2 1 1-10 nM E2 5), 7) E2 30 E2 7) E2 512076-0792011 Modulation of Learning and Memory slowly but also rapidly. Slow actions of estradiol (E2) occur via nuclear receptors (ER), while rapid E2

  11. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser emitting at 899 nm Marc Castaing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    technologies have been developed to reach the blue range: GaN la- ser diodes, frequency-doubled laser diodes to the doping percentage, P cm-2 the absorption cross section at the pump wavelength 808 nm , A s-1 the inverse

  12. Sub-10 nm Self-Enclosed Self-Limited Nanofluidic Channel Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sub-10 nm Self-Enclosed Self-Limited Nanofluidic Channel Arrays Qiangfei Xia, Keith J. Morton report a new method to fabricate self-enclosed optically transparent nanofluidic channel arrays with sub. Here we propose and demonstrate a new method to fabricate enclosed optically transparent nanofluidic

  13. Evanescent-wave pumped room-temperature single-mode GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowire lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Xia, E-mail: xzhang@bupt.edu.cn; Ren, Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 66, Beijing 100876 (China); Liu, Yange, E-mail: ygliu@nankai.edu.cn; Wang, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Optical Information and Technology, Ministry of Education and Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Evanescent-wave pumped room-temperature single-mode GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowire lasers are proposed and demonstrated. The nanowires are axially excited by evanescent wave outside a microfiber with a diameter about 10??m via a ns-pulse laser. The lasing emission with a low effective threshold less than 90 nJ is achieved at 868.62?nm along with a linewidth of ?1.8?nm. Moreover, multiple lasing lines in a wavelength range from 852.56?nm to 882.48?nm are observed. The mechanism of diverse lasing wavelengths is revealed. Furthermore, the proposed GaAs/AlGaAs nanowire laser has advantages such as simple structure, easy to operate, and controllable lasing wavelength, tending to be practical in optical communications and integrated photonic circuits.

  14. Deep ultraviolet photoluminescence of Tm-doped AlGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nepal, N.; Zavada, J. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Lee, D. S.; Steckl, A. J. [Nanoelectronics Laboratory, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Sedhain, A.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence (PL) properties of Tm-doped Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (0.39{<=}x{<=}1) alloys grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy were probed using above-bandgap excitation from a laser source at 197 nm. The PL spectra show dominant UV emissions at 298 and 358 nm only for samples with x=1 and 0.81. Temperature dependence of the PL intensities of these emission lines reveals exciton binding energies of 150 and 57 meV, respectively. The quenching of these UV emissions appears related to the thermal activation of the excitons bound to rare-earth structured isovalent (RESI) charge traps, which transfer excitonic energy to Tm{sup 3+} ions resulting in the UV emissions. A model of the RESI trap levels in AlGaN alloys is presented.

  15. Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    1 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects--Thin GateThin Gate Oxide DegradationOxide Degradation #12;2 AcknowledgmentsAcknowledgments University), ECE Miles Wiscombe (UG), ECE #12;3 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3

  16. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppulingam, B., E-mail: drbaskar2009@gmail.com; Singh, Shubra, E-mail: drbaskar2009@gmail.com; Baskar, K., E-mail: drbaskar2009@gmail.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai-600025 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  17. Characterization of nanosized Al{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nihtianova, D., E-mail: diana.nihtianova@gmail.com [Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 107, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Velichkova, N., E-mail: veli4kov@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nikolova, R., E-mail: rosica.pn@clmc.bas.bg [Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 107, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Koseva, I., E-mail: ikosseva@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yordanova, A., E-mail: a.yordanova@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nikolov, V., E-mail: vnikolov@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgi Bonchev Str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: TEM method allows to detect small quantities of impurities not detectable by other methods. In our case impurities of W{sub 5}O{sub 14} are detected in Al{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} nanopowder. Highlights: {yields} Nanosized Al{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} by simple co-precipitation method. {yields} Spherical particles with mean size of 22 nm distributed between 10 and 40 nm at 630 {sup o}C. {yields} XRD, DTA and TEM confirm well defined products with perfect structure. {yields} TEM locality allows detection of impurities not detectable by XRD and DTA. -- Abstract: Nanosized aluminum tungstate Al{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} was prepared by co-precipitation reaction between Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} aqueous solutions. The powder size and shape, as well as size distribution are estimated after different conditions of powder preparation. The purity of the final product was investigated by XRD and DTA analyses, using the single crystal powder as reference. Between the specimen and the reference no difference was detected. The crystal structure of Al{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} nanosized powder was confirmed by TEM (SAED, HRTEM). In additional, TEM locality allows to detect some W{sub 5}O{sub 14} impurities, which are not visible by conventional X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analyses.

  18. Effect of AC target power on AlN film quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knisely, Katherine, E-mail: kknisely@umich.edu; Grosh, Karl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2026 GG Brown2350 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of alternating current (AC) target power on film stress, roughness, and x-ray diffraction rocking curve full width half maximum (FWHM) was examined for AlN films deposited using S-gun magnetron sputtering on insulative substrates consisting of Si wafers with 575?nm thermal oxide. As the AC target power was increased from 5 to 8?kW, the deposition rate increased from 9.3 to 15.9?A/s, film stress decreased from 81 to ?170?MPa, and the rocking curve FWHM increased from 0.98 to 1.03. AlN film behavior is observed to change with target life; films deposited at 200?kWh target life were approximately 40?MPa more compressive and had 0.02 degree higher rocking curve FWHM values than films deposited at 130?kWh. AlN films deposited in two depositions were compared with films deposited in a single deposition, in order to better characterize the growth behavior and properties of AlN films deposited on an existing AlN film, which is not well understood. Two deposition films, when compared with single deposition films, showed no variation in residual stress trends or grain size behavior, but the average film roughness increased from 0.7 to 1.4?nm and rocking curve FWHM values increased by more than 0.25.

  19. Electron density distribution and crystal structure of 27R-AlON, Al{sub 9}O{sub 3}N{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asaka, Toru; Banno, Hiroki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Funahashi, Shiro; Hirosaki, Naoto [Nano Ceramics Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure of Al{sub 9}O{sub 3}N{sub 7} was characterized by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction (CuK?{sub 1}). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3-bar m (centrosymmetric). The hexagonal unit-cell dimensions (Z=3) are a=0.30656(2) nm, c=7.2008(3) nm and V=0.58605(5) nm{sup 3}. The initial structural model was derived by the powder charge-flipping method and subsequently refined by the Rietveld method. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of two of the five types of Al sites. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. The disordered crystal structure was successfully described by overlapping five types of domains with ordered atom arrangements. The distribution of atomic positions in one of the five types of domains can be achieved in the space group R3{sup }m. The atom arrangements in the four other domains are noncentrosymmetric with the space group R3m. Two of the four types of domains are related by a pseudo-symmetry inversion, and the two remaining domains also have each other the inversion pseudo-symmetry. The very similar domain structure has been also reported for 21R-AlON (Al{sub 7}O{sub 3}N{sub 5}) in our previous study. - Graphical abstract: A birds eye view of electron densities up to 50% (0.074 nm{sup ?3}) of the maximum on the plane parallel to (110) with the corresponding atomic arrangements of Al{sub 9}O{sub 3}N{sub 7}. Highlights: Crystal structure of Al{sub 9}O{sub 3}N{sub 7} is determined by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction. The atom arrangements are represented by the split-atom model. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting method is used to confirm the validity of the model. The disordered structure is described by overlapping five types of domains with ordered atom arrangements.

  20. Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

  1. Implementation of a doubling cavity to produce a 423 nm light source for the excitation of Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashimaru, H.; Kitajima, T.; Hasegawa, S. [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For selective excitation of isotopes of Ca, a 423 nm narrow linewidth, continuous wave (CW) light source which corresponds to the S-P transition (4s{sup 21}S{sub 0}-4s4p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) is required. A solid state CW light source which generates 423 nm is difficult to commercially use. Therefore, we have developed a Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) system to obtain 423 nm lights from 846 nm lights by using a nonlinear optical crystal.

  2. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K. [Laboratory for X-ray Microimaging and Bioinformatics, Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7059 (United States); KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  3. Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C. [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)] [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Promethium-doped phosphate glass laser at 933 and 1098 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupke, W.F.; Shinn, M.D.; Kirchoff, T.A.; Finch, C.B.; Boatner, L.A.

    1987-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A promethium (Pm/sup 3 +/) laser has been demonstrated for the first time. Trivalent promethium 147 doped into a lead-indium-phosphate glass etalon was used to produce room-temperature four-level laser emission at wavelengths of 933 and 1098 nm. Spectroscopic and kinetic measurements have shown that Pm/sup 3 +/ is similar to Nd/sup 3 +/ as a laser active ion.

  5. Investigation of a Polarization Controller in Titanium Diffused Lithium Niobate Waveguide near 1530 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Won Ju

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF A POLARIZATION CONTROLLER IN TITANIUM DIFFUSED LITHIUM NIOBATE WAVEGUIDE NEAR 1530 NM WAVELENGTH A Dissertation by WON JU SUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... systems are being commercialized [1-3], and efforts for 400G modulators are being pursued [1, 4]. Various materials have been explored for high speed devices need [5, 6], and lithium niobate remains the most attractive choice currently [7]. Fiber...

  6. Formation of Micro and Nano Structures Using VUV 157 nm Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, C. D.; Cockcroft, S. [Physics, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on laser ablation experiments on micro and nano size composite structures. The surface of CR-39 and polycarbonate has been intentionally seeded with silicon carbide and silver nanowires and subsequently laser irradiated at a wavelength of 157 nm. We show scanning electron micrograph images of prismatic and conical structures produced by laser ablation and discuss a shape transformation from a prismatic to a conical structure.

  7. Table 1 Comparison of potential sub-10 nm III-V device architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jess A.

    Extremely-Thin-Body (ETB) InAs quantum-well (QW) MOSFETs with improved electrostatics down to Lg = 50 nm (SAs channel. The ETB channel does not significantly degrade transport properties as evidenced by gm >1.5 mS/m and vinj = 2.4 107 cm/s. ETB-QW InAs MOSFET with scaled body for Improved Electrostatics T.-W. Kim, D

  8. InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers at 810 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Isozumi, S.; Nishi, H.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers emitting at 810 nm have been grown on GaAs substrates using two-step liquid-phase epitaxy. A threshold current of 79 mA and an external differential quantum efficiency of 26% are obtained. Fundamental transverse mode operation up to 3 mW is achieved in the laser with the active region of 3.5 ..mu..m wide.

  9. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

  10. Toward Rapid Unattended X-ray Tomography of Large Planar Samples at 50-nm Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudati, J.; Tkachuk, A.; Gelb, J.; Hsu, G.; Feng, Y.; Pastrick, R.; Lyon, A.; Trapp, D.; Beetz, T.; Chen, S.; Hornberger, B.; Seshadri, S.; Kamath, S.; Zeng, X.; Feser, M.; Yun, W. [Xradia, Inc., Concord, California (United States); Pianetta, P.; Andrews, J.; Brennan, S. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California (United States); Chu, Y. S. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)] (and others)

    2009-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray tomography at sub-50 nm resolution of small areas ({approx}15 {mu}mx15 {mu}m) are routinely performed with both laboratory and synchrotron sources. Optics and detectors for laboratory systems have been optimized to approach the theoretical efficiency limit. Limited by the availability of relatively low-brightness laboratory X-ray sources, exposure times for 3-D data sets at 50 nm resolution are still many hours up to a full day. However, for bright synchrotron sources, the use of these optimized imaging systems results in extremely short exposure times, approaching live-camera speeds at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago in the US These speeds make it possible to acquire a full tomographic dataset at 50 nm resolution in less than a minute of true X-ray exposure time. However, limits in the control and positioning system lead to large overhead that results in typical exposure times of {approx}15 min currently.We present our work on the reduction and elimination of system overhead and toward complete automation of the data acquisition process. The enhancements underway are primarily to boost the scanning rate, sample positioning speed, and illumination homogeneity to performance levels necessary for unattended tomography of large areas (many mm{sup 2} in size). We present first results on this ongoing project.

  11. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS EvidenceALS

  12. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications GroupALS

  13. SiO2 Passivation Effects on the Leakage Current in Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    was grown on c-plane sapphire substrate by MOCVD. Undoped 30 nm-thick Al0.26Ga0.74N and Fe-doped 3 m GaN substrate 3 nm undoped GaN 0.26 0.74 Source DrainMain-GateSiO2 2DEG SiO2 SiO2 Additional Gate 5 m3 m3 m 3 mSiO2 Passivation Effects on the Leakage Current in Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility

  14. A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of Fe-Al and Al20V2Eu intermetallics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Ji

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-rich Fe-Al systems (FeAl2, Fe2 Al5 and Fe4Al13) and Al20V2Eu have complicated structures with quasicrystal-like features making these materials potentially of interest for magnetic behavior. However, there is not much work on these materials...

  15. Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yat

    Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High Electron Mobility Transistors, 2006 ABSTRACT We report the rational synthesis of dopant-free GaN/AlN/AlGaN radial nanowire-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that the GaN/ AlN/AlGaN

  16. Controlling Across Complex Networks: Emerging links between networks and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. tanner@unm.edu 3 Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, MSC01 1100, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. chaouki@ece.unm.edu 4 Data's arsenal to make them available to control engineers, and describe how ideas developed for complex net

  17. Control of Microwave-Propelled Sails Using Delayed Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 - contact sidewise motions if the beam moves off center, since a net sideways force restores the sail to its position author edl@eece.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

  18. Pursue robust indefinite scalability David H. Ackley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 Daniel C. Cannon Dept. of Computer Science The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 Abstract For research insights and development poten- tial, we should interconnects, at least above some granularity--and also implying asynchronous or dynamically

  19. A Hybrid Framework for Resource Allocation among Multiple Agents Moving on Discrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Herbert G.

    continuous dynamics yields an interconnected system that is stable on each possible configuration of agents and Computer Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 {jlpiovesan Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 tanner@unm.edu, phone: 1-505-277-1493. Jorge

  20. Statistical-Learning Control of Multiple-Delay Systems with Applications to ATM Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author: C. T. Abdallah is with the Department of EECE, Univer- sity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 is with the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. E-mail: vlad are uncertain, one is faced with the challenging problem of trying to control a large, interconnected network

  1. An analog characterization of the subrecursive functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Tcnica de

    , Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 moore@santafe.edu 3 Computer Science Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 4 Physics Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 5 D or more output shafts. The main units were interconnected gear boxes and mechanical friction wheel

  2. A Hybrid Framework for Resource Allocation among Multiple Agents Moving on Discrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    continuous dynamics yield an interconnected system that is stable on each possible configuration of agents of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 {jlpiovesan Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 tanner@unm.edu, phone: 1-505-2771493. Jorge

  3. Statistical-Learning Control of Multiple-Delay Systems with Applications to ATM Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : C. T. Abdallah is with the Department of EECE, Univer- sity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 is with the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. E-mail: vlad are uncertain, one is faced with the challenging problem of trying to control a large, interconnected network

  4. SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION TO: IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, JULY 5, 2004 1 Wireless Communication with Smart Photonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Herbert G.

    photonics to gradually replace conven- tional RF components, such as the coax interconnecting the antenna are with the De- partment of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM of the University of New Mexico, MSC01 1150, Albuquerque, NM 87131, tanner@me.unm.edu. Tsai Liao

  5. An MPI Tool to Measure Application Sensitivity to Variation in Communication Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1386, leon,maccabe @cs.unm.edu 2 Scalable Computing Systems, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1110, bright@cs.sandia.gov Abstract. This work describes by Myricom as a communication layer for its Myrinet network. GM is comprised of a kernel driver, a user

  6. Proceedingsof the 39*IEEE Conferenceon Decision and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and adjust their transmission rates in order to match their share of the network resources. ATM networks. Byrne EECE Department Dipartimento di Informatica e Sistemistica Sandia National Laboratories The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA Napoli, ITALY Albuquerque, NM 87185-1003 USA Universit

  7. Hybrid Network on Chip (HNoC): Local Buses with a Global Mesh Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephanie

    and Subject Descriptors B.7.2 [Integrated Circuits]: Design aids simulation; C.4 [Performance of Systems-Ha University of New Mexico Department of ECE Albuquerque, NM, USA +1 (505) 277-6724 payman@ece.unm.edu George B. P. Bezerra University of New Mexico Department of CS Albuquerque, NM, USA +1 (505) 277-3411 gbezerra

  8. Modeling NoC Traffic Locality and Energy Consumption with Rent's Communication Probability Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephanie

    Circuits]: Design aids--simulation; C.4 [Performance of Systems]: Modeling techiniques General Terms Design Distribution George B. P. Bezerra Dept. of Computer Science University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 gbezerra@cs.unm.edu Stephanie Forrest Dept. of Computer Science University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM

  9. University of New Mexico Chapter University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay

    Sigma Xi University of New Mexico Chapter University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 May 13, 2011 Mr. Ajit Barve University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Dear Mr. Barve, On behalf to attend monthly scientific presentations at the University of New Mexico, and participation in the annual

  10. 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    . Here, we report that when using 785 nm excitation, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little

  11. 785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    using 785 nm excitation with 1 m spot size, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond films785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser School is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little work has been reported

  12. Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm Damien Sangla,1,2 Marc (Doc. ID 109884); published July 9, 2009 A Nd:YVO4 crystal was pumped directly into the emitting level nm for an absorbed pump power of 14.6 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 78.7%. We

  13. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  14. A facile method for nickel catalyst immobilization on ultra fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, T. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wen, G., E-mail: wgw@hitwh.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Huang, X.X.; Zhong, B.; Zhang, X.D.; Bai, H.W.; Yu, H.M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pure nickel coating has been successfully plated on the surface of ultra fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles via a facile electroless plating method. Coating morphology and crystallite size can be tailored by pH values. Dense coating with the maximum crystallite size of 24 nm was obtained at pH 11.0 and porous coating with the minimum crystallite size of 15 nm was obtained at pH value 12.5. The plated powders have been demonstrated to be an effective catalyst for growing boron nitride nanotubes.

  15. Fabrication of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20 vol.% Al nanocomposite powders using high energy milling and their sinterability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawrah, M.F., E-mail: mzawrah@hotmail.com [National Research Center, Ceramics Department (Egypt); Abdel-kader, H.; Elbaly, N.E. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Helwan University (Egypt)] [Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Helwan University (Egypt)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al nanocomposite powders were prepared via high energy ball milling. After 20 h milling, the size of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20 vol.% Al nanocomposite particles was in the range of 23-29 nm. A uniform distribution of nanosized Al reinforcement throughout the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix, coating the particles was successfully obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There was no any sign of phase changes during the milling. A competition between the cold welding mechanism and the fracturing mechanism were found during milling and finally the above two mechanisms reached an equilibrium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest value of relative density was obtained for the sintered bodies at 1500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The harness of the sintered composite was decreased while the fracture toughness was improved after addition Al into alumina. -- Abstract: In this study, alumina-based matrix nanocomposite powders reinforced with Al particles were fabricated and investigated. The sinterability of the prepared nanocomposite powder at different firing temperature was also conducted. Their mechanical properties in terms of hardness and toughness were tested. Alumina and aluminum powder mixtures were milled in a planetary ball mill for various times up to 30 h in order to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20% Al nanocomposite. The phase composition, morphological and microstructural changes during mechanical milling of the nanocomposite particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques, respectively. The crystallite size and internal strain were evaluated by XRD patterns using Scherrer methods. A uniform distribution of the Al reinforcement in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix was successfully obtained after milling the powders. The results revealed that there was no any sign of phase changes during the milling. The crystal size decreased with the prolongation of milling times, while the internal strain increased. A simple model is presented to illustrate the mechanical alloying of a ductile-brittle component system. A competition between the cold welding mechanism and the fracturing mechanism were found during powder milling and finally the above two mechanisms reached an equilibrium. The maximum relative density was obtained at 1500 Degree-Sign C. The harness of the sintered composite was decreased while the fracture toughness was improved after addition Al into alumina.

  16. al tratamiento local: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and MEG data (Vigario et al., 1998; Tang et al., 2000a; Vigario et al., 1999, 2000; Wubbeler et al Pearlmutter, Barak 39 Independent Components of...

  17. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  18. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jia-Wei; Taloni, Alessandro; Chen, Yeng-Long; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  19. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  20. Bulk and surface laser damage of silica by picosecond and nanosecond pulses at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Do, Binh T

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured bulk and surface dielectric breakdown thresholds of pure silica for 14 ps and 8 ns pulses of 1064 nm light. The thresholds are sharp and reproducible. For the 8 ns pulses the bulk threshold irradiance is 4.75 {+-} 0.25 kW/{mu}m{sup 2}. The threshold is approximately three times higher for 14 ps pulses. For 8 ns pulses the input surface damage threshold can be made equal to the bulk threshold by applying an alumina or silica surface polish.

  1. NM Stat. 62-9 - The Utility Franchise | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLC JumpNF- Review ofNM Stat.

  2. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NM.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Originalfaq.pdfFinal.pdfNM.pdf Jump to: navigation,

  3. Cathode encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keuning, W.; Weijer, P. van de; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, P.O. Box WAG12, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (25 deg. C) have been tested as water vapor permeation barriers for organic light emitting diode devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiN{sub x}:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition served as reference and were used to develop Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks. On the basis of Ca test measurements, a very low intrinsic water vapor transmission rate of {<=} 2 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and 4 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} (20 deg. C/50% relative humidity) were found for 20-40 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 300 nm a-SiN{sub x}:H films, respectively. The cathode particle coverage was a factor of 4 better for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films compared to the a-SiN{sub x}:H films and an average of 0.12 defects per cm{sup 2} was obtained for a stack consisting of three barrier layers (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

  4. Scott Taylor, ALS Safety Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics LabwildfiresScott Taylor, ALS Safety

  5. OMVPE Growth of Quaternary (Al,Ga,In)N for UV Optoelectronics (title change from A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAN,JUNG; FIGIEL,JEFFREY J.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; BANAS,MICHAEL ANTHONY; HEARNE,SEAN JOSEPH

    2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the growth and characterization of quaternary AlGaInN. A combination of photoluminescence (PL), high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) characterizations enables us to explore the contours of constant PL peak energy and lattice parameter as functions of the quaternary compositions. The observation of room temperature PL emission at 351nm (with 20% Al and 5% In) renders initial evidence that the quaternary could be used to provide confinement for GaInN (and possibly GaN). AlGaInN/GrdnN MQW heterostructures have been grown; both XRD and PL measurements suggest the possibility of incorporating this quaternary into optoelectronic devices.

  6. Two-photon laser excitation of trapped 232Th+ ions via the 402 nm resonance line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera-Sancho, O A; Zimmermann, K; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Glowacki, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of 232Th+ ions in a radiofrequency ion trap are reported. As the first excitation step, the strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the 6d^2 7s J=3/2 ground state to the 6d7s7p J=5/2 state at 24874 cm^{-1} is driven by radiation from an extended cavity diode laser. Spontaneous decay of the intermediate state populates a number of low-lying metastable states, thus limiting the excited state population and fluorescence signal obtainable with continuous laser excitation. We study the collisional quenching efficiency of helium, argon, and nitrogen buffer gases, and the effect of repumping laser excitation from the three lowest-lying metastable levels. The experimental results are compared with a four-level rate equation model, that allows us to deduce quenching rates for these buffer gases. Using laser radiation at 399 nm for the second step, we demonstrate two-photon excitation to the state at 49960 cm^{-1}, among the highest-lying classified levels of Th+. Thi...

  7. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  8. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M. [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  9. Summary Report Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    17 Abbreviations Used in This Report AAAHC Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care AL Albuquerque Operations Office ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable CMR...

  10. Electron density distribution and disordered crystal structure of 15R-SiAlON, SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banno, Hiroki; Hanai, Takaaki; Asaka, Toru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kimoto, Koji [Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure of SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4} was characterized by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction (CuK?{sub 1}). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3-bar m. The hexagonal unit-cell dimensions (Z=3) are a=0.301332(3) nm, c=4.18616(4) nm and V=0.3291825(5) nm{sup 3}. The initial structural model was successfully derived by the charge-flipping method and further refined by the Rietveld method. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three (Si,Al) sites. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting (MPF) method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. The reliability indices calculated from the MPF were R{sub wp}=5.05%, S (=R{sub wp}/R{sub e})=1.21, R{sub p}=3.77%, R{sub B}=1.29% and R{sub F}=1.01%. The disordered crystal structure was successfully described by overlapping three types of domains with ordered atom arrangements. The distribution of atomic positions in one of the three types of domains can be achieved in the space group R3-bar m. The atom arrangements in the other two types of domains are noncentrosymmetrical with the space group R3m. These two structural configurations are related by the pseudo-symmetry inversion. -- Graphical abstract: A bird's eye view of electron densities up to 75.3% (0.133 nm{sup ?3}) of the maximum on the plane parallel to (110) with the corresponding atomic arrangements of SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4}. Highlights: Crystal structure of SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4} is determined by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction. The atom arrangements are represented by the split-atom model. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting method is used to confirm the validity of the model. The disordered structure is described by overlapping three types of domains with ordered atom arrangements.

  11. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chen, Xilin; Yang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jiguang

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to form the stable surface film and to further enhance the long-term cycling stability of the graphite anodes of lithium-ion batteries, the surface of graphite powders has been modified by AlF3 coating through chemical precipitation method. The AlF3-coated graphite shows no evident changes in the bulk structure and a thin AlF3-coating layer of about 2 nm thick is found to uniformly cover the graphite particles with 2 wt% AlF3 content. However, it delivers a higher initial discharge capacity and largely improved rate performances compared to the pristine graphite. Remarkably, AlF3 coated graphite demonstrated a much better cycle life. After 300 cycles, AlF3 coated graphite and uncoated graphite show capacity retention of 92% and 81%, respectively. XPS measurement shows that a more conductive solid electrode interface (SEI) layer was formed on AlF3 coated graphite as compared to uncoated graphite. SEM monograph also reveals that the AlF3-coated graphite particles have a much more stable surface morphology after long-term cycling. Therefore, the improved electrochemical performance of AlF3 coated graphite can be attributed to a more stable and conductive SEI formed on coated graphite anode during cycling process.

  12. Atom probe tomography studies of Al?O? gate dielectrics on GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazumder, Baishakhi, E-mail: bmazumder@engineering.ucsb.edu; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Liu, Xiang; Yeluri, Ramya; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom probe tomography was used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of in situ Al?O?/GaN structures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Al?O? dielectrics grown at three different temperatures of 700, 900, and 1000 C were analyzed and compared. A low temperature GaN cap layer grown atop Al?O? enabled a high success rate in the atom probe experiments. The Al?O?/GaN interfaces were found to be intermixed with Ga, N, and O over the distance of a few nm. Impurity measurements data showed that the 1000 C sample contains higher amounts of C (4 10?/cm) and lower amounts of H (7 10?/cm), whereas the 700 C sample exhibits lower C impurities (<10?/cm) and higher H incorporation (2.2 10?/cm). On comparing with Al?O? grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), it was found that the MOCVD Al?O?/GaN interface is comparatively abrupt. Scanning transmission electron microscopy data showed that the 900 C and 1000 C MOCVD films exhibit polycrystalline nature, while the ALD films were found to be amorphous.

  13. Nanoscale-accuracy transfer printing of ultra-thin AlInGaN light-emitting diodes onto mechanically flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trindade, A. J., E-mail: antonio.trindade@strath.ac.uk; Guilhabert, B.; Massoubre, D.; Laurand, N.; Gu, E.; Watson, I. M.; Dawson, M. D. [Institute of Photonics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, 106 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Photonics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, 106 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Zhu, D.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer printing of 2 ?m-thick aluminum indium gallium nitride (AlInGaN) micron-size light-emitting diodes with 150?nm (14?nm) minimum spacing is reported. The thin AlInGaN structures were assembled onto mechanically flexible polyethyleneterephthalate/polydimethylsiloxane substrates in a representative 16 16 array format using a modified dip-pen nano-patterning system. Devices in the array were positioned using a pre-calculated set of coordinates to demonstrate an automated transfer printing process. Individual printed array elements showed blue emission centered at 486?nm with a forward-directed optical output power up to 80??W (355 mW/cm{sup 2}) when operated at a current density of 20?A/cm{sup 2}.

  14. AL2007-03.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf MoreAL 2007-03

  15. AL2007-05.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf MoreAL7-05

  16. ALS 20th Anniversary Celebration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL.AFTFutureALPES20thALS 20th

  17. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS Evidence

  18. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS

  19. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals NewScientific

  20. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals

  1. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS RevealsScientific

  2. AL PRO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th Day EnergyADAPTItalyAL PRO

  3. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. ALS Doctoral Fellowship in Residence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications Group

  6. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications GroupALSALS

  7. Al Geist | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, adefault Sign InLeaksGreenAl

  8. High-order harmonic generation in atomic hydrogen at 248 nm: Dipole-moment versus acceleration spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Chu, Shih-I

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the high-order harmonic-generation (HG) spectra of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm based on the Fourier transform of the expectation values of the induced dipole moment and acceleration. The calculations ...

  9. 34 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 22, No. 1 / January 1, 1997 Intense plasma discharge source at 13.5 nm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    and Education in Optics and Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-2700 J. J. Rocca The f lux emitted at 13.5 nm by a lithium plasma within the bandwidth of multilayer op- tics

  10. Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

  11. Engineering the (In, Al, Ga)N back-barrier to achieve high channel-conductivity for extremely scaled channel-thicknesses in N-polar GaN high-electron-mobility-transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jing, E-mail: jing@ece.ucsb.edu; Zheng, Xun; Guidry, Matthew; Denninghoff, Dan; Ahmadi, Elahe; Lal, Shalini; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); DenBaars, Steven P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling down the channel-thickness (t{sub ch}) in GaN/(In, Al, Ga)N high-electron-mobility-transistors (HEMTs) is essential to eliminating short-channel effects in sub 100?nm gate length HEMTs. However, this scaling can degrade both charge density (n{sub s}) and mobility (?), thereby reducing channel-conductivity. In this study, the back-barrier design in N-polar GaN/(In, Al, Ga)N was engineered to achieve highly conductive-channels with t{sub ch}?nm using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Compositional-grading was found to be the most effective approach in reducing channel-conductivity for structures with t{sub ch}???3-nm. For a HEMT with 3-nm-thick-channel, a sheet-resistance of 329 ?/? and a peak-transconductance of 718 mS/mm were demonstrated.

  12. Ytterbium-doped fibre laser tunable in the range 1017 - 1040 nm with second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fibre laser has been tuned to shorter emission wavelengths (from 1040 to 1017 nm). The laser output power obtained has been compared to calculation results. We have studied frequency doubling of the laser in a KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystal with type II phase matching in the XY plane and demonstrated wavelength tuning in the range 510 - 520 nm. (lasers)

  13. Frequency doubling and sum-frequency mixing operation at 469.2, 471, and 473 nm in Nd:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    at around 445, 469, or 479 nm are required to pump these Pr3-doped laser hosts [813]. Gal- lium nitride (GaN decades for different applications [14] such as la- ser remote sensing (differential absorption LIDAR to an absorption band of Pr3 [14]. For that purpose the laser has to work on the 938.5 nm transition line of Nd

  14. Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse-band 2% bandwidth conversion efficiency CE from a CO2 laser to 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet EUV light was investigated for Sn plasma. It was found that high in-band CE, 2.6%, is consistently obtained using a CO2 laser

  15. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray Microscopy: The First 120 Years Janos Kirz, ALS Abstract Rntgen's great...

  16. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Wednesday, 22 April 2015 13:19 Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray...

  17. United States Patent [19] Church et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    United States Patent [19] Church et al. [54] CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL POLYMER MOLECULES BASED 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 US005795782A [11] Patent Number: [45] Date of Patent: 5,795,782 Aug. 18, 1998 Boulanger et al

  18. Structural distortions in 5-10 nm silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Kamp, Noelle M.; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Smith, R.K.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. We have used x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron light source to investigate pressure-dependent and size-dependent trends in the crystal structure of silver nanoparticles in a hydrostatic medium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. Results suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. We propose a mechanism for this transition that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. To further support this hypothesis, we also show that similar measurements of single-crystal platinum nanoparticles reveal no such distortions.

  19. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Danna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dallmann, Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tyagi, Hush T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Nicholas A [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Toliver, Paul [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Chapman, Thomas E [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Runser, Robert J [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Mcnown, Scott R [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  20. Optical-fiber source of polarization-entangled photon pairs in the 1550nm telecom band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoying Li; Paul L. Voss; Jay E. Sharping; Prem Kumar

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber based source of polarization-entangled photon pairs that is well suited for quantum communication applications in the 1550nm band of standard fiber-optic telecommunications. Polarization entanglement is created by pumping a nonlinear-fiber Sagnac interferometer with two time-delayed orthogonally-polarized pump pulses and subsequently removing the time distinguishability by passing the parametrically scattered signal-idler photon pairs through a piece of birefringent fiber. Coincidence detection of the signal-idler photons yields biphoton interference with visibility greater than 90%, while no interference is observed in direct detection of either the signal or the idler photons. All four Bell states can be prepared with our setup and we demonstrate violations of CHSH form of Bell's inequalities by up to 10 standard deviations of measurement uncertainty.

  1. Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Paul Ernest

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

  2. Oxygen in Galactic Disk Stars: non-LTE abundances from the 777 nm O I triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen abundances for a large sample of dwarf and giant stars kinematically selected to be part of the Galactic thin and thick disks have been determined from a non-LTE analysis of the O I triplet lines at 777 nm. The abundance analysis was performed using the infrared flux method temperature scale, trigonometric surface gravities, and accurate atomic data. Within this framework, the ionization balance of iron lines could not be satisfied and so we adopted the iron abundances from Fe II lines only given that they are relatively less sensitive to changes in the atmospheric parameters. We show the resulting [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relationship and briefly discuss its implications.

  3. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  4. Fire Protection Review: Ross Aviation, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, S.E.; Sharland, J.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this survey was to review the facility fire protection program and to make recommendations or to identify areas according to the following criteria established by the US Department of Energy: Recommendations which would be made as the result of a Highly Protected Risk (HPR) fire inspection of an industrial facility. (This would include human element'' recommendations.) Identification of areas where provision of automatic protection would limit a fire or explosion loss to $1,000,000. Identification of Maximum Foreseeable Loss (MFL) areas where loss potential exceeds $50,000,000 assuming a failure of automatic protection systems and subsequent reliance only on separation, fire walls, or value limitations. In private industry, the effect of insured losses on continuity of operations is referred to as Business Interruption and is usually expressed in monetary terms to cover continuing expense and loss of profit until such time as repairs are made and production is resumed. Loss of use of facility of this type does not lend itself to expression in monetary terms. Surveys of other facilities resulted in a classification system for buildings which provide an indication of the importance of the building to the fulfillment of the mission of the facility. Recommendations in this report reflect to some degree the relative importance of the facility and the time to restore it to useful condition in the event a loss were to occur.

  5. albuquerque communications cables: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cooling by flow of dry gas, pulsed power is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described....

  6. albuquerque bernalillo county: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystems; Home Horticulture; Forest Resources; Food Safety, Health, Nutrition; Sustainable Living; Money Matters; 4-H YouthVolunteers Giving Recent donors residing in...

  7. 2030 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Albuquerque Metropolitan Planning Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mid-Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................................................................13-13 #0;#1;#0;#1; #0;5#0;"#0;##0;-#0;4#0;#1; 2-1 Population Density by Municipality, 2000-2004 ..........................................................................................2-2 2-2 Population by Municipality, 2000-2004..........................................................................................................2-3... .....................................................................................14-2 14-2 Neighborhood Association and Community Group MTP Meetings....................................................14-3 #0;#1; #0;'#0;*#0;(#0;6#0;3#0;4#0;#1; 2-1 Residential Building Permits, 1990...

  8. Interactive QMESH on VAX at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayes, R.L.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-dimensional mesh generating program, QMESH, has been adapted to an interactive application, whereby a user may process finite element meshes at a computer graphics terminal communicating with a VAX computer. Additions and corrections may be made at the terminal. Several mesh variation schemes may be tried in the evolution of a desired finite element mesh. Included in the package are the bandwidth minimization programs, RENUM and RENUM8, with which a user may interactively optimize the mesh numbering.

  9. 2030 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Albuquerque Metropolitan Planning Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mid-Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ;B#0;O#0;#1;#0;5#0;S#0;B#0;O#0;T#0;Q#0;P#0;S#0;U#0;B#0;U#0;J#0;P#0;O#0;#1;#0;1#0;M#0;B#0;O#0;#1;#0; #0;.#0;5#0;1#0; #0;#1; #0;G#0;P#0;S#0;#1;#0;U#0;I#0;F#0;#1;#0;"#0;M#0;C#0;V#0;R#0;V#0;F#0;S#0;R#0;V#0;F#0;#1;#0;.#0;F#0;U#0;S#0;P#0;Q#0;P#0;M#0;J#0;U#0...#0;#19;#0;#17;#0;#20;#0;#17;#0;#1;#0;.#0;F#0;U#0;S#0;P#0;Q#0;P#0;M#0;J#0;U#0;B#0;O#0;#1;#0;5#0;S#0;B#0;O#0;T#0;Q#0;P#0;S#0;U#0;B#0;U#0;J#0;P#0;O#0;#1;#0;1#0;M#0;B#0;O#0;#1;#0; #0;.#0;5#0;1#0; #0;#1; #0;G#0;P#0;S#0;#1;#0;U#0;I#0;F#0;#1;#0;"#0;M#0;C#0...

  10. Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole, Nebraska:LongboardLoretto,Los(Redirected

  11. New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project Taps HPCNew User and Data Analytics951New

  12. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search EquivalentLea,(Redirected

  13. APM hosts contracting officers in Albuquerque | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental DirectivesWorkNNSANAP-25 Admin Chg 1

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico: Life in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Top DefenseIntegrated

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico: Visiting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Top DefenseIntegratedSandia/New

  16. New Mexico Airlines begins Los Alamos/ Albuquerque flights April 8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R - 445 CU -StandardsNew Mexico Airlines

  17. Research & Technology Showcase in Albuquerque on September 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7 2Research &

  18. Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand TelephoneAlbemarle County,AlbroJump to:

  19. Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c*1r'*

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico: Life in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitcheSandianPrograms:Co-ops: GoLatest News

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico: Life in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitcheSandianPrograms:Co-ops: GoLatest

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Albuquerque, New Mexico: Life in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitcheSandianPrograms:Co-ops:

  3. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) NANOPHOTONIC PRODUCTION, MODULATION AND SWITCHING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b) by 194 days. (21) References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 200910236512 Al * 912009 Naya et al. .................... 250/281 2009

  4. United States Patent [19] Miura et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    of Pyrrole--3,4--diacetic Acid and Its Derivatives", Synthesis, pp. 262--265 (1989). Coderre et al., "Boron/1992 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Japan . Japan . WIPO . WIPO . Miura et al.,, "Synthesis, Tissue Uptake, and Toxicity Therapy for Cancer, Kobe, Japan (Oct. 31--Nov. 4, 1994). Miura et al., "Synthesis and Spectroscopic

  5. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Woll, Karsten [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute of Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); LaVan, David A., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  6. TEM study of {beta} Prime precipitate interaction mechanisms with dislocations and {beta} Prime interfaces with the aluminium matrix in Al-Mg-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teichmann, Katharina [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)] [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Marioara, Calin D.; Andersen, Sigmund J. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)] [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway); Marthinsen, Knut, E-mail: knut.marthinsen@material.ntnu.no [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)] [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction mechanisms between dislocations and semi-coherent, needle-shaped {beta} Prime precipitates in Al-Mg-Si alloys have been studied by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Dislocation loops appearing as broad contrast rings around the precipitate cross-sections were identified in the Al matrix. A size dependency of the interaction mechanism was observed; the precipitates were sheared when the longest dimension of their cross-section was shorter than approximately 15 nm, and looped otherwise. A more narrow ring located between the Al matrix and bulk {beta} Prime indicates the presence of a transition interface layer. Together with the bulk {beta} Prime structure, this was further investigated by High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM). In the bulk {beta} Prime a higher intensity could be correlated with a third of the Si-columns, as predicted from the published structure. The transition layer incorporates Si columns in the same arrangement as in bulk {beta} Prime , although it is structurally distinct from it. The Z-contrast information and arrangement of these Si-columns demonstrate that they are an extension of the Si-network known to structurally connect all the precipitate phases in the Al-Mg-Si(-Cu) system. The width of the interface layer was estimated to about 1 nm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta} Prime is found to be looped at sizes larger than 15 nm (cross section diameter). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta} Prime is found to be sheared at sizes smaller than 15 nm (cross section diameter). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recently determined crystal structure of {beta} Prime is confirmed by HAADF-STEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Between {beta} Prime and the Al-matrix a transition layer of about 1 nm is existent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {beta} Prime /matrix layer is structurally distinct from bulk {beta} Prime and the aluminium matrix.

  7. Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)] [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States); Nose, Masateru [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan)] [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan); Onishi, Ichiro [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiO{sub x} hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO{sub 2} targets with flows of N{sub 2}+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ?1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}) particles with sizes of ?1 nm or less. The a-SiO{sub x} particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ?25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiO{sub x} particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiO{sub x} particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiO{sub x} with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

  8. Epitaxial growth of AlN films via plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nepal, N.; Qadri, S. B.; Hite, J. K.; Mahadik, N. A.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R. Jr. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin AlN layers were grown at 200650 C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) simultaneously on Si(111), sapphire (1120), and GaN/sapphire substrates. The AlN growth on Si(111) is self-limited for trimethyaluminum (TMA) pulse of length > 0.04 s, using a 10 s purge. However, the AlN nucleation on GaN/sapphire is non-uniform and has a bimodal island size distribution for TMA pulse of ?0.03 s. The growth rate (GR) remains almost constant for T{sub g} between 300 and 400 C indicating ALE mode at those temperatures. The GR is increased by 20% at T{sub g} = 500 C. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurement shows that the ALE AlN layers grown at T{sub g} ? 400 C have no clear band edge related features, however, the theoretically estimated band gap of 6.2 eV was measured for AlN grown at T{sub g} ? 500 C. X-ray diffraction measurements on 37 nm thick AlN films grown at optimized growth conditions (T{sub g} = 500 C, 10 s purge, 0.06 s TMA pulse) reveal that the ALE AlN on GaN/sapphire is (0002) oriented with rocking curve full width at the half maximum (FWHM) of 670 arc sec. Epitaxial growth of crystalline AlN layers by PA-ALE at low temperatures broadens application of the material in the technologies that require large area conformal growth at low temperatures with thickness control at the atomic scale.

  9. ccsd00001116 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd00001116 (version 1) : 4 Feb 2004 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys: from 4, 2004) Zr and Sc precipitate in aluminum alloys to form the compounds Al3Zr and Al3Sc which

  10. Dynamics and manipulation of the dominant 13.5 nm in-band extreme ultraviolet emitting region of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuspeh, Samuel Edward

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing (HVM) of semiconductor microchips with nodes 32 nm and below is extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography using laser

  11. Impact of barrier thickness on transistor performance in AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown on free-standing GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deen, David A., E-mail: david.deen@alumni.nd.edu; Storm, David F.; Meyer, David J.; Bass, Robert; Binari, Steven C. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5347 (United States); Gougousi, Theodosia [Physics Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Evans, Keith R. [Kyma Technologies, Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of six ultrathin AlN/GaN heterostructures with varied AlN thicknesses from 1.56?nm have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN substrates. High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were fabricated from the set in order to assess the impact of barrier thickness and homo-epitaxial growth on transistor performance. Room temperature Hall characteristics revealed mobility of 1700?cm{sup 2}/V s and sheet resistance of 130 ?/? for a 3?nm thick barrier, ranking amongst the lowest room-temperature sheet resistance values reported for a polarization-doped single heterostructure in the III-Nitride family. DC and small signal HEMT electrical characteristics from submicron gate length HEMTs further elucidated the effect of the AlN barrier thickness on device performance.

  12. Activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for transformation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lien, H.L.; Zhang, W.X.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture has been developed in the laboratory. Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are infused and activated within an alkaline solution. Optimal Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio is in the range of 0.1 to 1. Batch experiments have demonstrated that the activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture can rapidly dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Due to the high reactivity, light density and low cost, the activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be used as a remediation agent in ex-situ treatment of industrial effluent, in-situ treatment wall, and for direct injection into ground water.

  13. Band gap structure modification of amorphous anodic Al oxide film by Ti-alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canulescu, S., E-mail: stec@fotonik.dtu.dk; Schou, J. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Rechendorff, K.; Pleth Nielsen, L. [Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Alle 29, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Borca, C. N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bordo, K.; Ambat, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The band structure of pure and Ti-alloyed anodic aluminum oxide has been examined as a function of Ti concentration varying from 2 to 20 at.?%. The band gap energy of Ti-alloyed anodic Al oxide decreases with increasing Ti concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that Ti atoms are not located in a TiO{sub 2} unit in the oxide layer, but rather in a mixed Ti-Al oxide layer. The optical band gap energy of the anodic oxide layers was determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in the energy range from 4.1 to 9.2?eV (300135?nm). The results indicate that amorphous anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a direct band gap of 7.3?eV, which is about ?1.4?eV lower than its crystalline counterpart (single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Upon Ti-alloying, extra bands appear within the band gap of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, mainly caused by Ti 3d orbitals localized at the Ti site.

  14. Page 312 Courses: Environmental Studies and Planning (ENSP) Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    -2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3) An examination of philosophical issues; concepts of extending and Critical Thinking). ENSP 307 ENviroNmENtal hiStory (4) History of the American environment and the ways). ENSP 308 ENviroNmENtal litEraturE (3) A survey of great American environmental books, including H. D

  15. Isotopic Analysis At Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIremNot2007) || Open EnergyAl.,

  16. A Multi-chain Measurements Averaging TDC Implemented in a 40 nm FPGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Shen; Shubin Liu; Binxiang Qi; Qi An; Shengkai Liao; Chengzhi Peng; Weiyue Liu

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision and high resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented in a 40 nm fabrication process Virtex-6 FPGA is presented in this paper. The multi-chain measurements averaging architecture is used to overcome the resolution limitation determined by intrinsic cell delay of the plain single tapped-delay chain. The resolution and precision are both improved with this architecture. In such a TDC, the input signal is connected to multiple tapped-delay chains simultaneously (the chain number is M), and there is a fixed delay cell between every two adjacent chains. Each tapped-delay chain is just a plain TDC and should generate a TDC time for a hit input signal, so totally M TDC time values should be got for a hit signal. After averaging, the final TDC time is obtained. A TDC with 3 ps resolution (i.e. bin size) and 6.5 ps precision (i.e. RMS) has been implemented using 8 parallel tapped-delay chains. Meanwhile the plain TDC with single tapped-delay chain yields 24 ps resolution and 18 ps precision.

  17. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel (nate) J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  18. Stress-induced piezoelectric field in GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tawfik, Wael Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511 (Egypt); Hyeon, Gil Yong; Lee, June Key, E-mail: junekey@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the influence of the built-in piezoelectric field induced by compressive stress on the characteristics of GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) prepared on sapphire substrates of different thicknesses. As the sapphire substrate thickness was reduced, the compressive stress in the GaN layer was released, resulting in wafer bowing. The wafer bowing-induced mechanical stress altered the piezoelectric field, which in turn reduced the quantum confined Stark effect in the InGaN/GaN active region of the LED. The flat-band voltage was estimated by measuring the applied bias voltage that induced a 180 phase shift in the electro-reflectance (ER) spectrum. The piezoelectric field estimated by the ER spectra changed by ?110?kV/cm. The electroluminescence spectral peak wavelength was blue-shifted, and the internal quantum efficiency was improved by about 22% at a high injection current of 100?mA. The LED on the 60-?m-thick sapphire substrate exhibited the highest light output power of ?59?mW at an injection current of 100?mA, with the operating voltage unchanged.

  19. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  20. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50?nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attota, Ravikiran, E-mail: Ravikiran.attota@nist.gov; Dixson, Ronald G. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30?nm40?nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22?nm (k?=?2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  1. Electron Transport Behavior on Gate Length Scaling in Sub-50 nm GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jaeheon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kangnam University, 111 Gugal-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-city, Gyeonggi-do, Korea 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Short channel GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) have been fabricated with gate length to 20 nm, in order to examine the characteristics of sub-50 nm MESFET scaling. Here the rise in the measured transconductance is mainly attributed to electron velocity overshoot. For gate lengths below 40 nm, however, the transconductance drops suddenly. The behavior of velocity overshoot and its degradation is investigated and simulated by using a transport model based on the retarded Langevin equation (RLE). This indicates the existence of a minimum acceleration length needed for the carriers to reach the overshoot velocity. The argument shows that the source resistance must be included as an internal element, or appropriate boundary condition, of relative importance in any model where the gate length is comparable to the inelastic mean free path of the carriers.

  2. Structural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer and interlayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    N buffer layer BL grown on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL grown under the AlGaN ternary layer TL. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an AlN BL on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL between an AlGaNStructural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer

  3. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  4. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yen-Ting [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkping University, S-58183 Linkping (Sweden); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan); Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. .; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkping University, S-58183 Linkping (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkping University, S-58183 Linkping (Sweden); Chen, Li-Chyong [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuei-Hsien [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nanishi, Yasushi [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a narrow-pass approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm.

  5. Effect of polarization on intersubband transition in AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Li, Z. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Huang, C. C.; Rong, X.; Xu, F. J.; Tang, N.; Qin, Z. X.; Shen, B. [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chen, Y. H. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Material Science, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Laboratory of Semiconductor Material Science, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China); Ge, W. K. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Intersubband transitions (ISBT) of AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with wavelength towards atmospheric window (3-5 {mu}m) have been investigated. A Ga-excess epitaxial method is used in the molecular beam epitaxy leading to ultra-sharp interface and negligible elements inter-diffusion. The absorption peak wavelength of the ISBT was successfully tuned in the range of 3-4 {mu}m by modifying the GaN well thickness from 2.8 to 5.5 nm. It was further found that the polarization charge density of the AlGaN/GaN MQWs was about -0.034 C/m{sup 2} which gave rise to blueshift of the ISBT wavelength and thus partially compensated its redshift with increasing well thickness.

  6. Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ALS, with most of his research supporting pharmaceutical companies working on new treatments for metabolic diseases and cancer. Pauly spent 15 years of his career working...

  7. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  8. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  9. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  10. Naftali(Tuli)Herscovici 52 Agnes Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricaland Computer Engineering universityof New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-1356USA t 1 (505) 277-1439(Fax& Computer EngineeringDepartment,The Universityof New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 E-mail: {rjordan the standards in wireless LANs, focusing on the bottom-two layers of the Open System Interconnect (03)model (see

  11. Epitaxial {tau} phase MnAl thin films on MgO (001) with thickness-dependent magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui Yishen; Chen Wei [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Yin Wenjing; Lu Jiwei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Wolf, Stuart A. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, ferromagnetic MnAl films were prepared by alternating Al/Mn quasi-monolayer deposition using a novel biased target ion beam deposition (BTIBD) technique. XRD results showed that the magnetic {tau} phase was well formed in MnAl thin films ({approx}10 nm), which grew epitaxially on single crystal MgO (001) substrates. The optimized saturation magnetization was {approx}394 emu/cc. Furthermore, we observed a thickness-dependent uniaxial anisotropy in ferromagnetic MnAl films, which was attributed to the change of the tetragonal lattice distortion as a function of film thickness. The relationship between the film thicknesses and saturation magnetizations suggested the existence of a magnetically dead layer {approx}2.7 nm with an extrapolated saturation moment around 523 emu/cc ({approx}1.90 {mu}{sub B}/Mn). This value has exceeded the experimental value in bulk materials and is close to the theoretically predicted magnetization ({approx}1.975 {mu}{sub B}/Mn).

  12. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Huang, Baiyu [Brigham Young University, Provo] [Brigham Young University, Provo; Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL] [ORNL; Ross, Dr. Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young University, Provo] [Brigham Young University, Provo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

  13. Calibration of Silver Plasmon Rulers in the 1-25 nm Separation Range: Experimental Indications of Distinct Plasmon Coupling Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calibration of Silver Plasmon Rulers in the 1-25 nm Separation Range: Experimental Indications of Distinct Plasmon Coupling Regimes Linglu Yang, Hongyun Wang, Bo Yan, and Bjorn M. Reinhard* Department nanoparticles, so-called silver plasmon rulers, are synthesized with use of a rational DNA programmed self

  14. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  15. Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields P2) with O2(X 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields of O(3 P2) with O2(X 3 g - ), O2 Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Product imaging of O(3 P2) following dissociation of ozone has been used to determine the relative yields of the product channels O(3 P2) + O2(X 3 g - ) of ozone. All three channels

  16. A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Sivaprasad Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen-the-shelf fiber-optic components and traditional RF and digital signal processing techniques to achieve fine erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) could be used to provide optical gain. The transmitted signal

  17. Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver and commercially available fiber-optic technologies. We use radio frequency (RF) pulse compression and digital commensurate with the desired range accuracy. With today's off-the-shelf fiber-optic components, multi

  18. Low-threshold, mirrorless emission at 981 nm in an Yb,Gd,Lu:KYW inverted rib waveguide laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low-threshold, mirrorless emission at 981 nm in an Yb,Gd,Lu:KYW inverted rib waveguide laser Amol for generating short pulses [2]. Liquid phase epitaxy has been used to fabricate planar [3, 4] and channel [5, 6W and a channel waveguide laser with an output power of 11 mW [9]. In this paper we demonstrate mirrorless lasing

  19. 2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm Laser Breakdown in Air Magesh Thiyagarajan, Member, IEEE, and John E. Scharer, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--We present the measurements and analysis of laser- induced breakdown processes in dry

  20. Sub-10-nm half-pitch electron-beam lithography by using poly,,methyl methacrylate... as a negative resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    is of great importance for high-density magnetic storage, integrated circuits, and nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Until now, hydrogen silsesquioxane HSQ and calixarene were the only two reported negative, the authors report that 10-nm half-pitch dense nanostructures can also be readily fabricated using the well

  1. A 65nm CMOS Ultra Low Power and Low Noise 131M Front-End Transimpedance Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    A 65nm CMOS Ultra Low Power and Low Noise 131M Front-End Transimpedance Amplifier Jiaping Hu and simulation of a high-transimpedance gain, ultra low-power dissipation and low-noise CMOS front- end control [3]. However, it introduces design challenges in the form of trade-offs between noise, power

  2. Using Mobilize Power Management IP for Dynamic & Static Power Reduction in SoC at 130 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Using Mobilize Power Management IP for Dynamic & Static Power Reduction in SoC at 130 nm Dan Tensilica's 32-bit Xtensa microprocessor core, using Virtual Silicon's Power Management IP. Independent of incorporating more and more devices on a single chip, but also managing the increase in the power that goes

  3. Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L.

    10760 1 Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface using a reproducible, simple process incorporating polyimide with good adhesion that does not require based on a simplified, robust process incorporating photosensitive polyimide with good metal adhesion

  4. Dynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanker, Daniel

    of pulsed lasers for ablation, drilling, and cutting of soft tissues in liquid environments are accompaniedDynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions Igor Turovets and Daniel Palanker Laser Center, Hadassah University Hospital, P.O. Box 12000

  5. High resolution photoelectron images and D{sup +} photofragment images following 532-nm photolysis of D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W.; Neyer, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Heck, A.J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-resonant ionization and dissociation of D{sub 2} by intense 532-nm laser light is studied by a variation of the ``Ion Imaging`` technique called ``Velocity Mapping``. Images of the both the photoelectrons and D{sup +} photofragments are obtained and analyzed at two different laser intensities. Results are compared to previous studies and several differences are discussed.

  6. The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar Changwoo Nahm,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar cells Changwoo Nahm,1 nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). At the optimum Au/TiO2 mass ratio of 0.05, the power nanoparticles were also introduced to the electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the solar-cell

  7. Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related primarily to pigmenta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related physiology and relationships between plants and their growth environment. We studied reflectance of two co collected from 24 sites and white spruce from 30 sites. Overall, reflectance spectra of the two species were

  8. South Of Espanola; North Of Pojoaque At Intersection of NM399 and US 84/285 Turn onto 399(WSW),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    will be on your left, Go to third house on right (#18 on fence), 1.5 story adobe with passive solar Windows facing at Affordable Price Or Possible Lease or Lease to Purchase 18 Terrace Farm Rd LaMesilla, NM 2 story passive the Puye Ruins on Santa Clara Pueblo. House is oriented with huge solar windows facing due south toward

  9. Development of scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope with spatial resolution of 30 nm using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Sano, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Yabashi, M.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K. [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a high-spatial-resolution scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope (SXFM) using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. As a result of two-dimensional focusing tests at BL29XUL of SPring-8, the full width at half maximum of the focused beam was achieved to be 50x30 nm{sup 2} (VxH) under the best focusing conditions. The measured beam profiles were in good agreement with simulated results. Moreover, beam size was controllable within the wide range of 30-1400 nm by changing the virtual source size, although photon flux and size were in a trade-off relationship. To demonstrate SXFM performance, a fine test chart fabricated using focused ion beam system was observed to determine the best spatial resolution. The element distribution inside a logo mark of SPring-8 in the test chart, which has a minimum linewidth of approximately 50-60 nm, was visualized with a spatial resolution better than 30 nm using the smallest focused x-ray beam.

  10. Effects of Mg-doped AlN/AlGaN superlattices on properties of p-GaN contact layer and performance of deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al tahtamouni, T. M., E-mail: talal@yu.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan); Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mg-doped AlN/AlGaN superlattice (Mg-SL) and Mg-doped AlGaN epilayers have been investigated in the 284 nm deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) as electron blocking layers. It was found that the use of Mg-SL improved the material quality of the p-GaN contact layer, as evidenced in the decreased density of surface pits and improved surface morphology and crystalline quality. The performance of the DUV LEDs fabricated using Mg-SL was significantly improved, as manifested by enhanced light intensity and output power, and reduced turn-on voltage. The improved performance is attributed to the enhanced blocking of electron overflow, and enhanced hole injection.

  11. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brnsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  12. Thermal stability and in situ SiN passivation of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lugani, L.; Carlin, J.-F.; Py, M. A.; Grandjean, N. [ICMP, cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal stability of nearly lattice-matched InAlN layers under metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions for temperatures >800?C and show that they are not fully stable. In particular, InAlN top layers undergo degradation during high temperature annealing due to a surface related process, which causes the loss of crystal quality. This strongly impacts the transport properties of InAlN/GaN HEMT heterostructures; in particular, the mobility is significantly reduced. However, we demonstrate that high thermal stability can be achieved by capping with a GaN layer as thin as 0.5?nm. Those findings enabled us to realize in situ passivated HEMT heterostructures with state of the art transport properties.

  13. Laser ablation of AlN films grown on sapphire substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safadi, Mona R.; Thakur, Jagdish S.; Auner, Gregory W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ligon Center of Vision, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ligon Center of Vision, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ablation threshold for single-crystal AlN semiconductor films grown epitaxially on sapphire substrate using indigenously built hollow cathode plasma deposition source molecular-beam epitaxy technique is investigated for a number of pulses by varying the fluence value of each pulse. Using a KrF excimer laser ({lambda}=248 nm and {tau}=25 ns) as a radiation source, we found that ablation of AlN thin films is a discontinuous process and its onset requires a minimum threshold fluence {approx_equal}1.59 J/cm{sup 2}. The ablation depth is analyzed for different numbers of pulses and for each number as a function of increasing fluence values. The results show that the ablation depth increases linearly with increasing pulse fluence. It is found that the use of a single pulse for ablation at a given value of fluence is more efficient than a large number of pulses at the same value of fluence/pulse. In addition, we investigated the lowest pulse-fluence limit that can sustain ablation on a disordered AlN film surface. We present a theoretical discussion about the laser energy absorption mechanism and also the rate of energy transfer from the conduction-band electrons to lattice phonons which can lead to the ablation of AlN film. It is found that the rate of energy transfer increases linearly with increasing temperature of the electron gas.

  14. Characteristics of AlN/GaN nanowire Bragg mirror grown on (001) silicon by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, Junseok; Bhattacharya, Pallab [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)] [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States); Zhou, Zifan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States); Guo, Wei [Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ooi, Boon S. [Photonics Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)] [Photonics Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN nanowires containing AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A peak reflectance of 70% with normal incidence at 560 nm is derived from angle resolved reflectance measurements on the as-grown nanowire DBR array. The measured peak reflectance wavelength is significantly blue-shifted from the ideal calculated value. The discrepancy is explained by investigating the reflectance of the nanoscale DBRs with a finite difference time domain technique. Ensemble nanowire microcavities with In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N nanowires clad by AlN/GaN DBRs have also been characterized. Room temperature emission from the microcavity exhibits considerable linewidth narrowing compared to that measured for unclad In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N nanowires. The resonant emission is characterized by a peak wavelength and linewidth of 575 nm and 39 nm, respectively.

  15. A new discontinuously reinforced aluminum MMC: Al+AlB{sub 2} flakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HALL,AARON C.; ECONOMY,J.

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a novel metal matrix composite based on the Al-B alloy system has been undertaken. Preparation of this discontinuously reinforced material is based on the precipitation of high aspect ratio AlB{sub 2} from an Al-B alloy. This paper describes a number of efforts forced on preparing high volume fractions (> 30 v%) of AlB{sub 2} in aluminum. New insights into the behavior of the Al-B alloys system allowed this effort to be successful.

  16. Optical characteristics of nanocrystalline Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N thin films deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenberg, Eda, E-mail: goldenberg@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [UNAM National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Kemal Okyay, Ali [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium nitride (GaN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films have been deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition at 200?C on c-plane sapphire and Si substrates. The dependence of film structure, absorption edge, and refractive index on postdeposition annealing were examined by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements, respectively. Well-adhered, uniform, and polycrystalline wurtzite (hexagonal) GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films were prepared at low deposition temperature. As revealed by the x-ray diffraction analyses, crystallite sizes of the films were between 11.7 and 25.2?nm. The crystallite size of as-deposited GaN film increased from 11.7 to 12.1 and 14.4?nm when the annealing duration increased from 30?min to 2?h (800?C). For all films, the average optical transmission was ?85% in the visible (VIS) and near infrared spectrum. The refractive indices of AlN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N were lower compared to GaN thin films. The refractive index of as-deposited films decreased from 2.33 to 2.02 (??=?550?nm) with the increased Al content x (0???x???1), while the extinction coefficients (k) were approximately zero in the VIS spectrum (>400?nm). Postdeposition annealing at 900?C for 2?h considerably lowered the refractive index value of GaN films (2.331.92), indicating a significant phase change. The optical bandgap of as-deposited GaN film was found to be 3.95?eV, and it decreased to 3.90?eV for films annealed at 800?C for 30?min and 2?h. On the other hand, this value increased to 4.1?eV for GaN films annealed at 900?C for 2?h. This might be caused by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation and following phase change. The optical bandgap value of as-deposited Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films decreased from 5.75 to 5.25?eV when the x values decreased from 1 to 0.68. Furthermore, postdeposition annealing did not affect the bandgap of Al-rich films.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and interface of SiC particle reinforced 2124 Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Durbadal, E-mail: durbadal73@yahoo.co.in [MEF Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Viswanathan, Srinath [Dept of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure and interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement of a composite play an important role in improving its properties. In the present investigation, the interface and intermetallic compound present in the samples were characterized to understand structural stability at an elevated temperature. Aluminum based 2124 alloy with 10 wt.% silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced composite was prepared through vortex method and the solid ingot was deformed by hot rolling for better particle distribution. Heat treatment of the composite was carried out at 575 C with varying holding time from 1 to 48 h followed by water quenching. In this study, the microstructure and interface of the SiC particle reinforced Al based composites have been studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) associated with wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the precipitate and intermetallic phases that are formed during heat treatment. The SiC particles are uniformly distributed in the aluminum matrix. The microstructure analyses of AlSiC composite after heat treatment reveal that a wide range of dispersed phases are formed at grain boundary and surrounding the SiC particles. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy analyses confirm that finely dispersed phases are CuAl{sub 2} and CuMgAl{sub 2} intermetallic and large spherical phases are Fe{sub 2}SiAl{sub 8} or Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si. It is also observed that a continuous layer enriched with Cu and Mg of thickness 5080 nm is formed at the interface in between Al and SiC particles. EDS analysis also confirms that Cu and Mg are segregated at the interface of the composite while no carbide is identified at the interface. - Highlights: The composite was successfully heat treated at 575C for 1-48 hrs. A layer of 50-75 nm is formed at interface after heat treatment. No Carbide formation and SiC dissolution is observed at this temperature. MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CuMgAl{sub 2} phases are segregated at interface of Al-SiC composite. Mg and Cu are also segregated at near to the grain boundary.

  18. Thermal diffusion in Ni/Al multilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Singh, S.; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Ni/Al multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering of nominal design [Ni(200A)/Al(100A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 and [Ni(50A)/Al(227A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 on Si substrates were annealed at 200 Degree-Sign C. As-deposited and annealed samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray reflectometry (XRR). The effort was to study the path of alloying in the above two multilayers of same elements but of opposite stoichiometric ratio. We find distinct differences in alloying of these samples.

  19. On the lateral crystal growth of laser irradiated NiTi thin films A. J. Birnbaum, Y. Lawrence Yao, U.-J. Chung, James. S. Im, X. Huang et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    -aspect crystals via pulsed, melt-mediated laser crystallization in NiTi thin films. Sputter-deposited 200 nm Ni of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3138782 Pulsed, melt-mediated laser crystallization techniques have been studied phase processing. Wang et al.6 and Bellouard and co-workers7 used a near IR cw laser to selectively

  20. A novel red phosphor Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 32}Cl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} for near UV white light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhigang; Zhao, Zhengyan; Shi, Yurong; Wang, Yuhua, E-mail: wyh@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Novel red phosphor Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 32}Cl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} was prepared by solid-state reaction. Excitation spectra suggested an obvious absorption in near-ultraviolet region. Under 392 nm excitation, the phosphors exhibited a red emission at 614 nm. Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 32}Cl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} could be potentially applied in near UV white LEDs. - Abstract: A novel red phosphor Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 32}Cl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} was synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, and its luminescence characteristics and charge compensators effect (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) were investigated. The excitation spectra showed a obvious absorption in near-ultraviolet region. Under 392 nm excitation, the phosphors exhibited an intense red emission at 614 nm. The Commission Internationale de lEclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates and quantum efficiency (QE) were (0.65, 0.35) and 62.3%, respectively. The good color saturation, high quantum efficiency and small thermal-quenching properties indicate that Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 32}Cl{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} could be potentially applied in near UV white light-emitting diodes.

  1. Summary Slides of ALS Industry Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlight ALSNews Volume 15 Caribou Biosciences Has Roots at ALS - 09.24.2014 Vol. 357 13 Lithium-Battery Dendrite Growth: A New View 8.3.2 04.30.2014 Vol. 352 12 IBM Probes...

  2. Western Baldwin County, AL Grid Interconnection Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas DeBell

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Objective of this Project was to provide an additional supply of electricity to the affected portions of Baldwin County, AL through the purchase, installation, and operation of certain substation equipment.

  3. L{sub g}?=?100?nm In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As quantum well metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with atomic layer deposited beryllium oxide as interfacial layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, D., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kwon, H. M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.-W., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org; Veksler, D.; Gilmer, D.; Kirsch, P. D. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kim, D.-H. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Malta, New York 12020 (United States); Hudnall, Todd W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, 78666 (United States); Bielawski, Christopher W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Maszara, W. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States); Banerjee, S. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we have fabricated nanometer-scale channel length quantum-well (QW) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) incorporating beryllium oxide (BeO) as an interfacial layer. BeO has high thermal stability, excellent electrical insulating characteristics, and a large band-gap, which make it an attractive candidate for use as a gate dielectric in making MOSFETs. BeO can also act as a good diffusion barrier to oxygen owing to its small atomic bonding length. In this work, we have fabricated In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As MOS capacitors with BeO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and compared their electrical characteristics. As interface passivation layer, BeO/HfO{sub 2} bilayer gate stack presented effective oxide thickness less 1 nm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As QW MOSFETs with a BeO/HfO{sub 2} dielectric, showing a sub-threshold slope of 100?mV/dec, and a transconductance (g{sub m,max}) of 1.1 mS/?m, while displaying low values of gate leakage current. These results highlight the potential of atomic layer deposited BeO for use as a gate dielectric or interface passivation layer for IIIV MOSFETs at the 7?nm technology node and/or beyond.

  4. Formation of in-volume nanogratings with sub-100 nm periods in glass by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Qiao, Lingling; Bellouard, Yves; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct experimental observation of the morphological evolution during the formation of nanogratings with sub-100-nm periods with the increasing number of pulses. Theoretical simulation shows that the constructive interference of the scattering light from original nanoplanes will create an intensity maximum located between the two adjacent nanoplanes, resulting in shortening of the nanograting period by half. The proposed mechanism enables explaining the formation of nanogratings with periods beyond that predicted by the nanoplasmonic model.

  5. Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue) B 420-460 Live Dead UV Blue Alexa 350 DAPI Indo-1(Violet) Hoechst 33342 C - empty Violet 405 A 505-550 Pac. Orange V500 VioGreen BVio 510 Viability Dye eF506 Alexa 430 Sapphire B 420-460 Pac. Blue eF450 V

  6. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andruszkw, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bhler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Krfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Mller, W D; Mosnier, A; Mller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schtt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  7. Luminescence and superradiance in electron-beam-excited Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.; Malin, T. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 13, Lavrentieva av., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhuravlev, K. S.; Osinnykh, I. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 13, Lavrentieva av., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Str., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Solomonov, V. I.; Spirina, A. V. [Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 106, Amundsen str., Ekaterinburg 620016 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminescence and superradiance characteristics of 0.51.2-?m thick Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on sapphire substrates were studied under excitation of the films with low-energy (<20?keV) and high-energy (170?keV) electron beams. In both cases, the luminescence spectra looked quite similarly; they exhibited a band-edge luminescence with x-dependent wavelength ranging from 365?nm to 310?nm and a broadband emission taking over the whole visible spectral region. Superradiance within the broad band was obtained by pumping the samples with powerful an electron beam in the form of an open-discharge-generated filament.

  8. High quality InAlN single layers lattice-matched to GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E. [ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rebled, J. M.; Peiro, F. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d'Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d'Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on properties of high quality {approx}60 nm thick InAlN layers nearly in-plane lattice-matched to GaN, grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire templates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Excellent crystalline quality and low surface roughness are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. High annular dark field observations reveal a periodic in-plane indium content variation (8 nm period), whereas optical measurements evidence certain residual absorption below the band-gap. The indium fluctuation is estimated to be {+-} 1.2% around the nominal 17% indium content via plasmon energy oscillations assessed by electron energy loss spectroscopy with sub-nanometric spatial resolution.

  9. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm spectral line profile only gets shallower and stays in absorption. Linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) is detected in all lines of the He I triplet during the flare. Moreover, the circular polarization (Stokes V) is dominant during the flare, being the blue component of the He I triplet much stronger than the red component, and both are stronger than the Si I Stokes V profile. The Si I inversions reveal enormous changes of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare. Before the flare magnetic field conc...

  10. Note: Deep ultraviolet Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shaoqing [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Fengtao; Guo, Meiling; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Zhaochi, E-mail: zcfeng@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Can, E-mail: zcfeng@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep UV Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm was developed in this laboratory. An ellipsoidal mirror and a dispersed-subtractive triple monochromator were used to collect and disperse Raman light, respectively. The triple monochromator was arranged in a triangular configuration with only six mirrors used. 177.3 nm laser excited Raman spectrum with cut-off wavenumber down to 200 cm{sup ?1} and spectral resolution of 8.0 cm{sup ?1} can be obtained under the condition of high purity N{sub 2} purging. With the CC ? bond in Teflon selectively excited by the 177.3 nm laser, resonance Raman spectrum of Teflon with good quality was recorded on the home-built instrument and the ?-?{sup *} transition of CC bond was studied. The result demonstrates that deep UV Raman spectrograph is powerful for studying the systems with electronic transition located in the deep UV region.

  11. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  12. ingeniera hidrulica en mxico, vol. XIX, nm. 4, pp. 121-128, octubre-diciembre de 2004 Introduccin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernndez-Walls, Rafael

    ). Entre estos mtodos estn los construidos con un rotor Savonius (eje perpendicular al campo de flujo Fonseca (1981) mencionan que los correntmetros de rotor Savonius responden a los flujos de cualquier

  13. al estado del: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REA DE DERECHO ADMINISTRATIVO REA DE DERECHO CONSTITUCIONAL REA DE CIENCIA Escolano, Francisco 8 BOLETN OFICIAL DEL ESTADO Nm. 162 Sbado 7 de julio de 2012 Sec....

  14. formation of the main deposit. At lower current densities, it is possible to deposit only this extremely thin tin film: it is 5 nm thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    . Whereas the 200-nm copper and 300-nm tin films in Fig. 4 have a thickness close to that predicted. We propose the following mechan- istic explanation of this effect. First, in thin cells problems of Li rechargeable batteries. Indeed, cycling efficiency of Li batteries is drastically reduced

  15. 6. M. Jeltsch et al., Science 276, 1423 (1997); S. J. Oh et al., Dev. Biol. 188, 96 (1997).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Andrew V.

    6. M. Jeltsch et al., Science 276, 1423 (1997); S. J. Oh et al., Dev. Biol. 188, 96 (1997). 7. V, 671 (1997). 16. A. Vecchi et al., Eur. J. Cell Biol. 63, 247 (1994). 17. The presence of VEGFR-3 m. 12, 473 (1998). 21. L. C. Wang et al., EMBO J. 16, 4374 (1997). 22. P. Carmeliet et al., Nature 383

  16. Synthesis and structural characterization of a new aluminum oxycarbonitride, Al{sub 5}(O, C, N){sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inuzuka, Haruya; Kaga, Motoaki; Urushihara, Daisuke [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nakano, Hiromi [Cooperative Research Facility Center, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Asaka, Toru [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Fukuda, Koichiro, E-mail: fukuda.koichiro@nitech.ac.j [Department of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new aluminum oxycarbonitride, Al{sub 5}(O{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub 4-x-y}) (x{approx}1.4 and y{approx}2.1), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound was found to be hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc, Z=2, and unit-cell dimensions a=0.328455(6) nm, c=2.15998(3) nm and V=0.201805(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios O:C:N were determined by EELS. The final structural model, which is isomorphous with that of (Al{sub 4.4}Si{sub 0.6})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.0}), showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al sites. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting (MPF) method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. The reliability indices calculated from the MPF were R{sub wp}=6.94% (S=1.22), R{sub p}=5.34%, R{sub B}=1.35% and R{sub F}=0.76%. The crystal was an inversion twin. Each twin-related individual was isostructural with Al{sub 5}C{sub 3}N (space group P6{sub 3}mc, Z=2). - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-O-C-N system, Al{sub 5}(O{sub 1.4}C{sub 2.1}N{sub 0.5}). The crystal is an inversion twin, and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. The three-dimensional electron density distributions are determined by the maximum-entropy methods-based pattern fitting, being consistent with the disordered structural model. Display Omitted

  17. AlGaN/GaN/AlN quantum-well field-effect transistors with highly resistive AlN epilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hongxing

    AlGaN/GaN/AlN quantum-well field-effect transistors with highly resistive AlN epilayers Z. Y. Fana 66506-2601 Received 23 November 2005; accepted 5 January 2006; published online 16 February 2006 AlGaN/GaN/AlN quantum-well field-effect transistors have been demonstrated. By replacing a semi-insulating GaN epilayer

  18. Abuse Tolerance Improvement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D. H. Johnson, 75 th Battery Safety Mtg., Feb. 21-22, 2007, Albuquerque, NM - Li-Ion Batteries: Safety and Abuse Tolerance Issues, E. P. Roth, MITIndustry Consortium on...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Two Sandia Engineers named as Influencer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Innovators of Wind Power On May 26, 2011, in Energy, News, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - April 28, 2011 - Sandia engineers Jose Zayas and Dale Berg...

  20. jkpc171.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management, May - June 1986; Greher and Olsen, ibid. 53. SNL Archives, interview, Leonard Jacobvitz, Albuquerque, NM, 1 October 1985. 54. Contract DE-AC04-76 DPO0789, ( 1983)...

  1. Journal of Neuroscience Methods 139 (2004) 1324 3D-catFISH: a system for automated quantitative three-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Gang

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA Received 29 January 2004; received in revised form 9-invasive functional imaging studies (e.g., PET, fMRI) that can dissociate regions of differential activation

  2. Blind Source Separation of Neuromagnetic Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearlmutter, Barak

    of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 Abstract Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a functional brain imaging resolution of MEG compared to fMRI and PET (milliseconds vs. seconds and tens of seconds) makes it ideal

  3. Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3rd New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 23, 2013 Clustering algorithms to find correlations, "meaningful" words, topics LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 23, 2013-A trio of Albuquerque...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Awards Wind Research Grants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind DOE Awards Wind Research Grants On May 18, 2011, in Energy, News, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy singlepic id633 w320 h240 floatrightALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - The Wind Energy...

  5. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Swift report-id SAND2010-5624A year 2010 event International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference location Albuquerque, NM The U.S. is currently re-evaluating the...

  6. 1248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 47, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2000 Paired MEG Data Set Source Localization Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    . Huang is with the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA (e-mail: mhuang@UNM.Edu). *R. M-9294(00)08014-9. (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acti- vation studies, differences between

  7. PREDICTIVE DECODING OF NEURAL DATA Yaroslav O. Halchenko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    . Researchers today can choose from a variety of imaging modalities that include EEG, MEG, PET, SPECT, MRI Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA, 2002 Master of Science in Laser and Optoelectronic Engineering, Vinnytsya

  8. 6340 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 58, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2010 Binary Consensus Over Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    are with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Depart- ment, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA (e in fading en- vironments. We show the impact of channel unreliability and net- work topology on consensus

  9. Communication-Aware Navigation Functions for Cooperative Target Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    . Mostofi are with the Cooperative Net- work Lab, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Uni- versity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87113, USA {alinem, ymostofi}@ece.unm.edu literature [10]. In [8

  10. Channel Learning and Communication-Aware Motion Planning in Mobile Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    . A. Ghaffarkhah and Y. Mostofi are with the Cooperative Net- work Lab, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Uni- versity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87113, USA {alinem, ymostofi

  11. Communication-Aware Surveillance in Mobile Sensor Networks Alireza Ghaffarkhah and Yasamin Mostofi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Uni- versity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87113, USA {alinem, ymostofi-2-0004 and NSF award # 0812338. A. Ghaffarkhah and Y. Mostofi are with the Cooperative Net- work Lab, Department

  12. TA-12-1 = 950 Proceedlngrof the 29th Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM, 87131 USA. Abstract consists of two subnetworks, a recursive net and a nonrecursive one. The outputs of these two networks

  13. Exemplar-based Pattern Recognition via Semi-Supervised Learning Georgios C. Anagnostopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA Gregory L. Heileman Department of EECE, University of New Mexico interconnection weights wir relating the neuron containing the information of thejthexemplar to the kthclass label

  14. SAND98-2221 Unlimited Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightwell, Ron

    of Computer Science The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 Abstract Distributed systems have been Introduction 7 System Environment 7 Node Architecture 10 Node Interconnect 11 Convergence of Parallel

  15. A Parallel State Assignment Algorithm for Finite State Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    2, 1 Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, Sun Fire, HP AlphaServer, and SGI Origin) interconnected with high-speed networks (e.g., vendor

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy singlepic id628 w320 h240 floatrightALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - In West Texas, New Mexico, and other places around the world, wind turbines are used to generate electricity....

  17. Radial structure of the Internet BY PETTER HOLME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephanie

    Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA 2 Santa Fe Institute of Internet data, for example, a local office network of computers and their interconnections; a network

  18. Formation Stabilization of Multiple Agents Using Decentralized Navigation Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Herbert G.

    . Tanner and Amit Kumar Mechanical Engineering Department University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 of the environment and the degree of the interconnection network. Feedback controllers steer the agents away from

  19. Closed-loop Load Balancing: Comparison of a Discrete Event Simulation with Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) interconnected via a high bandwidth network. To effectively utilize a parallel computer architecture. Abdallah and M. M. Hayat are with ECE Dept, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1356, USA

  20. Instrumenting LogP Parameters in GM: Implementation and Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    . Maccabe Scalable Systems Lab Computer Science Department The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM the last few years, Myrinet has become the high- performance clusters interconnect of preference over

  1. Published in IET Control Theory and Applications Received on 15th July 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of New Mexico UNM, MSC01 1100 1, Albuquerque, NM distributed control and interconnected systems. To illustrate the usefulness of NCSs one can cite

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: ATLAS II Data Acquisition System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy singlepic id628 w320 h240 floatrightALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - In West Texas, New Mexico, and other places around the world, wind turbines are used to generate electricity....

  3. CY09 ASER TTR Cover.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Box 671 Lihue, HI 96766 Dan Barkley (1 wCD) Government Information Department Zimmerman Library-UNM 1 University of New Mexico MSC05 3020 Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 FEDERAL,...

  4. Notices

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    can be reviewed at the DOENNSA Public Reading Room at Government InformationZimmerman Library, MSC05 3020, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, Tel:...

  5. Submitting Organization Sandia National ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fax: 925-294-3403 Email: kubiak@sandia.gov Joint Entry University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center Address: 1 University of New Mexico CityState: Albuquerque, NM...

  6. A multilocus evaluation of ermine (Mustela erminea) across the Holarctic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biology, University of New Mexico, MSC03 2020, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA, 2 College of Forestry and demographic analyses. Coales- cent species-tree estimation used a Bayesian approach for clade divergence based

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Wind Energy ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base may soon share a wind farm that will provide as much as one-third of the...

  8. EMs Tracy Mustin Celebrates Milestone at New Mexico Lab

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin joined other DOE officials and local and state leaders Wednesday to celebrate the completion of the Cold War legacy waste cleanup at Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. A major purpose of the Techni-Information Center k to provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THomst Edward S. Gaffney, Ktech Corp. , Albuquerque, NM Kenneth H. Wohletz, ESS-I Jack W. House, ESS-CPO Joseph A. Brown, ESS-3 SUBMITTEDTO The International Symposium on the Interaction of Conventional Munitons

  10. ElectroNeedle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Array Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1425 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1425 USA Stephen Casalnuovo (505) 844-6097 (505) 844-1198 (Fax) sacasal@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION:...

  11. battery2.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1033 Albuquerque, NM USA 87158-1033 Randy A. Normann (505) 845-9675, (505) 844-3952 (fax), ranorma@sandia.gov...

  12. LightWeight KerneL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1319 USA Ron Brightwell Phone: (505) 844-2099 Fax: (505) 845-7442 rbbrigh@sandia.gov...

  13. Submitting Organization Sandia National ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bauer Sandia National Laboratories. P.O. Box 5800, MS 1077 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1077 USA Phone:: (505)-845-0086 Fax:: (505) 844-7833 tmbaue@sandia.gov Contact Person Glenn D....

  14. Basic Instructor Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Emergency Operations Training Academy, NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is pleased to announce site certification by the National Training Center for conduct of the Basic Instructor Training class

  15. SHEAR DEFORMATION IN GRANULAR MATERIAL S. G. Bardenhagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulsky, Deborah L.

    of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 An investigation into the properties of granular materials of the binder as a lubricant in force chains. INTRODUCTION We report the results of an investigation

  16. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Signals. SGIP NIST Smart Grid Collaboration Site. http://Presented at the Grid Interop Forum, Albuquerque, NM.Last accessed: Open Smart Grid Users Group. OpenADR Task

  17. SANDIA REPORT SAND2006-5000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    , Clustering and Summarizing Documents Daniel M. Dunlavy, Sandia National Laboratories Dianne P. O'Leary Albuquerque, NM 87185-1318 dmdunla@sandia.gov Dianne P. O'Leary Department of Computer Science and Institute

  18. Workshop on programming languages for high performance computing (HPCWPL): final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Richard C.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deliberations and conclusions of the Workshop on Programming Languages for High Performance Computing (HPCWPL) held at the Sandia CSRI facility in Albuquerque, NM on December 12-13, 2006.

  19. Effects of high-temperature AIN buffer on the microstructure of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coerekci, S., E-mail: scorekci@kirklareli.edu.tr [K Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rklareli University, Department of Physics (Turkey); Oeztuerk, M. K. [Gazi University, Department of Physics (Turkey); Yu, Hongbo [Bilkent University, Nanotechnology Research Center (Turkey); Cakmak, M.; Oezcelik, S. [Gazi University, Department of Physics (Turkey); Oezbay, E. [Bilkent University, Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Physics, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (Turkey)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects on AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor structure of a high-temperature AlN buffer on sapphire substrate have been studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques. The buffer improves the microstructural quality of GaN epilayer and reduces approximately one order of magnitude the edge-type threading dislocation density. As expected, the buffer also leads an atomically flat surface with a low root-mean-square of 0.25 nm and a step termination density in the range of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Due to the high-temperature buffer layer, no change on the strain character of the GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers has been observed. Both epilayers exhibit compressive strain in parallel to the growth direction and tensile strain in perpendicular to the growth direction. However, an high-temperature AlN buffer layer on sapphire substrate in the HEMT structure reduces the tensile stress in the AlGaN layer.

  20. al censo nacional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCUMENTS 4,450,407 51984 Kwon et al. ... 324304 4 Romalis, Mike 229 (12) United States Patent Bezos et al. Computer Technologies and Information...