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Sample records for al ga sc

  1. AlGaN/GaN-based power semiconductor switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) have great potential for their use as high efficiency and high speed power semiconductor switches, thanks to their high breakdown electric field, mobility and ...

  2. GA-AL-SC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMat 4" | DepartmentJune 3, 2015 2 Who

  3. The first principle study of Ni{sub 2}ScGa and Ni{sub 2}TiGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Özduran, Mustafa; Turgut, Kemal; Arikan, Nihat; ?yigör, Ahmet; Candan, Abdullah

    2014-10-06

    We computed the electronic structure, elastic moduli, vibrational properties, and Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa alloys in the cubic L2{sub 1} structure. The obtained equilibrium lattice constants of these alloys are in good agreement with available data. In cubic systems, there are three independent elastic constants, namely C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44}. We calculated elastic constants in L2{sub 1} structure for Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa using the energy-strain method. The electronic band structure, total and partial density of states for these alloys were investigated within density functional theory using the plane-wave pseudopotential method implemented in Quantum-Espresso program package. From band structure, total and projected density of states, we observed metallic characters of these compounds. The electronic calculation indicate that the predominant contributions of the density of states at Fermi level come from the Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The computed density of states at Fermi energy are 2.22 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, 0.76 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The vibrational properties were obtained using a linear response in the framework at the density functional perturbation theory. For the alloys, the results show that the L2{sub 1} phase is unstable since the phonon calculations have imagine modes.

  4. Red emitting photonic devices using InGaP/InGaAlP material system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kangude, Yamini

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, two red emitting photonic devices are presented using the InGaP/InGaAlP material system. InGaP/InGaAlP material system provides large flexibility in the band gap energy while being lattice matched to GaAs ...

  5. Advantages of the Blue InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN Quantum Well Structured Electron Blocking Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    ABSTRACT: InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with p-(AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN) quantum well structured electron. The proposed QWEBL LED structure, in which a p-GaN QW layer is inserted in the p-AlGaN electron blocking layer the radiative recombination rates across the active region. Consequently, the light output power was enhanced

  6. Electron mobility enhancement in AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with InGaN nanogrooves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it was discovered by Davydov et al.1 and con- firmed by independent studies2,3 that its band gap is small, EG InN =0 The conduction band offset at GaN/AlN interface was estimated as EQW=0.7 EG AlN -EG GaN =1918 meV. The nanoN/GaN/AlN QW. The depth of the nanogroove is calculated as E0=0.8 EG GaN -EG InxGa1-xN . The band gap of InxGa1

  7. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  8. Electronic structure investigation of the cubic inverse perovskite Sc3AlN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnuson, Martin; Höglund, Carina; Abrikosov, Igor A; Birch, Jens; Hultman, Lars; 10.1103/PhysRevB.78.235102

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of the recently discovered inverse perovskite Sc3AlN, in comparison to ScN and Sc metal have been investigated by bulk-sensitive soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. The measured Sc L, N K, Al L1, and Al L2,3 emission spectra are compared with calculated spectra using first principle density-functional theory including dipole transition matrix elements. The main Sc 3d - N 2p and Sc 3d - Al 3p chemical bond regions are identified at -4 eV and -1.4 eV below the Fermi level, respectively. A strongly modified spectral shape of 3s states in the Al L2,3 emission from Sc3AlN in comparison to pure Al metal is found, which reflects the Sc 3d - Al 3p hybridization observed in the Al L1 emission. The differences between the electronic structure of Sc3AlN, ScN, and Sc metal are discussed in relation to the change of the conductivity and elastic properties.

  9. Graphene induced remote surface scattering in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiwen; Li, Dan; Wang, Bobo; Liu, Bin; Chen, Famin; Jin, Guangri; Lu, Yanwu, E-mail: ywlu@bjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2014-10-20

    The mobilities of single-layer graphene combined with AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on two-dimensional electron gases in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction are calculated. The impact of electron density in single-layer graphene is also studied. Remote surface roughness (RSR) and remote interfacial charge (RIC) scatterings are introduced into this heterostructure. The mobilities limited by RSR and RIC are an order of magnitude higher than that of interface roughness and misfit dislocation. This study contributes to designing structures for generation of higher electron mobility in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction.

  10. Switchable piezoelectric transduction in AlGaN/GaN MEMS resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Dana

    This work presents a new switching mechanism in piezoelectric transduction of AlGaN/GaN bulk acoustic resonators. A piezoelectric transducer is formed in the AlGaN, between a top Schottky electrode and a 2D electron gas ...

  11. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  12. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  13. Impact of electrochemical process on the degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Feng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) constitute a new generation of transistors with excellent electrical characteristics and great potential to replace silicon technology in the future, especially in high ...

  14. Issues associated with the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of ScGaN and YGaN alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Knapp, James Arthur; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Creighton, James Randall; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    The most energy efficient solid state white light source will likely be a combination of individually efficient red, green, and blue LED. For any multi-color approach to be successful the efficiency of deep green LEDs must be significantly improved. While traditional approaches to improve InGaN materials have yielded incremental success, we proposed a novel approach using group IIIA and IIIB nitride semiconductors to produce efficient green and high wavelength LEDs. To obtain longer wavelength LEDs in the nitrides, we attempted to combine scandium (Sc) and yttrium (Y) with gallium (Ga) to produce ScGaN and YGaN for the quantum well (QW) active regions. Based on linear extrapolation of the proposed bandgaps of ScN (2.15 eV), YN (0.8 eV) and GaN (3.4 eV), we expected that LEDs could be fabricated from the UV (410 nm) to the IR (1600 nm), and therefore cover all visible wavelengths. The growth of these novel alloys potentially provided several advantages over the more traditional InGaN QW regions including: higher growth temperatures more compatible with GaN growth, closer lattice matching to GaN, and reduced phase separation than is commonly observed in InGaN growth. One drawback to using ScGaN and YGaN films as the active regions in LEDs is that little research has been conducted on their growth, specifically, are there metalorganic precursors that are suitable for growth, are the bandgaps direct or indirect, can the materials be grown directly on GaN with a minimal defect formation, as well as other issues related to growth. The major impediment to the growth of ScGaN and YGaN alloys was the low volatility of metalorganic precursors. Despite this impediment some progress was made in incorporation of Sc and Y into GaN which is detailed in this report. Primarily, we were able to incorporate up to 5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} Y atoms into a GaN film, which are far below the alloy concentrations needed to evaluate the YGaN optical properties. After a no-cost extension was granted on this program, an additional more 'liquid-like' Sc precursor was evaluated and the nitridation of Sc metals on GaN were investigated. Using the Sc precursor, dopant level quantities of Sc were incorporated into GaN, thereby concluding the growth of ScGaN and YGaN films. Our remaining time during the no-cost extension was focused on pulsed laser deposition of Sc metal films on GaN, followed by nitridation in the MOCVD reactor to form ScN. Finally, GaN films were deposited on the ScN thin films in order to study possible GaN dislocation reduction.

  15. Development of metallization for GaAs and AlGaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S.P.

    1987-04-01

    A three-layer metallization system was developed for high temperature stability on GaAs and AlGaAs solar cells. The layers are a Pt ohmic contact metal that forms thermally stable compounds with GaAs, a TiN diffusion barrier, and a gold conductor. The solar cell structure was also designed for contact stability, with the key component being a heavily doped GaAs cap layer. Reactively sputtered TiN was found to act as an excellent barrier when deposited under the proper conditions. The conditions were carefully optimized for low resistivity and low stress in the films. A low but nonzero substrate bias during sputtering was found to be important. Solar cells with sputtered metallizations of Pt/TiN/Ti/Pt/Au were found to be thermally stable up to 500/sup 0/C for 15 minutes in vacuum. At 600/sup 0/C there was catastrophic degradation of the cells due to dissociation of uncapped GaAs surfaces. Below this temperature the metallization performed as designed. The Pt and GaAs layers reacted to form a stable PtGa compound layer that gave low contact resistance. There was no penetration of Au or GaAs through the barrier layer. These results are a very encouraging first step leading to stable, reliable GaAs and AlGaAs concentrator cells.

  16. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav; Luque, Antonio

    2014-09-26

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  17. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haj?asz, M., E-mail: m.hajlasz@m2i.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Donkers, J. J. T. M.; Sque, S. J.; Heil, S. B. S. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gravesteijn, D. J. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Rietveld, F. J. R. [NXP Semiconductors, Gerstweg 2, 6534 AE, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schmitz, J. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-06-16

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact is thought to come from reactions between the contact metals and the AlGaN/GaN. As a consequence, conventional extraction of the specific contact resistance and transfer length leads to erroneous results. In this Letter, the sheet resistance under gold-free Ti/Al-based Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates has been investigated by means of electrical measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and technology computer-aided design simulations. It was found to be significantly lower than that outside of the contact area; temperature-dependent electrical characterization showed that it exhibits semiconductor-like behavior. The increase in conduction is attributed to n-type activity of nitrogen vacancies in the AlGaN. They are thought to form during rapid thermal annealing of the metal stack when Ti extracts nitrogen from the underlying semiconductor. The high n-type doping in the region between the metal and the 2-dimensional electron gas pulls the conduction band towards the Fermi level and enhances horizontal electron transport in the AlGaN. Using this improved understanding of the properties of the material underneath the contact, accurate values of transfer length and specific contact resistance have been extracted.

  18. Polarization field engineering of GaN/AlN/AlGaN superlattices for enhanced thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sztein, Alexander, E-mail: asztein@umail.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bowers, John E.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A novel polarization field engineering based strategy to simultaneously achieve high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials is demonstrated. Polarization based electric fields are used to confine electrons into two-dimensional electron gases in GaN/AlN/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N superlattices, resulting in improved electron mobilities as high as 1176 cm{sup 2}/Vs and in-plane thermal conductivity as low as 8.9?W/mK. The resulting room temperature ZT values reach 0.08, a factor of four higher than InGaN and twelve higher than GaN, demonstrating the potential benefits of this polarization based engineering strategy for improving the ZT and efficiencies of thermoelectric materials.

  19. Composition profiling of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Giddings, A. D.; Prosa, T. J.; Larson, D. J. [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Mano, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-10-13

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) is a growth method which can create III-V quantum dots (QDs) whose optoelectronic properties can be accurately controlled through the crystallisation conditions. In this work, GaAs/AlGaAs DE-QDs have been analyzed with the complimentary techniques of cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography. Structural details and a quantitative chemical analysis of QDs of different sizes are obtained. Most QDs were found to be pure GaAs, while a small proportion exhibited high intermixing caused by a local etching process. Large QDs with a high aspect ratio were observed to have an Al-rich crown above the GaAs QD. This structure is attributed to differences in mobility of the cations during the capping phase of the DE growth.

  20. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Etheridge, Joanne; Wong, Bryan M.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  1. Advanced technologies for improving high frequency performance of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jinwook W. (Jinwook Will)

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have used a combination of physical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental work to identify and overcome some of the main challenges in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) for ...

  2. High-field quasi-ballistic transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Tripachko, N. A.; Belyaev, A. E.; Vitusevich, S. A. Hardtdegen, H.; Lüth, H.

    2014-02-17

    Mechanisms of electron transport formation in 2D conducting channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures in extremely high electric fields at 4.2?K have been studied. Devices with a narrow constriction for the current flow demonstrate high-speed electron transport with an electron velocity of 6.8?×?10{sup 7}?cm/s. Such a velocity is more than two times higher than values reported for conventional semiconductors and about 15% smaller than the limit value predicted for GaN. Superior velocity is attained in the channel with considerable carrier reduction. The effect is related to a carrier runaway phenomenon. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for GaN-based materials.

  3. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  4. Lateral and Vertical Transistors Using the AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S; Mishra, UK

    2013-10-01

    Power conversion losses are endemic in all areas of electricity consumption, including motion control, lighting, air conditioning, and information technology. Si, the workhorse of the industry, has reached its material limits. Increasingly, the lateral AlGaN/GaN HEMT based on gallium nitride (GaN-on-Si) is becoming the device of choice for medium power electronics as it enables high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor at attractive pricing for wide market penetration. The reduced form factor enabled by high-efficiency operation at high frequency further enables significant system price reduction because of savings in bulky extensive passive elements and heat sink costs. The high-power market, however, still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes more difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside of silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high power conversion needs. In this paper, the development, performance, and status of lateral and vertical GaN devices are discussed.

  5. AlGaAs-On-Insulator Nonlinear Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Minhao; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of nonlinear and integrated photonics has recently seen a surge with Kerr frequency comb generation in micro-resonators as the most significant achievement. Efficient nonlinear photonic chips have myriad applications including high speed optical signal processing, on-chip multi-wavelength lasers, metrology, molecular spectroscopy, and quantum information science. Aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) exhibits very high material nonlinearity and low nonlinear loss when operated below half its bandgap energy. However, difficulties in device processing and low device effective nonlinearity made Kerr frequency comb generation elusive. Here, we demonstrate AlGaAs-on-insulator as a nonlinear platform at telecom wavelengths. Using newly developed fabrication processes, we show high-quality-factor (Q>100,000) micro-resonators with integrated bus waveguides in a planar circuit where optical parametric oscillation is achieved with a record low threshold power of 3 mW and a frequency comb spanning 350 nm i...

  6. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Arès, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  7. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi; Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0%???2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  8. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell spherical quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emre Kavruk, Ahmet E-mail: aekavruk@gmail.com; Koc, Fatih; Sahin, Mehmet E-mail: mehsahin@gmail.com

    2013-11-14

    In this work, the optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell quantum dot heterostructure have been studied as a function of Al doping concentrations for cases with and without a hydrogenic donor atom. It has been observed that the absorption coefficient strength and/or resonant absorption wavelength can be adjusted by changing the Al content of inner-barrier and/or outer-barrier regions. Besides, it has been shown that the donor atom has an important effect on the control of the electronic and optical properties of the structure. The results have been presented as a function of the Al contents of the inner-barrier x and outer-barrier y regions and probable physical reasons have been discussed.

  9. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-?m transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2?ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75?kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  10. Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Goswami, Srijit, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Ghosh, Arindam [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Vikram [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Pepper, Michael [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04

    We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

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  12. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The cycled'' organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  13. Contribution of alloy clustering to limiting the two-dimensional electron gas mobility in AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Chalabi, Hamidreza [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kaun, Stephen W.; Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    The influence of alloy clustering on fluctuations in the ground state energy of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures is studied. We show that because of these fluctuations, alloy clustering degrades the mobility even when the 2DEG wavefunction does not penetrate the alloy barrier unlike alloy disorder scattering. A comparison between the results obtained for AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures shows that alloy clustering limits the 2DEG mobility to a greater degree in InAlN/GaN heterostructures. Our study also reveals that the inclusion of an AlN interlayer increases the limiting mobility from alloy clustering. Moreover, Atom probe tomography is used to demonstrate the random nature of the fluctuations in the alloy composition.

  14. Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated Antenna Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Abstract -- In this paper, effects of output harmonic terminations on PAE termination, we observe a substantial increase in PAE and output power. Further, we demonstrate the high

  15. SnO2 functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor for hydrogen sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    for spacecraft and other long-term sensing applications. However, hydrogen is a dangerous gas for storage for monitoring leakage of hydrogen storage equipment and fuel tanks for spacecraft and hydrogen fuel cellSnO2 functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor for hydrogen sensing applications

  16. The origin and reduction of switching noise in GaAs/AlGaAs lateral gated devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, John H.

    to cryogenic temperature with all gates grounded to the substrate to protect against electrostatic effects in AlGaAs: electrons `freeze' into deep traps ­ DX centres ­ below about 150 K. The occupation of donors

  17. Characterization of the gate oxide of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    2011; published online 21 March 2011 A subnanometer thick interfacial oxide layer present between used to characterize a Ni/AlGaN interfacial oxide layer with subnanometer thickness. The semiconducting

  18. Investigation of the effect of temperature during off-state degradation of AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , creating both electron traps and increasing electron tunneling through the defect states [4Investigation of the effect of temperature during off-state degradation of AlGaN/GaN High Electron 2011 a b s t r a c t AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors were found to exhibit a negative

  19. Effects of high-temperature AIN buffer on the microstructure of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coerekci, S.; Oeztuerk, M. K.; Yu, Hongbo; Cakmak, M.; Oezcelik, S.; Oezbay, E.

    2013-06-15

    Effects on AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor structure of a high-temperature AlN buffer on sapphire substrate have been studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques. The buffer improves the microstructural quality of GaN epilayer and reduces approximately one order of magnitude the edge-type threading dislocation density. As expected, the buffer also leads an atomically flat surface with a low root-mean-square of 0.25 nm and a step termination density in the range of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Due to the high-temperature buffer layer, no change on the strain character of the GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers has been observed. Both epilayers exhibit compressive strain in parallel to the growth direction and tensile strain in perpendicular to the growth direction. However, an high-temperature AlN buffer layer on sapphire substrate in the HEMT structure reduces the tensile stress in the AlGaN layer.

  20. Valence and conduction band alignment at ScN interfaces with 3C-SiC (111) and 2H-GaN (0001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2014-08-25

    In order to understand and predict the behavior of future scandium nitride (ScN) semiconductor heterostructure devices, we have utilized in situ x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the valence band offset (VBO) present at ScN/3C-SiC (111) and 2H-GaN (0001)/ScN (111) interfaces formed by ammonia gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The ScN/3C-SiC (111) VBO was dependent on the ScN growth temperature and resistivity. VBOs of 0.4?±?0.1 and 0.1?±?0.1?eV were, respectively, determined for ScN grown at 925?°C (low resistivity) and 800?°C (high resistivity). Using the band-gaps of 1.6?±?0.2 and 1.4?±?0.2?eV previously determined by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy for the 925 and 800?°C ScN films, the respective conduction band offsets (CBO) for these interfaces were 0.4?±?0.2 and 0.9?±?0.2?eV. For a GaN (0001) interface with 925?°C ScN (111), the VBO and CBO were similarly determined to be 0.9?±?0.1 and 0.9?±?0.2?eV, respectively.

  1. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce?(Ni/Al/Ga)??-A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ce(NiAlGa)-A new phase with the LaAl structure type Janka, Oliver Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat, Munster...

  2. Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using Large-Bandgap AlGaInN Thin Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using Large-Bandgap AlGaInN Thin Barrier Layers in InGaN Quantum DOI: 10.1109/JPHOT.2013.2255028 1943-0655/$31.00 Ó2013 IEEE #12;Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using with the consideration of carrier transport effect for efficiency droop suppression. The lattice-matched Al

  3. Analysis of AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor structure by using capacitance-frequency-temperature mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Hong-An; Kudo, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshi-kazu [Center for Nano Materials and Technology, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2012-07-23

    AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is analyzed by using capacitance-frequency-temperature (C-f-T) mapping. Applying sputtering-deposited AlN, we attained AlN/AlGaN/GaN MIS heterostructure field-effect transistors with much suppressed gate leakage currents, but exhibiting frequency dispersion in C-V characteristics owing to high-density AlN/AlGaN interface states. In order to investigate the interface states deteriorating the device performance, we measured temperature-dependent frequency dispersion in the C-V characteristics. As a result, we obtained C-f-T mapping, whose analysis gives the activation energies of electron trapping, namely the interface state energy levels, for a wide range of the gate biases. This analysis method is auxiliary to the conventional conductance method, serving as a valuable tool for characterization of wide-bandgap devices with deep interface states. From the analysis, we can directly evaluate the gate-control efficiency of the devices.

  4. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  5. Optical investigation of InAs quantum dots inserted in AlGaAs/GaAs modulation doped heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khmissi, H.; Baira, M.; Bouzaieene, L.; Saidi, F.; Maaref, H. [Laboratoire de Micro-optoelectronique et Nanostructures, Universite de Monastir (Tunisia); Sfaxi, L. [Laboratoire de Micro-optoelectronique et Nanostructures, Universite de Monastir (Tunisia); Universite de Sousse Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l'Environnement 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Bru-Chevallier, C. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), CNRS UMR-5270, INSA-LYON, 7, Avenue Jean Capelle, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2011-03-01

    Optical properties of InAs quantum dots (QDs) inserted in AlGaAs/GaAs modulation doped heterostructure are investigated. To study the effect of carrier transfer behavior on the luminescence of self-assembled quantum dots, a series of sample has been prepared using molecular beam epitaxy (Riber 32 system) in which we have varied the thickness separating the delta dopage and the InAs quantum dots layer. Photoluminescence spectra show the existence of two peaks that can be attributed to transition energies from the ground state (E{sub 1}-HH{sub 1}) and the first excited state (E{sub 2}-HH{sub 2}). Two antagonist effects have been observed, a blue shift of the emission energies result from electron transferred from the AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction to the InAs quantum dots and a red shift caused by the quantum confined Stark effect due to the internal electric field existing In the AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction.

  6. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce?(Ni/Al/Ga)??—A new phase with the La?Al?? structure type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janka, Oliver; Shang, Tian; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Bauer, Eric D.; Thompson, Joe D.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2015-03-01

    Single crystals of Ce?(Ni/Al/Ga)?? were obtained from an Al flux reaction. Single crystals of the title compound crystallizing in the orthorhombic space group Immm (No. 71, Z = 2) with a = 436.38(14), b = 1004.5(3) and c = 1293.4(4) pm. This is a standardized unit cell of the previously published La?Al?? structure type. Wavelength dispersive microprobe provides the composition of Ce?.?????Ni?.?????Al?.?????Ga?.?????. Single crystal refinement provides the composition Ce?Ni?.??Al?.??Ga?.?? with substitution of the Ni and Ga on the Al1 and Al4 sites with the Al2 and Al3 solely occupied by Al. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal antiferromagnetic ordering with TN = 4.8 K and there is no evidence for a ferromagnetic ordering that has been reported for Ce?Al??. The effective magnetic moment was found to be ?eff = 1.9?B/Ce, which is lower than the expected value for trivalent Ce (2.54?B/Ce).

  7. Electron density and currents of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bairamis, A.; Zervos, Ch.; Georgakilas, A.; Adikimenakis, A.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G.

    2014-09-15

    AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally, and the effects of the AlN barrier and GaN buffer layer thicknesses on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and transport properties have been evaluated. HEMT structures consisting of [300?nm GaN/ 200?nm AlN] buffer layer on sapphire were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and exhibited a remarkable agreement with the theoretical calculations, suggesting a negligible influence of the crystalline defects that increase near the heteroepitaxial interface. The 2DEG density varied from 6.8?×?10{sup 12} to 2.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} as the AlN barrier thickness increased from 2.2 to 4.5?nm, while a 4.5?nm AlN barrier would result to 3.1?×?10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} on a GaN buffer layer. The 3.0?nm AlN barrier structure exhibited the highest 2DEG mobility of 900?cm{sup 2}/Vs for a density of 1.3?×?10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2}. The results were also confirmed by the performance of 1??m gate-length transistors. The scaling of AlN barrier thickness from 1.5?nm to 4.5?nm could modify the drain-source saturation current, for zero gate-source voltage, from zero (normally off condition) to 0.63?A/mm. The maximum drain-source current was 1.1?A/mm for AlN barrier thickness of 3.0?nm and 3.7?nm, and the maximum extrinsic transconductance was 320 mS/mm for 3.0?nm AlN barrier.

  8. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wei, E-mail: wguo2@ncsu.edu; Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji [HexaTech, Inc., 991 Aviation Pkwy, Suite 800, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560 (United States); Gerhold, Michael [Engineering Science Directorate, Army Research Office, P.O. BOX 12211, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27703 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Optical gain spectra for ?250?nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150?kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8?nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60?cm{sup ?1} when pumped at 1?MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280?nm laser diodes.

  9. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killat, N., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paskova, T. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States) [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Evans, K. R. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)] [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Leach, J. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States) [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  10. Terahertz intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, C.; Malis, O.; Shao, J.; Shirazi-HD, M.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate THz intersubband absorption (15.6–26.1?meV) in m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells. We find a trend of decreasing peak energy with increasing quantum well width, in agreement with theoretical expectations. However, a blue-shift of the transition energy of up to 14?meV was observed relative to the calculated values. This blue-shift is shown to decrease with decreasing charge density and is, therefore, attributed to many-body effects. Furthermore, a??40% reduction in the linewidth (from roughly 8 to 5?meV) was obtained by reducing the total sheet density and inserting undoped AlGaN layers that separate the wavefunctions from the ionized impurities in the barriers.

  11. FIRST DEMONSTRATION OF MONOLITHIC InP-BASED InAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs TRIPLE JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    FIRST DEMONSTRATION OF MONOLITHIC InP-BASED InAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs TRIPLE JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS RobynAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs triple junction solar cell grown on InP substrate. X-ray diffraction characterization shows high quality solar cell materials. Preliminary 1-sun AM1.5D testing of the triple junction solar cell shows promising

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation comparison of atomic scale intermixing at the amorphous Al2O3/semiconductor interface for a-Al2O3/Ge, a-Al2O3/InGaAs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    /semiconductor interface for a-Al2O3/Ge, a-Al2O3/InGaAs, and a-Al2O3/InAlAs/InGaAs Evgueni A. Chagarov *, Andrew oxides Ge InGaAs InAlAs Oxide­semiconductor stack High-K oxide a b s t r a c t The structural properties of a-Al2O3/Ge, a-Al2O3/In0.5Ga0.5As and a-Al2O3/In0.5Al0.5As/InGaAs interfaces were investigated

  13. On the redox origin of surface trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Di; Tuller, Harry L.; Thompson, Carl V.; Palacios, Tomás

    2014-03-28

    Water-related redox couples in ambient air are identified as an important source of the surface trapping states, dynamic on-resistance, and drain current collapse in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Through in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), direct signature of the water-related species—hydroxyl groups (OH) was found at the AlGaN surface at room temperature. It was also found that these species, as well as the current collapse, can be thermally removed above 200?°C in vacuum conditions. An electron trapping mechanism based on the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} redox couples is proposed to explain the 0.5?eV energy level commonly attributed to the surface trapping states. Finally, the role of silicon nitride passivation in successfully removing current collapse in these devices is explained by blocking the water molecules away from the AlGaN surface.

  14. 2DEG electrodes for piezoelectric transduction of AlGaN/GaN MEMS resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Dana

    A 2D electron gas (2DEG) interdigitated transducer (IDT) in Gallium Nitride (GaN) resonators is introduced and demonstrated. This metal-free transduction does not suffer from the loss mechanisms associated with more commonly ...

  15. 1.9 kV AlGaN/GaN Lateral Schottky Barrier Diodes on Silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Mingda [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Song, Bo [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Qi, Meng [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Hu, Zongyang [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Nomoto, Kazuki [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Yan, Xiaodong [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Cao, Yu [IQE, Westborough, MA (United States); Johnson, Wayne [IQE, Westborough, MA (United States); Kohn, Erhard [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Jena, Debdeep [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Xing, Grace Huili [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In this letter, we present AlGaN/GaN lateral Schottky barrier diodes on silicon with recessed anodes and dual field plates. A low specific on-resistance RON,SP (5.12 m?{center_dot}cm2), a low turn-on voltage (1.9 kV), were simultaneously achieved in devices with a 25 ?m anode/cathode separation, resulting in a power figure-of-merit (FOM) BV2/RON,SP of 727 MW{center_dot}cm2. The record high breakdown voltage of 1.9 kV is attributed to the dual field plate structure.

  16. 1.9 kV AlGaN/GaN Lateral Schottky Barrier Diodes on Silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Mingda; Song, Bo; Qi, Meng; Hu, Zongyang; Nomoto, Kazuki; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Yu; Johnson, Wayne; Kohn, Erhard; Jena, Debdeep; et al

    2015-02-16

    In this letter, we present AlGaN/GaN lateral Schottky barrier diodes on silicon with recessed anodes and dual field plates. A low specific on-resistance RON,SP (5.12 m? · cm2), a low turn-on voltage (1.9 kV), were simultaneously achieved in devices with a 25 ?m anode/cathode separation, resulting in a power figure-of-merit (FOM) BV2/RON,SP of 727 MW·cm2. The record high breakdown voltage of 1.9 kV is attributed to the dual field plate structure.

  17. Plasmonic terahertz detectors based on a high-electron mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bia?ek, M. Witowski, A. M.; Grynberg, M.; ?usakowski, J.; Orlita, M.; Potemski, M.; Czapkiewicz, M.; Umansky, V.

    2014-06-07

    In order to characterize magnetic field (B) tunable THz plasmonic detectors, spectroscopy experiments were carried out at liquid helium temperatures and high magnetic fields on devices fabricated on a high electron mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The samples were either gated (the gate of a meander shape) or ungated. Spectra of a photovoltage generated by THz radiation were obtained as a function of B at a fixed THz excitation from a THz laser or as a function of THz photon frequency at a fixed B with a Fourier spectrometer. In the first type of measurements, the wave vector of magnetoplasmons excited was defined by geometrical features of samples. It was also found that the magnetoplasmon spectrum depended on the gate geometry which gives an additional parameter to control plasma excitations in THz detectors. Fourier spectra showed a strong dependence of the magnetoplasmon resonance amplitude on the conduction-band electron filling factor which was explained within a model of the electron gas heating with THz radiation. The study allows to define both the advantages and limitations of plasmonic devices based on high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures for THz detection at low temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  18. Compositionally graded relaxed AlGaN buffers on semipolar GaN for mid-ultraviolet emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Erin C.; Wu Feng; Haeger, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Shuji; Denbaars, Steven P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Speck, James S.; Romanov, Alexey E.

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we report on the growth and properties of relaxed, compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N buffer layers on freestanding semipolar (2021) GaN substrates. Continuous and step compositional grades with Al concentrations up to x = 0.61 have been achieved, with emission wavelengths in the mid-ultraviolet region as low as 265 nm. Coherency stresses were relaxed progressively throughout the grades by misfit dislocation generation via primary (basal) slip and secondary (non-basal) slip systems. Threading dislocation densities in the final layers of the grades were less than 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} as confirmed by plan-view transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence studies.

  19. Green (In,Ga,Al)P-GaP light-emitting diodes grown on high-index GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledentsov, N. N., E-mail: nikolay.ledentsov@v-i-systems.com; Shchukin, V. A. [VI Systems GmbH, Hardenbergstr. 7, Berlin D-10623 (Germany); Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere FI-33720 (Finland); Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Gordeev, N. Yu.; Maximov, M. V. [A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Schlichting, S.; Nippert, F.; Hoffmann, A. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, Berlin D-10623 (Germany)

    2014-11-03

    We report on green (550–560?nm) electroluminescence (EL) from (Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P-(Al{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P double p-i-n heterostructures with monolayer-scale GaP insertions in the cladding layers and light-emitting diodes based thereupon. The structures are grown side-by-side on high-index and (100) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. At moderate current densities (?500?A/cm{sup 2}), the EL intensity of the structures is comparable for all substrate orientations. Opposite to the (100)-grown strictures, the EL spectra of (211) and (311)-grown devices are shifted towards shorter wavelengths (?550?nm at room temperature). At high current densities (>1?kA/cm{sup 2}), a much higher EL intensity is achieved for the devices grown on high-index substrates. The integrated intensity of (311)-grown structures gradually saturates at current densities above 4?kA/cm{sup 2}, whereas no saturation is revealed for (211)-grown structures up to the current densities above 14?kA/cm{sup 2}. We attribute the effect to the surface orientation-dependent engineering of the GaP band structure, which prevents the escape of the nonequilibrium electrons into the indirect conduction band minima of the p-doped (Al{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P cladding layers.

  20. Influence of pressure on photoluminescence and electroluminescence in GaN/InGaN/AlGaN quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Benard.A.

    recently that the temperature shifts of the photo- and electroluminescence EL peak energies in Nichia greenV/GPa for the green and blue diodes, respectively. The observed pressure coefficients are much lower than those characteristic of the energy gap in GaN ( 40 meV/GPa) or the energy gap in InN ( 33 meV/GPa). This kind

  1. A 3-10 GHZLCR-matched Power Amplifier using Flip-Chip Mounted AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    amplifier using GaN- HEMTs-on-Sapphire. I INTRODUCTION GaN HEMTs have enormous potential for realizing high-power Traveling Wave Power Amplifier circuit (TWPA)[1][2] for realization of wideband power amplifiersWE4A-5 A 3-10 GHZLCR-matched Power Amplifier using Flip-Chip Mounted AlGaN/GaN HEMTs Jane J

  2. Structure and scintillation yield of Ce-doped Al–Ga substituted yttrium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidletskiy, Oleg; Kononets, Valerii; Lebbou, Kheirreddine; Neicheva, Svetlana; Voloshina, Olesya; Bondar, Valerii; Baumer, Vyacheslav; Belikov, Konstantin; Gektin, Alexander; Grinyov, Boris; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Range of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. ? Light yield of mixed crystals reaches 130% of the YAG:Ce value at x ? 0.4. ? ?1% of antisite defects is formed in YGG:Ce, but no evidence of this is obtained for the rest of crystals. -- Abstract: Structure and scintillation yield of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are studied. Crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. Distribution of host cations in crystal lattice is determined. Quantity of antisite defects in crystals is evaluated using XRD and atomic emission spectroscopy data. Trend of light output at Al/Ga substitution in Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce is determined for the first time. Light output in mixed crystals reaches 130% comparative to Ce-doped yttrium–aluminum garnet. Luminescence properties at Al/Ga substitution are evaluated.

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} using oligonucleotide-functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Junjie; Li, Jiadong; Miao, Bin; Wu, Dongmin; Wang, Jine; Pei, Renjun; Wu, Zhengyan

    2014-08-25

    An oligonucleotide-functionalized ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of Hg{sup 2+}. The advantages of ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN HEMT and highly specific binding interaction between Hg{sup 2+} and thymines were combined. The current response of this Hg{sup 2+} ultrasensitive transistor was characterized. The current increased due to the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} ions on the surface by the highly specific thymine-Hg{sup 2+}-thymine recognition. The dynamic linear range for Hg{sup 2+} detection has been determined in the concentrations from 10{sup ?14} to 10{sup ?8} M and a detection limit below 10{sup ?14} M level was estimated, which is the best result of AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensors for Hg{sup 2+} detection till now.

  4. Electron heating due to microwave photoexcitation in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanayaka, A. N.; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We extract the electron temperature in the microwave photo-excited high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system (2DES) by studying the influence of microwave radiation on the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdHOs) in a regime where the cyclotron frequency, ?{sub c}, and the microwave angular frequency, ?, satisfy 2? ? ?{sub c} ? 3.5? The results indicate that increasing the incident microwave power has a weak effect on the amplitude of the SdHOs and therefore the electron temperature, in comparison to the influence of modest temperature changes on the dark-specimen SdH effect. The results indicate negligible electron heating under modest microwave photo-excitation, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  5. Study of the one dimensional electron gas arrays confined by steps in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huijie E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Guijuan; Liu, Guipeng; Wei, Hongyuan; Jiao, Chunmei; Yang, Shaoyan E-mail: sh-yyang@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Lianshan; Zhu, Qinsheng

    2014-05-21

    One dimensional electron gas (1DEG) arrays in vicinal GaN/AlGaN heterostructures have been studied. The steps at the interface would lead to the lateral barriers and limit the electron movement perpendicular to such steps. Through a self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson approach, the electron energy levels and wave functions were calculated. It was found that when the total electron density was increased, the lateral barriers were lowered due to the screening effects by the electrons, and the electron gas became more two-dimension like. The calculated 1DEG densities were compared to the experimental values and good agreements were found. Moreover, we found that a higher doping density is more beneficial to form 1-D like electron gas arrays.

  6. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1991--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The ``cycled`` organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  7. Investigation of photoexcited parallel conduction in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures in the quantum limit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobiela, Pawel Stanislaw

    1986-01-01

    conduction paths, one in the 2-DEG (medium 1) and the second an another medium (like AlGaAs), the conductivity tensor can be expressed as o' = rri + ap. Further analysis can be carried out by considering two separate limits: low and high magnetic fields.... The interval between the current pulses depended on the temperature and varied from 2-3 sec. at 10 K to about 1 min. at 15 mK. For each magnetic field scan between 0 and 7. 5 T about 500 readings were taken for l&oth current directions. As mentioned before...

  8. High bandwidth-efficiency solar-blind AlGaN Schottky photodiodes with low dark current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High bandwidth-efficiency solar-blind AlGaN Schottky photodiodes with low dark current T. Tut a , N.38Ga0.62N/GaN heterojunction solar-blind Schottky photodetectors with low dark current, high responsivity, and fast pulse response were demonstrated. A five-step microwave compatible fabrication process

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a new catalyst Pt/Mg(Ga)(Al)O for alkane dehydrogenation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis

    Sun a , Georges Siddiqi a , Miaofang Chi b , Alexis T. Bell a,* a Department of Chemical Engineering/Mg(Ga)(Al)O catalysts for ethane and propane dehydrogenation are described in the second part of this study (G. Siddiqi for producing intermediates. The catalytic dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, and butane offers an attrac- tive

  10. Relaxation and critical strain for maximum In incorporation in AlInGaN on GaN grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuters, Benjamin; Finken, M.; Wille, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Hollaender, B.; Heuken, M.

    2012-11-01

    Quaternary AlInGaN layers were grown on conventional GaN buffer layers on sapphire by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy at different surface temperatures and different reactor pressures with constant precursor flow conditions. A wide range in compositions within 30-62% Al, 5-29% In, and 23-53% Ga was covered, which leads to different strain states from high tensile to high compressive. From high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we determined the compositions, strain states, and crystal quality of the AlInGaN layers. Atomic force microscopy measurements were performed to characterize the surface morphology. A critical strain value for maximum In incorporation near the AlInGaN/GaN interface is presented. For compressively strained layers, In incorporation is limited at the interface as residual strain cannot exceed an empirical critical value of about 1.1%. Relaxation occurs at about 15 nm thickness accompanied by strong In pulling. Tensile strained layers can be grown pseudomorphically up to 70 nm at a strain state of 0.96%. A model for relaxation in compressively strained AlInGaN with virtual discrete sub-layers, which illustrates the gradually changing lattice constant during stress reduction is presented.

  11. Development of AlGaN-based graded-index-separate-confinement-heterostructure deep UV emitters by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paiella, Roberto

    Development of AlGaN-based graded-index-separate-confinement- heterostructure deep UV emitters://avspublications.org/jvstb/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Development of AlGaN-based graded-index-separate-confinement- heterostructure deep UV emitters. Nikiforov, Luca Dal Negro, and Roberto Paiella Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  12. Growth mechanisms of GaSb heteroepitaxial films on Si with an AlSb buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Botton, G. A.; Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1; Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 ; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.; Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7; Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7

    2013-09-21

    The initial growth stages of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates and the role of the AlSb buffer layer were studied by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Heteroepitaxy of GaSb and AlSb on Si both occur by Volmer-Weber (i.e., island mode) growth. However, the AlSb and GaSb islands have distinctly different characteristics as revealed through an atomic-resolution structural study using Z-contrast of HAADF-STEM imaging. While GaSb islands are sparse and three dimensional, AlSb islands are numerous and flattened. The introduction of 3D island-forming AlSb buffer layer facilitates the nucleation of GaSb islands. The AlSb islands-assisted nucleation of GaSb islands results in the formation of drastically higher quality planar film at a significantly smaller thickness of films. The interface of the AlSb and GaSb epilayers with the Si substrate was further investigated with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the key role of the AlSb buffer layer in the growth of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates.

  13. Integrated AlGaAs source of highly indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claire Autebert; Natalia Bruno; Anthony Martin; Aristide Lemaître; Carmen Gomez Carbonell; Ivan Favero; Giuseppe Leo; Hugo Zbinden; Sara Ducci

    2015-07-20

    The generation of nonclassical states of light in miniature chips is a crucial step towards practical implementations of future quantum technologies. Semiconductor materials are ideal to achieve extremely compact and massively parallel systems and several platforms are currently under development. In this context, spontaneous parametric down conversion in AlGaAs devices combines the advantages of room temperature operation, possibility of electrical injection and emission in the telecom band. Here we report on a chip-based AlGaAs source, producing indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons with a brightness of $7.2\\times10^6$ pairs/s and a signal-to-noise ratio of $141\\pm12$. Indistinguishability between the photons is demonstrated via a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment with a visibility of $89\\pm3\\%$, while energy-time entanglement is tested via a Franson interferometer leading to a value for the Bell parameter $ S=2.70\\pm0.10$.

  14. Integrated AlGaAs source of highly indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autebert, Claire; Martin, Anthony; Lemaître, Aristide; Carbonell, Carmen Gomez; Favero, Ivan; Leo, Giuseppe; Zbinden, Hugo; Ducci, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nonclassical states of light in miniature chips is a crucial step towards practical implementations of future quantum technologies. Semiconductor materials are ideal to achieve extremely compact and massively parallel systems and several platforms are currently under development. In this context, spontaneous parametric down conversion in AlGaAs devices combines the advantages of room temperature operation, possibility of electrical injection and emission in the telecom band. Here we report on a chip-based AlGaAs source, producing indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons with a brightness of $7.2\\times10^6$ pairs/s and a signal-to-noise ratio of $141\\pm12$. Indistinguishability between the photons is demonstrated via a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment with a visibility of $89\\pm3\\%$, while energy-time entanglement is tested via a Franson interferometer leading to a value for the Bell parameter $ S=2.70\\pm0.10$.

  15. Multiexciton complex from extrinsic centers in AlGaAs epilayers on Ge and Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarti, F.; Muñoz Matutano, G.; Bauer, D.; Dotti, N.; Vinattieri, A.; Gurioli, M., E-mail: gurioli@lens.unifi.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, LENS and CNISM, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Firenze (Italy); Bietti, S.; Sanguinetti, S. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali and L-NESS, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Isella, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica and L-NESS, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2013-12-14

    The multiexciton properties of extrinsic centers from AlGaAs layers on Ge and Si substrates are addressed. The two photon cascade is found both in steady state and in time resolved experiments. Polarization analysis of the photoluminescence provides clearcut attribution to neutral biexciton complexes. Our findings demonstrate the prospect of exploiting extrinsic centers for generating entangled photon pairs on a Si based device.

  16. Perpendicularly magnetized {tau}-MnAl (001) thin films epitaxied on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, S. H.; Zhu, L. J.; Lu, J.; Pan, D.; Wang, H. L.; Yu, X. Z.; Xiao, J. X.; Zhao, J. H.

    2013-04-15

    Perpendicularly magnetized {tau}-MnAl films have been epitaxied on GaAs (001) by molecular-beam epitaxy. Crystalline quality and magnetic properties of the samples were strongly dependent on growth temperature. The highest coercivity of 10.7 kOe, saturation magnetization of 361.4 emu/cm{sup 3}, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy constant of 13.65 Merg/cm{sup 3}, and magnetic energy product of 4.44 MGOe were achieved. These tunable magnetic properties make MnAl films valuable as excellent and cost-effective alternative for not only high density perpendicular magnetic recording storage and spintronics devices but also permanent magnets.

  17. Determination of two-dimensional electron and hole gas carriers in AlGaN/GaN/AlN heterostructures grown by Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    between GaN and a sapphire substrate, the dislocation scattering mechanism and the electron spillover

  18. Thermal stability of the deep ultraviolet emission from AlGaN/AlN Stranski-Krastanov quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himwas, C.; Songmuang, R.; Le Si Dang; Bleuse, J.; Monroy, E.; Rapenne, L.; Sarigiannidou, E.

    2012-12-10

    We report on the structural and optical properties of AlGaN/AlN quantum dot (QD) superlattices synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Modifying the composition and geometry of the QDs, the peak emission wavelength can be shifted from 320 nm to 235 nm while keeping the internal quantum efficiency larger than 30%. The efficient carrier confinement is confirmed by the stability of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time, from low temperature up to 100 K. Above this threshold, the PL intensity decreases and the radiative lifetime increases due to carrier thermalization. We also identified the intraband electronic transition between the ground level of the conduction band and the first excited state confined along the growth axis (s-p{sub z}).

  19. Influence of n-type versus p-type AlGaN electron-blocking layer on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    to be further improved in order for the high- power LEDs to penetrate into the consumer market of gen- eral to higher optical output power and external quantum efficiency, compared to the devices with p-AlGaN EBLGaN/GaN based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) possess unique advantages including high energy conversion effi

  20. 238 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 5, MAY 2004 Polyimide Passivated AlGaNGaN HFETs With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Shyh-Chiang

    238 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 5, MAY 2004 Polyimide Passivated AlGaN­GaN HFETs, degrading RF performance. A passivation scheme utilizing a polyimide film as the passivating layer. This data suggests that polyimide can be an effective passivation film for reducing surface states. Index

  1. Correlating stress generation and sheet resistance in InAlN/GaN nanoribbon high electron mobility transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azize, Mohamed

    We report the nanoscale characterization of the mechanical stress in InAlN/GaN nanoribbon-structured high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) through the combined use of convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) and ...

  2. Screening of the quantum-confined Stark effect in AlN/GaN nanowire superlattices by germanium doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hille, P. Müßener, J.; Becker, P.; Teubert, J.; Schörmann, J.; Eickhoff, M.; Mata, M. de la; Rosemann, N.; Chatterjee, S.; Magén, C.; Arbiol, J.; Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats , 08010 Barcelona, CAT

    2014-03-10

    We report on electrostatic screening of polarization-induced internal electric fields in AlN/GaN nanowire heterostructures with germanium-doped GaN nanodiscs embedded between AlN barriers. The incorporation of germanium at concentrations above 10{sup 20}?cm{sup –3} shifts the photoluminescence emission energy of GaN nanodiscs to higher energies accompanied by a decrease of the photoluminescence decay time. At the same time, the thickness-dependent shift in emission energy is significantly reduced. In spite of the high donor concentration, a degradation of the photoluminescence properties is not observed.

  3. The Effect of the Thermal Boundary Resistance on Self-Heating of AlGaN/GaN HFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sound velocity in GaN. The cut off wave vector is given by where NA is the Avogadro number, is the mass

  4. Optical ridge waveguides in AlGaAs and LiNbO3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Roger Mark

    1993-01-01

    the properties of ridge waveguides in AlGaAs, and also to develop and characterize low loss optical waveguides in LiNbOs that combine ridge geometry with the photoelastic efFect. A model that predicts strain contours and related ref'ractive index distribution... waveguides is important. This would establish profiles of the index distribution and guided modal fields, and permit adjustments of ridge height and film thickness for obtaining maximum coupling efilciencies. A computer model using the relaxation method...

  5. Carrier dynamics in Beryllium doped low-temperature-grown InGaAs/InAlAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Globisch, B., E-mail: Bjoern.Globisch@hhi.fraunhofer.de; Dietz, R. J. B.; Stanze, D.; Göbel, T.; Schell, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, Einsteinufer 37, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-28

    The electron and hole dynamics in low-temperature-grown InGaAs/InAlAs multiple quantum well structures are studied by optical pump-probe transmission measurements for Beryllium (Be) doping levels between 3?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} and 4?×?10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. We investigate electron dynamics in the limit cases of unsaturated and completely saturated electron trapping. By expanding a rate equation model in these limits, the details of carrier dynamics are revealed. Electrons are trapped by ionized arsenic antisites, whereas recombination occurs between trapped electrons and holes trapped by negatively charged Be dopants.

  6. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, H.; Cifre, J.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloys influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 ? D03 ? L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.

  7. Mn-doped Ga(As,P) and (Al,Ga)As ferromagnetic semiconductors: Electronic structure calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masek, J.; Kudrnovsky, J.; Maca, F.; Sinova, Jairo; MacDonald, A. H.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, T.

    2007-01-01

    A remarkable progress towards functional ferromagnetic semiconductor materials for spintronics has been achieved in p-type (Ga,Mn)As. Robust hole-mediated ferromagnetism has, however, been observed also in other III-V hosts such as antimonides, Ga...

  8. Development of an IR-transparent, inverted-grown, thin-film, Al[sub 0. 34]Ga[sub 0. 66]As/GaAs cascade solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.; Timmons, M.L.; Sharps, P.R.; Colpitts, T.S.; Hills, J.S.; Hancock, J.; Hutchby, J.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Inverted growth and the development of associated cell processing, are likely to offer a significant degree of freedom for improving the performance of many III-V multijunction cascades and open new avenues for advanced multijunction concepts. This is especially true for the development of high-efficiency Al[sub 0.37]Ga[sub 0.63]As/GaAs cascades where the high growth temperatures required for the AlGaAs top cell growth can cause the deterioration of the tunnel junction interconnect. In the approach of inverted-grown AlGaAs/GaAs cascade cells, the AlGaAs top cell is grown first at 780 [degree]C and the GaAs tunnel junction and bottom cell are grown at 675 [degree]C. After the inverted growth, the AlGaAs/GaAs cascade structure is selectively removed from the parent substrate. The feasibility of inverted growth is demonstrated by a fully-processed, inverted-grown, thin film GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 efficiency of 20.3%. Also, an inverted-grown, thin-film, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiencies of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, has been obtained.

  9. Arsenic decapping and pre-atomic layer deposition trimethylaluminum passivation of Al2O3/InGaAs(100) interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Arsenic decapping and pre-atomic layer deposition trimethylaluminum passivation of Al2O3/InGaAs(100 traps in atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3/GaAs (001) metal-oxide- semiconductor capacitors using atmospheric of atomic layer deposition temperature on HfO2/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor interface properties J. Appl

  10. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, H.; Cifre, J.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloysmore »influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 ? D03 ? L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.« less

  11. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga+Al) alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, H.; Cifre, J.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloysmore »influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 ? D03 ? L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.« less

  12. Si-CMOS-Like Integration of AlGaN/GaN Dielectric-Gated High-Electron-Mobility Transistors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derek Wade

    2014-07-31

    production is projected to consume ~100,000 wafers per year by 2015 (Yole Development, “Power GaN – 2012 Edition”), this manufacturing breakthrough represents potential savings of ~$17 million per year....

  13. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27–102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  14. High-efficiency Al sub 0. 22 Ga sub 0. 78 As solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melloch, M.R. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Tobin, S.P.; Bajgar, C. (Spire Corporation, Patriots Park, Bedford, MA (USA)); Keshavarzi, A.; Stellwag, T.B.; Lush, G.B.; Lundstrom, M.S. (School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (USA)); Emery, K. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, CO (USA))

    1990-07-02

    The quality of {ital pn} junction photodetectors made of Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As has been investigated as a first step in the optimization of tandem solar cells. We have obtained 1 sun AM1.5 efficiencies of 16.1% for 0.25 cm{sup 2} Al{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As solar cells fabricated from molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) material. This efficiency is 3.2 percentage points higher than the previously best reported efficiency of 12.9% for an Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As solar cell fabricated from MBE material.

  15. Birefringence in the transparency region of GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko, A.A.; Etchegoin, P.; Fainstein, A.; Eberl, K.; Cardona, M.

    1999-09-01

    Birefringence measurements for in-plane propagation of light below the absorption edge in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells (MQW{close_quote}s) are reported for different well/barrier widths. A remarkable drop in the low-frequency limit of the birefringence has been observed for MQW structures with small periods and ascribed to the presence of local fields. The temperature dependence of the birefringence is also studied and complementary results in InP quantum dot structures are also presented. The latter exhibit a strong resonant birefringence, which can be explained by the reduced dimensionality in the joint density of states for optical transitions in the dots. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Effect of exciton oscillator strength on upconversion photoluminescence in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Osamu, E-mail: kojima@phoenix.kobe-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Shouhei; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Akahane, Kouichi [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2014-11-03

    We report upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL) in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells. UCPL from the AlAs barrier is caused by the resonant excitation of the excitons in the GaAs well. When the quantum well has sufficient miniband width, UCPL is hardly observed because of the small exciton oscillator strength. The excitation-energy and excitation-density dependences of UCPL intensity show the exciton resonant profile and a linear increase, respectively. These results demonstrate that the observed UCPL caused by the saturated two-step excitation process requires a large number of excitons.

  17. Single photon emission from impurity centers in AlGaAs epilayers on Ge and Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minari, S.; Cavigli, L.; Sarti, F.; Abbarchi, M.; Accanto, N.; Munoz Matutano, G.; Vinattieri, A.; Gurioli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, LENS and CNISM, Universita di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Firenze (Italy); Bietti, S.; Sanguinetti, S. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali and L-NESS, Universita di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy)

    2012-10-22

    We show that the epitaxial growth of thin layers of AlGaAs on Ge and Si substrates allows to obtain single photon sources by exploiting the sparse and unintentional contamination with acceptors of the AlGaAs. Very bright and sharp single photoluminescence lines are observed in confocal microscopy. These lines behave very much as single excitons in quantum dots, but their implementation is by far much easier, since it does not require 3D nucleation. The photon antibunching is demonstrated by time resolved Hanbury Brown and Twiss measurements.

  18. Physics of gate leakage current in N-polar InAlN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Arunesh; Trew, Robert J.; Bilbro, Griff L.

    2014-10-28

    A physics based model of the gate leakage current in N-polar InAlN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors is demonstrated. The model is based on the space charge limited current flow dominated by the effects of deep traps in the InAlN surface layer. The model predicts accurately the gate-leakage measurement data of the N-polar InAlN/GaN device with InAlN cap layer. In the pinch-off state, the gate leakage current conduction through the surface of the device in the drain access region dominates the current flow through the two dimensional electron gas channel. One deep trap level and two levels of shallow traps are extracted by fitting the model results with measurement data.

  19. Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life ofASCRLight Source (ALS) Scientific

  20. Deep ultraviolet photodetectors grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire and AlGaN/sapphire substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    , CINVESTAV, Mexico D.F. 07300, Mexico ABSTRACT Optically-based chemical and biological sensors require: photodetector, solar blind, AlGaN, superlattice 1. INTRODUCTION A solar blind photodetector (SBPD) is sensitive the solar blackbody spectrum [1]. Such photodetectors have broad applications including space

  1. 75 GHz ECL Static Frequency Divider in InAlAs/InGaAs Transferred Substrate HBT Technology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    75 GHz ECL Static Frequency Divider in InAlAs/InGaAs Transferred Substrate HBT Technology. T.: (805) 893-8044 / Fax: (805) 893-3262, E-mail: thomas@goodness.ece.ucsb.edu We report 75 GHz static frequency of operation for a static frequency divider. The circuit has 60 transistors, and dissipates 800 m

  2. Half-Metallicity and Efficient Spin Injection in AlN=GaN:Cr (0001) Heterostructure J. E. Medvedeva,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    V, so that the conduction electrons can tunnel into the semiconductor material with 100% spin, Australia 3 Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Cr-doped AlN=GaN (0001) heterostructures reveal

  3. Single photon emission of a charge-tunable GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As droplet quantum dot device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langer, Fabian Plischke, David; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2014-08-25

    In this work, we report the fabrication of a charge-tunable GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As quantum dot (QD) device containing QDs deposited by modified droplet epitaxy producing almost strain and composition gradient free QDs. We obtained a QD density in the low 10{sup 9?}cm{sup ?2} range that enables us to perform spectroscopy on single droplet QDs showing linewidths as narrow as 40??eV. The integration of the QDs into a Schottky diode allows us to controllably charge a single QD with up to four electrons, while non-classical photoluminescence is proven by photon auto-correlation measurements showing photon-antibunching (g{sup (2)}(0)?=?0.05).

  4. Spin depolarization under low electric fields at low temperatures in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Laipan; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Chongyun; Yu, Jinling; Gao, Hansong; Ma, Hui; Qin, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Wu, Qing; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-10-13

    The spin polarization under low electric fields (?300?V/cm) at low temperatures has been studied in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well. The spin polarization was created by optical spin orientation using circularly polarized light and the inverse spin-Hall effect was employed to measure the spin polarization current. We observed an obvious spin depolarization especially at lower temperatures (80–120?K). We ascribed the spin depolarization of the photoinduced electrons to the heating effect from the low electric fields (the low field regime 50–300?V/cm). This spin depolarization due to the heating effect is sensitive to temperature and electric field, suggesting a wide range of potential applications and devices.

  5. Broadband emission in InAs/InGaAlAs quantum-dash-in-well laser Boon S. Ooi1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Quantum dash, Quantum dot, Broadband emission, Semiconductor Laser. Abstract. We report on the developmentBroadband emission in InAs/InGaAlAs quantum-dash-in-well laser Boon S. Ooi1, a , Hery S. Djie1 of wide gain InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum-dash structure for broadband diode laser and amplifier

  6. High-temperature luminescence in an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb light-emitting heterostructure with a high potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petukhov, A. A., E-mail: andrey-rus29@rambler.ru; Zhurtanov, B. E.; Kalinina, K. V.; Stoyanov, N. D.; Salikhov, H. M.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The electroluminescent properties of an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb heterostructure with a high potential barrier in the conduction band (large conduction-band offset) at the n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb type-II heterointerface ({Delta}E{sub c} = 0.79 eV) are studied. Two bands with peaks at 0.28 and 0.64 eV at 300 K, associated with radiative recombination in n-InGaAsSb and n-GaSb, respectively, are observed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. In the entire temperature range under study, T = 290-480 K, additional electron-hole pairs are formed in the n-InGaAsSb active region by impact ionization with hot electrons heated as a result of the conduction-band offset. These pairs contribute to radiative recombination, which leads to a nonlinear increase in the EL intensity and output optical power with increasing pump current. A superlinear increase in the emission power of the long-wavelength band is observed upon heating in the temperature range T = 290-345 K, and a linear increase is observed at T > 345 K. This work for the first time reports an increase in the emission power of a light-emitting diode structure with increasing temperature. It is shown that this rise is caused by a decrease in the threshold energy of the impact ionization due to narrowing of the band gap of the active region.

  7. Arsenic decapping and half cycle reactions during atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on In0.53Ga0.47As,,001...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Arsenic decapping and half cycle reactions during atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on In0.53Ga0 of a protective As layer and subsequent atomic layer deposition ALD of Al2O3 on In0.53Ga0.47As 001 . H2O dosing such as InxGa1-xAs.1 Atomic layer deposition ALD has been the technique of choice for the deposition of high

  8. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Malyshev

    2015-02-08

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture than a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F011(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional "cubic" diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas - from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development

  9. In situ study of atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaP (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Qin, X.; Hinkle, C. L.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-09-16

    The interfacial chemistry of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on chemically treated GaP (100) has been studied using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “self-cleaning” effect for Ga-oxide upon exposure to trimethylaluminum is seen to be efficient on the native oxide and chemically treated surfaces. The phosphorus oxide chemical states are seen to change during the ALD process, but the total concentration of P-oxides is seen to remain constant throughout the ALD process.

  10. Raman scattering in InAs/AlGaAs quantum dot nanostructures E. Giulotto,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As upper CL UCL with the same composition of LCL, and a 10 nm thick GaAs cap layer. Buffers and LCLs were

  11. High photo-excited carrier multiplication by charged InAs dots in AlAs/GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wangping Wang; Ying Hou; Dayuan Xiong; Ning Li; Wei Lu

    2007-10-15

    We present an approach for the highly sensitive photon detection based on the quantum dots (QDs) operating at temperature of 77K. The detection structure is based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode combined with a layer of self-assembled InAs QDs (QD-RTD). A photon rate of 115 photons per second had induced 10nA photocurrent in this structure, corresponding to the photo-excited carrier multiplication factor of 10^7. This high multiplication factor is achieved by the quantum dot induced memory effect and the resonant tunneling tuning effect of QD-RTD structure.

  12. Heteroepitaxial (Al)GaAs structures on Ge and Si for advanced high-efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M.; Spitzer, M.B.; Tobin, S.P.; Wolfson, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    The results of heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs and GaAlAs directly on Si are presented, and applications to new cell structures are suggested. The novel feature of this work is the elimination of a Ge lattice transition region. This feature not only reduces the cost of substrate preparation, but also makes possible the fabrication of high efficiency monolithic cascade structures. All films to be discussed were grown by organometallic chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. This process yielded reproducible, large-area films of GaAs, grown directly on Si, that are tightly adherent and smooth, and are characterized by a defect density of 5 X 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -2/. Preliminary studies indicate that GaAlAs can also be grown in this way. The use of a 20-layer superlattice to reduce dislocations was attempted, although in this experiment a Ge-coated Si substrate was utilized. Also presented are several low-cost and/or low-weight structures which make use of these heteroepitaxial layers in the construction of high-efficiency solar cells.

  13. Depth-resolved ultra-violet spectroscopic photo current-voltage measurements for the analysis of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor epilayer deposited on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozden, Burcu; Yang, Chungman; Tong, Fei; Khanal, Min P.; Mirkhani, Vahid; Sk, Mobbassar Hassan; Ahyi, Ayayi Claude; Park, Minseo

    2014-10-27

    We have demonstrated that the depth-dependent defect distribution of the deep level traps in the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) epi-structures can be analyzed by using the depth-resolved ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic photo current-voltage (IV) (DR-UV-SPIV). It is of great importance to analyze deep level defects in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure, since it is recognized that deep level defects are the main source for causing current collapse phenomena leading to reduced device reliability. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT epi-layers were grown on a 6 in. Si wafer by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The DR-UV-SPIV measurement was performed using a monochromatized UV light illumination from a Xe lamp. The key strength of the DR-UV-SPIV is its ability to provide information on the depth-dependent electrically active defect distribution along the epi-layer growth direction. The DR-UV-SPIV data showed variations in the depth-dependent defect distribution across the wafer. As a result, rapid feedback on the depth-dependent electrical homogeneity of the electrically active defect distribution in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT epi-structure grown on a Si wafer with minimal sample preparation can be elucidated from the DR-UV-SPIV in combination with our previously demonstrated spectroscopic photo-IV measurement with the sub-bandgap excitation.

  14. Inhomogeneous distribution of defect-related emission in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with different Al content and Si concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurai, Satoshi, E-mail: kurai@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Ushijima, Fumitaka; Yamada, Yoichi [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan); Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurimamachiya, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2014-02-07

    The spatial distribution of luminescence in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers that differ in Al content and Si concentration has been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping in combination with scanning electron microscopy. The density of surface hillocks increased with decreasing Al content and with increasing Si concentration. The mechanisms giving rise to those hillocks are likely different. The hillocks induced surface roughening, and the compositional fluctuation and local donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) emission at hillock edges in AlGaN epitaxial layers were enhanced irrespective of the origin of the hillocks. The intensity of local DAP emission was related to Si concentration, as well as to hillock density. CL observation revealed that DAP emission areas were present inside the samples and were likely related to dislocations concentrated at hillock edges. Possible candidates for acceptors in the observed DAP emission that are closely related in terms of both Si concentration and hillock edges with large deformations are a V{sub III}-Si{sub III} complex and Si{sub N}, which are unfavorable in ordinary III-nitrides.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma–reactive ion etching of c- and a-plane AlGaN over the entire Al composition range: Effect of BCl{sub 3} pretreatment in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Amit P.; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Azizur Rahman, A.; Gokhale, Maheshwar R.; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2013-11-15

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP)–reactive ion etching (RIE) patterning is a standard processing step for UV and optical photonic devices based on III-nitride materials. There is little research on ICP-RIE of high Al-content AlGaN alloys and for nonpolar nitride orientations. The authors present a comprehensive study of the ICP-RIE of c- and a-plane AlGaN in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma over the entire Al composition range. The authors find that the etch rate decreases in general with increasing Al content, with different behavior for c- and a-plane AlGaN. They also study the effect of BCl{sub 3} deoxidizing plasma pretreatment. An ICP deoxidizing BCl{sub 3} plasma with the addition of argon is more efficient in removal of surface oxides from Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N than RIE alone. These experiments show that Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N etching is affected by the higher binding energy of AlN and the higher affinity of oxygen to aluminum compared to gallium, with oxides on a-plane AlGaN more difficult to etch as compared to oxides on c-plane AlGaN, specifically for high Al composition materials. The authors achieve reasonably high etch rate (?350 nm/min) for high Al-content materials with a smooth surface morphology at a low DC bias of ??45 VDC.

  16. EV Community Readiness projects: Center for Transportation and the Environment (GA, AL, SC); Centralina Council of Governments (NC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. Ferromagnetism in Mn-and Cr-Implanted AlGaP M.E. Overberg a,*, G.T. Thaler a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebard, Arthur F.

    ­15]. This raises the possi- bility of spintronic devices such as transistors which exploit the spin of the electron to integrate GaP-based spintronic devices with existing Si microcircuitry. Recent reports have shown room for room temperature spintronic devices is AlGaP doped with transition ele- ments. The bandgap is larger

  18. Influence of electromechanical effects and wetting layers on band structures of AlN/GaN quantum dots and spin control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Influence of electromechanical effects and wetting layers on band structures of AlN/GaN quantum In a series of recent papers we demonstrated that coupled electromechanical effects can lead to pronounced

  19. Radiation damage and 5f-electron localization of Plutonium compounds: -Pu, PuGa3, and PuAl2 , Corwin H. Booth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiation damage and 5f-electron localization of Plutonium compounds: -Pu, PuGa3, and PuAl2 Yu and pure science, people have been studying various plutonium compounds for decades. Starting in the 1980's

  20. Free-standing Al[subscript x]Ga[subscript 1?x]As heterostructures by gas-phase etching of germanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Garrett D.

    We outline a facile fabrication technique for the realization of free-standing Al[subscript x]Ga[subscript 1?x]As heterostructures of arbitrary aluminum content. Utilizing xenon difluoride (XeF[subscript 2]) we rapidly and ...

  1. Comparison of steady-state and transient characteristics of lattice-matched and strained InGaAs-AlGaAs (on GaAs) and InGaAs-AlInAs (on InP) quantum-well lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Y.; Singh, J. ); Loehr, J.P. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper reports on numerical techniques to study the output spectra and to solve the multimode coupled rate equations including TE and TM propagations for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As-Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As and In{sub 0.53+x}Ga{sub 0.47{minus}x}As-Al{sub 0.48}In{sub 0.52}As quantum well lasers. Optical properties are calculated from a 4 {times} 4 k {center dot} p bandstructure and strain effects are included with the deformation potential theory. The authors find that an introduction of 1.4% compressive strain to the quantum well results in roughly 3-4 times improvement in the intrinsic static characteristics in terms of lower threshold current, greater mode suppression, and lower nonlashing photon population in the laser cavity. The authors also identify the role of strain on the large signal temporal response. If the laser is switched from the off state to a given photon density in the lasing mode, then the strained system exhibits a faster intrinsic time response. However, if the lasers are switched to equal total photon density, then the strained system has a slower time response. The authors also include calculated CHSH Auger rates in our model and find that the main effect of Auger recombination is to greatly increase the threshold current and to shorten the response time to large signal switching.

  2. Investigation of the negative differential resistance reproducibility in AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucherit, M.; Soltani, A.; Rousseau, M.; Deresmes, D.; Berthe, M.; Durand, C.; De Jaeger, J.-C.

    2011-10-31

    AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/sapphire template and processed into mesa diameters from 2 {mu}m to 4 {mu}m. The current-voltage characteristics were carried out in direct current operation and under-high vacuum. A sharp negative differential resistance (NDR) was detected in the forward bias at 120 K. The NDR was observed for the mesa size of 2 {mu}m at 4 V with a peak-to-valley current ratio of 3.5. The measurement conditions were chosen to make NDR reproducible more than 50 times and apparent in both scan voltage directions after electrical treatment.

  3. Optical characteristics of nanocrystalline Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N thin films deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenberg, Eda; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Kemal Okyay, Ali

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films have been deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition at 200?°C on c-plane sapphire and Si substrates. The dependence of film structure, absorption edge, and refractive index on postdeposition annealing were examined by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements, respectively. Well-adhered, uniform, and polycrystalline wurtzite (hexagonal) GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films were prepared at low deposition temperature. As revealed by the x-ray diffraction analyses, crystallite sizes of the films were between 11.7 and 25.2?nm. The crystallite size of as-deposited GaN film increased from 11.7 to 12.1 and 14.4?nm when the annealing duration increased from 30?min to 2?h (800?°C). For all films, the average optical transmission was ?85% in the visible (VIS) and near infrared spectrum. The refractive indices of AlN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N were lower compared to GaN thin films. The refractive index of as-deposited films decreased from 2.33 to 2.02 (??=?550?nm) with the increased Al content x (0???x???1), while the extinction coefficients (k) were approximately zero in the VIS spectrum (>400?nm). Postdeposition annealing at 900?°C for 2?h considerably lowered the refractive index value of GaN films (2.33–1.92), indicating a significant phase change. The optical bandgap of as-deposited GaN film was found to be 3.95?eV, and it decreased to 3.90?eV for films annealed at 800?°C for 30?min and 2?h. On the other hand, this value increased to 4.1?eV for GaN films annealed at 900?°C for 2?h. This might be caused by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation and following phase change. The optical bandgap value of as-deposited Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films decreased from 5.75 to 5.25?eV when the x values decreased from 1 to 0.68. Furthermore, postdeposition annealing did not affect the bandgap of Al-rich films.

  4. Magnetic field effect on the terahertz emission from nanometer InGaAs/AlInAs high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyakonova, N.; Teppe, F.; Lusakowski, J.; Knap, W.; Levinshtein, M.; Dmitriev, A.P.; Shur, M.S.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.

    2005-06-01

    The influence of the magnetic field on the excitation of plasma waves in InGaAs/AlInAs lattice matched high electron mobility transistors is reported. The threshold source-drain voltage of the excitation of the terahertz emission shifts to higher values under a magnetic field increasing from 0 to 6 T. We show that the main change of the emission threshold in relatively low magnetic fields (smaller than approximately 4 T) is due to the magnetoresistance of the ungated parts of the channel. In higher magnetic fields, the effect of the magnetic field on the gated region of the device becomes important.

  5. Role of Ce4+ in the scintillation mechanism of codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12:Ce

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12?Ce?(GGAG?Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-levelmore »diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.« less

  6. Formation of manganese -doped atomic layer in wurtzite GaN Meng Shi, Abhijit Chinchore, Kangkang Wang, Andrada-Oana Mandru, Yinghao Liu et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is formulated based on the experimental data, and implications for possible spintronic applications The importance of spintronics in general was emphati- cally described by Wolf et al.,1 while the possibility to fabri- cate room-temperature spintronic devices based on GaN was proposed by Dietl et al.2 The idea

  7. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce?(Ni/Al/Ga)??-A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Z 2) with a 436.38(14), b 1004.5(3) and c 1293.4(4) pm. This is a standardized unit cell of the previously published LaAl structure type. Wavelength dispersive...

  8. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5 .mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photolvoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of growing layer.

  9. The impact of monolayer coverage, barrier thickness and growth rate on the thermal stability of photoluminescence of coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dot hetero-structure with quaternary capping of InAlGaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, A.; Verma, U.; Halder, N.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2012-03-15

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupled InAs/GaAs MQDs with (In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As + GaAs) caps are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monolayer coverage, barrier thickness and growth rate of the dots are the factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL peaks for the samples are within 1.1-1.3 {mu}m; significant for IBSCs and lasers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NPTP (non-resonant multi-phonon assisted tunneling process) effect on FWHM of PL. -- Abstract: The self-assembled InAs/GaAs MQDs are widely investigated for their potential application in optoelectronic devices like lasers and photovoltaics. We have explored the effect of QD growth rate and structural parameters like capping layer thickness on the morphology and optical properties of the MQD heterostructures overgrown with a combination capping of InAlGaAs and GaAs. The growth rate of the seed layers in the MQD samples is also varied to investigate its effect in the vertical stacking of the islands. The change in the morphology and the optical properties of the samples due to variation in growth and structural parameters are explained by the presence of strain in the QD structures, which arises due to lattice mismatch.

  10. Optical reflection from the Bragg lattice of AsSb metal nanoinclusions in an AlGaAs matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushanov, V. I.; Chaldyshev, V. V., E-mail: chald.gvg@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhenskii, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The optical properties of metal-semiconductor metamaterials based on an AlGaAs matrix are studied. The specific feature of these materials is that there are As and AsSb nanoinclusion arrays which modify the dielectric properties of the material. These nanoinclusions are randomly arranged in the medium or form a Bragg structure with a reflectance peak at a wavelength close to 750 nm, corresponding to the transparency region of the matrix. The reflectance spectra are studied for s- and p-polarized light at different angles of incidence. It is shown that (i) As nanoinclusion arrays only slightly influence the optical properties of the medium in the wavelength range 700-900 nm, (ii) chaotic AsSb nanoinclusion arrays cause strong scattering of light, and (iii) the spatial periodicity in the arrangement of AsSb nanoinclusions is responsible for Bragg resonance in the optical reflection.

  11. Luminescence and superradiance in electron-beam-excited Al{sub x}Ga{1-sub x}N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.; Malin, T. V.; Zhuravlev, K. S.; Osinnykh, I. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Spirina, A. V.

    2014-09-21

    Luminescence and superradiance characteristics of 0.5–1.2-?m thick Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on sapphire substrates were studied under excitation of the films with low-energy (<20 keV) and high-energy (170 keV) electron beams. In both cases, the luminescence spectra looked quite similarly; they exhibited a band-edge luminescence with x-dependent wavelength ranging from 365 nm to 310 nm and a broadband emission taking over the whole visible spectral region. Superradiance within the broad band was obtained by pumping the samples with powerful an electron beam in the form of an open-discharge-generated filament.

  12. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Juan; Xing, Jun-Liang; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Wei; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ren, Zheng-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-02-03

    Modulation-doped In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum-well (QW) structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies show high crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology. X-ray diffraction investigations confirm 1.94% compressive strain within In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb channel. High room temperature hole mobility with high sheet density of 1000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 0.877?×?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}, and 965 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 1.112?×?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} were obtained with different doping concentrations. Temperature dependent Hall measurements show different scattering mechanisms on hole mobility at different temperature range. The sheet hole density keeps almost constantly from 300?K to 77?K. This study shows great potential of In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb QW for high-hole-mobility device applications.

  13. The impact of argon admixture on the c-axis oriented growth of direct current magnetron sputtered Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1?x}N thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayrhofer, P. M.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C.; Stöger-Pollach, M.

    2014-05-21

    The piezoelectric properties of wurtzite aluminium nitride (w-AlN) are enhanced by alloying with scandium (Sc), thus offering superior properties for applications in micro electro-mechanical systems devices. Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1?x}N thin films have been prepared by DC reactive magnetron sputtering on Si (100) substrates from a single target. When targeting a concentration range from x?=?0 up to x?=?0.15, the preparation conditions have been optimized by varying the Ar/N{sub 2} ratio in the sputtering gas. To incorporate an increasing Sc concentration, a higher Ar/N{sub 2} ratio has to be applied during the deposition process. Hence, the argon concentration in the sputtering gas becomes a crucial parameter for microstructure-related parameters. To determine phase purity, degree of c-axis orientation, lattice parameter, and grain size, the Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1?x}N thin films were investigated by techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  14. Measuring the depth profiles of strain/composition in AlGaN-graded layer by high-resolution x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchuk, A. V.; Stanchu, H. V.; Kladko, V. P.; Belyaev, A. E.; Li, Chen; Ware, M. E.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Salamo, G. J.

    2014-12-14

    Here, we demonstrate X-ray fitting through kinematical simulations of the intensity profiles of symmetric reflections for epitaxial compositionally graded layers of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy pseudomorphically on [0001]-oriented GaN substrates. These detailed simulations depict obvious differences between changes in thickness, maximum concentration, and concentration profile of the graded layers. Through comparison of these simulations with as-grown samples, we can reliably determine these parameters, most important of which are the profiles of the concentration and strain which determine much of the electrical properties of the film. In addition to learning about these parameters for the characterization of thin film properties, these fitting techniques create opportunities to calibrate growth rates and control composition profiles of AlGaN layers with a single growth rather than multiple growths as has been done traditionally.

  15. Band offsets between amorphous LaAlO3 and In0.53Ga0.47As W. Tsai, and C. M. Garner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    V. Within the resolution of the medium energy ion scattering technique, no interfacial oxide layer is seen and no undesirable oxide layer was ob- served at the LaAlO3 and InGaAs interface despite annealing up to 500 °C.10

  16. Atomically abrupt and unpinned Al2O3/In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces: Experiment and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    an In0.53Ga0.47As 100 channel and an Al2O3 dielectric layer grown by atomic layer deposition ALD when at the end of epitaxial growth of the channel was thermally desorbed in situ in an atomic layer deposition 100 channel from oxidation and contamina- tion during exposure to air. An As2 capping layer deposited

  17. Raman scattering as a tool for the evaluation of strain in GaN/AlN quantum dots: The effect of capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Garro, N.; Coraux, J.; Daudin, B.

    2007-10-15

    The strain state of GaN/AlN quantum dots grown on 6H-SiC has been investigated as a function of AlN capping thickness by three different techniques. On the one hand, resonant Raman scattering allowed the detection of the A{sub 1}(LO) quasiconfined mode. It was found that its frequency increases with AlN deposition, while its linewidth did not evolve significantly. Available experiments of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction and diffraction anomalous fine structure on the same samples provided the determination of the wurtzite lattice parameters a and c of the quantum dots. A very good agreement is found between resonant Raman scattering and x-ray measurements, especially concerning the in-plane strain state. The results demonstrate the adequacy of Raman scattering, in combination with the deformation potential and biaxial approximations, to determine quantitatively values of strain in GaN quantum dot layers.

  18. InAs quantum dot growth on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy for intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakomin, R.; Kawabata, R. M. S.; Souza, P. L.; Mourão, R. T.; Pires, M. P.; Micha, D. N.

    2014-09-07

    InAs quantum dot multilayers have been grown using Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As spacers with dimensions and compositions near the theoretical values for optimized efficiencies in intermediate band photovoltaic cells. Using an aluminium composition of x?=?0.3 and InAs dot vertical dimensions of 5?nm, transitions to an intermediate band with energy close to the ideal theoretical value have been obtained. Optimum size uniformity and density have been achieved by capping the quantum dots with GaAs following the indium-flush method. This approach has also resulted in minimization of crystalline defects in the epilayer structure.

  19. Mechanochemical-thermal preparation and structural studies of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Silva, K.L. [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstr. 3a, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Department of Physics, State University of Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa (Brazil); Sepelak, V., E-mail: vladimir.sepelak@kit.ed [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Duevel, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstr. 3a, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Paesano, A. [Department of Physics, State University of Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa (Brazil); Hahn, H. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Litterst, F.J. [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Heitjans, P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstr. 3a, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Becker, K.D. [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A series of Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} solid solutions (0{<=}x{<=}1), prepared by mechanochemical processing of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixtures and subsequent annealing, was investigated by XRD, EDX, and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR. The structure of the Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} solid solutions is found to be orthorhombic, space group Pbam (No. 55). The lattice parameters of the Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} series increase linearly with increasing gallium content. Rietveld refinement of the XRD data as well as the analysis of the {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra show a preference of gallium cations for the tetrahedral sites in Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9}. As a consequence, this leads to a far from random distribution of Al and Ga cations across the whole series of solid solutions. -- Graphical Abstract: Mullite-type Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} mixed crystals (0{<=}x{<=}1) prepared by a combined mechanochemical-thermal route possess a non-random distribution of Ga{sup 3+} and Al{sup 3+} cations over the sites of tetrahedral (T) and octahedral [O] coordination, characterized by the preference of Ga{sup 3+} (Al{sup 3+}) for tetrahedral (octahedral) sites. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} (0{<=}x{<=}1) were synthesized via mechanochemical-thermal route. {yields} The lattice parameters of Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} increase linearly with gallium content. {yields} Quantitative information on the cation distribution in Bi{sub 2}(Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 4}O{sub 9} is derived. {yields} Ga{sup 3+} and Al{sup 3+} show the preference for tetrahedral and octahedral sites, respectively.

  20. Deep-level defects introduced by 1 MeV electron radiation in AlInGaP for multijunction space solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2005-11-01

    Presented in this paper are 1 MeV electron irradiation effects on wide-band-gap (1.97 eV) (Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}){sub 0.52}In{sub 0.48}P diodes and solar cells. The carrier removal rate estimated in p-AlInGaP with electron fluence is about 1 cm{sup -1}, which is lower than that in InP and GaAs. From high-temperature deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, a deep-level defect center such as majority-carrier (hole) trap H2 (E{sub {nu}}+0.90{+-}0.05 eV) was observed. The changes in carrier concentrations ({delta}p) and trap densities as a function of electron fluence were compared, and as a result the total introduction rate, 0.39 cm{sup -1}, of majority-carrier trap centers (H1 and H2) is different from the carrier removal rate, 1 cm{sup -1}, in p-AlInGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing (100 mA/cm{sup 2}), the annealing activation energy of H2 defect is {delta}E=0.60 eV, which is likely to be associated with a vacancy-phosphorus Frenkel pair (V{sub p}-P{sub i}). The recovery of defect concentration and carrier concentration in the irradiated p-AlInGaP by injection relates that a deep-level defect H2 acts as a recombination center as well as compensator center.

  1. Effects of dislocation strain on the epitaxy of lattice-mismatched AlGaInP layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­V compound multi-junction solar cells [2]. LEDs at red and yellow wavelengths using the (Aly- Ga1Ày)xIn1Àx

  2. Band alignment and electrical properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamimura, Takafumi Hoi Wong, Man; Krishnamurthy, Daivasigamani; Higashiwaki, Masataka; Sasaki, Kohei; Kuramata, Akito; Yamakoshi, Shigenobu; Masui, Takekazu

    2014-05-12

    The band alignment of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/n-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). With a band gap of 6.8?±?0.2?eV measured for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the conduction and valence band offsets at the interface were estimated to be 1.5?±?0.2?eV and 0.7?±?0.2?eV, respectively. The conduction band offset was also obtained from tunneling current in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/n-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (2{sup ¯}01) metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) diodes using the Fowler-Nordheim model. The electrically extracted value was in good agreement with the XPS data. Furthermore, the MOS diodes exhibited small capacitance-voltage hysteresis loops, indicating the successful engineering of a high-quality Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface.

  3. Instrumentation SC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Pasture feeding depresses adipose tissue development in beef cattle whereas grain feeding, enhances adipogenesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that specific fatty acids would differentially affect lipogenesis in explants of bovine subcutaneous (SC...

  4. Two dimensional electron transport in modulation-doped In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} ultrathin quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Cheng-Ying Law, Jeremy J. M.; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C.; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-03-28

    We have investigated the growth and electron transport in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} two dimensional electron gases (2DEG) and compared their properties with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As 2DEGs. For 10?nm thick InGaAs wells, the electron mobility of InGaAs/AlAsSb 2DEGs is comparable to that of InGaAs/InAlAs 2DEGs. Upon thinning the wells to 3?nm, the 2DEG mobility is degraded quickly and stronger interface roughness scattering is observed for InGaAs/AlAsSb heterointerfaces than for InGaAs/InAlAs heterointerfaces. Changing the group-V exposure between As and Sb during growth interruptions at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces did not significantly change the 2DEG mobility. With the insertion of a two monolayer InAlAs at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces, the interface roughness scattering is reduced and the mobility greatly increased. The room temperature 2DEG mobility shows 66% improvement from 1.63?×?10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V·s to 2.71?×?10{sup 3}?cm{sup 2}/V·s for a 3?nm InGaAs well.

  5. Band offsets determination and interfacial chemical properties of the Al2O3/GaSb system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    of a high quality dielectric/substrate interface. Native oxides of III­V com- pounds lead to the formation Sb is formed at the oxide/GaSb interface, which leads to a high leakage current.8 To overcome treatment. In contrast, NH4 2S and HCl solutions inhibit the Sb oxide formation. The lowest amount of Ga

  6. Analysis of the causes of the decrease in the electroluminescence efficiency of AlGaInN light-emitting-diode heterostructures at high pumping density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhansky, I. V., E-mail: igor@quantum.ioffe.ru; Zakheim, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The study is devoted to theoretical explanation of a decrease in the electroluminescence efficiency as the pump current increases, which is characteristic of light-emitting-diode (LED) heterostructures based on AlInGaN. Numerical simulation shows that the increase in the external quantum efficiency at low current densities J {approx} 1 A/cm{sup 2} is caused by the competition between radiative and nonradiative recombination. The decrease in the quantum efficiency at current densities J > 1 A/cm{sup 2} is caused by a decrease in the efficiency of hole injection into the active region. It is shown that the depth of the acceptor energy level in the AlGaN emitter, as well as low electron and hole mobilities in the p-type region, plays an important role in this effect. A modified LED heterostructure is suggested in which the efficiency decrease with the pump current should not occur.

  7. A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm 0.4 0.35 In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic-mail:ykwon@snu.ac.kr) Abstract -- In this work, we demonstrate a compact 77GHz single-chip transceiver for an automotive radar at the transmitter and a 5dB conversion gain at the receiver. Index Terms -- Automotive radar, 77GHz, MHEMT, MMIC

  8. Electrical current leakage and open-core threading dislocations in AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, Michael Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Wierer, Jonathan J.; Smith, Michael; Biedermann, Laura

    2014-08-07

    Electrical current transport through leakage paths in AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and their effect on LED performance are investigated. Open-core threading dislocations, or nanopipes, are found to conduct current through nominally insulating Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layers and limit the performance of DUV-LEDs. A defect-sensitive phosphoric acid etch reveals these open-core threading dislocations in the form of large, micron-scale hexagonal etch pits visible with optical microscopy, while closed-core screw-, edge-, and mixed-type threading dislocations are represented by smaller and more numerous nanometer-scale pits visible by atomic-force microscopy. The electrical and optical performances of DUV-LEDs fabricated on similar Si-doped Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N templates are found to have a strong correlation to the density of these nanopipes, despite their small fraction (<0.1% in this study) of the total density of threading dislocations.

  9. Polarization induced hole doping in graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shibin; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yajie; Wang, Zhiming; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Zhi; Jiang, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2013-02-11

    Polarization induced hole doping on the order of {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} is achieved in linearly graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and conventional Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layers grown on AlN are beryllium (Be) doped via epitaxial growth. The hole concentration in graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N:Be (x = 0.7 {approx} 1) layers demonstrates that polarization generates hole charges from Be dopant. The Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layer is not conductive owing to the absence of carriers generated from the Be dopant without the inducement of polarization. Polarization doping provides an approach to high efficiency p-type doping in high Al composition AlGaN.

  10. Analysis of different tunneling mechanisms of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/AlGaAs tunnel junction light-emitting transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2014-10-27

    The electrical and optical characteristics of tunnel junction light-emitting transistors (TJLETs) with different indium mole fractions (x?=?5% and 2.5%) of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As base-collector tunnel junctions have been investigated. Two electron tunneling mechanisms (photon-assisted or direct tunneling) provide additional currents to electrical output and resupply holes back to the base region, resulting in the upward slope of I-V curves and enhanced optical output under forward-active operation. The larger direct tunneling probability and stronger Franz-Keldysh absorption for 5% TJLET lead to higher collector current slope and less optical intensity enhancement when base-collector junction is under reverse-biased.

  11. Growth, microstructure, and luminescent properties of direct-bandgap InAlP on relaxed InGaAs on GaAs substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaton, Daniel A.

    Direct-bandgap InAlP alloy has the potential to be an active material in nitride-free yellow-green and amber optoelectronics with applications in solid-state lighting, display devices, and multi-junction solar cells. We ...

  12. Characterization of heavy masses of two-dimensional conduction subband in InGaAs/InAlAs MQW structures by pulsed cyclotron resonance technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotera, N.; Tanaka, K. [Kyushu Inst. of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan); Arimoto, H.; Miura, N. [Univ. of Tokyo, Roppongi, Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Solid State Physics; Jones, E.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mishima, T. [Hitachi Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo (Japan). Central Research Lab.; Washima, M. [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Research Center

    1998-05-01

    Conduction-band effective masses in a direction parallel to the quantum well plane were investigated in n-type-modulation-doped InGaAs/InAlAs multiquantum well system. Thicknesses of well and barrier were 5 and 10 nm. Three highly-doped specimens having about 1 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2} per one quantum well were prepared by MBE. Double-crystal X-ray diffraction was used to check the crystal quality. Heavy electron effective masses, almost 50% bigger than the band edge mass of 0.041m{sub 0}, were measured by far-infrared and infrared cyclotron resonances under pulse high magnetic fields up to 100 T. Nonparabolicity of this subband was less than 12% by comparing the two cyclotron resonances. Observed two-dimensional subband structure was quite different from conduction-band effective mass in a direction perpendicular to the same quantum well and from GaAs/GaAlAs quantum well system.

  13. X ray photoelectron analysis of oxide-semiconductor interface after breakdown in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhter, P.; Palumbo, F.; Cohen Weinfeld, K.; Eizenberg, M.

    2014-09-08

    In this work, the post-breakdown characteristics of metal gate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs structures were studied using surface analysis by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that for dielectric breakdown under positive bias, localized filaments consisting of oxidized substrate atoms (In, Ga and As) were formed, while following breakdown under negative bias, a decrease of oxidized substrate atoms was observed. Such differences in the microstructure at the oxide-semiconductor interface after breakdown for positive and negative voltages are explained by atomic diffusion of the contact atoms into the gate dielectric in the region of the breakdown spot by the current induced electro-migration effect. These findings show a major difference between Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs and SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces, opening the way to a better understanding of the breakdown characteristics of III-V complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor technology.

  14. Structural properties of free-standing 50 mm diameter GaN waferswith (101_0) orientation grown on LiAlO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, Jacek; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Maruska, Herbert-Paul; Chai, Bruce H.; Hill, David W.; Chou, Mitch M.C.; Gallagher, John J.; Brown, Stephen

    2005-09-27

    (10{und 1}0) GaN wafers grown on (100) face of {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Despite good lattice matching in this heteroepitaxial system, high densities of planar structural defects in the form of stacking faults on the basal plane and networks of boundaries located on prism planes inclined to the layer/substrate interface were present in these GaN layers. In addition, significant numbers of threading dislocations were observed. High-resolution electron microscopy indicates that stacking faults present on the basal plane in these layers are of low-energy intrinsic I1type. This is consistent with diffraction contrast experiments.

  15. A detailed investigation on the impact of post-growth annealing on the materials and device characteristics of 35-layer In{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}As/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector with quaternary In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikary, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Subhananda

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? We investigated the effect of ex situ annealing on InGaAs/GaAs QDIP with InAlGaAs layer. ? As-grown defect was removed by using post-growth annealing treatment. ? Increase in the compressive strain due to annealing is calculated from XRD curve. ? Three-fold enhancement in responsivity is observed in the QDIPs annealed at 650 °C. ? Two-fold enhancement in D* is observed sample annealed at 650 °C compared to as grown. -- Abstract: The effect of post-growth rapid thermal annealing on 35-layer In{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}As/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) with quaternary In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As capping has been investigated. Transmission electron microscopy showed some as-grown defects were removed by post growth annealing treatment. An increase in the compressive strain in the heterostructure due to annealing was identified from X-ray diffraction curve. A two-color photoresponse in the long-wave region (8.5 and 10.2 ?m) was observed in both as-grown device and those annealed at 650 °C temperature. A three-fold enhancement in peak responsivity was observed in the QDIPs annealed at 650 °C (1.19 A/W) compared to that in the as-grown (0.34 A/W). Detectivity also increased by two fold from as-grown to 650 °C annealed device. The changes are attributed to the removal of as-grown defects and dislocations during epitaxial growth. These removals changed the confinement potential profile, which resulted in an improvement in the detectivity and responsivity of the annealed sample.

  16. The relationship between depth-resolved composition and strain relaxation in InAlN and InGaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Wenyuan; Kong, Wei; Li, Jincheng; Kim, Tong-Ho; Brown, April S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Collar, Kristen [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-10-14

    A study of the relationship between strain and the incorporation of group III elements in ternary InGaN and InAlN grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy compositional depth profiles with x-ray diffraction, we are able to find a clear relationship between strain and In incorporation including tensile-strained InAlN which has, to date, not been studied. The results show that fully strained films contain homogeneous indium composition while partially relaxed films have a non-homogeneous indium composition with depth. These results can be interpreted by considering the impurity formation energies of indium in host lattices.

  17. InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode with a polarization tunnel junction Zi-Hui Zhang, Swee Tiam Tan, Zabu Kyaw, Yun Ji, Wei Liu et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    to the enhanced optical output power and external quantum efficiency. Compared to the reference InGaN/GaN LEDs; accepted 29 April 2013; published online 15 May 2013) We report InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LED have been devoted to boosting the optical output power and enhancing the external quantum efficiency

  18. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 ?m to a modest 0.50 ?m over an underlying 0.10-?m intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 ?m/3 ?m) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85oC and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  19. Photopumped red-emitting InP/In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P self-assembled quantum dot heterostructure lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryou, J. H.; Dupuis, R. D.; Walter, G.; Kellogg, D. A.; Holonyak, N.; Mathes, D. T.; Hull, R.; Reddy, C. V.; Narayanamurti, V.

    2001-06-25

    We report the 300 K operation of optically pumped red-emitting lasers fabricated from InP self-assembled quantum dots embedded in In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P layers on GaAs (100) substrates grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Quantum dots grown at 650{degree}C on In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P layers have a high density on the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2} and the dominant size of individual quantum dots ranges from {similar_to}5 to {similar_to}10 nm for 7.5 monolayer {open_quotes}equivalent growth.{close_quotes} These InP/In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P quantum dot heterostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. Laser structures are prepared from wafers having two vertically stacked InP quantum dot active layers within a 100-nm-thick In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.2}P waveguide and upper and lower 600 nm InAlP cladding layers. We observe lasing at {lambda}{similar_to}680 nm at room temperature in optically pumped samples. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Exciton and biexciton dynamics in single self-assembled InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dash emitting near 1.55??m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusanowski, ?.; Syperek, M. Rudno-Rudzi?ski, W.; Mrowi?ski, P.; Sek, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.; Forchel, A.

    2013-12-16

    Exciton and biexciton dynamics in a single self-assembled InAs/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.23}Al{sub 0.24}As/InP(001) quantum dash emitting near 1.55??m has been investigated by micro-photoluminescence and time-resolved micro-photoluminescence at T?=?4.2?K. The exciton and biexciton fine structure splitting of ?60??eV, the biexciton binding energy of ?3.5?meV, and the characteristic exciton and biexciton decay times of 2.0?±?0.1?ns and 1.1?±?0.1?ns, respectively, have been determined. The measurement of the biexciton and exciton cross-correlation statistics of the photon emission confirmed the cascaded relaxation process. The exciton-to-biexciton decay time ratio and a small fine structure splitting suggest carrier localization within the investigated quantum dash.

  1. Fermi level control of compensating point defects during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of Si-doped AlGaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Z; Bryan, I; Gaddy, BE; Reddy, P; Hussey, L; Bobea, M; Guo, W; Hoffmann, M; Kirste, R; Tweedie, J; Gerhold, M; Irving, DL; Sitar, Z; Collazo, R

    2014-12-01

    A Fermi-level control scheme for point defect management using above-bandgap UV illumination during growth is presented. We propose an extension to the analogy between the Fermi level and the electrochemical potential such that the electrochemical potential of a charged defect in a material with steady-state populations of free charge carriers may be expressed in terms of the quasi-Fermi levels. A series of highly Si-doped Al0.65Ga0.35N films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with and without UV illumination showed that samples grown under UV illumination had increased free carrier concentration, free carrier mobility, and reduced midgap photoluminescence all indicating a reduction in compensating point defects. (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  2. A combined capacitance-voltage and hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterisation of metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As capacitor structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jun; Povey, Ian M.; Hurley, Paul K.; Walsh, Lee; Hughes, Greg; Woicik, Joseph C.; O'Regan, Terrance P.

    2014-07-14

    Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) characterization and hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) measurements have been used to study metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As capacitor structures with high (Ni) and low (Al) work function metals. The HAXPES measurements observe a band bending occurring prior to metal deposition, which is attributed to a combination of fixed oxide charges and interface states of donor-type. Following metal deposition, the Fermi level positions at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As interface move towards the expected direction as observed from HAXPES measurements. The In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As surface Fermi level positions determined from both the C-V analysis at zero gate bias and HAXPES measurements are in reasonable agreement. The results are consistent with the presence of electrically active interface states at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As interface and suggest an interface state density increasing towards the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As valence band edge.

  3. Investigation of arsenic and antimony capping layers, and half cycle reactions during atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, Hong; Brennan, Barry; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Oktyabrsky, Serge [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany–SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany–SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    In-situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, ion scattering spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the GaSb(100) surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy after thermal desorption of a protective As or Sb layer and subsequent atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. An antimony protective layer is found to be more favorable compared to an arsenic capping layer as it prevents As alloys from forming with the GaSb substrate. The evolution of oxide free GaSb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface is investigated by “half-cycle” ALD reactions of trimethyl aluminum and deionized water.

  4. Gate Length Reduction Technology for Pseudomorphic In0:52Al0:48As/In0:7Ga0:3As High Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    Gate Length Reduction Technology for Pseudomorphic In0:52Al0:48As/In0:7Ga0:3As High Electron, 2006; accepted November 29, 2006; published online April 24, 2007) Gate length reduction technology was developed for pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (P-HEMTs) applicable to nano

  5. Density functional theory simulations of amorphous high-oxides on a compound semiconductor alloy: a-Al2O3/InGaAs(100)-(42), a-HfO2/InGaAs(100)-(42), and a-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    atomic layer deposition Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 042904 (2014); 10.1063/1.4863440 Si passivation effects x 0.53 ) and atomic-layer deposited Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 202110 (2009); 10.1063/1.3137187 Energy-band parameters of atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 on In x Ga 1 - x As Appl. Phys. Lett

  6. Effect of tunnel injection through the Schottky gate on the static and noise behavior of GaInAs/AlInAs high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro-Melgar, Diego; Mateos, Javier González, Tomás Vasallo, Beatriz G.

    2014-12-21

    By using a Monte Carlo simulator, the influence of the tunnel injection through the Schottky contact at the gate electrode of a GaInAs/AlInAs High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) has been studied in terms of the static and noise performance. The method used to characterize the quantum tunnel current has been the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approach. The possibility of taking into account the influence of the image charge effect in the potential barrier height has been included as well. Regarding the static behavior, tunnel injection leads to a decrease in the drain current I{sub D} due to an enhancement of the potential barrier controlling the carrier transport through the channel. However, the pinch-off is degraded due to the tunneling current. Regarding the noise behavior, since the fluctuations in the potential barrier height caused by the tunnel-injected electrons are strongly coupled with the drain current fluctuations, a significant increase in the drain-current noise takes place, even when the tunnel effect is hardly noticeable in the static I-V characteristics, fact that must be taken into account when designing scaled HEMT for low-noise applications. In addition, tunnel injection leads to the appearance of full shot noise in the gate current.

  7. Distribution of cations in wurtzitic InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN alloys: Consequences for energetics and quasiparticle electronic structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Carvalho, Luiz Cláudio; Schleife, André; Furthmüller, Jürgen; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2012-03-27

    The ternary, isostructural, wurtzite-derived group-III mononitride alloys InxGa1-xN andInxAl1-xN are reexamined within a cluster expansion approach. Using density functional theory together with the AM05 exchange-correlation functional, the total energies and the optimized atomic geometries of all 22 clusters classes of the cluster expansion for each material system are calculated. The computationally demanding calculation of the corresponding quasiparticle electronic structures is achieved for all cluster classes by means of a recently developed scheme to approximately solve the quasiparticle equation based on the HSE06 hybrid functional and the G?W? approach. Using two different alloy statistics, the configurational averages for the lattice parameters,more »the mixing enthalpies, and the bulk moduli are calculated. The composition-dependent electronic structures of the alloys are discussed based on configurationally averaged electronic states, band gaps, and densities of states. Ordered cluster arrangements are found to be energetically rather unfavorable, however, they possess the smallest energy gaps and, hence, contribute to light emission. The influence of the alloy statistics on the composition dependencies and the corresponding bowing parameters of the band gaps is found to be significant and should, hence, lead to different signatures in the optical-absorption or -emission spectra.« less

  8. Epitaxial growth of 100-?m thick M-type hexaferrite crystals on wide bandgap semiconductor GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Bolin; Su, Zhijuan; Bennett, Steve; Chen, Yajie, E-mail: y.chen@neu.edu; Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Thick barium hexaferrite BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (BaM) films having thicknesses of ?100??m were epitaxially grown on GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates from a molten-salt solution by vaporizing the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement verified the growth of BaM (001) textured growth of thick films. Saturation magnetization, 4?M{sub s}, was measured for as-grown films to be 4.6 ± 0.2 kG and ferromagnetic resonance measurements revealed a microwave linewidth of ?100?Oe at X-band. Scanning electron microscopy indicated clear hexagonal crystals distributed on the semiconductor substrate. These results demonstrate feasibility of growing M-type hexaferrite crystal films on wide bandgap semiconductor substrates by using a simple powder melting method. It also presents a potential pathway for the integration of ferrite microwave passive devices with active semiconductor circuit elements creating system-on-a-wafer architectures.

  9. Comparison of the properties of AlGaInN light-emitting diode chips of vertical and flip-chip design using silicon as the a submount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markov, L. K., E-mail: l.markov@mail.ioffe.ru; Smirnova, I. P.; Pavlyuchenko, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kukushkin, M. V.; Vasil'eva, E. D. [ZAO Innovation 'Tetis' (Russian Federation); Chernyakov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Science-and-Technology Microelectronics Center (Russian Federation); Usikov, A. S. [De Core Nanosemiconductors Ltd. (India)

    2013-03-15

    Vertical and flip-chip light-emitting diode (LED) chips are compared from the viewpoint of the behavior of current spreading in the active region and the distribution of local temperatures and thermal resistances of chips. AlGaInN LED chips of vertical design are fabricated using Si as a submount and LED flipchips were fabricated with the removal of a sapphire substrate. The latter are also mounted on a Si submount. The active regions of both chips are identical and are about 1 mm{sup 2} in size. It is shown that both the emittance of the crystal surface in the visible range and the distribution of local temperatures estimated from radiation in the infrared region are more uniform in crystals of vertical design. Heat removal from flip-chips is insufficient in regions of the n contact, which do not possess good thermal contact with the submount. As a result, the total thermal resistances between the p-n junction and the submount both for the vertical chips and for flip-chips are approximately 1 K/W. The total area of the flip-chips exceeds that of the vertical design chips by a factor of 1.4.

  10. Electron and hole g factors in InAs/InAlGaAs self-assembled quantum dots emitting at telecom wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Belykh; A. Greilich; D. R. Yakovlev; M. Yacob; J. P. Reithmaier; M. Benyoucef; M. Bayer

    2015-10-08

    We extend the range of quantum dot (QD) emission energies where electron and hole $g$ factors have been measured to the practically important telecom range. The spin dynamics in InAs/In$_{0.53}$Al$_{0.24}$Ga$_{0.23}$As self-assembled QDs with emission wavelengths at about 1.6 $\\mu$m grown on InP substrate is investigated by pump-probe Faraday rotation spectroscopy in a magnetic field. Pronounced oscillations on two different frequencies, corresponding to the QD electron and hole spin precessions about the field are observed from which the corresponding $g$ factors are determined. The electron $g$ factor of about $-1.9$ has the largest negative value so far measured for III-V QDs by optical methods. This value, as well as the $g$ factors reported for other III-V QDs, differ from those expected for bulk semiconductors at the same emission energies, and this difference increases significantly for decreasing energies.

  11. Distribution of cations in wurtzitic InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN alloys: Consequences for energetics and quasiparticle electronic structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Carvalho, Luiz Cláudio; Schleife, André; Furthmüller, Jürgen; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2012-03-01

    The ternary, isostructural, wurtzite-derived group-III mononitride alloys InxGa1-xN andInxAl1-xN are reexamined within a cluster expansion approach. Using density functional theory together with the AM05 exchange-correlation functional, the total energies and the optimized atomic geometries of all 22 clusters classes of the cluster expansion for each material system are calculated. The computationally demanding calculation of the corresponding quasiparticle electronic structures is achieved for all cluster classes by means of a recently developed scheme to approximately solve the quasiparticle equation based on the HSE06 hybrid functional and the G?W? approach. Using two different alloy statistics, the configurational averages for the lattice parameters, the mixing enthalpies, and the bulk moduli are calculated. The composition-dependent electronic structures of the alloys are discussed based on configurationally averaged electronic states, band gaps, and densities of states. Ordered cluster arrangements are found to be energetically rather unfavorable, however, they possess the smallest energy gaps and, hence, contribute to light emission. The influence of the alloy statistics on the composition dependencies and the corresponding bowing parameters of the band gaps is found to be significant and should, hence, lead to different signatures in the optical-absorption or -emission spectra.

  12. Yellow-green emission for ETS-LEDs and lasers based on a strainedInGaP quantum well heterostructure grown on a transparent, compositionally graded AlInGaP buffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diodes have been fabricated utilizing simple top and bottom contacts. The highest LED power of 0.18µW perYellow-green emission for ETS-LEDs and lasers based on a strained­InGaP quantum well with a reduced power of 0.08µW per facet at 20mA. For a quantum well composition of In0.37Ga0.63P and an overall

  13. First principles study of the structural, elastic, electronic and phonon properties of CdX{sub 2}O{sub 4} (X=Al, Ga, In) spinel-type oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candan, Abdullah; U?ur, Gökay

    2014-10-06

    We have performed ab-initio calculations of the structural, electronic, elastic and dynamical properties for the spinel compounds CdX{sub 2}O{sub 4} (X=Al, Ga, In) using the plane wave pseudo-potential method within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated lattice parameters, elastic constants for these compounds are in good agreement with the previous calculated values. The computed direct band gaps of CdAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CdGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are 2.90 eV, 1.92 eV and 1.16 eV, respectively. The lattice vibrations were calculated by direct method. The calculated phonon dispersion curves show that all compounds are dynamically stable in the spinel structure.

  14. Growth of large-domain YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} with new seeding crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4} and SrLaGaO{sub 4}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, D.; Hull, J. R.; LeBlanc, D.; LeBlanc, M. A. R.; Dabkowski, A.; Chang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Fan, H.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Cincinnati; Univ. of Ottawa; McMaster Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    1995-05-10

    Single crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4} and SrLaGaO{sub 4} were used as seeds to grow large domains of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} for levitation applications. These crystals have high melting temperatures (> 1500 C) and similar lattice structures to that of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}. In a seeded melt-texturing method developed previously, the single crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4}, SrLaGaO{sub 4}, and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} were used as seeds for comparison. After melt processing, scanning electron microscopy analysis did not reveal any major differences in all these seeded melt-textured samples. However, the levitation forces in the samples seeded with single crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4} and SrLaGaO{sub 4} increased considerably compared to that of the sample seeded with NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}. A model is proposed to describe the domain growth mechanism during seeded melt processing.

  15. SC Johnson Waxdale Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 6.4 MW CHP application at SC Johnson Waxdale Plant in Racine, Wisconsin.

  16. TThe {\\sc Majorana} Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MAJORANA collaboration

    2009-10-23

    The {\\sc Majorana} Project, a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment is described with an emphasis on the choice of Ge-detector configuration.

  17. Microstructural evaluation of Sb-adjusted Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer layer systems for IR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.; Paine, D.C.; Uppal, P.; Ahearn, J.S.; Nichols, K.; Charache, G.W.

    1998-06-01

    The authors report on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of Sb-adjusted quaternary Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBE at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBe at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} is successively increased in a series of 125 nm thick layers. Post growth analysis using conventional bright field and weak beam dark field imaging of these buffer layers in cross-section reveals that the interface misfit dislocations are primarily of the 60{degree} type and are distributed through out the interfaces of the buffer layer. When optimized, the authors have shown, using plan view and cross-sectional TEM, that this approach can reduce the threading defect density to below the detectability limit of TEM (< 10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}) and preserve growth surface planarity. The Sb-graded approach was used to fabricate two 2.2 {micro}m power converter structures fabricated using InGaAs grown on Sb-based buffer layers on GaAs substrates. A microstructural and electrical characterization was performed on these device structures and the results are contrasted with a sample in which InP was selected as the substrate. Microstructure, defect density and device performance in these not-yet-optimized Sb-based buffer layers compares favorably to equivalent devices fabricated using InP substrates.

  18. Engineering Al-based Thin Film Materials for Power Devices and Energy Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perng, Ya-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    application on AlGaN/GaN, AlN can serve as a superior passivation layer to Al 2 O 3 because of its piezoelectric

  19. M.Sc. Finance M.Sc. Investment and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    M.Sc. Finance M.Sc. Investment and Finance M.Sc. International Banking and Finance and M.Sc. International Accounting and Finance 2014-15 Introductory Meeting Information Welcome to the full-time postgraduate taught programmes for the Department of Accounting and Finance at the University of Strathclyde

  20. Structural and band alignment properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on epitaxial Ge grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y.; Maurya, D.; Priya, S.; Patra, P. K.; Ma, A. W. K.; Aphale, A.; Macwan, I.

    2013-04-07

    Structural and band alignment properties of atomic layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide film deposited on crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge grown in-situ on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers were investigated using cross-sectional transmission microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). High-resolution triple axis x-ray measurement demonstrated pseudomorphic and high-quality Ge epitaxial layer on crystallographically oriented GaAs substrates. The cross-sectional TEM exhibited a sharp interface between the Ge epilayer and each orientation of the GaAs substrate as well as the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film and the Ge epilayer. The extracted valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v}, values of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to (100), (110), and (111) Ge orientations using XPS measurement were 3.17 eV, 3.34 eV, and 3.10 eV, respectively. Using XPS data, variations in {Delta}E{sub v} related to the crystallographic orientation were {Delta}E{sub V}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(100)Ge{>=}{Delta}E{sub V}(111)Ge and the conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c}, related to the crystallographic orientation was {Delta}E{sub c}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(100)Ge using the measured {Delta}E{sub v}, bandgap of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in each orientation, and well-known Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters are important for future application of Ge-based p- and n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor design.

  1. Sub-250?nm low-threshold deep-ultraviolet AlGaN-based heterostructure laser employing HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Tsung-Ting; Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Mahbub Satter, Md.; Li, Xiao-Hang; Lochner, Zachary; Douglas Yoder, P.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Shen, Shyh-Chiang Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Fischer, Alec M.; Wei, Yong; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2013-11-18

    We report a sub-250-nm, optically pumped, deep-ultraviolet laser using an Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N-based multi-quantum-well structure grown on a bulk Al-polar c-plane AlN substrate. TE-polarization-dominant lasing action was observed at room temperature with a threshold pumping power density of 250?kW/cm{sup 2}. After employing high-reflectivity SiO{sub 2}/HfO{sub 2} dielectric mirrors on both facets, the threshold pumping power density was further reduced to 180?kW/cm{sup 2}. The internal loss and threshold modal gain can be calculated as 2?cm{sup ?1} and 10.9?cm{sup ?1}, respectively.

  2. Ultra-thin GaAs single-junction solar cells integrated with a reflective back scattering layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Weiquan; Becker, Jacob; Liu, Shi; Kuo, Ying-Shen; Li, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Yong-Hang; Landini, Barbara; Campman, Ken

    2014-05-28

    This paper reports the proposal, design, and demonstration of ultra-thin GaAs single-junction solar cells integrated with a reflective back scattering layer to optimize light management and minimize non-radiative recombination. According to our recently developed semi-analytical model, this design offers one of the highest potential achievable efficiencies for GaAs solar cells possessing typical non-radiative recombination rates found among commercially available III-V arsenide and phosphide materials. The structure of the demonstrated solar cells consists of an In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P/GaAs/In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P double-heterostructure PN junction with an ultra-thin 300?nm thick GaAs absorber, combined with a 5??m thick Al{sub 0.52}In{sub 0.48}P layer with a textured as-grown surface coated with Au used as a reflective back scattering layer. The final devices were fabricated using a substrate-removal and flip-chip bonding process. Solar cells with a top metal contact coverage of 9.7%, and a MgF{sub 2}/ZnS anti-reflective coating demonstrated open-circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) up to 1.00?V, short-circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) up to 24.5?mA/cm{sup 2}, and power conversion efficiencies up to 19.1%; demonstrating the feasibility of this design approach. If a commonly used 2% metal grid coverage is assumed, the anticipated J{sub sc} and conversion efficiency of these devices are expected to reach 26.6?mA/cm{sup 2} and 20.7%, respectively.

  3. The impact of oxygen incorporation during intrinsic ZnO sputtering on the performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kkotnim; Ok, Eun-A; Park, Jong-Keuk; Kim, Won Mok; Baik, Young-Joon; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-08-25

    We investigated the impact of incorporating 2% oxygen during intrinsic ZnO sputtering on the efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells. The added oxygen not only reduced the optical absorption loss of the Al-doped ZnO overlaying layer but also improved the electronic properties of the underlying CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by increasing carrier density, lowering defect level, and increasing diffusion length, eventually enhancing J{sub SC}, V{sub OC}, and fill factor. It was found that the Na doping concentration was significantly increased around the CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} junction due to the plasma-activated oxygen. The improved electronic properties are better explained by the increased Na concentration than simply the oxygen-related defect passivation.

  4. Remarkably reduced efficiency droop by using staircase thin InGaN quantum barriers in InGaN based blue light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Kun; Ikeda, Masao, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Liu, Jianping, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Zhang, Shuming; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Cai, Jin; Wang, Hui; Wang, H. B. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Suzhou Nanojoin Photonics Co., Ltd., Suzhou (China)

    2014-10-27

    The efficiency droop of InGaN/GaN(InGaN) multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) with thin quantum barriers (QB) is studied. With thin GaN QB (3?nm–6?nm thickness), the efficiency droop is not improved, which indicates that hole transport cannot be significantly enhanced by the thin GaN QBs. On the contrary, the efficiency droop was remarkably reduced by using a InGaN staircase QB (InGaN SC-QB) MQWs structure where InGaN SC-QBs lower the transport energy barrier of holes. The efficiency droop ratio was as low as 3.3% up to 200?A/cm{sup 2} for the InGaN SC-QB LED. By using monitoring QW with longer wavelength we observe a much uniform carrier distribution in the InGaN SC-QB LEDs, which reveals the mechanism of improvement in the efficiency droop.

  5. IEEE MTT-S 2001 International Microwave Symposium Digest, Vol. 3 pp. 1713-1716 185 GHz Monolithic Amplifier in InGaAs/InAlAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    , and automotive radar. Monolithic amplifiers in this frequency range have previously been demonstrated in In in these technologies have exhibited large small signal gains. Weinreb et al [1] have reported a six-stage amplifier]. Larger ICs include 66 GHz master-slave flip flops [9] and 18 GHz delta-sigma ADCs [10]. Here, we report

  6. Synthesis and structural characterization of the ternary Zintl phases AE{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} and AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Hua; Tyson, Chauntae; Saito, Maia [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Ten new ternary phosphides and arsenides with empirical formulae AE{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} and AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As) have been synthesized using molten Ga, Al, and Pb fluxes. They have been structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction to form with two different structures-Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4} crystallize with the Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} structure type (space group C2/c, Z=4); Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} adopt the Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} structure type (space group Pnma, Z=4). The polyanions in both structures are made up of TrPn{sub 4} tetrahedra, which share common corners and edges to form {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-} layers in the phases with the Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} structure, and {sup 1}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-} chains in Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} with the Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} structure type. The valence electron count for all of these compounds follows the Zintl-Klemm rules. Electronic band structure calculations confirm them to be semiconductors. - Graphical abstract: AE{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} and AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As) crystallize in two different structures-Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Eu{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}, Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}P{sub 4}, Sr{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}As{sub 4}, are isotypic with the previously reported Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} (space group C2/c (No. 15)), while Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} adopt a different structure known for Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} (space group Pnma (No. 62). The polyanions in both structures are made up of TrPn{sub 4} tetrahedra, which by sharing common corners and edges, form {sup 2}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-}layers in the former and {sup 1}{sub {infinity}}[TrPn{sub 2}]{sub 3-} chains in Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AE{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Pn{sub 4} (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Pn=P, As) are new ternary pnictides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}P{sub 4} and Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} adopt the Na{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4} structure type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Sr- and Ca-compounds crystallize with the Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}As{sub 4} structure type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The valence electron count for all title compounds follows the Zintl-Klemm rules.

  7. Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Spectroscopic Study of Band Offsets and Interface Self-cleaning by Atomic Layer Deposited HfO2 on In0.53Ga0.47As and In0.52Al0.48As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu; /SLAC, SSRL; Chen, P.T.; Sun, Y.; Goel, N.; Majhi, P.; Garner, M; Tsai, W.; Pianetta, P.; Nishi, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2008-10-31

    The Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Spectroscopic (SRPES) study was conducted to (a) investigate the surface chemistry of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As post chemical and thermal treatments, (b) construct band diagram and (c) investigate the interface property of HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As. Dilute HCl and HF etch remove native oxides on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.47}As, whereas in-situ vacuum annealing removes surface arsenic pile-up. After the atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2}, native oxides were considerably reduced compared to that in as-received epi-layers, strongly suggesting the self-clean mechanism. Valence and conduction band offsets are measured to be 3.37 {+-} 0.1eV, 1.80 {+-} 0.3eV for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and 3.00 {+-} 0.1eV, 1.47 {+-} 0.3eV for In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.47}As, respectively.

  8. Reduction of leakage current in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors using AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} confinement layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Cheng-Ying Lee, Sanghoon; Cohen-Elias, Doron; Law, Jeremy J. M.; Carter, Andrew D.; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Chobpattana, Varistha; Stemmer, Susanne; Gossard, Arthur C.; Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106

    2013-11-11

    We compare the DC characteristics of planar In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As channel MOSFETs using AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} barriers to similar MOSFETs using In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barriers. AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44}, with ?1.0?eV conduction-band offset to In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, improves electron confinement within the channel. At gate lengths below 100?nm and V{sub DS}?=?0.5?V, the MOSFETs with AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} barriers show steeper subthreshold swing (SS) and reduced drain-source leakage current. We attribute the greater leakage observed with the In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barrier to thermionic emission from the N?+?In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As source over the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As heterointerface. A 56?nm gate length device with the AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} barrier exhibits 1.96 mS/?m peak transconductance and SS?=?134?mV/dec at V{sub DS}?=?0.5?V.

  9. NERSC at SC11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncriefB O N1 NERSC at SC11 October

  10. NERSC at SC13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncriefB O N1 NERSC at SC11 October3

  11. SC e-journals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT4.F..2.SCSC Logos AboutSC

  12. Analysis of Stripping to Quasibound Levels in Sc-41 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngblood, David H.; Kozub, R. L.; Kenefick, R. A.; Hiebert, John C.

    1970-01-01

    . Percy. W. Hauser and H. Feshbach, Phys. Rev. 87, 366 (1952). B. M. Drisko (unpubliShed. P. H. Stelson and L. Grodzins, Nucl. Data Al, 21 (1965). PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 2, NUMBER 2 AUGUST 1970 Analysis of Stripping to Quasibound Levels in 4'Sc~ D...) Sc reaction at 40-MeV bombarding energy. Distorted-wave Born-approximation calculations for the proton unstable excited states quasibound by the Coulomb and centrifugal barrier were performed using a form factor corresponding to an unbound...

  13. NERSC Training at SC11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving Basic NERSC Training at SC11 SC11Logo NERSC

  14. NERSC Training at SC12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving Basic NERSC Training at SC11 SC11Logo NERSC

  15. High intensity low temperature (HILT) performance of space concentrator GaInP/GaInAs/Ge MJ SCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvarts, Maxim Z., E-mail: shvarts@scell.ioffe.ru; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay A.; Mintairov, Sergey A.; Soluyanov, Andrei A.; Timoshina, Nailya Kh. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya str., St.-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Gudovskikh, Alexander S. [Saint-Petersburg Academic University - Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Luque, Antonio [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya str., St.-Petersburg, 194021, Russia and Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    In the work, the results of an investigation of GaInP/GaInAs/Ge MJ SCs intended for converting concentrated solar radiation, when operating at low temperatures (down to ?190 °C) are presented. A kink of the cell I-V characteristic has been observed in the region close to V{sub oc} starting from ?20°C at operation under concentrated sunlight. The causes for its occurrence have been analyzed and the reasons for formation of a built-in potential barrier for majority charge carriers at the n-GaInP/n-Ge isotype hetero-interface are discussed. The effect of charge carrier transport in n-GaInP/n-pGe heterostructures on MJ SC output characteristics at low temperatures has been studied including EL technique.

  16. Engineering Al-based Thin Film Materials for Power Devices and Energy Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perng, Ya-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    of Nitride Semiconductors and Devices: Materials Properties,semiconductor electronic devices. AlN, possessing similar material propertiessemiconductors, SiC and AlGaN/GaN. Due to the differences in material properties,

  17. Integrated Circuit Implementation for a GaN HFETs Driver Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, Jason D.

    @engr.sc.edu Abstract- The paper presents the design of an integrated circuit (IC) for a 10MHz low power-loss driver exploit the advantages of GaN devices, such as superior switching speed and operation in high-power the authors focus on the design of the IC and present preliminary results and considerations. The driver

  18. A hole accelerator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Zhu, Binbin; Zhang, Yiping; Lu, Shunpeng; Zhang, Xueliang; Hasanov, Namig; Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Demir, Hilmi Volkan, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-10-13

    The quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been significantly limited by the insufficient hole injection, and this is caused by the inefficient p-type doping and the low hole mobility. The low hole mobility makes the holes less energetic, which hinders the hole injection into the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) especially when a p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) is adopted. In this work, we report a hole accelerator to accelerate the holes so that the holes can obtain adequate kinetic energy, travel across the p-type EBL, and then enter the MQWs more efficiently and smoothly. In addition to the numerical study, the effectiveness of the hole accelerator is experimentally shown through achieving improved optical output power and reduced efficiency droop for the proposed InGaN/GaN LED.

  19. p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode driven by three-dimensional hole gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Tiam Tan, Swee; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Ju, Zhengang; Zhang, Xueliang [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore) [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey); Department of Physics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey)

    2013-12-23

    Here, GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N heterostructures with a graded AlN composition, completely lacking external p-doping, are designed and grown using metal-organic-chemical-vapour deposition (MOCVD) system to realize three-dimensional hole gas (3DHG). The existence of the 3DHG is confirmed by capacitance-voltage measurements. Based on this design, a p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) driven by the 3DHG is proposed and grown using MOCVD. The electroluminescence, which is attributed to the radiative recombination of injected electrons and holes in InGaN/GaN quantum wells, is observed from the fabricated p-doping-free devices. These results suggest that the 3DHG can be an alternative hole source for InGaN/GaN LEDs besides common Mg dopants.

  20. Low-frequency noise in GaNAlGaN heterostructure field-effect transistors at cryogenic temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Nezih

    that the 1/f noise in GaN/AlGaN HFETs might be caused by electron tunneling from the channel to the traps was practically independent of the frequency of analysis. The model linking this maximum to the electron tunneling Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering and Center for Integrated Electronics

  1. Development of GaAs/Si and GaAs/Si monolithic structures for future space solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitzer, M.B.; Vernon, S.M.; Wolfson, R.G.; Tobin, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs and GaAlAs directly on Si are presented, and applications to new cell structures are suggested. The novel feature is the elimination of a Ge lattice transition region. This feature not only reduces the cost of substrate preparation, but also makes possible the fabrication of high efficiency monolithic cascade structures. All films to be discussed were grown by organometallic chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. This process yielded reproducible, large-area films of GaAs, grown directly on Si, that are tightly adherent and smooth, and are characterized by a defect density of 5 x 10(6) power/sq cm. Preliminary studies indicate that GaAlAs can also be grown in this way. A number of promising applications are suggested. Certainly these substrates are ideal for low-weight GaAs space solar ells. For very high efficiency, the absence of Ge makes the technology attractive for GaAlAs/Si monolithic cascades, in which the Si substrates would first be provided with a suitable p/n junction. An evaluation of a three bandgap cascade consisting of appropriately designed GaAlAs/GaAs/Si layers is also presented.

  2. SC11 Education Program Applications due July 31

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SC11 Education Program Applications due July 31 SC11 Education Program Applications due July 31 June 9, 2011 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) Applications for the Education...

  3. Room-temperature elastic constants of Sc and ScD[sub 0. 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisure, R.G. ); Schwarz, R.B.; Migliori, A.; Lei, M. )

    1993-07-01

    The complete set of elastic constants for Sc and ScD[sub 0.18] has been measured at room temperature. The results show that the addition of hydrogen to this rare-earth metal has a qualitatively different effect than the addition of hydrogen to transition metals such as palladium, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum. In the case of Sc all five elastic constants increase with the addition of hydrogen. The bulk modulus for ScD[sub 0.18] is 9.5% higher than that for Sc. The Debye temperature computed from the room-temperature elastic constants is 355 K for Sc and 371 K for ScD[sub 0.18].

  4. Efficiency calculations of thin-film GaAs solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Amano, C.

    1985-11-01

    Dislocation effect upon the efficiency of single-crystal thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cells on Si substrates is analyzed. Solar-cell properties are calculated based on a simple model; in the model, dislocations act as recombination centers to reduce the minority-carrier diffusion length in each layer and increase the space-charge layer recombination current. Numerical analysis is also carried out to optimize thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar-cell structures. The fabrication of thin-film AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cells with a practical efficiency larger than 18% on Si substrates appears possible if the dislocation density in the thin-film GaAs layer is less than 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -2/.

  5. SC Correspondence Control Center (SC CCC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT4.F..2.SC Correspondence

  6. Radiation damage of GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nishioka, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    1987-01-15

    1-MeV electron irradiation damages in GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates are examined for the first time. Damage constant for minority-carrier diffusion length in GaAs heteroepitaxial films on Si substrates is found to be the same as that in GaAs homoepitaxial films on GaAs substrates. This agreement suggests that GaAs/Si has the same defect introduction rate with radiation as GaAs/GaAs. The degradation of GaAs solar cells on Si with electron irradiation is less than that of GaAs solar cells on GaAs, because in the present, GaAs films on Si substrates have lower minority-carrier diffusion length compared to GaAs films on GaAs and these films are insensitive to radiation. The p/sup +/-p/sup +/-n AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cell with junction depth of about 0.3 ..mu..m is concluded to be useful for a high-efficiency and radiation-resistant solar cell fabricated on a Si substrate.

  7. Nano-scale luminescence characterization of individual InGaN/GaN quantum wells stacked in a microcavity using scanning transmission electron microscope cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Gordon Müller, Marcus; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Glauser, Marlene; Carlin, Jean-François; Cosendey, Gatien; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    Using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy directly performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope at liquid helium temperatures, the optical and structural properties of a 62 InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well embedded in an AlInN/GaN based microcavity are investigated at the nanometer scale. We are able to spatially resolve a spectral redshift between the individual quantum wells towards the surface. Cathodoluminescence spectral linescans allow directly visualizing the critical layer thickness in the quantum well stack resulting in the onset of plastic relaxation of the strained InGaN/GaN system.

  8. B.Sc.),1995(-M.Sc.)1998( ,Ph.D.)2003( -)2003-2004( , .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 " " " B.Sc.),1995(-M.Sc.)1998( ,Ph.D.)2003( -)2003-2004( , . , ­ ) ,2004 of Technology)2003- 4(.-MIT2004-6 . , - - MIT . -Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture2004-5-MIT-2002(;Honorary Research Fellow, )SWIT(,2001-2004)(;NASA Langley Research Center, NRC Research Associate)2002

  9. B.Sc.)(-M.Sc. )1989,1996.(Ph.D. )2001.( -,.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    " " " B.Sc.)(-M.Sc. )1989,1996.(Ph.D. )2001.( - ,. : - , , . - ,DTM;" Diplome d' Lngeneur)1990( - -Brussels Free University)1995( -Ph.D.)2000( . - )2001-2002( )2002( .-M.S.),1996( .M.S.)1998(-Ph.D.)2001( +) (-CALTECH. - -MIT)2001-2002(, Irvine

  10. Development of epitaxial AlxSc1-xN for artificially structured metal/semiconductor superlattice metamaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sands, Timothy D.; Stach, Eric A.; Saha, Bivas; Saber, Sammy; Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kvam, Eric P.

    2015-02-01

    Epitaxial nitride rocksalt metal/semiconductor superlattices are emerging as a novel class of artificially structured materials that have generated significant interest in recent years for their potential application in plasmonic and thermoelectric devices. Though most nitride metals are rocksalt, nitride semiconductors in general have hexagonal crystal structure. We report rocksalt aluminum scandium nitride (Al,Sc)N alloys as the semiconducting component in epitaxial rocksalt metal/semiconductor superlattices. The AlxSc1-xN alloys when deposited directly on MgO substrates are stabilized in a homogeneous rocksalt (single) phase when x more »the rocksalt phase has been extended to x xSc1-xN alloys show moderate direct bandgap bowing with a bowing parameter, B = 1.41 ± 0.19 eV. The direct bandgap of metastable rocksalt AlN is extrapolated to be 4.70 ± 0.20 eV. The tunable lattice parameter, bandgap, dielectric permittivity, and electronic properties of rocksalt AlxSc1-xN alloys enable high quality epitaxial rocksalt metal/AlxSc1-xN superlattices with a wide range of accessible metamaterials properties.« less

  11. South Carolina State 4-H Congress Clemson University, Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina State 4-H Congress Clemson University, Clemson, SC July 15-18, 2015 The Clemson of Agriculture, South Carolina Counties, Extension Service, Clemson, SC. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative

  12. Improved photoluminescence of InGaAsN,,In...GaAsP quantum well by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy using growth pause annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    for Photonics, Department of Electrical Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin­Madison, 1415 Engineering are the hydride sources of AsH3 and PH3 . The trimethyl precursors of gal- lium Ga , aluminum Al , and indium

  13. Studiengangsbericht fr den Studiengang M.Sc. Chemie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    Studiengangsbericht für den Studiengang M.Sc. Chemie Stand: März 2013 v 5.5 #12;M.Sc. Chemie Stand...........25 #12;M.Sc. Chemie Stand: März 2013 2 TEIL A: Konzeption des Studiengangs Anmerkung: Dieser Teil ist.1.2 Eckdaten zum Studiengang Bezeichnung des Studiengangs: Chemie (Chemistry) Hochschulgrad: M

  14. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Hartwell Lake Reservoir1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 2002 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  15. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 2000 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  16. Fant's Grove Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    requirements during 2002. Since we are only a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water's Grove Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Fant's Grove Water System Clemson, SC 2002 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  17. Outdoor Laboratory Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    2000. Since we are only a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draw its water from the U1 Outdoor Laboratory Water System Clemson, SC 2000 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  18. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 1999 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  19. Outdoor Laboratory Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    1999. Since we are only a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draw its water from the U1 Outdoor Laboratory Water System Clemson, SC 1999 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  20. Fant's Grove Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    requirements during 2001. Since we are only a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U.S. Army Corps1 Fant's Grove Water System Clemson, SC 2001 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  1. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 2001 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  2. Myers et al. Page 1 Use of High Temperature Hydrogen Annealing to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Tom

    , Department of Chemical Engineering West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 J. Alam, Electrical Eng growth of GaN and AlN as well as with thick, "free-standing" layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy in this study were Ga-polar GaN layers grown on (0001) sapphire grown at TDI, Inc. using hydride vapor phase

  3. Hybrid architecture for shallow accumulation mode AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with epitaxial gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Hamilton, A. R.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ritzmann, J.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-01-06

    . P. Kouwenhoven, J. R. Petta, S. Tarucha, and L. M. K. Vandersypen, Rev. Mod. Phys. 79, 1217 (2007). 3M. J. Iqbal, R. Levy, E. J. Koop, J. B. Dekker, J. P. de Jong, J. H. M. van der Velde, D. Reuter, A. D. Wieck, R. Aguado, Y. Meir, and C. H. van der... . Pfeiffer, K. W. West, and C. K. Harnett, Appl. Phys. Lett. 63, 2132 (1993). 19W. Y. Mak, K. D. Gupta, H. E. Beere, I. Farrer, F. Sfigakis, and D. A. Ritchie, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 242107 (2010). 20S. Sarkozy, K. D. Gupta, C. Siegert, A. Ghosh, M. Pepper, I...

  4. Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBarthe Gold-Ionic Liquid Interface. (JournalHEMTs.

  5. Influence of Barrier Design on Current Collapse in High Voltage AlGaN/GaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBarthe Gold-Ionic Liquid Interface.

  6. Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, [approximately] 1 [times] 10[sup 5] cm[sup [minus]5], as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 [times]10[sup 7] cm[sup [minus]2]. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

  7. 2013 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

  8. Bibtexcitationinfo | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301)...

  9. OUT-OF-PLANE SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF SC COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keith Coogler Westinghouse Electric Co. INTRODUCTION Steel-plate composite (SC) structures have been used to expedite construction of the third generation of nuclear power...

  10. Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Sustainability Contact Information Operations Program Management U.S. Department of Energy SC-33Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

  11. RSVP | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Guidelines Award Laureates Ceremony RSVP The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2Germantown...

  12. Databases | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

  13. Reports | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

  14. Links | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

  15. Workshops | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

  16. March | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Links Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

  17. ........... ~sc., T/7b =I NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.· ~sc., T/7b ·=I NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION rmrmmmm ,Acting Chief, Corrmunicati 'TIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION MANNED SPACECRAFT CENTER HOUSTON

  18. Ahmed H. Zewail, 1998 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life ofASCRLight Source (ALS)(SC)

  19. Alan R. Bishop, 1993 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life ofASCRLight Source (ALS)(SC)Alan

  20. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive Committee ALS Users'ALS

  1. InGaAsN Solar Cells with 1.0eV Bandgap, Lattice Matched to GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Banas, J.J.; Gee, J.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Jones, E.D.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1998-11-24

    The design, growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and processing of an In{sub 0.07}Ga{sub 0.93}As{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02} solar Al, with 1.0 ev bandgap, lattice matched to GaAs is described. The hole diffusion length in annealed, n-type InGaAsN is 0.6-0.8 pm, and solar cell internal quantum efficiencies > 70% arc obwined. Optical studies indicate that defects or impurities, from InGAsN doping and nitrogen incorporation, limit solar cell performance.

  2. Spectroscopy of {sup 52,53}Sc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Gelin, M.; Mittig, W.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Poves, A.; Theisen, Ch.

    2009-01-15

    Excited states of neutron-rich odd-A and odd-odd Sc isotopes, populated in deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions, induced by a {sup 238}U beam on a thin {sup 48}Ca target, have been identified. A strong feeding of both yrast and nonyrast states in such a reaction is illustrated using a combination of a large efficiency spectrometer and a {gamma} detector array. The structure of the populated states is interpreted in terms of the role of the valence proton and neutrons and compared to shell model calculations in the full pf shell.

  3. Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Akyol, Fatih; Park, Pil Sung; Esposto, Michele; Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow band gap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In{sub 0.33}Ga{sub 0.67}N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient interband tunneling was achieved close to zero bias with a high current density of 118 A/cm{sup 2} at a reverse bias of 1 V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm{sup 2}. These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

  4. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2004 Annual Water-Quality Report

  5. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112 Clemson, SC 2004 Annual Water-Quality Report

  6. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    2007. Since we are only a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water of the water daily. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2007 Annual Water-Quality Report

  7. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2005 Annual Water-Quality Report

  8. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112 Clemson, SC 2003 Annual Water-Quality Report

  9. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2008 Annual Water-Quality Report

  10. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    2006. Since we are only a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water of the water daily. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2006 Annual Water-Quality Report

  11. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    a distribution system, we do not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier University Water System is supplied by ARJWS, Hartwell Lake Filter Plant which draws its water from the U1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2003 Annual Water-Quality Report

  12. Space time coded code division multiplexing on SC140 DSP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Murali P

    2001-01-01

    is implemented on StarCore's SC140 fixed-point DSP core. The very large instruction word architecture of the SC140 is utilized to efficiently implement space-time coded code-division multiplexing system. The goal is to evaluate the suitability of space-time coded...

  13. Photoluminescence study of the 1.047 eV emission in GaN K. Pressela)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    GaN/ AlGaN blue green light emitting diode, which has a much higher quantum efficiency than the SiC blue light emitting diode, became possible.2 Presently the wide bandgap semi- conductor GaN is intensively. Especially the 1.19 eV is very intense. Thus one can think of developing a light emitting diode in the near

  14. ZnO Nanotubes Grown at Low Temperature Using Ga as Catalysts and Their Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    substantial reports on tubular nanostructures of various materials including GaN,12 MoS2,13 TiO2,14 SiO2,15 AlZnO Nanotubes Grown at Low Temperature Using Ga as Catalysts and Their Enhanced PhotocatalyticVed: April 8, 2009 We report the synthesis of ZnO nanotubes grown via the Ga-catalyzed vapor transport method

  15. Clean Cities Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (GA, AL, SC); Centralina Council of Governments (NC) EV Community Readiness projects: South Florida Regional Planning Council; Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy...

  16. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  17. 2H and 27Al Solid-State NMR Study of the Local Environments in Aldoped 2-Line Ferrihydrite, Goethite, and Lepidocrocite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jongsik; Ilott, Andrew J.; Middlemiss, Derek S.; Chernova, Natasha A.; Pinney, Nathan; Morgan, Dane; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-05-13

    -doped goethite. Two sets of samples were prepared, labeled sets A and B, which differ in the temperature used in their syntheses. Set A, 70 ?C synthesis: to synthesize a series of goethite with 0, 6, 13, and 27 mol % Al substitution (labeled GA0, GA6, GA13... significant fraction occupies the surface sites. The lower temperature synthesis of GB0 (48 vs. 70 ºC) may also promote more vacancy formation. Figure 12. 2H MAS NMR spectra of Al-doped goethite samples, (a) GA0, (b) GA13, and (c) GA27, acquired at 433 K...

  18. AL. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8GE 1A L L'-AL.

  19. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01)19^ U N I TALSALSSpectroscopyALS

  20. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive Committee ALS Users'ALSQuick

  1. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive Committee ALS

  2. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat Pumpsfacility doe logoInIndustry @ ALS

  3. Reviw Al

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003 1990-2016 East CoastReviw Al now ..

  4. Towards Fully Integrated High Temperature Wireless Sensors Using GaN-based HEMT Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Wireless sensors which are capable of working at extreme environments can significantly improve the efficiency and performance of industrial processes by facilitating better control systems. GaN, a widely researched wide bandgap material, has the potential to be used both as a sensing material and to fabricate control electronics, making it a prime candidate for high temperature integrated wireless sensor fabrication. In this paper we are presenting an experimental study on AlGaN/GaN HEMT's performance at higher temperature (up to 300 C). From test results, DC and microwave parameters at different temperatures were extracted.

  5. Atomic imaging of atomic layer deposition oxide nucleation with trimethylaluminum on As-rich InGaAs(001) 2 4 vs Ga/In-rich InGaAs(001) 4 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Atomic imaging of atomic layer deposition oxide nucleation with trimethylaluminum on As-rich In atomic layer deposition Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 042904 (2014); 10.1063/1.4863440 Effective passivation of In0.2Ga0.8As by HfO2 surpassing Al2O3 via in-situ atomic layer deposition Appl. Phys. Lett. 101

  6. Epitaxial growth of aligned AlGalnN nanowires by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Jung (Woodbridge, CT); Su, Jie (New Haven, CT)

    2008-08-05

    Highly ordered and aligned epitaxy of III-Nitride nanowires is demonstrated in this work. <1010> M-axis is identified as a preferential nanowire growth direction through a detailed study of GaN/AlN trunk/branch nanostructures by transmission electron microscopy. Crystallographic selectivity can be used to achieve spatial and orientational control of nanowire growth. Vertically aligned (Al)GaN nanowires are prepared on M-plane AlN substrates. Horizontally ordered nanowires, extending from the M-plane sidewalls of GaN hexagonal mesas or islands demonstrate new opportunities for self-aligned nanowire devices, interconnects, and networks.

  7. The use of short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices in blue-region light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizov, V. S., E-mail: vsizov@mail.ioffe.ru; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Sakharov, A. V.; Lundin, W. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Cherkashin, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Hytch, M. J. [National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (CEMES) (France); Nikolaev, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Mintairov, A. M.; He Yan; Merz, J. L. [University of Notre Dame, EE Department (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Optical and light-emitting diode structures with an active InGaN region containing short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices are studied. It is shown that short-period superlattices are thin two-dimensional layers with a relatively low In content that contain inclusions with a high In content 1-3 nm thick. Inclusions manifest themselves from the point of view of optical properties as a nonuniform array of quantum dots involved in a residual quantum well. The use of short-period superlattices in light-emitting diode structures allows one to decrease the concentration of nonradiative centers, as well as to increase the injection of carriers in the active region due to an increase in the effective height of the AlGaN barrier, which in general leads to an increase in the quantum efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  8. Award Search | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E:...

  9. Award Search | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E:...

  10. Award Search | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E:...

  11. Award Search | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E:...

  12. Award Search | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E:...

  13. Award Search | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Small Business Technology Transfer U.S. Department of Energy SC-29Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5707 F: (301) 903-5488 E:...

  14. Contacts | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    with the national laboratories under SC stewardship on honing pitches to national media. Web Manager Dean Pettersson Phone: 202-287-6991 Email: dean.pettersson@science.doe.gov Dean...

  15. Thermoelectric Transport in a ZrN/ScN Superlattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    at Springerlink.com Thermoelectric Transport in a ZrN/ScNthe potential for a high thermoelectric ?gure of merit. Theexperimental studies of the thermoelectric transport in ZrN/

  16. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  17. GaAs MOEMS Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPAHN, OLGA B.; GROSSETETE, GRANT D.; CICH, MICHAEL J.; TIGGES, CHRIS P.; RENO, JOHN L.; PEAKE, GREGORY M.; KLEM, JOHN F.; LEAN, JEN; FULLER, CHARLES T.; BURKHART, JEFF; BAUER, THOMAS; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.

    2003-03-01

    Many MEMS-based components require optical monitoring techniques using optoelectronic devices for converting mechanical position information into useful electronic signals. While the constituent piece-parts of such hybrid opto-MEMS components can be separately optimized, the resulting component performance, size, ruggedness and cost are substantially compromised due to assembly and packaging limitations. GaAs MOEMS offers the possibility of monolithically integrating high-performance optoelectronics with simple mechanical structures built in very low-stress epitaxial layers with a resulting component performance determined only by GaAs microfabrication technology limitations. GaAs MOEMS implicitly integrates the capability for radiation-hardened optical communications into the MEMS sensor or actuator component, a vital step towards rugged integrated autonomous microsystems that sense, act, and communicate. This project establishes a new foundational technology that monolithically combines GaAs optoelectronics with simple mechanics. Critical process issues addressed include selectivity, electrochemical characteristics, and anisotropy of the release chemistry, and post-release drying and coating processes. Several types of devices incorporating this novel technology are demonstrated.

  18. Polarization self-screening in [0001] oriented InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes for improving the electron injection efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Kyaw, Zabu; Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-23

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the [0001] orientation inherit very strong polarization induced electric fields. This results in a reduced effective conduction band barrier height for the p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) and makes the electron blocking effect relatively ineffective and the electron injection efficiency drops. Here, we show the concept of polarization self-screening for improving the electron injection efficiency. In this work, the proposed polarization self-screening effect was studied and proven through growing a p-type EBL with AlN composition partially graded along the [0001] orientation, which induces the bulk polarization charges. These bulk polarization charges are utilized to effectively self-screen the positive polarization induced interface charges located at the interface between the EBL and the last quantum barrier when designed properly. Using this approach, the electron leakage is suppressed and the LED performance is enhanced significantly.

  19. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  20. Lithospheric petrology of the eastern Arabian Plate: Constraints from Al-Ashkhara (Oman) xenoliths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    and basanite igneous activity. Nd model ages for the spinel peridotite xenoliths range between 0.59 and 0.65 Ga brought to the surface by volcanic eruptions (Griffin and O'Reilly, 1987; Rudnick et al., 1986; Zhou et al and isotopic composition and thermal state of the upper mantle (e.g. Eggins et al., 1998; Griffin and O

  1. Connect with SC | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2budget/about/jobs/ BelowCommunityConnect with SC

  2. SC FPD 360 Mentoring | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports andRobert N. Thorn, 1967RulonS&SS.SC

  3. SC In Your State | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNews Archives NewsSC In Your State

  4. SC Federal Project Directors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT4.F..2.SC

  5. Computational analysis of thin film InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Computational analysis of thin film InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells with back side light, Austin, TX 78758, USA * ety@ece.utexas.edu Abstract: Simulations of thin film (~2.5 µm thick) InGaAs/GaAs. Roberts, G. Hill, and C. Calder, "Progress in quantum well solar cells," Thin Solid Films 511­512, 76

  6. GaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    into existing multijunction cells either as a means to increase the current or efficiency by using low band gapGaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response R. B infrared spectral response of GaAs-based solar cells that incorporate type II GaSb quantum dots QDs formed

  7. Gate-control efficiency and interface state density evaluated from capacitance-frequency-temperature mapping for GaN-based metal-insulator-semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Hong-An; Kudo, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshi-kazu

    2014-11-14

    We present an analysis method for GaN-based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices by using capacitance-frequency-temperature (C-f-T) mapping to evaluate the gate-control efficiency and the interface state density, both exhibiting correlations with the linear-region intrinsic transconductance. The effectiveness of the method was exemplified by application to AlN/AlGaN/GaN MIS devices to elucidate the properties of AlN-AlGaN interfaces depending on their formation processes. Using the C-f-T mapping, we extract the gate-bias-dependent activation energy with its derivative giving the gate-control efficiency, from which we evaluate the AlN-AlGaN interface state density through the Lehovec equivalent circuit in the DC limit. It is shown that the gate-control efficiency and the interface state density have correlations with the linear-region intrinsic transconductance, all depending on the interface formation processes. In addition, we give characterization of the AlN-AlGaN interfaces by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in relation with the results of the analysis.

  8. Low resistance ohmic contacts on wide band-gap GaN M. E. Lin, Z. Ma, F. Y. Huang, Z. F. Fan, L. H. Allen, and H. MorkoG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    -beam evaporation onto the GaN substrate, and then thermally annealed in a temperature range from 500 to 900 "C as high temperature/high power electrical devices, there still remains much more work to be done on GaN epilayers, Foresi et aL6 used Al and Au contacts with 575 "C anneal cycle. However, the specific

  9. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  10. IP ADDRESS HOSTNAME MACHINE TYPE 129.252.130.106 canopus.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, Jason D.

    IP ADDRESS HOSTNAME MACHINE TYPE 129.252.130.106 canopus.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.107 deneb.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.108 glensh.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.111 menkar.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.112 nunki.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.113 pollux.cse.sc.edu # SUN

  11. GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ? 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

  12. NAZIFE ERKURSUN After my B.Sc. at Dokuz Eylul University (9 September University), Turkey, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAZIFE ERKURS¸UN After my B.Sc. at Dokuz Eyl¨ul University (9 September University), Turkey, and my M.Sc. at Middle East Technical University, Turkey studies, I was admitted in a Ph.D. program

  13. Distribution List: For Action: Joseph A. McBrearty, SC-3 John...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SC-OR Patricia Schuneman, SC-CH Jeffrey C. Armstrong, SR David Hess, EMCBC Diane Snow, CBFO Michael Adams, NE-ID Kelly Gele, FE-4451 Department of Energy M&O CONTRACTOR...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 09 Lehman final 1003 SC PM Workshop |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9 Lehman final 1003 SC PM Workshop More Documents & Publications SC Introduction to Risk Management Audit Report: IG-0532 Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1045Peer Reviews PanelLehman...

  15. EA-387 Energia Renovable S.C., LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energia Renovable S.C., LLC EA-387 Energia Renovable S.C., LLC Order authorizing Energia Renovable to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-387 Energia Renovable (MX).pdf More...

  16. Second harmonic generation in photonic crystal cavities in (111)-oriented GaAs Sonia Buckley, Marina Radulaski, Klaus Biermann, and Jelena Vukovi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    . III-V semi- conductors also allow integration of active gain media such as quantum dots or quantum-V semiconductors such as GaAs, GaP, and InP, as these materi- als have a very high second order nonlinearity

  17. In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on GaAs using trimethyaluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on Ga 26 June 2008; published online 21 July 2008 In situ atomic-layer deposition ALD of Al2O3 on p­4 Recently, many ex situ methods such as atomic-layer deposition ALD of high-k on GaAs have achieved success

  18. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  19. Structure, transport and thermal properties of UCoGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purwanto, A.; Robinson, R.A.; Prokes, K.

    1994-04-01

    By means of neutron powder diffraction, we find that UCoGa crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAl structure and orders ferromagnetically at low temperatures with magnetic moments stacked along the c axis. The magnetic-ordering temperature is reflected in anomalies in the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivity and the specific heat at Tc = 47 K. Furthermore, the strong anisotropy in the electrical resistivity for i {parallel} c and i {perpendicular} c indicates a significant contribution of the magnetic anisotropy to the electrical resistivity.

  20. Experience with OpenMP for MADX-SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Imperio, Nicholas; Montag, Christophe; Yu, Kwangmin; Kapin, Valery; McIntosh, Eric; Renshall, Harry; Schmidt, Frank

    2014-07-01

    MADX-SC allows the treatment of frozen space charge using beam-beam elements in a thin lattice, i.e. one can take advantage of the standard set-up of MAD-X lattices without the need for specialized codes for the space-charge (SC) evaluation. The idea is to simulate over many turns without the problem of noise as in the PIC SC codes. For the examples under study, like the PS and RHIC, it would be desirable to simulate up to 1 million turns or more. To this end one had to make an effort to optimize the scalar speed and, most importantly, get a speed-up of approximately a factor of 5 using OpenMP.

  1. Electrical properties of Er-doped In0.53Ga0.47As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Peter G.; Lu, Hong; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Gossard, Arthur G.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-01-01

    03C117-3 Burke et al. : Electrical properties of Er-doped InElectrical properties of Er-doped In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As PeterBahk and John E. Bowers Electrical and Computer Engineering

  2. Cu(In,Ga)Se2based Photovoltaics: Challenges and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2­based Photovoltaics: Challenges and Opportunities William Shafarman Institute of Energy Conversion University of Delaware #12;Thin Film Photovoltaics Potential for low cost PV using a Thickness K.Kim, et al., IEEE J. Photovoltaics, 3, 446 (2013). 2 µm, 60 min reaction 1 µm, 25 min reaction 0

  3. Materials Data on CaScAlSiO6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the k·p method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 Å. The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 Å GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  5. Magnetism and transport properties of epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films on GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong Anh Tuan; Shin, Yooleemi; Cho, Sunglae; Dang Duc Dung; Vo Thanh Son

    2012-04-01

    Epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films in disordered bcc {alpha}-Fe crystal structure (A2) have been grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The saturated magnetization (M{sub S}) decreased from 1371 to 1105 kA/m with increasing Ga concentration from 10.5 to 24.3 % at room temperature. The lattice parameter increased with the increase in Ga content because of the larger atomic radius of Ga atom than that of Fe. The increase in carrier density with Ga content caused in lower resistivity.

  6. Utah Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)Utah Regions National

  7. Utah Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)Utah Regions

  8. Vermont Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)Utah RegionsVermont

  9. Vermont Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)Utah

  10. Virginia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)UtahVirginia Regions

  11. Virginia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)UtahVirginia

  12. Washington Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science (SC)UtahVirginiaDCRegions

  13. Catalysis | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn, 1969CALCD Energy(SC)(SC)

  14. CITI Technical Report 01-6 SC-CFS: Smartcard Secured Cryptographic File System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honeyman, Peter

    CITI Technical Report 01-6 SC-CFS: Smartcard Secured Cryptographic File System Naomaru Itoi Center;le system, are not perfect against these attacks. We have developed SC-CFS, a #12;le system that encrypts #12;les and takes advantage of a smartcard for per-#12;le key generation. SC-CFS counters password

  15. GaN nanowires show more 3D piezoelectricity than bulk GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    director cds murder nudity soundtrack BBC movie releases footage worth documentary film Blu-rays Blu-ray Ga

  16. ISSN 1670-8539 M.Sc. PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    ISSN 1670-8539 M.Sc. PROJECT REPORT Andri Mar Björgvinsson Master of Science Computer Science May;#12;Project Report Committee: Björn Þór Jónsson, Supervisor Associate Professor, Reykjavík University, Iceland, University of Iceland, Iceland Project report submitted to the School of Computer Science at Reykjavík

  17. ISSN 1670-8539 M.Sc. PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    ISSN 1670-8539 M.Sc. PROJECT REPORT Þór Sigurðsson Master of Science Computer Science May 2011 ENSEMBLE FORECASTS #12;#12;Project Report Committee: Ari Kristinn Jónsson, Supervisor Rector, Reykjavik, Reykjavik University Project report submitted to the School of Computer Science at Reykjavík University

  18. CN/2011/SC/IHP/PI/2 Sediment Issues & Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    CN/2011/SC/IHP/PI/2 #12;Sediment Issues & Sediment Management in Large River Basins Interim Case Study Synthesis Report International Sediment Initiative Technical Documents in Hydrology UNESCO Office Sediment Initiative Core Group - Members: o Prof. Desmond Walling o Prof. Manfred Spreafico o Prof. Hu

  19. DOE/SC-0060 U. S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severeDOE/SC-0060 U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science September, 2002 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee A BURNING PLASMA PROGRAM STRATEGY TO ADVANCE FUSION ENERGY #12;1 Report of the FESAC

  20. Statistische Software (R) Paul Fink, M.Sc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattaneo, Marco

    Statistische Software (R) Paul Fink, M.Sc. Institut für Statistik Ludwig Mathematics Computation 1900 1950 2000 ?Theory Methodology Paul Fink: Statistische Software (R) SoSe 2015 2, · und Computer verwenden, um Daten zu analysieren. Paul Fink: Statistische Software (R) SoSe 2015 3

  1. M.Sc. Thesis Master of Science in Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M.Sc. Thesis Master of Science in Engineering SensibleJournal 2014: A Mobile Life-logging System (English) This text presents a mobile life-logging application called SensibleJournal 2014, which (Danish) Denne afhandling præsenterer en life-logging mobil-app kaldet SensibleJournal 2014, der

  2. Economics Engineering (B.Sc.) Summer Term 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Oliver

    Economics Engineering (B.Sc.) Summer Term 2015 Short version Date: 26.02.2015 Department of Economics and Management KIT - University of the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and National Research Center of the Helmholtz Association www.kit.edu #12;Publisher: Department of Economics and Management Karlsruhe Institute

  3. Economics Engineering (M.Sc.) Summer Term 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Oliver

    Economics Engineering (M.Sc.) Summer Term 2015 Short version Date: 26.02.2015 Department of Economics and Management KIT - University of the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and National Research Center of the Helmholtz Association www.kit.edu #12;Publisher: Department of Economics and Management Karlsruhe Institute

  4. Economics Engineering (M.Sc.) Summer Term 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Oliver

    Economics Engineering (M.Sc.) Summer Term 2015 Long version Date: 26.02.2015 Department of Economics and Management KIT - University of the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and National Research Center of the Helmholtz Association www.kit.edu #12;Publisher: Department of Economics and Management Karlsruhe Institute

  5. Economics Engineering (B.Sc.) Summer Term 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Oliver

    Economics Engineering (B.Sc.) Summer Term 2015 Long version Date: 26.02.2015 Department of Economics and Management KIT - University of the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and National Research Center of the Helmholtz Association www.kit.edu #12;Publisher: Department of Economics and Management Karlsruhe Institute

  6. ALS User Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS User Meeting Print web banner ALS User Meeting: October 5-7, 2015 Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting...

  7. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  8. Spontaneous emission in GaN/InGaN photonic crystal nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Sigalas, "InGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure light-emitting diodes employing photonic crystal, "III-nitride blue and ultraviolet photonic crystal light emitting diodes," Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 466, and H. Benisty, "Photonic-crystal GaN light-emitting diodes with tailored guided modes distribution

  9. Role of Ce4+ in the scintillation mechanism of codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12:Ce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12?Ce?(GGAG?Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-level diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.

  10. Effect of arsenic on the optical properties of GaSb-based type II quantum wells with quaternary GaInAsSb layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janiak, F. Motyka, M.; S?k, G.; Dyksik, M.; Ryczko, K.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Patriarche, G.

    2013-12-14

    Optical properties of molecular beam epitaxially grown type II “W” shaped GaSb/AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb/GaSb quantum wells (QWs) designed for the active region of interband cascade lasers have been investigated. Temperature dependence of Fourier-transformed photoluminescence and photoreflectance was employed to probe the effects of addition of arsenic into the original ternary valence band well of GaInSb. It is revealed that adding arsenic provides an additional degree of freedom in terms of band alignment and strain tailoring and allows enhancing the oscillator strength of the active type II transition. On the other hand, however, arsenic incorporation apparently also affects the structural and optical material quality via generating carrier trapping states at the interfaces, which can deteriorate the radiative efficiency. These have been evidenced in several spectroscopic features and are also confirmed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images. While arsenic incorporation into type II QWs is a powerful heterostructure engineering tool for optoelectronic devices, a compromise has to be found between ideal band structure properties and high quality morphological properties.

  11. Optimising GaN (1122) hetero-epitaxial templates grown on (1010) sapphire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pristovsek, Markus; Frentrup, Martin; Han, Yisong; Humphreys, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    N (112¯2) hetero-epitaxial templates grown on (101¯0) sapphire process was monitored with a two wavelength Laytec EpiTT reflectometer. Two different approaches have been used for the initial GaN buffer. One is a nucleation of GaN islands which were... annealed and overgrown. This approach is described in [2]. The other approach is AlN nucle- ation, which is performed at 5 kPa reactor pressure with a total flow of 21.7 litres/minute. First the re- actor is heated to 1060?C under hydrogen flow and 150 Pa...

  12. High excitation power photoluminescence studies of ultra-low density GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnenberg, D.; Graf, A.; Paulava, V.; Heyn, Ch.; Hansen, W. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Zentrum für Mikrostrukturforschung, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    We fabricate GaAs epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) by filling of self-organized nanoholes in AlGaAs. The QDs are fabricated under optimized process conditions and have ultra-low density in the 10{sup 6} cm{sup ?2} regime. At low excitation power the optical emission of single QDs exhibit sharp excitonic lines, which are attributed to the recombination of excitonic and biexcitonic states. High excitation power measurements reveal surprisingly broad emission lines from at least six QD shell states.

  13. Fig. 1: (a) TEM image of InAs HEMT fabricated in Ref. [4]. The device region enclosed in the dotted white rectangle is included in the simulation domain. (b) Schematic view of the InAs HEMT. The channel region is composed of a 10 nm InGaAs/InAs/InGaAs Mul

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    in the dotted white rectangle is included in the simulation domain. (b) Schematic view of the InAs HEMT. The channel region is composed of a 10 nm InGaAs/InAs/InGaAs Multi-Quantum-Well grown on a thick In0.52Al0.48As layer lattice-matched to the InP substrate. In0.52Al0.48As layer below the gate contact acts

  14. Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 5} cm{sup {minus}5}, as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 {times}10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}2}. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

  15. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  16. Scientific Achievement Networks of highly photoresponsive crystalline GaSe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B.

    Scientific Achievement Networks of highly photoresponsive crystalline GaSe nanosheets a crystalline GaSe target was adjusted to directly grow networks of interconnected triangular GaSe crystalline nanosheets of ~ 200 nm size (inset shows atomic

  17. ErAs : InGaAs/InGaAlAs superlattice thin-film power generator array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Si Superlattice Power Generators, Clemson University Press,of superlattice property, generator and packaging design, andifference drop across the generator up to 33 K and the

  18. ErAs : InGaAs/InGaAlAs superlattice thin-film power generator array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    semiconductor superlattice struc- ture provides an attractive way for the enhancement of the material thermoelectric properties.

  19. Thin film GaAs solar cells on glass substrates by epitaxial liftoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, X.Y.; Goertemiller, M.; Boroditsky, M.; Ragan, R.; Yablonovitch, E.

    1997-02-01

    In this work, we describe the fabrication and operating characteristics of GaAs/AlGaAs thin film solar cells processed by the epitaxial liftoff (ELO) technique. This technique allows the transfer of these cells onto glass substrates. The performance of the lifted-off solar cell is demonstrated by means of electrical measurements under both dark and illuminated conditions. We have also optimized the light trapping conditions in this direct-gap material. The results show that good solar absorption is possible in active layers as thin as 0.32 {mu}m. In such a thin solar cell, the open circuit voltage would be enhanced. We believe that the combination of an epitaxial liftoff thin GaAs film, and nano-texturing can lead to record breaking performance. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Growth and properties of crystalline barium oxide on the GaAs(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasir, M.; Dahl, J.; Lång, J.; Tuominen, M.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P., E-mail: pekka.laukkanen@utu.fi; Kokko, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kuzmin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Polojärvi, V.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)] [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2013-11-04

    Growing a crystalline oxide film on III-V semiconductor renders possible approaches to improve operation of electronics and optoelectronics heterostructures such as oxide/semiconductor junctions for transistors and window layers for solar cells. We demonstrate the growth of crystalline barium oxide (BaO) on GaAs(100) at low temperatures, even down to room temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements reveal that the amount of interface defects is reduced for BaO/GaAs, compared to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs, suggesting that BaO is a useful buffer layer to passivate the surface of the III-V device material. PL and photoemission data show that the produced junction tolerates the post heating around 600?°C.

  1. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  2. Luminescence Properties of ScPO{sub 4} Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, L.A.; Trukhin, A.N.

    1999-08-16

    Flux-grown ScPO{sub 4} single crystals exhibit a number of luminescence bands in their x-ray-excited luminescence spectra - including sharp lines arising from rare-earth elements plus a number of broad bands at 5.6 cV, 4.4 eV, and 3 eV. The band at 5.6 eV was attributed to a self-trapped exciton (STE) [l], and it could be excited at 7 eV and higher energies. This luminescence is strongly polarized (P = 70 %) along the optical axes of the crystal and exhibits a kinetic decay time constant that varies from several ns at room temperature to {approximately}10 {micro}s at 60 K and up to {approximately}1 ms at 10 K. It is assumed that the STE is localized on the SC ions. The band at 3 eV can be excited in the range of the ScPO{sub 4} crystal transparency (decay time = 3 to 4 {micro}s.) This band is attributed to a lead impurity that creates different luminescence centers. At high temperatures, the band at 4.4 eV is dominant in the x-ray-excited TSL and afterglow spectra. Its intensity increases with irradiation time beginning at zero at the initial irradiation time. The 4.4 eV band does not appear in a fast process under a pulsed electron beam, showing that accumulation is necessary for its observation. A sample of ScPO{sub 4} doped with vanadium exhibited a prevalent band at 4.4 eV at T = 480 K.

  3. Improved input and output couplers for SC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Latina, A.; Lunin, A.; Poloubotko, V.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Different couplers are described that allow the reduction of both transverse wake potential and RF kick in the SC acceleration structure of ILC. A simple rotation of the couplers reducing the RF kick and transverse wake kick is discussed for both the main linac and bunch compressors, along with possible limitations of this method. Designs of a coupler unit are presented which preserve axial symmetry of the structure, and provide reduced both the RF kick and transverse wake field.

  4. OUT-OF-PLANE SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF SC COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovember 2014Marketing2014) |D D O TECHNOLOGIES FOR SC WALLS

  5. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; Worschech, L.; Gru?tzmacher, D.

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  6. Conductivity and structure of ErAs nanoparticles embedded in GaAs pn junctions analyzed via conductive atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    in III-V semiconductors J. Appl. Phys. 111, 103706 (2012) Role of surface trap states on two-dimensional electron gas density in InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructures Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 152116 (2012) Free carrier studies of macroscopic tunnel junctions. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10

  7. Ohmic contacts to n-GaSb 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhengchong

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, the Ill-V semiconductor GaSb and its ternary alloys containing antimony have exhibited interesting electrical and optical properties for device applications which include negative resistance tunnel devices, lasers, detectors and FET...

  8. Beta decay of Ga-62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, BC; Iacob, VE; Azhari, A.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Hardy, John C.; Mayes, VE; Neilson, RG; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    . 73, 396 ~1994!. @7# J.C. Hardy, and I.S. Towner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 252501 ~2002!. @8# J.C. Hardy and I.S. Towner, Eur. Phys. J. A 15, 223 ~2002!. @9# C.N. Davids, C.A. Gagliardi, M.J. Murphy, and E.B. Norman, 015501- daughter 62Zn have been..., 1463 ~1979!. @10# F. Herfurth et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 15, 17 ~2002!. @11# R. Chiba, S. Shibasaki, T. Numao, H. Yokota, S. Yamada, K. Kotajima, S. Itagaki, S. Iwasaki, T. Takeda, and T. Shinozuka, Phys. Rev. C 17, 2219 ~1978!. @12# D.E. Alburger...

  9. Temperature-Dependence of Exciton Radiative Recombination in (Al,Ga)N/GaN Quantum Wells Grown on a-Plane GaN Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corfdir, Pierre; Dussaigne, Amélie; Teisseyre, Henryk; Suski, Tadeusz; Grzegory, Izabella; Lefebvre, Pierre; Giraud, Etienne; Shahmohammadi, Mehran; Phillips, Richard; Ganière, Jean-Daniel; Grandjean, Nicolas; Deveaud, Benoît

    -Daniel Ganiere1, Nicolas Grandjean1, and Beno?ˆt Deveaud1 1Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Fe´de´rale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland 2Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, CB3 0HE Cambridge, United Kingdom 3Institute... of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-142 Warsaw, Poland 4Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw, Poland 5CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR5221, 34095 Montpellier, France E-mail: pmc53@cam.ac.uk Received...

  10. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Mandal, Krishna C. (Ashland, MA)

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  11. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  12. Supercomputing on a Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    beyond 100 GPUs." SC'11 Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Article No. 70 (2011). DOI: 10.1145...

  13. Final Report: DOE Project: DE-SC-0005399 Linking the uncertainty...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Report: DOE Project: DE-SC-0005399 Linking the uncertainty of low frequency variability in tropical forcing in regional climate change Citation Details In-Document Search...

  14. Dr. Daniel A. Hitchcock | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Links Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

  15. DOE Applied Math Summit | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Links Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

  16. ASCR News INCITE | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Links Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

  17. Other Participants 1995 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:...

  18. Other Participants 1997 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:...

  19. Other Participants 2002 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    School, Aurora, CO South Aiken High School , Aiken , SC Southside High School , Fort Smith , AR St. Croix Country Day School , Kingshill, VI Stockdale High School , Bakersfield...

  20. Other Participants 2000 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Paul M. Dorman High School , Spartanburgh , SC Punahou Academic High School , Honolulu , HI Reno High School , Reno , NV Shawnee Mission South High School , Shawnee Mission , KS...

  1. Other Participants 1993 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:...

  2. GaAs micro-pyramids serving as optical micro-cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl, M.; Beck, T.; Li, S.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M.

    2010-01-04

    An efficient light-matter coupling requires high-quality (Q) micro-cavities with small mode volume. We suggest GaAs micro-pyramids placed on top of AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors to be promising candidates. The pyramids were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy, electron-beam lithography and a subsequent wet-chemical etching process using a sacrificial AlAs layer. Measured Q-factors of optical modes in single pyramids reach values up to 650. A finite-difference time-domain simulation assuming a simplified cone-shaped geometry suggests possible Q-factors up to 3600. To enhance the light confinement in the micro-pyramids we intend to overgrow the pyramidal facets with a Bragg mirror--results of preliminary tests are given.

  3. Control of InGaAs and InAs facets using metal modulation epitaxy Mark A. Wistey, Ashish K. Baraskar, Uttam Singisetti, Greg J. Burek, Byungha Shin, Eunji Kim, Paul C. McIntyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    by molecular beam epitaxy of self-assembled InAs quantum dots on InAlAs and InGaAs lattice-matched to InP J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 25, 1044 (2007); 10.1116/1.2731334 Trench-type InGaAs quantum-wire field effect

  4. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Surface Simulation of Zinc-Blende GaN(001) Intrinsic 4 Reconstruction: Linear Gallium Tetramers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reconstruction: Linear Gallium Tetramers? Hamad A. AL-Brithen, Rong Yang, Muhammad B. Haider, Costel Constantin and occupied states, in agreement with surface simulations based on the 4 1 linear tetramer model the existence of linear Ga tetramers. DOI: PACS numbers: 68.35.Bs, 68.37.Ef, 73.20.At Based on both fundamental

  5. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 × 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5?×?10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  6. Journal of Crystal Growth 298 (2007) 272275 Dislocation analysis in homoepitaxial GaInN/GaN light emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    2007-01-01

    of GaInN/GaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) on quasi-bulk GaN with an atomically flat polished were much improved. The optical output power of the light emitting diode increased by more than one. Cathodoluminescence; A1. Threading dislocation density; A2. Homoepitaxial growth; B1. GaInN; B3. Light emitting diode

  7. Thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN and AlxGa1-xN alloys and Alexander A. Balandin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN and AlxGa1-xN alloys Weili Liua and Alexander A. Balandin have investigated theoretically the thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN crystals and AlxGa1-xN-based alloys may have some potential as thermoelectric materials at high temperature. It was found

  8. Ultra-high frequency photoconductivity decay in GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Johnston, S. W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Umbel, R. [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-04

    GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructures (DHs) were grown in-situ using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. High-resolution x-ray rocking curve demonstrates a high-quality GaAs/Ge/GaAs heterostructure by observing Pendelloesung oscillations. The kinetics of the carrier recombination in Ge/GaAs DHs were investigated using photoconductivity decay measurements by the incidence excitation from the front and back side of 15 nm GaAs/100 nm Ge/0.5 {mu}m GaAs/(100)GaAs substrate structure. High-minority carrier lifetimes of 1.06-1.17 {mu}s were measured when excited from the front or from the back of the Ge epitaxial layer, suggests equivalent interface quality of GaAs/Ge and Ge/GaAs. Wavelength-dependent minority carrier recombination properties are explained by the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient of Ge.

  9. Long-wavelength emission in photo-pumped GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} laser with low temperature dependence of lasing wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuyuki, Takuma; Yoshioka, Ryo; Yoshida, Kenji; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2013-11-11

    This study demonstrates long-wavelength emission of up to 1204?nm in photo-pumped GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy under low temperature conditions. The characteristic temperature (T{sub 0}) between 20 and 80?°C in the GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} lasers with Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As electron blocking layer is approximately 100?K, which is larger than that of the typical 1.3-?m InGaAsP Fabry-Perot laser diodes (FP-LDs; T{sub 0}?=?66?K). The temperature coefficient of the lasing wavelength is approximately 40% of that of InGaAsP FP-LDs.

  10. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  11. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D?=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s?¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  12. DOE SC Exascale Requirements Review: High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQ F 1410.2EnergyReleasingSC Exascale

  13. DOE/SC Lehman Review of US ITER Project, USIPO,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l0-27ATTACHMENTS321234SC

  14. The calculated rovibronic spectrum of scandium hydride, ScH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson\\, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of six low-lying electronic states of scandium hydride, $X\\,{}^{1}\\Sigma^+$, $a\\,{}^{3}\\Delta$, $b\\,{}^{3}\\Pi$, $A\\,{}^{1}\\Delta$ $c\\,{}^{3}\\Sigma^+$, and $B\\,{}^{1}\\Pi$, is studied using multi-reference configuration interaction as a function of bond length. Diagonal and off-diagonal dipole moment, spin-orbit coupling and electronic angular momentum curves are also computed. The results are benchmarked against experimental measurements and calculations on atomic scandium. The resulting curves are used to compute a line list of molecular ro-vibronic transitions for $^{45}$ScH.

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Savannah River Swamp - SC 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51Savannah River Swamp - SC 01

  16. Full Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)Fermi

  17. Gallery | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)FermiFunding OpportunityGallery

  18. Gcreport | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)FermiFunding

  19. Georgia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)FermiFundingGenome To Life

  20. Georgia Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)FermiFundingGenome To LifeGeorgia

  1. Idaho Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High Energy PhysicsScience (SC)Idaho Regions

  2. Idaho Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High Energy PhysicsScience (SC)Idaho RegionsIdaho

  3. Illinois Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High Energy PhysicsScience (SC)Idaho

  4. Illinois Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High Energy PhysicsScience (SC)IdahoIllinois

  5. Maine Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 High EnergyJanuaryLawrenceof Science (SC)Maine

  6. Poster Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  7. SDM | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) Redefining the LimitsRhode

  8. September | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) Redefining theSLACSciencein

  9. September | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) Redefining theSLACScienceinSeptember

  10. September | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) Redefining

  11. Tennessee Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) RedefiningSign Up| U.S.IVDOETennessee

  12. Tennessee Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) RedefiningSign Up|

  13. Texas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) RedefiningSign Up|Texas Regions

  14. Texas Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) RedefiningSign Up|Texas RegionsTexas

  15. UNC EFRC | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)

  16. Washington Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)Science

  17. Wisconsin Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest Virginia RegionsWisconsin

  18. Wisconsin Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest Virginia

  19. Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest VirginiaWorking

  20. Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest VirginiaWorkingWyoming

  1. aa | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest Advanced Scientific

  2. august | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest Advanced ScientificAugust

  3. july | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest Advanced

  4. october | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC)ScienceWest AdvancedOctober Advanced

  5. DOE SC Exascale Requirements Reviews: High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. SC11 Education Program Applications due July 31

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. SC web highlight (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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  8. 2009 Awards | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  9. 2010's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico's The Ernest(SC) 7's

  10. 2010's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico's The Ernest(SC) 7's's

  11. 2013 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico's The Ernest(SC)32013

  12. 2013 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico's The Ernest(SC)320133

  13. NP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  14. NP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6AerosolsofMarshallMission HighScience (SC) 8Budget

  15. Obligations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-Nicholas Turro, 1982 The Ernest(SC)

  16. Phone List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-Nicholas Turro, 1982Science (SC)PeidongPhone List

  17. Phone List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-Nicholas Turro, 1982Science (SC)PeidongPhone

  18. Program Contacts | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  19. Program Contacts | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  20. Sharlene Weatherwax | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports andRobert(SC) Shape Matters

  1. 2012 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn, 1969 The EnricoOffice ofScience (SC) 12

  2. 2012 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn, 1969 The EnricoOffice ofScience (SC)

  3. Agenda 20130128 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  4. Local Map | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  5. Nov 2011 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC) NorthEast1

  6. Nov 2013 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)

  7. November 2000 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)0 Advanced

  8. November 2006 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)0 Advanced6

  9. November 2007 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)0

  10. November 2009 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)09 Advanced

  11. November 2010 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)09

  12. November 2014 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)094

  13. Nsacmembers2007 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)0947

  14. Nsacmembers2008 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)09478

  15. Nsacmembers2009 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearchScience (SC)094789

  16. Reports | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  17. Sally Mitchell | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  18. Sample Questions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  19. Sample Questions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  20. Staff Directories | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  1. Structural Biology | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  2. Student Participants | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4Office of Science (SC)EPSCoR Home »Student

  3. Exascale Challenges | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC) Electron coolingScientific

  4. February | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC) ElectronAugust 20012FYFebruary

  5. February | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC) ElectronAugust

  6. February | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC) ElectronAugustFebruary Advanced

  7. Fellow Stories | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC) ElectronAugustFebruary

  8. Final Discussion | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  9. Florida Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  10. Florida Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)Fermi NationalFermiFlorida Regions

  11. Science Headlines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  12. Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  13. Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNews Archives NewsSC InScience

  14. Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNews Archives NewsSC InScienceScience

  15. Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNews Archives NewsSC InScienceScienceScience

  16. 2005 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNews ArchivesDOE Office of Science (SC)5

  17. 2005 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNews ArchivesDOE Office of Science (SC)55

  18. Administration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNewsOffice of Science (SC)Office

  19. Award Laureates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNewsOffice of(SC) Atomic-LevelAward

  20. Award Laureates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNewsOffice of(SC) Atomic-LevelAwardAward

  1. Awards | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNewsOffice of(SC)

  2. Awards | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rzNewsOffice of(SC)Awards Small Business

  3. China SC Exact Equipment Co LTD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHEL JumpCMNACelt PowerWind Power CoSC Exact

  4. Parking and Transportation Services Lot SC108 Student Contract Agreement Addendum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Parking and Transportation Services Lot SC108 Student Contract Agreement Addendum NEW: Due at Buford and Randall Avenues. Parking will remain available in the southwest area of the lot as well as pedestrian access to campus. I understand and agree that the contract parking space in Lot SC108 is only

  5. Downlink W-CDMA performance analysis and receiver implmentation on SC140 Motorola DSP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Kaushik

    2004-09-30

    -point implementation of the W-CDMA downlink receiver algorithm on a general-purpose digital signal processor (StarCore SC140 by Motorola). The very large instruction word architecture of SC140 core is utilized to generate optimal implementation, to meet the real time...

  6. ISIS 9.0: SC Degree Audit 1 Updated: 09.08.15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    ISIS 9.0: SC ­ Degree Audit 1 Updated: 09.08.15 Degree Audit for Students ISIS 9.0 Degree Audit options to view additional information. #12;ISIS 9.0: SC ­ Degree Audit 2 Updated: 09.08.15 Degree Audit for Students ISIS 9.0 Report Detail Various links are available for specific information regarding your degree

  7. Irradiation requirements of Nb3Sn based SC magnets electrical insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Irradiation requirements of Nb3Sn based SC magnets electrical insulation developed within the Eu and Power Engineering #12;Outline · Motivation of launching EuCARD irradiation task · Nb3Sn SC magnet coils electrical insulation candidates · EuCARD insulators certification conditions · Post irradiation tests

  8. M.Sc. PSYCHOLOGY -Application Checklist (Last updated: July 10, 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    M.Sc. PSYCHOLOGY - Application Checklist (Last updated: July 10, 2015) IMPORTANT NOTES 1 to: www.unbc.ca/financial-aid. 5. Applicants to the M.Sc. in Psychology must have an Honours degree in Psychology or an undergraduate degree in Psychology (or a related field) with research experience. ALL

  9. M.Sc. PSYCHOLOGY -Application Checklist (Last updated: November 27, 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    M.Sc. PSYCHOLOGY - Application Checklist (Last updated: November 27, 2013) IMPORTANT NOTES 1 to UNBC Financial Aid & Awards by the February 15th Deadline. 6. Applicants to the M.Sc. in Psychology must have an Honours degree in Psychology or an undergraduate degree in Psychology (or a related field

  10. A Machine Learning Approach to Link Adaptation for SC-FDE System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillow, Jonathan

    versus just the post-processing SNR estimate. Simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm peak-to- average-power ratio, allowing more power efficient hardware architectures [1]. For example, SC of nonlinearities [2]. A variation of SC-FDE is used for the uplink in Third Generation Part- nership Project Long

  11. School of Marine Science and Policy Policy Statement Sc/1/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    School of Marine Science and Policy Policy Statement Sc/1/13 (Replaces Policy Statement Sc/1/12) Graduate Program 1. Administration a) The School of Marine Science and Policy (SMSP) offers the following degrees and concentrations administered within the four graduate-level programs of Marine Biosciences

  12. SC-1, S-2: Standing Waves and Sound Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names__________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    SC-1, S-2: Standing Waves and Sound Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names. SC-1 Transverse Standing Waves on Strings: In this lab you will do Procedures I and II about to help you visualize how standing waves are generated by the superposition two traveling waves. Procedure

  13. Office of South Carolina Residency University of South Carolina*Columbia, SC 29208* (803) 777-4060* (803) 777-3977 (fax)* resident@mailbox.sc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of South Carolina Residency University of South Carolina*Columbia, SC 29208* (803/I will not provide more than 49% of his/her support while attending the University of South Carolina AGREEMENT: We

  14. Effective Landé factor in a GaMnAs quantum dot; with the effects of sp-d exchange on a bound polaron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalitha, D., E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com; Peter, A. John, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, Government Arts College, Melur-625106, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-04-24

    The effective g-factor of conduction (valence) band electron (hole) is obtained in the GaMnAs quantum dot. Magneto bound polaron in a GaMnAs/Ga{sub 0.6}Al{sub 0.4}As quantum dot is investigated with the inclusion of exchange interaction effects due to Mn alloy content and the geometrical confinement. The spin polaronic energy of the heavy hole exciton is studied with the spatial confinement using a mean field theory in the presence of magnetic field strength.

  15. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  16. Growth, strain relaxation properties and high-? dielectric integration of mixed-anion GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} metamorphic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Clavel, M.; Goley, P.; Hudait, M. K., E-mail: mantu.hudait@vt.edu [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    Mixed-anion, GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} metamorphic materials with a wide range of antimony (Sb) compositions extending from 15% to 62%, were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs substrates. The impact of different growth parameters on the Sb composition in GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} materials was systemically investigated. The Sb composition was well-controlled by carefully optimizing the As/Ga ratio, the Sb/Ga ratio, and the substrate temperature during the MBE growth process. High-resolution x-ray diffraction demonstrated a quasi-complete strain relaxation within each composition of GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y}. Atomic force microscopy exhibited smooth surface morphologies across the wide range of Sb compositions in the GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} structures. Selected high-? dielectric materials, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were deposited using atomic layer deposition on the GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62} material, and their respective band alignment properties were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed XPS analysis revealed a valence band offset of >2 eV for all three dielectric materials on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, indicating the potential of utilizing these dielectrics on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62} for p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) applications. Moreover, both Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} showed a conduction band offset of >2 eV on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, suggesting these two dielectrics can also be used for n-type MOS applications. The well-controlled Sb composition in several GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} material systems and the detailed band alignment analysis of multiple high-? dielectric materials on a fixed Sb composition, GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, provides a pathway to utilize GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} materials in future microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  17. InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot interdiffiusion induced by cap layer overgrowth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, J.; Babinski, A.; Czeczott, M.; Bozek, R.

    2000-06-28

    The effect of thermal treatment during and after growth of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures was studied. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of interacting QDs, as was expected from analysis of temperature dependence of QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. The results indicate that the effect of post-growth annealing can be similar to the effect of elevated temperature of capping layer growth. Both, these thermal treatments can lead to a similar In and Ga interdiffiusion resulting in a similar blue-shift of QD PL peak.

  18. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmore »to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.« less

  19. IEEE Energy2030 Atlanta, GA USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    of an aggregation of battery vehicles for the provision of frequency regulation ­ requiring very fast response timesIEEE Energy2030 Atlanta, GA USA 17-18 November, 2008 Design of a Conceptual Framework for the V2G in common is the batteries, which provide good storage capacity that can be effectively integrated

  20. 495 Tech Way NW Atlanta, GA 30318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    495 Tech Way NW Atlanta, GA 30318 404.385.0384 comments@energy.gatech.edu Copyright 2014 · Georgia concerns, low-cost, clean, secure energy solutions will be necessary to address our global energy needs and sustain our way of life. Georgia Tech Energy Innovations The Strategic Energy Institute's scientists

  1. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  2. An approach toward 25-percent efficient GaAs heteroface solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringel, S.A.; Rohatgi, A. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA). School of Electrical Engineering); Tobin, S.P. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (USA))

    1989-07-01

    In order to approach one-sun 25-percent efficiency in GaAs solar cells, it is necessary to improve the basic understanding of internal loss mechanisms by a combination of characterization techniques and computer models. A methodology is developed to measure and evaluate minority-carrier transport properties such as lifetime and recombination velocity throughout the device structure in a 21.2-percent GaAs cell. It is found that this cell has a recombination velocity of 1.25 X 10/sup 5/ cm/s at the AlGaAs/GaAs interface and a base minority-carrier lifetime of 8 ns. Guidelines are provided to increase the efficiency of this cell to 24 percent with slightly increased surface passivation and base lifetime using effective recombination velocity and device modeling computer programs. Further device modeling is performed to show that efficiencies of 25 percent can be obtained using a modified heteroface structure with a moderate surface recombination velocity of 1 X 10/sup 4/ cm/s if lifetime limiting mechanisms and their relation to device design are fully understood.

  3. Development and Industrialization of InGaN/GaN LEDs on Patterned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    epitaxial growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) layers capable of producing high-efficiency LEDs when combined with chip-on-board packaging techniques. The proposed...

  4. Emission and Excitation Spectra of ZnO:Ga and ZnO:Ga,N Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Rodnyi; I. V. Khodyuk; E. I. Gorokhova; S. B. Mikhrin; P. Dorenbos

    2010-09-07

    The spectral characteristics of ZnO:Ga and ZnO:Ga,N ceramics prepared by uniaxial hot pressing have been investigated. At room temperature, the edge (exciton) band at 3.12 eV dominates in the luminescence spectra of ZnO:Ga, while a wide luminescence band at 2.37 eV, which is likely to be due to zinc vacancies, is observed in the spectra of ZnO:Ga,N. Upon heating, the edge band maximum shifts to lower energies and the bandwidth increases. The extrapolated position of the edge-band maximum at zero temperature, Em(0) = 3.367 +/- 0.005 eV, is in agreement with the data for thin zinc oxide films. The luminescence excitation spectra in the range from 3 to 6.5 eV are reported and the mechanism of energy transfer to excitons and luminescence centers is considered.

  5. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; ??can, ?mdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  6. Energy absorption in Ni-Mn-Ga/ polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuchtwanger, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    In recent years Ni-Mn-Ga has attracted considerable attention as a new kind of actuator material. Off-stoichiometric single crystals of Ni2MnGa can regularly exhibit 6% strain in tetragonal martensites and orthorhombic ...

  7. InGaAs/GaAs (110) quantum dot formation via step meandering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diez-Merino, Laura; Tejedor, Paloma

    2011-07-01

    InGaAs (110) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer very promising prospects as a material base for a new generation of high-speed spintronic devices, such as single electron transistors for quantum computing. However, the spontaneous formation of InGaAs QDs is prevented by two-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth on singular GaAs (110) substrates. In this work we have studied, by using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), the growth of InGaAs/GaAs QDs on GaAs (110) stepped substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the modification of the adatom incorporation kinetics to surface steps in the presence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen. The as-grown QDs exhibit lateral dimensions below 100 nm and emission peaks in the 1.35-1.37 eV range. It has been found that a step meandering instability derived from the preferential attachment of In adatoms to [110]-step edges relative to [11n]-type steps plays a key role in the destabilization of 2D growth that leads to 3D mound formation on both conventional and H-terminated vicinal substrates. In the latter case, the driving force for 3D growth via step meandering is enhanced by H-induced upward mass transport in addition to the lower energy cost associated with island formation on H-terminated substrates, which results in a high density array of InGaAs/GaAs dots selectively nucleated on the terrace apices with reduced lateral dimensions and improved PL efficiency relative to those of conventional MBE-grown samples.

  8. Guided Neuronal Growth on Arrays of Biofunctionalized GaAs/InGaAs Semiconductor Microtubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelius S. Bausch; Aune Koitmäe; Eric Stava; Amanda Price; Pedro J. Resto; Yu Huang; David Sonnenberg; Yuliya Stark; Christian Heyn; Justin C. Williams; Erik W. Dent; Robert H. Blick

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate embedded growth of cortical mouse neurons in dense arrays of semiconductor microtubes. The microtubes, fabricated from a strained GaAs/InGaAs heterostructure, guide axon growth through them and enable electrical and optical probing of propagating action potentials. The coaxial nature of the microtubes -- similar to myelin -- is expected to enhance the signal transduction along the axon. We present a technique of suppressing arsenic toxicity and prove the success of this technique by overgrowing neuronal mouse cells.

  9. GaNPAs Solar Cells Lattice-Matched To GaP: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We propose the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct band-gaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We demonstrate the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and discuss the prospects for the development of monolithic high-efficiency multijunction solar cells based on silicon substrates.

  10. {\\sc CosmoNet}: fast cosmological parameter estimation in non-flat models using neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Auld; M. Bridges; M. P. Hobson

    2007-03-16

    We present a further development of a method for accelerating the calculation of CMB power spectra, matter power spectra and likelihood functions for use in cosmological Bayesian inference. The algorithm, called {\\sc CosmoNet}, is based on training a multilayer perceptron neural network. We compute CMB power spectra (up to $\\ell=2000$) and matter transfer functions over a hypercube in parameter space encompassing the $4\\sigma$ confidence region of a selection of CMB (WMAP + high resolution experiments) and large scale structure surveys (2dF and SDSS). We work in the framework of a generic 7 parameter non-flat cosmology. Additionally we use {\\sc CosmoNet} to compute the WMAP 3-year, 2dF and SDSS likelihoods over the same region. We find that the average error in the power spectra is typically well below cosmic variance for spectra, and experimental likelihoods calculated to within a fraction of a log unit. We demonstrate that marginalised posteriors generated with {\\sc CosmoNet} spectra agree to within a few percent of those generated by {\\sc CAMB} parallelised over 4 CPUs, but are obtained 2-3 times faster on just a \\emph{single} processor. Furthermore posteriors generated directly via {\\sc CosmoNet} likelihoods can be obtained in less than 30 minutes on a single processor, corresponding to a speed up of a factor of $\\sim 32$. We also demonstrate the capabilities of {\\sc CosmoNet} by extending the CMB power spectra and matter transfer function training to a more generic 10 parameter cosmological model, including tensor modes, a varying equation of state of dark energy and massive neutrinos. {\\sc CosmoNet} and interfaces to both {\\sc CosmoMC} and {\\sc Bayesys} are publically available at {\\tt www.mrao.cam.ac.uk/software/cosmonet}.

  11. Accurate characterization and improvement of GaAs microstrip attenuation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, James Mason

    1992-01-01

    Convergence. III. E. 6 Final Model. III. F Simulation Results for 100 um GaAs. . III. F. 1 On-GaAs Microstrip. III. I', 2 Suspended Microstrip Line . . . . 50 . . . . 51 . . . . 54 . . . . 56 . . . . 56 . . . 56 . . . . 64 64 . . . , 64 III. F. 3... Comparison Between On-GaAs and Suspcndcd Microstrip . . . 68 III. F. 4 Microstrip Inductance III. G EM Parameters in CAD Simulations . . III. H Simulation Results for 150 um GaAs. III. I Conclusions and Recommendations. IV RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS...

  12. U.S. Virgin Islands Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011Science (SC) RedefiningSign(SC)(SC)U.S.

  13. Final Report for DOE Grant Number DE-SC0001481

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Edison

    2013-12-02

    This report covers research activities, major results and publications supported by DE-SC-000-1481. This project was funded by the DOE OFES-NNSA HEDLP program. It was a joint research program between Rice University and the University of Texas at Austin. The physics of relativistic plasmas was investigated in the context of ultra-intense laser irradiation of high-Z solid targets. Laser experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser were performed in the summers of 2011, 2012 and 2013. Numerical simulations of laser-plasma interactions were performed using Monte Carlo and Particle-in-Cell codes to design and support these experiments. Astrophysical applications of these results were also investigated.

  14. First-principles investigations of Ni3Al(111) and NiAl(110) surfaces at metal dusting conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saadi, Souheil

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the structure and surface composition of the {gamma}{prime}-Ni{sub 3}Al(111) and {beta}-NiAl(110) alloy surfaces at conditions relevant for metal dusting corrosion related to catalytic steam reforming of natural gas. In regular service as protective coatings, nickel-aluminum alloys are protected by an oxide scale, but in case of oxide scale spallation, the alloy surface may be directly exposed to the reactive gas environment and vulnerable to metal dusting. By means of density functional theory and thermochemical calculations for both the Ni{sub 3}Al and NiAl surfaces, the conditions under which CO and OH adsorption is to be expected and under which it is inhibited, are mapped out. Because CO and OH are regarded as precursors for nucleating graphite or oxide on the surfaces, phase diagrams for the surfaces provide a simple description of their stability. Specifically, this study shows how the CO and OH coverages depend on the steam to carbon ratio (S/C) in the gas and thereby provide a ranking of the carbon limits on the different surface phases.

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce?(Ni/Al/Ga)??-A new phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technial Information About OSTI Mission Organization Chart Achievements Alliances OSTI History Feedback DOE STI Program Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP)...

  16. Electrical properties of pn junctions based on superlattices of AlNAlGa,,In...N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    and 280 nm would open a number of applications, from fluorescence excitation to data storage. Despite- tures were grown on sapphire using gas source molecular beam epitaxy12 with ammonia. The samples were

  17. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES OF WIDE BANDGAP (AlN)m(GaN) n [001] SUPERLATTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Laurent J.

    couches minces (GCM), Universit'e de Montr'eal, Montr'eal, Canada H3C 3J7 ABSTRACT Wide bandgap III in detail the effective masses or energy splittings. Our calculations are carried out within the LDA using

  18. Continuous-wave sum-frequency generation in AlGaAs Bragg reflection waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolghasem, Bhavin J. Bijlani, and Amr S. Helmy* The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4, Canada radiation in mid-IR regimes, where no laser source exists [2]. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) is also at

  19. Electrical Degradation of InAlAs/InGaAs Metamorphic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    to saturate 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 0 200 400 600 time [min] RD gmo /RD(0) RS/RS(0) /gmo(0) Stress at VDGo + VT=1 0 400 800 1200 1600 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 RD /RD (0)andgmo /gmo (0) time [min] 1 2 3 4 RD/RD(0) gmo/gmo(0) VDGo +VT [V] #12;Simpler Case: TLMs Ohmics Channel -Doping Cap Integrated TLMs : uniform

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of Ce₃(Ni/Al/Ga)₁₁-A new phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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