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1

GRR/Section 13-FD-d - Airport Evaluation Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-FD-d - Airport Evaluation Process 3-FD-d - Airport Evaluation Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-FD-d - Airport Evaluation Process 13FDDAirportEvaluationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Federal Aviation Administration United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies 49 USC 44718: Structures Interfering with Air Commerce 49 USC 40103: Sovereignty & Use of Airspace Pub. L. 111-383 - the "Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 14 CFR 77 - Safe, Efficient Use, and Preservation of the Navigable Airspace Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13FDDAirportEvaluationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

2

Dynamic Control of Airport Departures: Algorithm Development and Field Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

testing of this control protocol at Boston Logan International Airport. I. INTRODUCTION Airport surfaceDynamic Control of Airport Departures: Algorithm Development and Field Evaluation Ioannis Simaiakis burn at major airports. In this paper, we formulate the airport surface congestion management problem

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

3

Queuing Models of Airport Departure Processes for Emissions Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is validated through a comparison of its predictions with observed data at Boston's Logan International AirportQueuing Models of Airport Departure Processes for Emissions Reduction Ioannis Simaiakis burn and emissions at airports. This paper investigates the possibility of reducing fuel burn

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

4

Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Capital Improvement Program Development Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Airport Capital Improvement Program (ACIP) serves as the primary tool for project planning and formulation by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA relies on the ACIP to serve as the basis for the distribution of Aviation Trust...

Tener, Scott D.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Airports and land use planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The EPA has developed an Airport Noise Regulatory concept including an impact analysis methodology and a readily understandable format for the presentation of results. The regulatory process provides a means of reducing and/or preventing aviation noise impacts via a balanced mix of aviation actions and lead use controls. The analysis methodology which EPA has developed is based upon a comparison of aviation noise and the background levels which are due to all sources other than aviation. Hence the noise impacts of multi modal systems can be evaluated. Noise criteria have been developed for the classification of airports by severity of impact and for goals necessary to protect the public health and welfare. The regulatory process was designed to insure participation of the airport proprietor local governments and the general public. Each airport noise abatement plan will be subjected to public scrutiny in an open hearing as well as to review by the Federal Aviation Administration with consulation by the EPA. The process results in an airport operating pier for noise abatement which is basic to land use planning.

S. E. Starley

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DFW Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Continuous Commissioning? CATEE 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference Dallas, Texas November 9, 2011 2 Outline ? Acknowledgement ? DFW Airport Overview ? Geography ? Operational... ? Weather (temperature) ? Energy ? Continuous Commissioning? ? Consolidated Rental-A-Car (RAC) Center ? Airport Administration Building ? Terminal D (2 million sq.ft. international terminal) ? Energy Plaza (central utilities plant) ? Other Facilities...

Dennis, J. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Ground access to major airports in the United States : summary of present characteristics and evaluation of future requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synopsis: The ground access problem at United States airports will be discussed in general terms. Those characteristics of airport users relative to ground transportation will be analyzed to provide a clear picture of the ...

Munds, Allan J.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Metrics to Characterize Airport Operational Performance Using Surface Surveillance Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tower BOS Boston General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport EDCT Expected Departure Clearance International Airport, and are therefore evaluated and discussed using this airport as an example. These metricsMetrics to Characterize Airport Operational Performance Using Surface Surveillance Data Harshad

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

9

Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraint in the departure process at busy airports like Boston Logan International airport. For example1 Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports Kari Andersson1 , Francis Carr2 , Eric Feron3 and William D. Hall4 Abstract: Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can

Feron, Eric

10

Holiday Inn Chicago Midway Airport Holiday Inn Chicago Midway Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holiday Inn Chicago ­ Midway Airport Holiday Inn Chicago ­ Midway Airport 6624 S. Cicero Avenue of arrival. Holiday Inn Chicago Midway Airport is located just ten miles from downtown Chicago and offers complimentary 24 hour airport shuttle service to and from Midway Airport. The hotel offers amenities

Pritchard, Jonathan

11

Exposure Evaluation Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

symptoms, further evaluation by HCP, and recommendations from evaluation by referral. It is a clinical judgment based on the history of the exposure, including what is...

12

ORISE: Process and Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process and Program Evaluation Process and Program Evaluation As an integral part of producing effective health and safety programs, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducts scientific-based process and program evaluation to provide government agencies and organizations with the tools to improve the health of workers and the general public. Whether the goal is to change awareness, attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, policies or systems, ORISE helps determine the right evaluation methods based on specific needs and resources, including: Formative evaluations to assess the problem, target audience needs and guide successful process implementation Assessments to identify unmet needs in programs, organizations or communities Audience evaluations to learn about targeted populations

13

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport - MO 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Airport - MO 01 Airport - MO 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites St. Louis Airport, MO Alternate Name(s): Airport Site St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS) Former Robertson Storage Area Robertson Airport MO.01-1 MO.01-2 Location: Brown Road, Robertson, Missouri MO.01-2 Historical Operations: Stored uranium process residues containing uranium, radium, and thorium for the MED and AEC. MO.01-2 MO.01-3 MO.01-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MO.01-1 MO.01-7 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MO.01-4 MO.01-5 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MO.01-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to St. Louis Airport, MO MO.01-1 - DOE Memorandum; Coffman to LaGrone; Subject: Authorization

14

AIRPORT LIGHTING Session Highlights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These sessions were designed to offer practical-yet-specialized training and information outreach for personnel information on airport lighting and navigational aid equipment selection, funding, maintenance, and operation known as AirTAP, sponsored three airport-lighting training sessions at different locations in Minnesota

Minnesota, University of

15

Residence Inn Chicago Midway Airport Residence Inn Chicago Midway Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residence Inn Chicago � Midway Airport Residence Inn Chicago � Midway Airport 6638 S. Cicero Avenue by Marriott Chicago Midway Airport is located ten miles from downtown Chicago. The hotel offers free shuttle-suite, extended-stay hotel - 5 blocks from Midway Airport � 5 floors, 132 suites � AAA 3 Diamonds � Complimentary

Pritchard, Jonathan

16

Transportation to Purdue University Indianapolis Airport and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Purdue University Indianapolis Airport and Shuttle Service to Campus The closest major airport to West Lafayette, IN is in Indianapolis (code IND). The Indianapolis Airport is...

17

Airline Passengers' Satisfaction with Airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airports are places where people have the potential to experience either satisfaction or frustration, and marketing and tourism scholars have argued that customer satisfaction is one of the primary goals of airports. However, few studies have...

Kim, Hyun Joo

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport Site Vicinity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

St Louis Airport Site Vicinity St Louis Airport Site Vicinity Properties - 017 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: St. Louis Airport Site Vicinity Properties (017) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: These properties are located in Hazelwood and Berkeley, Missouri, approximately 15 miles northwest of downtown St. Louis. The properties are associated with the St. Louis Airport Site. The Manhattan Engineer District (MED), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), acquired the St. Louis Airport Site in 1946. The site was operated by the MED and the Atomic Energy Commission (the successor agency to the MED and a

19

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- February 13, 2013 - February 13, 2013 BBNP Preliminary Process & Market Study ? LBNL Project Manager: Ed Vine DOE Project Manager: Jeff Dowd Project Team: Research Into Action, Inc., NMR Group, Evergreen Economic Consulting, and Nexant, Inc. Page 2 - February 13, 2013 BBNP Preliminary Process & Market Study ? Who we are We are a team of evaluators... independent of the BBNP program with whom DOE has contracted to assess the performance of BBNP and identify lessons learned We are: Research Into Action, NMR Group, Nexant, and Evergreen Economics Page 3 - February 13, 2013 BBNP Preliminary Process & Market Study ? What we are doing, what we hope to learn We are assessing the national BBNP program, not individual grantees or their programs

20

FAA Airport Categories Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Categories Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FAA Airport Categories Website Abstract This website lists FAA airport categories....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Miami International Airport stormwater NPDES plan  

SciTech Connect

Miami International Airport (MIA) is endeavoring to essentially double its traffic volume by the turn of the century. This is a great challenge since the site is already highly developed. Space, safety and other constraints make it difficult to implement conventional detention/retention stormwater practices. Other practices were evaluated to control stormwater quantity/quality, since some of the downstream bodies of water are flood-prone or environmentally sensitive.

Perez, A.I.; Goldman, J.Z. [Camp Dresser and McKee Inc., Miami, FL (United States); Schmidt, M.F. [Camp Dresser and McKee Inc., Jacksonville, FL (United States); Clark, E.E. [Clark Engineers-Scientists Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Issues evaluation process at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the issues evaluation process for Rocky Flats Plant as established in July 1990. The issues evaluation process was initiated February 27, 1990 with a Charter and Process Overview for short-term implementation. The purpose of the process was to determine the projects required for completion before the Phased Resumption of Plutonium Operations. To determine which projects were required, the issues evaluation process and emphasized risk mitigation, based on a ranking system. The purpose of this report is to document the early design of the issues evaluation process to record the methodologies used that continue as the basis for the ongoing Issues Management Program at Rocky Flats Plant.

Smith, L.C.

1992-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Airports and Bicycles: what are the obstacles and incentives for operators 1 to improve bicycle access?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airport f Boston International Airport g Minneapolis-St.Airport f Boston International Airport g Minneapolis-St.56. Boston Logan International Airport. Transportation

Orrick, Phyllis; Frick, Karen Trapenberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport March 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today announced plans to construct and operate a hydrogen fuel production plant and vehicle fueling station at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility will use grid electricity to split water to produce pure hydrogen fuel. The fuel will be used by the airport's operations and the 130th Air Wing of the West Virginia Air National Guard. NETL will begin operations at the Yeager Airport facility in August 2009 and plans to conduct two years of testing and evaluation. The facility will be designed using "open architecture," allowing the capability to add

25

Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process presented at the PEM fuel cell pre-solicitation meeting held May 26, 2005 in Arlington, VA.

26

ORISE: Process and Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

As an integral part of producing effective health and safety programs, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducts scientific-based process and...

27

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety evaluation requirement of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety. Does not cancel other directives. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

The impact of airline-airport relations on airport management decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airlines, in the past, have had an important influence on airport operations through privileges granted them by the airport lease agreements. Airport administrators and sponsoring agencies have agreed to grant these ...

Cohen, Dayl Arlene

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Airports: No Exit from London  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... cent in passenger traffic at Heathrow London Airport is expected from the introduction of the Boeing 747 jets next April. These aircraft, which are having their final tests at the ...

1969-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety (NES) evaluation requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-2.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

2001: An Airspace Odyssey SUMMARY PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2001 AIRPORT NOISE SYMPOSIUM AND AIRPORT AIR QUALITY SYMPOSIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at both Boston Logan International Airport and Los AngelesRunway 27 at Boston Logan International Airport. The FAAexpansion of Boston Logan International Airport. The third

Gosling, Geoffrey D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS, IN PRESS, AUGUST 2013 1 Dynamic Control of Airport Departures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rate Control at Boston airport in 2011, and the development of a decision-support tool for its illustrates this behavior for the most frequently used runway configuration at Boston Logan International of Airport Departures: Algorithm Development and Field Evaluation Ioannis Simaiakis, Melanie Sandberg

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

33

Silver City Grant County Airport (SVC) Pavement Condition and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silver City Grant County Airport (SVC) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M. Lucero ....................................1. Airport Conditions at Silver City Grant County Airport (SVC) 4 ..................................Figure 1. Geographic Location of Silver City Grant County Airport (SVC) 4 ......................Table 1

Cal, Mark P.

34

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Aircraft energy conservation during airport ground operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies and assesses potential fuel conservation options which are available for use during ground operations at Dulles International (IAD) and Washington National (DCA) airports. The study also identifies and analyzes ground operations fuel savings options which have been considered and/or implemented by the various airlines operating at IAD and/or DCA since 1971. In addition, an evaluation of computer models which could be used for analyzing these fuel conservation options at other airports is included. The impact of socio/economic factors such as safety, environment, limitation on expansion and restrictions on accommodating forecast activity at DCA and IAD were considered during the analysis of each option.

Bauchspies, J.S.; Costello, F.A.; Felder, J.; Hilliard, H.; Thompson, J.K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports  

SciTech Connect

Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport land reclamation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AirportAirport Suvarnabhumi Airport... ,Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, ThailandBangkok, Thailand 12;OverviewOverview Magnitudes and Financing... -- Land purchased inLand...

38

ST. LOUIS AIRPORT/ HAZELWOOD INTERIM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Airport County: St. Louis County Other Names: Hazelwood Interim Storage & Vicinity, Latty Avenue radioactively-contaminated sites are part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Site information and updates #12;can be found

39

Evaluating Energy Efficiency Improvements in Manufacturing Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and increasing awareness of "green" customers have brought energy efficient manufacturing on top of the agendaEvaluating Energy Efficiency Improvements in Manufacturing Processes Katharina Bunse1 , Julia Sachs kbunse@ethz.ch, sachsj@student.ethz.ch, mvodicka@ethz.ch Abstract. Global warming, rising energy prices

Boyer, Edmond

40

Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes  

SciTech Connect

This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Application Content and Evaluation CriteriaProcess Application Content and Evaluation CriteriaProcess This presentation by Jill Gruber of the DOE Golden Field Office was given at...

42

Emergence and Impact of Secondary Airports in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As major airports in the United States have reached their maximum capacity and became congested, available capacity at surrounding airports has been utilized by the emergence of secondary airports. Given the expectation ...

Bonnefoy, Philippe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Demonstration of Reduced Airport Congestion Through Pushback Rate Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airport surface congestion results in significant increases in taxi times, fuel burn and emissions at major airports. This paper presents the field tests of a control strategy to airport congestion control at Boston Logan ...

Simaiakis, Ioannis

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Continuous Commissioning of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous Commissioning ? of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Jerry R. Dennis, CEM, CEP Rusty T., P.E., CEM, CEP, LEED AP Larry Kramer, P.E., CEM DFW International Airport Energy and Transportation Management DFW Airport, TX... Schroeder, P.E. HHS Associates, LLD Plano, TX ABSTRACT The DFW International Airport is one of the largest and busiest airports in the world. Located in North Texas, squarely between the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, the DFW Airport not only...

Yazdani, B.; Schroeder, F.; Kramer, L.; Baltazar, J. C.; Turner, W. D.; Wei, G.; Deng, S.; Henson, R.; Dennis, J. R.; T., R.

45

Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

AIRPORT SNOW AND ICE CONTROL Session Highlights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about the program, please contact: Jim Grothaus, Technology Transfer Engineer Air responsible for all of the equipment used to maintain the airfields at MSP International Airport, and shared-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) requires runways to be cleared within 30 minutes of closing. After

Minnesota, University of

47

Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced...

49

Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation Criteria/Process Jill Gruber Golden Field Office Department of Energy May 18, 2007 The information presented here is an outline of how the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) may be structured. The final application requirements will be shown in the FOA when it is posted on Grants.gov. The schedule and awards are dependent on future appropriations and may change if future appropriations are lower than expected or in the event of a continuing resolution. DOE Points of Contact DOE Golden Field Office: Jill Gruber, Project Officer Bob Kingsley, Contract Specialist Stephanie Carabajal, Contracting Officer DOE HQ: Pete Devlin, Technology Development Manager Preliminary Application Content * Separate applications for each topic * Title should identify the topic area

50

Network Congestion Control of Airport Surface Operations Harshad Khadilkar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters for Boston Logan International Airport are es- timated using empirical data from a surface with simulations of traffic on a network model of Boston Logan International Airport. Nomenclature ASDE-X Airport Surface Detection Equipment, Model X BOS Boston Logan International Airport C Cost function for control

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

51

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

52

LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport July 14, 2010 - 3:34pm Addthis Hammond, La., airport is replacing the existing incandescent taxiway lights (pictured) with LEDs. | Photo courtesy of Hammond Northshore Regional Airport Hammond, La., airport is replacing the existing incandescent taxiway lights (pictured) with LEDs. | Photo courtesy of Hammond Northshore Regional Airport Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Upgrades for safety, energy at Hammond airport possible through Recovery Act Taxiway lights to be replaced with LEDs Airport could save up to $15,000 annually on electric bills Energy efficiency is taking off at the airport in Hammond, La., about 70

53

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Powers Airport Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans on AddThis.com... Feb. 19, 2011 Propane Powers Airport Shuttles in New Orleans D iscover how the New Orleans airport displaced over 139,000 gallons of

54

LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport July 14, 2010 - 3:34pm Addthis Hammond, La., airport is replacing the existing incandescent taxiway lights (pictured) with LEDs. | Photo courtesy of Hammond Northshore Regional Airport Hammond, La., airport is replacing the existing incandescent taxiway lights (pictured) with LEDs. | Photo courtesy of Hammond Northshore Regional Airport Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Upgrades for safety, energy at Hammond airport possible through Recovery Act Taxiway lights to be replaced with LEDs Airport could save up to $15,000 annually on electric bills Energy efficiency is taking off at the airport in Hammond, La., about 70

55

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Atlanta Airport Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG on AddThis.com... Sept. 9, 2012 Atlanta Airport Converts Shuttles to CNG L earn how an Atlanta company saves money and conserves fuel with compressed natural gas airport shuttles.

56

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dallas Airport Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com... Sept. 5, 2009 Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels F ind out how Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport uses alternative fuels

57

Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport ceo faces Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ceo faces Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Creating smarter airports An opportunity to transform travel and trade Summary: airports Executive summary Airports face multiple...

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport nye county Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2007 Project Initiation Workshop Aransas County Airport Rockport, Texas 03... : Corpus Christi International Airport (CRP) To: Aransas County Airport: 301 N Liveoak St,...

60

Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 April 2008 Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide was developed for the purpose of documenting the appraisal approach and techniques specific to evaluations of classified and unclassified cyber security programs throughout DOE. Office of Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide provides additional insight into the Office of Cyber Security Evaluations (HS-62) evaluation approach and processes associated with assessing classified and unclassified cyber security programs. The objective of this document is to establish a standard approach and methodology for conducting cyber security reviews that is well understood by all inspection participants.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Airports and the General Conformity Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions SOURCE: The Boeing Company (http://www.boeing.com/Modes SOURCE: The Boeing Company (http://www.boeing.com/Deliveries SOURCE: The Boeing Company, Current Market

Amin, Ratna S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Colorado Airport Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... July 1, 2010 Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Voluntary Airport Low Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program

64

Money Smart Evaluation Process Evaluation of the Money Smart program involves 3 parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Money Smart Evaluation Process Evaluation of the Money Smart program involves 3 parts: o Pre on the FCS Agent website under Money Smart. End of session evaluations are also included in the Instructor

65

Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility  

SciTech Connect

This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Of airports and architecture : exercises in public form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airports as an architectural and urban typology typically lack physical and spatial integration with their urban context. Contrary to the city, airports have evolved into semi-autonomous spaces and products of political ...

Fouad, Daniel James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Market-based airport demand management : theory, model and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing demand for access to the world's major commercial airports combined with capacity constraints at many of these airports have led to increasing air traffic congestion. In particular, the scarcity of ...

Fan, Terence P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Airport Zero Emission Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com...

69

Energy Management Practices at Dalls/Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Management Practices at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Jerry R. Dennis, CEM, CEP Energy Manager October 9, 2013 Energy Management Practices at DFW Airport, October 9, 2013 Presentation Outline ? DFW Airport Overview ? Energy... Management Section ? Structure & Mission ? Supply-Side Management ? Reliability ? Cost (Risk) mitigation ? Environmental stewardship ? Demand-Side Management ? Energy monitoring ? Energy audits ? Energy standards ? Continuous Commissioning...

Dennis, J. R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Airports in the 21st Century DRAFT April 12, 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Dallas/Fort Worth, Denver International, Orlando and Washington/Dulles in the United StatesAirports in the 21st Century DRAFT April 12, 2000 1 AIRPORTS IN THE 21ST CENTURY Prospects Institute of Technology SUMMARY This paper explores the long-term prospects for airport development between

Entekhabi, Dara

71

MANAGEMENT OF MULTI-AIRPORT SYSTEMS: A DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Berlin, Boston, Minneapolis/St.Paul, St.Louis, and Seattle. Yet the experience in managing multi-airport: * Edmonton: The International airport has been emptied as passengers flock to the more convenient downtown deserted (BAA, 1992); * Montreal: Montreal/Mirabel, the International airport, receives about less than 3

Entekhabi, Dara

72

A Network Congestion Control Approach to Airport Departure Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a generic airport and then validate it using surface surveillance data from Boston Logan InternationalA Network Congestion Control Approach to Airport Departure Management Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa at airports, by posing the problem in a network congestion control framework. We develop a network model

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

73

Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 April 2008 The Safeguards and Security Appraisal Process Guide provides additional planning techniques and a detailed set of tables that describe the necessary steps to successfully conduct each phase of a safeguards and security appraisal activity. Office of Security Evaluations (HS-61) has prepared the Safeguards and Security Appraisal Process Guide, as part of a continuing effort to enhance the quality and consistency of safeguards and security appraisals. This guide should be used along with the Office of Independent Oversight (HS-60) Appraisal Process Protocols that describes the overall philosophy, scope, and general procedures applicable to all Independent Oversight appraisal

74

Building Airport Systems for the Next Generation Dealing with the uncertainties of airport development will require new strategies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Atlanta, Boston, Dallas/Fort Worth, Las Vegas, Miami International, New York/Kennedy, Orlando International, Philadelphia, Washington/Dulles, and elsewhere. Brand-new or thoroughly reworked airportsBuilding Airport Systems for the Next Generation Dealing with the uncertainties of airport

75

Office of Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, April 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CYBER SECURITY EVALUATIONS CYBER SECURITY EVALUATIONS APPRAISAL PROCESS GUIDE April 2008 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide Preface April 2008 i Preface Department of Energy (DOE) Order 470.2B, Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Program, and Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Standard Operating Procedure, SOP-10-01, Independent Oversight Appraisal Process Protocols, February 2008, provide direction for the Office of Independent Oversight (HS-60) to establish the requirements, responsibilities, and processes for the development and maintenance of Appraisal Process Protocols that describe the activities for evaluating the effectiveness of DOE safeguards and security; cyber security; emergency management; and

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated land evaluation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Aircraft Landing Scheduling for Non-Controlled Airports AIAA-2004... Modeling Methodologies Evaluation Flight Simulation Enhancements for this...

77

Office of Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, April 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURITY EVALUATIONS SECURITY EVALUATIONS APPRAISAL PROCESS GUIDE April 2008 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide Preface April 2008 i Preface The Office of Security Evaluations (HS-61) has prepared the Safeguards and Security Appraisal Process Guide, as part of a continuing effort to enhance the quality and consistency of safeguards and security appraisals. This guide should be used along with the Office of Independent Oversight (HS-60) Appraisal Process Protocols that describes the overall philosophy, scope, and general procedures applicable to all Independent Oversight appraisal activities, as dictated in DOE Orders 470.2B, Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Program, and 226.1, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy. In

78

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 This guide is a subordinate document to the Independent Oversight Appraisal Process Protocols. While the protocols provide general guidance common to all appraisal activities, this document provides additional detail and guidance regarding procedures and methods specific to ES&H appraisals conducted by Independent Oversight. DOE Order 470.2B is an important reference document that defines program requirements and, in particular, defines processes for sites to respond to identified vulnerabilities and to develop corrective action plans. The processes described in this guide are used for all ES&H appraisals, including periodic inspections, special

79

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations R E B E C C body of research linking bioenergy cultivation to changing patterns of biodiversity, there has been remarkably little interest in how bioenergy plantations affect key ecosystem processes underpinning impor

80

New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power January 27, 2011 - 2:03pm Addthis The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. Todd G. Allen Project Officer, Golden Field Office What are the key facts? The City of San Antonio's EECBG proram staff awarded a block grant for a solar photovoltaic (PV) system at the airport, designed and built the project, and complied with all local and federal regulations... all in seven months. In early 2010, the City of San Antonio's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program staff quickly realized a golden opportunity lay right at their fingertips. The opening of the new San

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Laws & Incentives Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use - Salt Lake City, UT to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use - Salt Lake City, UT on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use - Salt Lake City, UT on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use - Salt Lake City, UT on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use - Salt Lake City, UT on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Incentive for Airport Alternative Fuels Use - Salt Lake City, UT on Digg

82

Comprehensive Energy Management and CC at DFW Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Continuous Commissioning? International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge New York, NY Larry Kramer, P.E., LC, CEM October 20, 2011 Continuous... Commissioning? of DFW International Airport, ICEBO October 20, 2011 2 DFW Airport Overview ? Serves Dallas & Fort Worth ? 18,076 acres (29.8 square mi.) ? 7 runways - 4 are 13,400? ? 4 aircraft can land simultaneously ? 3 control towers ? 5 terminals...

Kramer, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Passenger experience and their implications for airports retail environment design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project develops new knowledge on the full range of activities and interactions that make up airport passengers' retail experiences. The practical application of this (more)

Livingstone, Alison Kate

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - amsterdam airport schiphol Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

these two airports: Schiphol Airport (Amsterdam) 40 minutes by taxi or 1 hour... by train (see by Train). Rotterdam Airport 10 minutes by taxi or more than an hour by bus....

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - adds vancouver airport Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering, Airport Systems Planning, Design, and Management Collection: Engineering ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 13 de Neufville Low Cost Airports 3142007...

86

The Benchmark Evaluation Process: From Experimental Data to Benchmark Model  

SciTech Connect

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) provides a handbook of descriptions, evaluations, and models of experiments with fissionable material. The 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments' (ICSBEP Handbook) is useful for criticality safety analysts and nuclear-data evaluators for validation of neutron transport codes and nuclear cross-section sets. Each of the four main parts of the ICSBEP document provides valuable information. The four parts are as follows: Part 1, detailed description of the experiment; Part 2, evaluation of experimental data to obtain parameter values that define the model and their uncertainties; Part 3, derivation and concise description of the benchmark model; and Part 4, sample calculation results. The ICSBEP Handbook provides a practical, standardized format for documenting nuclear experiments.Valuable, previously unknown data are often discovered during the evaluation process. Besides these discoveries, many other things have been learned during this first decade of evaluating and providing benchmark models of experiments. The current method is described in order to improve understanding of what is required to evaluate benchmark experiments for validation purposes.

Dean, Virginia A.F. [Consultant, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization The assessment of generic Engineered Barrier System (EBS) concepts and design optimization to harbor various disposal configurations and waste types needs advanced approaches and methods to analyze barrier performance. The report addresses: 1) Overview of the importance of Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes to barrier performance, and international collaborations; 2) THMC processes in clay barriers; 3) experimental studies of clay stability and clay-metal interactions at high temperatures and pressures; 4) thermodynamic modeling and database development; 5) Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of clay

88

Process simulation and economical evaluation of enzymatic biodiesel production plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process simulation and economical evaluation of an enzymatic biodiesel production plant has been carried out. Enzymatic biodiesel production from high quality rapeseed oil and methanol has been investigated for solvent free and cosolvent production processes. Several scenarios have been investigated with different production scales (8 and 200mio. kg biodiesel/year) and enzyme price. The cosolvent production process is found to be most expensive and is not a viable choice, while the solvent free process is viable for the larger scale production of 200mio. kg biodiesel/year with the current enzyme price. With the suggested enzyme price of the future, both the small and large scale solvent free production proved viable. The product price was estimated to be 0.731.49/kg biodiesel with the current enzyme price and 0.050.75/kg with the enzyme price of the future for solvent free process.

Lene Fjerbaek Sotoft; Ben-Guang Rong; Knud V. Christensen; Birgir Norddahl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modeling airline frequency competition for airport congestion Vikrant Vaze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responsible for the growing demand for airport resources. We propose a game-theoretic model for airline Barnhart Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract: Demand often exceeds capacity at the congested airports. Airline frequency competition is partially

Entekhabi, Dara

90

Final Report Appendices: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report Appendices: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, December 2012.

91

Final Report: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, December 2012.

92

A Decision Support Tool for the Pushback Rate Control of Airport Departures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-testing of these types of strategies at Boston Logan International Airport, focusing on the communication). Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) is a major airport in the United States, and serves1 A Decision Support Tool for the Pushback Rate Control of Airport Departures Melanie Sandberg

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

93

Decentralized aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to enhance the transportation capabilities of the small airports in the U.S.A., and distribute the high volume of air traffic at the hub airports to those small airports, which are mostly non-controlled airports. Currently, two major focus areas of research...

Ding, Yuanyuan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

SELECTION AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE REDUCTANTS FOR SRAT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Defense Waste Processing Facility - Engineering (DWPF-E) has requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform scoping evaluations of alternative flowsheets with the primary focus on alternatives to formic acid during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The reductants shown below were selected for testing during the evaluation of alternative reductants for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing. The reductants fall into two general categories: reducing acids and non-acidic reducing agents. Reducing acids were selected as direct replacements for formic acid to reduce mercury in the SRAT, to acidify the sludge, and to balance the melter REDuction/OXidation potential (REDOX). Non-acidic reductants were selected as melter reductants and would not be able to reduce mercury in the SRAT. Sugar was not tested during this scoping evaluation as previous work has already been conducted on the use of sugar with DWPF feeds. Based on the testing performed, the only viable short-term path to mitigating hydrogen generation in the CPC is replacement of formic acid with a mixture of glycolic and formic acids. An experiment using glycolic acid blended with formic on an 80:20 molar basis was able to reduce mercury, while also targeting a predicted REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) of 0.2 expressed as Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe. Based on this result, SRNL recommends performing a complete CPC demonstration of the glycolic/formic acid flowsheet followed by a design basis development and documentation. Of the options tested recently and in the past, nitric/glycolic/formic blended acids has the potential for near term implementation in the existing CPC equipment providing rapid throughput improvement. Use of a non-acidic reductant is recommended only if the processing constraints to remove mercury and acidify the sludge acidification are eliminated. The non-acidic reductants (e.g. sugar) will not reduce mercury during CPC processing and sludge acidification would require large amounts of nitric acid (and subsequently larger reductant additions) unless a reducing acid is also used.

Stone, M.; Pickenheim, B.; Peeler, D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

97

Solar utility and renewability evaluation for biodiesel production process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new design concept using solar utility to supply steam and electricity for biodiesel production was proposed. A new indicator, called the renewability index, was then defined and quantified by exergy to evaluate the benefits of substituting fossil fuel utility facilities with solar utility facilities. To reduce the unfavorable environmental impacts of the biodiesel production process, a novel process on an 8000ta?1 scale with solar utility facilities was designed and simulated using Aspen Plus. The results show that the amount of fossil fuel consumption saved per year amounts to 1275t of standard coal and 4676t of CO2 release is also eliminated every year. The renewability index of the biodiesel production process with solar utility facilities is 99.9%, 10.5% higher than that with fossil fuel utility facilities. The results reported in this paper indicate that the unfavorable environmental impacts of the biodiesel production process also deserve attention and the impacts can be eliminated by using solar utility facilities.

Zhi Hou; Danxing Zheng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Tonopah Airport Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tonopah Airport Solar Power Plant Tonopah Airport Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Tonopah Airport Solar Power Plant Facility Tonopah Airport Solar Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer Solar Millenium, LLC Location Nye County, Nevada Coordinates 38.5807111°, -116.0413889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5807111,"lon":-116.0413889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Washington, D.C. -- A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles

100

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW) Pavement Condition and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M ................................................1. Conditions at Roswell International Air Center (ROW) 4 .................................Figure 1. Geographic Location of Roswell International Air Center (ROW) 4 ..............................Table 1

Cal, Mark P.

102

EECBG Success Story: LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

About 250 lights along the taxiway at Hammond Northshore Regional Airport in Louisiana are being replaced with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with funds from an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). Learn more.

103

Competitive behavior of airlines at multiple airport systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The way passenger traffic is distributed at multiple airport systems continues to intrigue air transportation planners, urban planners, and policy-makers as researchers attempt to unravel how airlines, air travelers and ...

Chen, Edmund

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Transfer passenger needs at airports : human factors in terminal design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the needs of particular users of airport: transfer passengers. The object of this work has been to produce a set of design guidelines for terminals. these guidelines are framed upon a user-need survey ...

Brillembourg, Marie-Claire

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A survey of approaches to the airport slot allocation problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: The allocation of slots at congested major commercial airports is one of the most difficult problems facing the aviation community today. The stakes involved are very large and the controversy generated by ...

Cohen, Dayl Arlene

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Mitigating airport congestion : market mechanisms and airline response models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient allocation of scarce resources in networks is an important problem worldwide. In this thesis, we focus on resource allocation problems in a network of congested airports. The increasing demand for access to the ...

Harsha, Pavithra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

New MagViz Airport Liquid Analysis System Undergoes Testing  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 16, 2008?An innovative application of a technology first used for medical imaging may enhance airport security if Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are successful. Los Alamos technologists have adapted Magnetic Res

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

Abstract--Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused by an increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this project is to provide the airport manager at major airports, such as Dulles International Airport of emissions offset. The case study of this project will be Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD Abstract-- Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused

109

Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

Krupa, J.F.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Public funding of airport incentives in the United States: The efficacy of the Small Community Air Service Development Grant program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As U.S. airlines began to restrict available domestic capacity at smaller airports in 2008 as a result of higher fuel prices and an economic downturn, these airports have increasingly started to rely on incentive packages composed of revenue guarantees, waived or reduced airport use fees, marketing support, or direct subsidies to attract new service. There are two main federal programs that provide funding for such incentives for small U.S. airports: the Essential Air Service (EAS) program and the Small Community Air Service Development Grant (SCASDG) program. While the EAS program has received considerable academic attention, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the success of SCASDG recipients in attracting and retaining their targeted air service. Using a metric of SCASD grant success, this paper evaluates the outcomes of 115 SCASD grantees from 2006 to 2011. In each year, fewer than half of the grant recipients were ultimately successful in meeting the goals of their proposal. Several case studies suggest that successful grantees often had significant community or airline support prior to submitting their grant and were located in slightly larger-than-average communities. Further careful consideration is necessary to determine whether reform of the SCASDG program is warranted to more effectively support the development of small community air service in the United States.

Michael D. Wittman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FCC-70 FCC-70 Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems John Rugh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The air-conditioning (A/C) system compressor load can significantly impact the fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric automobiles. With the increasing emphasis on fuel economy, it is clear that the A/C compressor load needs to be reduced. In order to accomplish this goal, more efficient climate control delivery systems and reduced peak soak temperatures will be necessary to reduce the impact of vehicle A/C systems on fuel economy and tailpipe emissions. Good analytical techniques are important in identifying promising concepts. The goal at

112

Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

Bradley, W.H. [General Motors, Warren, MI (United States). Service Technology Group

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241  

SciTech Connect

The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation process. It was possible to correlate it with the final amount of non-degraded resins. These results show that these conditions were favorable to destroy the resins, indicating to be the AOP an effective technique to reduce the volume of the waste. (authors)

Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil)] [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil); Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)] [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North Carolina Airport North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on AddThis.com...

115

Airport Viz - A 3D Tool to Enhance Security Operations | ornl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airport Viz - A 3D Tool to Enhance Security Operations June 12, 2013 Problem Statement: Airport security personnel needed an easy-to-use tool to investigate passenger checkpoint...

116

Modeling Changes in Connectivity at U.S. Airports: A Small Community Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There currently exists no industry-standard model for measuring an airport's level of connectivity to the global air transportation network. This discussion paper introduces the Airport Connectivity Quality Index (ACQI)--a ...

Wittman, Michael D.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

St. Louis Airport St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: St. Louis Airport Relies on Biodiesel and Natural Gas Vehicles on AddThis.com...

118

Airports and Bicycles: what are the obstacles and incentives for operators 1 to improve bicycle access?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leading to the airport. The MBTA is testing a policy thatTransportation Authority (MBTA) T trains, buses and ferry.

Orrick, Phyllis; Frick, Karen Trapenberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Feasibility Analysis of Aircraft Landing Scheduling for Non-Controlled Airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasibility Analysis of Aircraft Landing Scheduling for Non-Controlled Airports AIAA-2004 airports Air traffic control automation system development Trajectory analysis Aircraft landing scheduling aircraft scheduling will become the key operational issue at non-controlled airports as the operation

Valasek, John

120

Analysis of Airport Performance using Surface Surveillance Data: A Case Study of BOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operational performance of an airport, and present them for the specific case of Boston Logan International. For this study, we used ASDE-X data from Boston Logan International Airport (BOS), dra of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139. hamsa@mit.edu. AIAA Member. Operations Manager, Boston Airport Traffic

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Optimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa Balakrishnan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Boston's Logan International Airport in the US are used to illustrate the advantages of the proposed for Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) is shown in Fig. 1. Gates at each of the four main terminalsOptimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

122

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Impact of Arrivals on Departure Taxi Operations at Airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-out operations. Through an analysis of departures out of John F. Kennedy International Airport and Boston Logan affect departure operations at Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) as well as those at other International Airport, several variables affecting taxi-out times were identified, including primarily

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

123

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This is the Technical Progress Report for the eleventh quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period January 1 through March 31, 1997. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized process stream samples from HTI Run ALC-2, in which Black Thunder Mine coal was liquefied using four combinations of dispersed catalyst precursors. These results are described in the Results and Discussion section of this report. (2) Oil assays were completed on the HT I Run PB-05 product blend. Background information is presented in the Results and Discussion section of this report. The results are presented in Appendix 1. (3) Fractional distillation of the net product oil of HTI Run POC-1 was completed. Background information is presented in the Results and Discussion section of this report. The results are presented in Appendix 2. (4) CONSOL completed an evaluation of the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers from coal liquefaction phenols. Those results are described briefly in the Results and Discussion section of this report. The full report is presented in Appendix 3. (5) At the request of DOE, various coal liquid samples and relevant characterization data were supplied to the University of West Virginia and the Federal Energy Technology Center. These activities are described in Appendix 4. (6) The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is completing the resid reaction computer model. A summary of Delaware's progress is provided in the Results and Discussion section. (7) The University of Delaware was instructed on the form in which the computer model is to be delivered to CONSOL (Appendix 5). (8) The University of Delaware submitted a paper on the resid reactivity work for presentation at the 213th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 13-17, 1997 in San Francisco, California. The paper, ''Kinetics of Hydroprocessing of Coal-Derived Vacuum Resids'', is appended (Appendix 6).

G.A. Robbins; G.W. Heunisch; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process evaluation of the gasification of leningrad oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experiments on the thermal processing of Leningrad oil shale in a laboratory reactor under the conditions...

Yu. A. Strizhakova; N. Ch. Movsum-Zade; T. A. Avakyan; T. V. Usova

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Application of a pedestrian portal monitor at Madrid International Airport in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three pedestrian portal monitor systems, designed to detect illicit trafficking or inadvertent movement of radioactive materials carried by passengers at airports, have been evaluated. The systems were supplied by three manufacturers: Bicron, Exploranium and Thermo-Eberline. In an initial evaluation, conducted at the Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering of the School of Civil Engineering, it was observed that the FHT-1372 system manufactured by Thermo-Eberline gave a more sensitive response and allowed the measurement of total photon dose rate and artificial photon dose rate. Therefore, this system was installed at Barajas International Airport in Madrid in 2002 for a period of 108 days in order to select an appropriate investigation level (defined as the radiation level that is selected as the trigger for further investigation). During this period 1,339,931 passengers were screened and a total of 39 alarms were triggered, 5 of which with a value 10 times the mean value of the natural background from photon radiation (which was 85nSv/h), and no alarms exceeded 100?Sv/h at 1m distance, which is the level of response for legal transport of radioactive materials set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). An investigation level of approximately 1.3 times the natural background was finally selected. This value coincides with the results obtained in the ITRAP (Illicit Trafficking Radiation Detection Assessment Program) carried out by the IAEA.

Ll. Pujol; J.A. Gonzalez-Gonzalez; M.J. Suarez-Navarro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Observations of W intering Snowy Owls ( Nyctea scandiaca ) at Logan Airport, East Boston, Massachusetts fr om 1981-1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Airport, Boston, MA. 591 #12;2nd Owl Symposium under snow with the noise at Logan Airport. DataObservations of W intering Snowy Owls ( Nyctea scandiaca ) at Logan Airport, East Boston in East Boston, MA, latitude 42°22N and longitude 071°01W . The 13th busiest in the world, the airport

127

Freight/logistics symposium ..2 Airport guidebook...................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Freight/logistics symposium ..2 · Airport guidebook...................3 · State Fair exhibit Administration in Boston, is charged with improving the nation's transpor- tation system through collaborations between the USDOT and other federal, state, local, and international agencies and entities. "This

Minnesota, University of

128

CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez Joshua A. Bonaventura-Sparagna & Marek Kmiecik ASRC, SUNY, Albany, NY Ray George & David Renné NREL, Golden, CO ABSTRACT Cloud cover has been generated all or in part from cloud cover measurements [1,2]. This paper presents evidence

Perez, Richard R.

129

Demonstration of Reduced Airport Congestion through Pushback Rate Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in taxi times, fuel burn and emissions at major airports. This paper describes the field tests conducted during August and September 2010, fuel use was reduced by an estimated 12,250- 14,500 kg (4,000-4,700 US gallons), while aircraft gate pushback times were increased by an average of only 4.4 minutes

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

130

Issue 417 October 2014 At an airport without an operational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the standard non-towered airport procedures. The following ASRS reports highlight some of the problems commonly A C680 Flight Crew had to abort their takeoff when an aircraft made an unannounced departure-Pilot called, "Airspeed alive" and then said he saw an airplane far down the runway. I yelled, "Abort" below 50

131

Evaluation and Comparison of Ecological Models Simulating Nitrogen Processes in Treatment Wetlands,Implemented in Modelica.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models have been implemented, simulated, and visualized in the (more)

Edelfeldt, Stina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Evaluating the effects of wildfire on stream processes in a Colorado front range watershed, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impacts of a September 2010 wildfire on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are being evaluated in a Colorado Front Range stream.

Sheila F. Murphy; Jeffrey H. Writer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on t...

Olga C Damman; Michelle Hendriks; Jany Rademakers; Diana MJ Delnoij

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation of Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation of Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webinar, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

135

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation of Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation of Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webinar, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings program.

136

THERMODYNAMIC EVALUATION OF PROCESSES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM CARBONACEOUS FUEL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research work presents the thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production using steam methane reforming process at different conditions. The model is developed using HSC 4.1 (more)

Kaini, Bhanu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Safety-oriented Resilience Evaluation in Chemical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to compare the resilience levels of two ethylene production designs demonstrated the proposed approaches and gave insights on process resilience of the designs....

Dinh, Linh Thi Thuy

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of public engagement in the Yolo County budget process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The County Administrator???s Office of Yolo County continues to seek new opportunities to improve processes for operational improvement. In recent years, many local governments have (more)

Williams, Lyndsey Kathleen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A method for carbon oxide concentration evaluation in high-temperature combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for evaluating carbon oxide concentration in high-temperature combustion processes is presented. The paper offers an optimizing control problem for fuel combustion process using a stabilizing regulatory controller, which affects the fuel/air ...

K. E. Arystanbaev, A. T. Apsemetov

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A method for carbon oxide concentration evaluation in high-temperature combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for evaluating carbon oxide concentration in high-temperature combustion processes is presented. The paper offers an optimizing control problem for fuel combustion process using a stabilizing regulatory ...

K. E. Arystanbaev; A. T. Apsemetov

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Dynamic Control for Batch Process Systems Using Stochastic Utility Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

single turn; 3. once in operation, it is not possible to shut down a furnace, e.g., to take corrective measures; and 4. batching takes approximately 5 to 10 times longer than serial processing. Products can be processed either as a full batch (the... maximum number of products, i.e. the full capacity of the processor) or as a partial batch. The full batch condition poses fewer decision-making problems since management is needed only to determine which product type has priority in processing...

Park, Hongsuk

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

Design and development of a supplier evaluation process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-cost sourcing is a strategy many companies, including Pratt & Whitney, use to reduce part costs. As they increase their efforts to resource products to low-cost regions, Pratt & Whitney needs a robust process to ...

Corum, Andrew (Andrew R.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

GRR/Section 13-FD-c - Navigable Water Evaluation Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c - Navigable Water Evaluation Process c - Navigable Water Evaluation Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-FD-c - Navigable Water Evaluation Process 13FDCNavigableWatersEvaluationProcess (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Federal Emergency Management Agency US Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Bridges over Navigable Waters Act 33 CFR 115.50 Application for bridge permits Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13FDCNavigableWatersEvaluationProcess (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

144

GRR/Section 13-FD-a - Farmland Evaluation Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-FD-a - Farmland Evaluation Process 3-FD-a - Farmland Evaluation Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-FD-a - Farmland Evaluation Process 13-FD-a - FarmlandEvaluationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Department of Agriculture Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Farmland Protection Policy Act DOA FPPA Regulations 7 CFR 658 Statutory definition of "farmland" - 7 USC 4201 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-FD-a - FarmlandEvaluationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

145

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL characterized 38 process strea m samples from HTI Run PB- 04, in which Black Thunder Mine Coal, Hondo vacuum resid, autom obile shredder residue (ASR), and virgin plastics were used as liquefaction feedstocks with dispersed catalyst. A paper on kinetic modeling of resid reactivity was presented at the DOE Coal Lique -faction and Solid Fuels Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, i n Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "The Reactivity of Direct Coal Liquefaction Resids", i s appended (Appendix 1). Three papers on characterization of samples from coal/ resid/ waste p lastics co- liquefaction were presented or submitted for presen tation at conferences. Because of their similarity, only one of the papers is appended to this report. The paper, "Characterization o f Process Samples From Co- Liquefaction of Coal and Waste Polymers", (Appendix 2) was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuels C ontractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "Characterization of Process Stream Samples From Bench- Scale Co -Liquefaction Runs That Utilized Waste Polymers as Feedstocks" was presented at the 214th National Meeting of the Ameri can Chemical Society, September 7- 11, 1997, in Las Vegas, NV. The paper, "Characterization of Process Oils from Coal/ Waste Co- Liquefaction" wa s submitted for presentation at the 14th Japan/ U. S. Joint Technical Meeting on Coa l Liquefaction and Materials for Coal Liquefaction on October 28, 1997, in Tokyo, Japan. A joint Burns and Roe Services Corp. and CONSOL pap er on crude oil assays of product oils from HTI Run PB- 03 was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuel s Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper , "Characterization of Liquid Products from All- Slurry Mode Liquefaction", is appende d (Appendix 3).

G. A. Robbins; R. A. Winschel; S. D. Brandes

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evaluation of an integrated Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining process model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data Mining projects are implemented by following the knowledge discovery process. This process is highly complex and iterative in nature and comprises of several phases, starting off with business understanding, and followed by data understanding, data ... Keywords: Analytical testing, CRISP-DM, Evaluation, IKDDM, Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) process models

Sumana Sharma; Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson; George M. Kasper

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels February 22, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program A recent flight to a conference inspired me to think about the impact of airports on our environment and society. Although modern planes have made it safe and fun to travel around the world, they use a vast amount of fuel. The petroleum used by the array of behind-the-scenes equipment, from shuttle buses to luggage carriers, adds up as well. Although Clean Cities doesn't address planes, our 87 local coalitions have helped airports limit their petroleum use in other ways, reducing their smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced

150

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels February 22, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program A recent flight to a conference inspired me to think about the impact of airports on our environment and society. Although modern planes have made it safe and fun to travel around the world, they use a vast amount of fuel. The petroleum used by the array of behind-the-scenes equipment, from shuttle buses to luggage carriers, adds up as well. Although Clean Cities doesn't address planes, our 87 local coalitions have helped airports limit their petroleum use in other ways, reducing their smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced

151

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Report of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. Activities from the first three quarters of the fiscal 1998 year were reported previously as Quarterly Technical Progress Reports (DOE/PC93054-57, DOE/PC93054-61, and DOE/PC93054-66). Activities for the period July 1 through September 30, 1998, are reported here. This report describes CONSOL's characterization of process-derived samples obtained from HTI Run PB-08. These samples were derived from operations with Black Thunder Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal, simulated mixed waste plastics, and pyrolysis oils derived from waste plastics and waste tires. Comparison of characteristics among the PB-08 samples was made to ascertain the effects of feed composition changes. A comparison also was made to samples from a previous test (Run PB-06) made in the same processing unit, with Black Thunder Mine coal, and in one run condition with co-fed mixed plastics.

G.A. Robbins; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Relaxing the perimeter and high-density rules: implications for Washington Dulles International Airport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Perimeter and High-Density Rules have been the foundation upon which the physically limited capacity of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport has been allocated. The perimeter rule at National Airport requires nonstop scheduled airline flights from that airport to serve destinations within a 1250-mile perimeter. The distance limit was initially introduced for a combination of reasons including environmental conservation (especially with respect to noise nuisance) and the desire to offer some protection for other airports in the Washington DC area as they built up traffic to reach a critical mass. The US Senate has recently taken actions to adjust the perimeter rule at National Airport. Any major relaxing of the rule will have implications for the other major airports in the National Capital Region; namely Washington Dulles International Airport and BaltimoreWashington International Airport. The resultant knock-on effects of this development on the wider economy of the region is examined here. The main attention of the paper is on the impact of any major change in the perimeter rule on Washington Dulles International Airport, and on the subsequent knock-on effects this would have on the region's employment level and structure.

Kenneth Button; Peter Arena; Roger Stough

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport ground support Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Texas at Austin, University of - Center for Transportation Research Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2 Paper Number: 109 Abstract--Airports are of...

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - airport market feasibility Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Texas at Austin, University of - Center for Transportation Research Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2 Amsterdam Multi-airport System Policy...

155

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

February 13, 2013 Webinar: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation … Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation - Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation - Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast February 13, 2013 Ed Vine: Hello everyone and good afternoon. My name is Ed Vine and I am a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, otherwise known as LBNL, and I'm the LBNL project manager for the evaluation of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. You may hear the term BBNP-it's a short- handed version for that. So thank you for joining us and welcome to today's webinar on the preliminary process and market evaluation of the BBNP. This evaluation addresses the national program with a goal of identifying what elements of grantee programs are most successful at bringing about market changes that will result in sustainable energy savings. The study provides a preliminary assessment focused on

157

GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process GRR/Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 10 - On-Site Evaluation Process 10SiteEvaluation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Fish and Wildlife Service United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies Endangered Species Act Clean Water Act Clean Air Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 10SiteEvaluation.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

158

Thermoelectric Microdevice Fabrication Process and Evaluation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system), radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are used for power [1]. Thermoelectric devicesThermoelectric Microdevice Fabrication Process and Evaluation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL of integrated thermal management and power management and distribution. Micro thermoelectric converters

159

A nutritional evaluation of to, a staple African food, cooked using three different processing methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF TO, A STAPLE AFRICAN FOOD, COOKED USING THREE DIFFERENT PROCESSING METHODS A Thesis by BEVERLY THURMOND JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology A NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF TO, A STAPLE AFRICAN FOOD, COOKED USING THREE DIFFERENT PROCESSING METHODS A Thesis by BEVERLY THURMOND JOHNSON Approved as to style...

Johnson, Beverly Thurmond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Dravo Lime, Inc. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to power generators with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on many coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project previously tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium-and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide byproduct slurry produced from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization system. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP, Unit 3, and the second test was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant testing provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. This report presents the results from those long-term tests. The tests determined the effectiveness of injecting commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP) for sulfuric acid control. The results show that injecting either slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, this overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NOX control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The long-term tests also determined balance-of-plant impacts from slurry injection during the two tests. These include impacts on boiler back-end temperatures and pressure drops, SCR catalyst properties, ESP performance, removal of other flue gas species, and flue gas opacity. For the most part the balance-of-plant impacts were neutral to positive, although adverse effects on ESP performance became an issue during the BMP test.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Leakage Evaluated and Controlled from Industrial Process Pipeline by Optimum Gasket Assembly Stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 Leakage Evaluated and Controlled from Industrial Process Pipeline by Optimum Gasket Assembly and vehicles), but they have ignore the leakage between pipelines in process industries. When hazardous something to do with false selection of gaskets, inappropriate setting and repair, as well as poor

Chen, Shu-Ching

164

The Integrated Airport: Building a Successful NextGen Testbed  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This presentation will describe a unique public-private partnership - the Integrated Airport - that was created to engage in research and testing related to NextGen Technology deployment. NextGen refers to the program that will be initiated to modernize the US National Airspace. As with any major, multi-decadeinitiative, such as NextGen, integration of work efforts by multiple partners in the modernization is critical for success. This talk will focus on the development of the consortium, how the consortium plans for NextGen initiatives, the series of technology demonstrations we have produced and plans for the future of NextGen testing and implementation.

Christina Frederick-Recascino

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

In May 2002, the Airport Technical Assistance Program, also known as AirTAP,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.revisor.leg.state.mn.us. This rule pro- vides runway length-based lighting require- ments as well as wind indicator and other through TALS. State funding for electrical maintenance is available by request. Wildlife Control Seminar October 17, 2002: Marshall Municipal Airport This workshop with provide information on airport wildlife

Minnesota, University of

166

Directions to the University of Connecticut Storrs Campus From Bradley International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directions to the University of Connecticut ­ Storrs Campus From Bradley International Airport: As you exit the airport take CT-20 towards I-91 (Hartford/Springfield) for about 4 miles. Take I-91 South miles. Take the I-84 East exit towards Boston for about 12.5 miles to exit 68 (Route 195). Travel south

Olshevsky, Vadim

167

Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) Monitoring of the Airport Calibration Pads at Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado, for Long-Term Radiation Variations (August 1978) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report

168

Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH EVALUATIONS APPRAISAL PROCESS GUIDE July 2009 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide Preface July 2009 i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), published its Appraisal Process Protocols to describe the philosophy, scope, and general procedures applicable to all Independent Oversight appraisal activities. The Office of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Evaluations (HS-64) initially prepared this companion guide as part of a continuing effort to enhance the quality and consistency of ES&H oversight appraisals. The

170

Evaluation of continuous oxydesulfurization processes. Final technical report, September 1979-July 1981  

SciTech Connect

Three processes developed by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), Ledgemont Laboratories, and Ames Laboratories for the oxydesulfurization of coal were evaluated in continuous processing equipment designed, built, and/or adapted for the purpose at the DOE-owned Multi-Use Fuels and Energy Processes Test Plant (MEP) located at TRW's Capistrano Test Site in California. The three processes differed primarily in the chemical additives (none, sodium carbonate, or ammonia), fed to the 20% to 40% coal/water slurries, and in the oxygen content of the feed gas stream. Temperature, pressure, residence time, flow rates, slurry concentration and stirrer speed were the other primary independent variables. The amount of organic sulfur removed, total sulfur removed and the Btu recovery were the primary dependent variables. Evaluation of the data presented was not part of the test effort.

Jones, J.F.; Wever, D.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economic and environmental evaluation of microalgae biodiesel production using process simulation tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work introduces a systematic method for the economic and environmental analysis and design of new technologies applied to the 3rd generation (from microalgae) biodiesel production process. The evaluation method is based on the integrated use of process simulation techniques with economic and environmental models. The approach is applied to a new technology introduced by some of the authors, where the glycerol produced in the transesterification is used as carbon source for microalgae growth. Firstly, a state of the art biodiesel production plant in the process simulator it is modelled and the economical and environmental performance is computed. Then, the new technology is introduced and its performance are compared. The method presented is very useful for decision-makers in order to evaluate the inclusion of new technologies to improve the chemical process operation and topological designs.

Robert Brunet; David Carrasco; Eduardo Muoz; Gonzalo Guilln-Goslbez; Ioanis Katakis; Laureano Jimnez

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

UNH Jerard/Fussell 1 Project Summary -Dynamic Evaluation of Machine Tool Process Capability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNH ­ Jerard/Fussell 1 Project Summary - Dynamic Evaluation of Machine Tool Process Capability large and small plant operations and decisions. For example, we show some real world examples where part, annual expenditures on machining operations total more than $200 Billion or about 2% of GDP. · Self

New Hampshire, University of

173

Peer Review As part of the overall evaluation process for faculty members, standing peer review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peer Review As part of the overall evaluation process for faculty members, standing peer review, scholarship, and service. Peer review committees may be established at the discipline and/or at the division level (interdisciplinary). Peer review committees will consist of at least five tenured faculty members

Gering, Jon C.

174

Evaluation of Authorization Basis Management Systems and Processes at the Pantex Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Evaluation of Authorization Basis Management Systems and Processes at the OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................... 4 2.0 RESULTS ......................................................................................... 6 Line Management Responsibility for Safety ................................ 6 Clear Roles, Responsibilities, and Authorities ........................... 10 Competence Commensurate with Responsibility ...................... 15 Balanced Priorities ........................................................................ 18 Identification and Flowdown of Requirements.......................... 22 Hazard Analysis and Controls

175

February 13, 2013 Webinar: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

February 13, 2013 Webinar: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast ; Better Buildings Neighborhood Program; national program with a goal of identifying what elements of grantee programs are most successful at bringing about market changes that will result in sustainable energy savings

176

Differential-ground-motion array at Hollister Municipal Airport, California  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the differential array of seismometers recently installed at the Hollister, California, Municipal Airport. Such an array of relatively closely spaced seismometers has already been installed in El Centro and provided useful information for both engineering and seismological applications from the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake. Differential ground motions, principally due to horizontally propagating surface waves, are important in determining the stresses in such extended structures as large mat foundations for nuclear power stations, dams, bridges and pipelines. Further, analyses of the records of the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake from the differential array have demonstrated the utility of short-baseline array data in tracking the progress of the rupture wave front of an earthquake. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Bycroft, G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evaluation Methodology for Advance Heat Exchanger Concepts Using Analytical Hierarchy Process  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the secondary/process heat exchanger (SHX) for power production and process heat application for a Next Generation Nuclear Reactors (NGNR). The potential options for use as an SHX are explored such as shell and tube, printed circuit heat exchanger. A shell and tube (helical coiled) heat exchanger is a recommended for a demonstration reactor because of its reliability while the reactor design is being further developed. The basic setup for the selection of the SHX has been established with evaluation goals, alternatives, and criteria. This study describes how these criteria and the alternatives are evaluated using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP).

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules  

SciTech Connect

This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Field evaluation of the availability for corn and soybean of phosphorus recovered as struvite from corn fiber processing for bioenergy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??FIELD EVALUATION OF THE AVAILABILITY FOR CORN AND SOYBEAN OF PHOSPHORUS RECOVERED AS STRUVITE FROM CORN FIBER PROCESSING FOR BIOENERGY A paper to be submitted (more)

Thompson, Louis Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Airport snow removal is a critical winter operation in Minnesota. To ensure effective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

training program and do we document our training activities? · Do we have good weather forecast- ing, visit www.AirTAP.umn.edu. A publication of the Airport Technical Assistance Program of the Center

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Application of Artificial Neural Network Forecasts to Predict Fog at Canberra International Airport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The occurrence of fog can significantly impact air transport operations, and plays an important role in aviation safety. The economic value of aviation forecasts for Sydney Airport alone in 1993 was estimated at $6.8 million (Australian dollars) ...

Dustin Fabbian; Richard de Dear; Stephen Lellyett

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Airport surface traffic optimization and simulation in the presence of uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface traffic congestion causes significant taxi delays and long queues for takeoffs at busy airports, increasing operational and environmental costs. These impacts may be mitigated by optimizing runway and taxiway ...

Lee, Hanbong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A linear programming solution to the gate assignment problem at airport terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research solves the flight-to-gate assignment problem at airports in such a way as to minimize, or at least reduce, walking distances for passengers inside terminals. Two solution methods are suggested. The first is ...

Mangoubi, Rami

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

How to prepare an airport for the Olympic Games? : transportation of the Olympic Family Members  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes and assesses the preparation of Athens International Airport for and its performance during the Olympic Games in 2004. The analysis includes infrastructural modifications made and organizational ...

Kassens, Eva

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Evolution of domestic traffic and fares at the top 200 US airports between 1990 and 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this thesis is to analyze the evolution of domestic Origin- Destination (O-D) traffic and fares at the Top 200 airports in the United States between 1990 and 2008. The impetus behind this research is ...

Ben Abda, Mehdi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Customer relations management: service operations: simulation's role in baggage screening at the airports: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Aviation and Transportation Security Act passed by Congress in November, 2001 required the nation's airports to perform 100% checked baggage screening by December 31, 2002. To determine the impact of this requirement on its operations, Lambert St. ...

Suna Hafizogullari; Gloria Bender; Cenk Tunasar

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Observation and Analysis of Departure Planning Operations at Boston Logan International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Departure Planner (DP) is a concept for a decision-aiding tool that is aimed at improving the departure operations performance at major congested airports. In order to support the development of the DP tool, the flow ...

Idris, Husni R.

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy, Shading and Daylighting Analysis for the Austin Bergstrom International Airport Terminal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Austin Airport included large glass areas for viewing arriving and departing planes, the sky, and the surrounding terrain. The glass was envisioned to provide quality natural lighting for the terminal during daylight hours in order to improve the quality...

Holder, L. M. III; Holder, L. M. IV

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Getting to Osnabrck 1 Flying to Mnster / Osnabrck Int. Airport (FMO)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Getting to Osnabrück 1 Flying to Münster / Osnabrück Int. Airport (FMO) Although no transatlantic, but it also has no direct transatlantic flights. Many discount airlines -- such as Ryan Air -- fly to Bremen

Osnabrück, Universität

191

A combined graph theory and analytic hierarchy process approach for multicriteria evaluation of hydrogen energy systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a renewable energy source and has the potential to mitigate the green house gas effect and to meet the increasing global electricity demand. In the present study, a multicriteria methodology is developed by combining graph theory and analytic hierarchy process methods for the evaluation and selection of hydrogen energy systems. The hydrogen energy system alternatives are assessed with respect to economic, environmental, performance and social criteria by computing the hydrogen energy system preference index. A detailed procedure for determination of hydrogen energy system preference index is suggested. Two examples relating to hydrogen production processes and hydrogen energy technologies are cited in order to demonstrate and validate the effectiveness and flexibility of the proposed methodology. In each example, a list of all possible choices from the best to the worst alternatives is obtained taking into account different evaluation criteria.

Pramod B. Lanjewar; R.V. Rao; A.V. Kale

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Stimulating utilities to promote energy efficiency: Process evaluation of Madison Gas and Electric's Competition Pilot Program  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process evaluation of the design and implementation of the Energy Conservation Competition Pilot (hereafter referred to as the Competition), ordered by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSCW) with a conceptual framework defined by PSCW staff for the Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) Company. This process evaluation documents the history of the Competition, describing the marketing strategies adopted by MGE and its competitors, customer service and satisfaction, administrative issues, the distribution of installed measures, free riders, and the impact of the Competition on MGE, its competitors, and other Wisconsin utilities. We also suggest recommendations for a future Competition, compare the Competition with other approaches that public utility commissions (PUCs) have used to motivate utilities to promote energy efficiency, and discuss its transferability to other utilities. 48 refs., 8 figs., 40 tabs.

Vine, E.; De Buen, O.; Goldfman, C.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A design-for-environment study for plating processes -- Evaluations of wastewater precipitation and separation technologies  

SciTech Connect

A wastewater pollution prevention study was performed for two plating processes. This study included wastewater precipitation process analysis, and evaluation of separation and recycling alternatives. The pollution prevention opportunity assessment goals are: to reduce and reuse wastewater, to develop a design-for-environment plating process, and to conduct a material life-cycle analysis (LCA) for selected materials and with well-defined boundary. From an analysis of coordination chemistry and a series of precipitation process tests, it was found that treatment with optimized pH and mixing rate, proper coprecipitants (such as iron salts), and chemical dosages were needed to dissociate metal ions from the chelated complexes (Cu-EDTA) in the wastewater. In this study, reverse osmosis and ion exchange, separation/recycling technologies were also evaluated. A water reclamation project with these two technologies was implemented. The analysis indicated, that with recycling systems, 33% of the wastewater could be reclaimed and more than 90% of reduction of copper in wastewater was achieved. With the LCA, a greener approach was implemented to reduce the wasted parts disposal problems.

Chang, L.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hydrogen production from methane and solar energy Process evaluations and comparison studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Three conventional and novel hydrogen and liquid fuel production schemes, i.e. steam methane reforming (SMR), solar SMR, and hybrid solar-redox processes are investigated in the current study. H2 (and liquid fuel) productivity, energy conversion efficiency, and associated CO2 emissions are evaluated based on a consistent set of process conditions and assumptions. The conventional SMR is estimated to be 68.7% efficient (HHV) with 90% CO2 capture. Integration of solar energy with methane in solar SMR and hybrid solar-redox processes is estimated to result in up to 85% reduction in life-cycle CO2 emission for hydrogen production as well as 99122% methane to fuel conversion efficiency. Compared to the reforming-based schemes, the hybrid solar-redox process offers flexibility and 6.58% higher equivalent efficiency for liquid fuel and hydrogen co-production. While a number of operational parameters such as solar absorption efficiency, steam to methane ratio, operating pressure, and steam conversion can affect the process performances, solar energy integrated methane conversion processes have the potential to be efficient and environmentally friendly for hydrogen (and liquid fuel) production.

Feng He; Fanxing Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Public Funding of Airport Incentives: The Efficacy of the Small Community Air Service Development Grant (SCASDG) Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As U.S. airlines began to restrict available domestic capacity at smaller airports in 2008 as a result of higher

Wittman, Michael D.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kellogg, L.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties in friction stir processed SKD61 tool steel  

SciTech Connect

A SKD61 tool steel was friction stir processed using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Microstructure, tensile properties and wear characteristic were evaluated. Fine grains with a martensite structure were produced in the friction stir processed zone, which led to the increase of the microindentation hardness. The grains became finer when the heat input was lowered. The transverse tensile strength of the friction stir processed zone was equal to that of base metal and all the tensile specimens fractured at base metal zone. The wear width and depth of the friction stir processed zone at the load of 1.96 N were 339 {mu}m and 6 {mu}m, as compared to 888 {mu}m and 42 {mu}m of the base metal, decreased by 62% and 86%. Findings of the present study suggest that low heat input is an effective method to produce a friction stir processed zone composed of relatively fine grain martensitic structure with good tensile properties and wear characteristic.

Chen, Y.C., E-mail: armstrong@hit.edu.cn [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nakata, K. [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Corrosion evaluation of the PNS CITROX process for chemical decontamination of BWR structural materials  

SciTech Connect

The effects of PNS Citrox decontamination on the corrosion and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600 were assessed. Evaluations involved decontaminated surface morphology examination, as well as constant extension rate tensile (CERT) testing in BWR water. Quenched and tempered low alloy steel was also included for evaluation of general corrosion. The Pacific Nuclear Services (PNS) Citrox decontamination included laboratory one- and three-step processes as well as an in-plant three- step Citrox process applied at the Vermont Yankee Power Plant. For the laboratory Citrox decontamination, intergranular attack (IGA) up to 3.2 mils in depth was observed in the sensitized Type 304 stainless steel. No IGA occurred in the laboratory decontaminated Alloy 600. On the other hand, no IGA was found in sensitized Type 304 stainless steel for the in-plant Citrox decontamination, but shallow and extremely narrow IGA was observed in the Alloy 600. Results of CERT stress corrosion cracking tests indicated that sensitized Type 304 stainless steel exposed to the three-step laboratory Citrox decontamination suffered degradation of IGSCC resistance. However, no degradation of IGSCC resistance was observed for the steel exposed to the one-step laboratory process or to PNS Citrox decontamination at the Vermont Yankee Plant. Moderate general corrosion in the range of one to three mils per decontamination cycle was observed in quenched and tempered low alloy steel. However, very low general corrosion was found in sensitized Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600.

Wang, M.T.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluation and comparison of models and modelling tools simulating nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models were implemented, simulated, and visualized using the Modelica modelling and simulation language [P. Fritzson, Principles of Object-Oriented Modelling and Simulation with Modelica 2.1 (Wiley-IEEE Press, USA, 2004).] and an associated tool. The differences and similarities between the MathModelica Model Editor and three other ecological modelling tools have also been evaluated. The results show that the models can well be modelled and simulated in the MathModelica Model Editor, and that nitrogen decrease in a constructed treatment wetland should be described and simulated using the Nitrification/Denitrification model as this model has the highest overall quality score and provides a more variable environment.

Stina Edelfeldt; Peter Fritzson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. The technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. Using these results, the carbon sequestration potential of the three technologies was then evaluated. The results of these evaluations are given in this final report.

Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume I. Recent airport measurement programs, data analyses, and sub-model development. Final report Jan78-Jul 80  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Microsoft PowerPoint - Pittsburgh International Airport to Morgantown Site Directions.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pittsburgh International Airport to Pittsburgh International Airport to Morgantown Site, Morgantown, WV 1. Exit airport on US-60S toward Pittsburgh/I-79S (follow signs to Pittsburgh, proceed ~7 miles). 2. Merge onto US-22E/US-30E toward Pittsburgh (proceed ~3 miles). 3. Merge onto I-79S toward WASHINGTON, PA (proceed ~25 miles). I-70 East merges with I-79, continue on I-70E/I-79S. 4. Merge RIGHT at Exit 21 onto I-79S toward MORGANTOWN, WV (proceed ~39 miles). 5 T k EXIT 155 STAR CITY EXIT t WV 7 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 5. Take EXIT 155, STAR CITY EXIT at WV-7, WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 6. Turn LEFT onto CHAPLIN HILL RD. Proceed to 2 nd light (US-19 intersection). 7. Bear RIGHT onto US-19; move into left lane; proceed to first light past bridge. 8. Turn left onto BOYERS AVE. 9. At intersection turn RIGHT onto UNIVERSITY AVE.

205

Improving Building Comfort and Energy Savings of the McKenzie Airport Terminal by Maintaining and Improving Pneumatic Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McKenzie Airport Terminal is located at Easterwood Airport, which is owned and operated by Texas A&M University. It was built in 1988. Most all HVAC equipment, which includes boiler, chiller, pumps, AHUs and exhaust fans, due to lack of maintenance...

Liu, C.; Bruner, H. L.; Deng, S.; Brundidge, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

660 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, VOL. 50, NO. 3, AUGUST 2008 Responses of Airport Runway Lighting System to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--A test airport runway lighting system, including a buried cable protected that the model is unable to predict cable currents and voltages in the test system, presumably due to neglecting, Bejleri et al. [1] conducted an experimental study of the test airport runway system. In their ex

Florida, University of

207

96 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, VOL. 46, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2004 Triggered Lightning Testing of an Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lightning Testing of an Airport Runway Lighting System Mirela Bejleri, Vladimir A. Rakov, Fellow, IEEE rods, lighting system, lightning protection, triggered lightning. I. INTRODUCTION THE EXPERIMENTS Abstract--The interaction of rocket-triggered lightning with an airport runway lighting system has been

Florida, University of

208

Evaluation of a Conjunctive SurfaceSubsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at RegionalLocal Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive SurfaceSubsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperaturemoisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and landatmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A process for evaluation and state approval of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This document contains copies of the vugraphs used by C. R. Hodgin for the November 6, 1991 presentation summarizing the process to be used for evaluation of the Emergency Response Dispersion Model. (MHB)

Hodgin, C.R.

1991-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Development and application of a probabilistic evaluation method for advanced process technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to develop and apply a method for research planning for advanced process technologies. To satisfy requirements for research planning, it is necessary to: (1) identify robust solutions to process design questions in the face of uncertainty to eliminate inferior design options; (2) identify key problem areas in a technology that should be the focus of further research to reduce the risk of technology failure; (3) compare competing technologies on a consistent basis to determine the risks associated with adopting a new technology; and (4) evaluate the effects that additional research might have on comparisons with conventional technology. An important class of process technologies are electric power plants. In particular, advanced clean coal technologies are expected to play a key role in the energy and environmental future of the US, as well as in other countries. Research planning for advanced clean coal technology development is an important part of energy and environmental policy. Thus, the research planning method developed here is applied to case studies focusing on a specific clean coal technology. The purpose of the case studies is both to demonstrate the research planning method and to obtain technology-specific conclusions regarding research strategies.

Frey, H.C.; Rubin, E.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development and application of a probabilistic evaluation method for advanced process technologies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to develop and apply a method for research planning for advanced process technologies. To satisfy requirements for research planning, it is necessary to: (1) identify robust solutions to process design questions in the face of uncertainty to eliminate inferior design options; (2) identify key problem areas in a technology that should be the focus of further research to reduce the risk of technology failure; (3) compare competing technologies on a consistent basis to determine the risks associated with adopting a new technology; and (4) evaluate the effects that additional research might have on comparisons with conventional technology. An important class of process technologies are electric power plants. In particular, advanced clean coal technologies are expected to play a key role in the energy and environmental future of the US, as well as in other countries. Research planning for advanced clean coal technology development is an important part of energy and environmental policy. Thus, the research planning method developed here is applied to case studies focusing on a specific clean coal technology. The purpose of the case studies is both to demonstrate the research planning method and to obtain technology-specific conclusions regarding research strategies.

Frey, H.C.; Rubin, E.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Quantifying the air quality-CO2 tradeoff potential for airports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aircraft movements on the airport surface are responsible for CO2 emissions that contribute to climate change and other emissions that affect air quality and human health. While the potential for optimizing aircraft surface movements to minimize CO2 emissions has been assessed, the implications of CO2 emissions minimization for air quality have not been quantified. In this paper, we identify conditions in which there is a tradeoff between CO2 emissions and population exposure to O3 and secondary PM2.5 i.e. where decreasing fuel burn (which is directly proportional to CO2 emissions) results in increased exposure. Fuel burn and emissions are estimated as a function of thrust setting for five common gas turbine engines at 34 US airports. Regional air quality impacts, which are dominated by ozone and secondary PM2.5, are computed as a function of airport location and time using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model. Tradeoffs between CO2 emissions and population exposure to PM2.5 and O3 occur between 218% and 560% of the year, respectively, depending on airport location, engine type, and thrust setting. The total duration of tradeoff conditions is 512 times longer at maximum thrust operations (typical for takeoff) relative to 4% thrust operations (typical for taxiing). Per kilogram of additional fuel burn at constant thrust setting during tradeoff conditions, reductions in population exposure to PM2.5 and O3 are 613% and 321060% of the annual average (positive) population exposure per kilogram fuel burn, where the ranges encompass the medians over the 34 airports. For fuel burn increases due to thrust increases (i.e. for constant operating time), reductions in both PM2.5 and O3 exposure are 1.56.4 times larger in magnitude than those due to increasing fuel burn at constant thrust (i.e. increasing operating time). Airports with relatively high population exposure reduction potentials which occur due to a combination of high duration and magnitude of tradeoff conditions are identified. Our results are the first to quantify the extent of the tradeoff between CO2 emissions and air quality impacts at airports. This raises the possibility of reducing the air quality impacts of airports beyond minimizing fuel burn and/or optimizing for minimum net environmental impact.

Akshay Ashok; Irene C. Dedoussi; Steve H.L. Yim; Hamsa Balakrishnan; Steven R.H. Barrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of improved techniques for the removal of fission products from process wastewater and groundwater: FY 1996 status  

SciTech Connect

This report describes laboratory results acquired in the course of evaluating new sorbents for the treatment of radiologically contaminated groundwater and process wastewater. During FY 1996, the evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin for the removal of cesium and strontium from wastewaters was completed. Additionally, strontium sorption on sodium nonatitanate powder was characterized in a series of multicomponent batch studies. Both of these materials were evaluated in reference to a baseline sorbent, natural chabazite zeolite.

Bostick, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Guo, B. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nuclear Explosives Safety Evaluation Process (DOE-STD-3015-2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SENSITIVE DOE-STD-3015-2004 November 2004 Superseding DOE-STD-3015-2001 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY EVALUATION PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. DOE-STD-3015-2004 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and is available for use with DOE O 452.1, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, and DOE O 452.2, SAFETY OF

216

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Described in this report are the following activities: CONSOL characterized process stream samples from HTI Run ALC-2, in which Black Thunder Mine coal was liquefied using four combinations of dispersed catalyst precursors. Oil assays were completed on the HTI Run PB-05 product blend. Fractional distillation of the net product oil of HTI Run POC-1 was completed. CONSOL completed an evaluation of the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers from coal liquefaction phenols. At the request of DOE, various coal liquid samples and relevant characterization data were supplied to the University of West Virginia and the Federal Energy Technology Center. The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is completing the resid reaction computer model. The University of Delaware was instructed on the form in which the computer model is to be delivered to CONSOL.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Heunisch, G.W.; Winschel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Evaluating Safeguards Benefits of Process Monitoring as compared with Nuclear Material Accountancy  

SciTech Connect

This paper illustrates potential safeguards benefits that process monitoring (PM) may have as a diversion deterrent and as a complementary safeguards measure to nuclear material accountancy (NMA). This benefit is illustrated by quantifying the standard deviation associated with detecting a considered material diversion scenario using either an NMA-based method or a PM-based approach. To illustrate the benefits of PM for effective safeguards, we consider a reprocessing facility. We assume that the diversion of interest for detection manifests itself as a loss of Pu caused by abnormally operating a dissolver for an extended period to accomplish protracted diversion (or misdirection) of Pu to a retained (unconditioned) waste stream. For detecting the occurrence of this diversion (which involves anomalous operation of the dissolver), we consider two different data evaluation and integration (DEI) approaches, one based on NMA and the other based on PM. The approach based on PM does not directly do mass balance calculations, but rather monitors for the possible occurrence of anomaly patterns related to potential loss of nuclear material. It is thus assumed that the loss of a given mass amount of nuclear material can be directly associated with the execution of proliferation-driven activities that trigger the occurrence of an anomaly pattern consisting of series of events or signatures occurring at different unit operations and time instances. By effectively assessing these events over time and space, the PM-based DEI approach tries to infer whether this specific pattern of events has occurred and how many times within a given time period. To evaluate the goodness of PM, the 3 Sigma of the estimated mass loss is computed under both DEI approaches as function of the number of input batches processed. Simulation results are discussed.

Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Reed Carlson

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. During this reporting period, the technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. The results of these evaluations are summarized in this report.

Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heterogeneous and Monolithic Catalyst Development for the Biodiesel Production Process & Evaluation of Static Mixers for the Esterification Process .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present biodiesel production process, sodium hydroxide and sulphuric acid are the conventional homogeneous catalysts used, in spite of their drawbacks, such as soap (more)

Annamalai, Nagarajan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design, modeling and process economic analysis are employedper day. Like BTL process, economic analysis has shown thatused as major input for process economic analysis in the

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of the Rockwell International flash-hydroliquefaction process. Final summary report  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy, UOP/SDC has evaluated the Rockwell Hydroliquefaction Process to determine the adequacy of the existing PDU data base and to assess the practicability and operability of the process. UOP/SDC conducted nine studies. Their findings follow: (1) A complete designed set of experiments must be run on the present PDU to make possible satisfactory analysis of the effects of variables especially the effect of diluents in the H/sub 2/ feed and the possibility of carbon deposition problems. (2) Basic improvements in the equipment and operation of the PDU should first be made (Ten specific recommendations are made). (3) A reactor design concept must be developed that looks feasible for design, fabrication, and operation. (4) A conceptual commercial design and economics should be prepared based on a realistic set of design bases and criteria. (5) If the above are accomplished successfully with attractive results, then and only then: (a) A study should be made of the refining requirements of the product, which are expected to be expensive based on the H/C ratio. (b) The PDU should be modified for continuous runs of up to one month to: Confirm the data correlations, estimate the reliability of the reactor and process, adhere to the requirements stated above, test cryogenic gas separation, study fouling and erosion, study lockhopper feeding, establish initial reliability of the coal injector and precombustion assembly head, collect scale-up and design data, and conduct a materials study and confirm materials choices. (c) Determine particle size of the char and of the solids in the oil product, the degree to which they may be separated, and how the ash should be removed from the product oil.

Sirohi, V.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone and Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash gasification facility, owned and operated by sgSolutions LLC, is one of the largest single train solid fuel gasification facilities in the world capable of transforming 2,000 tons per day of petroleum coke or 2,600 tons per day of bituminous coal into synthetic gas for electrical power generation. The Wabash plant utilizes Phillips66 proprietary E-Gas (TM) Gasification Process to convert solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal into synthetic gas that is fed to a combined cycle combustion turbine power generation facility. During plant startup in 1995, reliability issues were realized in the gas filtration portion of the gasification process. To address these issues, a slipstream test unit was constructed at the Wabash facility to test various filter designs, materials and process conditions for potential reliability improvement. The char filtration slipstream unit provided a way of testing new materials, maintenance procedures, and process changes without the risk of stopping commercial production in the facility. It also greatly reduced maintenance expenditures associated with full scale testing in the commercial plant. This char filtration slipstream unit was installed with assistance from the United States Department of Energy (built under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34158) and began initial testing in November of 1997. It has proven to be extremely beneficial in the advancement of the E-Gas (TM) char removal technology by accurately predicting filter behavior and potential failure mechanisms that would occur in the commercial process. After completing four (4) years of testing various filter types and configurations on numerous gasification feed stocks, a decision was made to investigate the economic and reliability effects of using a particulate removal gas cyclone upstream of the current gas filtration unit. A paper study had indicated that there was a real potential to lower both installed capital and operating costs by implementing a char cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas (TM) technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction; 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation; 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design; 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit; 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; and, 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

Rizzo, Jeffrey J. [Phillips66 Company, West Terre Haute, IN (United States)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

For any Minnesota airport, winter is a hard time of year. Snow storms, freezing rain,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Airport Technical Assistance Program of the Center for Transportation Studies at the University Board, and Minnesota Local Technical Assistance Program. For more information about the expo visit www safely plowed in addition to their countless other winter weather responsibilities. At this year

Minnesota, University of

224

An investigation of the information needs of air passengers traveling to the airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1998). As the popularity of air travel continues to increase, the number of trips to and from the airport will inevitably rise also. Passengers will need accurate information about all modes on a total trip basis. This includes the modes of access...

Burdette, Debra Arlene

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of chemical analyses to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods are obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, new analytical instruments and techniques to examine coal-derived samples are being evaluated. The data obtained form this study are used to guide process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank, established and maintained for use in this project, is available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) is being examined. From the literature and experimental data, a kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. Such a model will provide insights to improve process performance and the economics of direct coal liquefaction.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediations (SRRs) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a peanut vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A go/no-go decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a go decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a no-go determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the go/no-go CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a go/no-go CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the go/no-go decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the go/no-go criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

228

Standard Test Method for Mechanical Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation of Plating/Coating Processes and Service Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes mechanical test methods and defines acceptance criteria for coating and plating processes that can cause hydrogen embrittlement in steels. Subsequent exposure to chemicals encountered in service environments, such as fluids, cleaning treatments or maintenance chemicals that come in contact with the plated/coated or bare surface of the steel, can also be evaluated. 1.2 This test method is not intended to measure the relative susceptibility of different steels. The relative susceptibility of different materials to hydrogen embrittlement may be determined in accordance with Test Method F1459 and Test Method F1624. 1.3 This test method specifies the use of air melted AISI E4340 steel per SAE AMS-S-5000 (formerly MIL-S-5000) heat treated to 260 280 ksi (pounds per square inch x 1000) as the baseline. This combination of alloy and heat treat level has been used for many years and a large database has been accumulated in the aerospace industry on its specific response to exposure...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluating the robustness of phylogenetic methods to among-site variability in substitution processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...evolution organized by Ziheng Yang and Nick Goldman Evaluating the robustness of...2003), so evaluating the relative merits of these methods has been an important...Junhyong Kim, Tracy Heath, Ziheng Yang, Nick Goldman and two anonymous reviewers...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Sahid C. Smith Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Review Team thanks Ms. Sonitza Blanco, Team Lead Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office and Mr. Pete Hill, Liquid Waste Planning Manager for Washington Savannah River Company, for their

231

The effects of capacity discipline on smaller U.S. airports : trends in service, connectivity, and fares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After decades of growth in domestic flights, seats, and available seat-miles, airlines reduced capacity at airports across the United States from 2007-2012 in response to a global economic downturn and high and volatile ...

Wittman, Michael D. (Michael David)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Why some airport-rail links get built and others do not : the role of institutions, equity and financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis seeks to provide an understanding of reasons for different outcomes of airport ground access projects. Five in-depth case studies (Hongkong, Tokyo-Narita, London- Heathrow, Chicago- O'Hare and Paris-Charles de ...

Nickel, Julia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of biosphere features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP along with the corresponding technical basis for the excluded FEPs and the descriptions of how the included FEPs were incorporated in the biosphere model. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report concern characteristics of the reference biosphere, the receptor, and the environmental transport and receptor exposure pathways for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios considered in biosphere modeling. This revision provides the summary of the implementation of included FEPs in TSPA-LA, (i.e., how the FEP is included); for excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report is one of the 10 documents constituting the biosphere model documentation suite. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' describes in detail the biosphere conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters and their development. Outputs from these six reports are used in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis and Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' to generate the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs), which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' analyzes the output of these two BDCF reports.

M. Wasiolek; P. Rogers

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Initial Evaluation of Processing Methods for an Epsilon Metal Waste Form  

SciTech Connect

During irradiation of nuclear fuel in a reactor, the five metals, Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, migrate to the fuel grain boundaries and form small metal particles of an alloy known as epsilon metal ({var_epsilon}-metal). When the fuel is dissolved in a reprocessing plant, these metal particles remain behind with a residue - the undissolved solids (UDS). Some of these same metals that comprise this alloy that have not formed the alloy are dissolved into the aqueous stream. These metals limit the waste loading for a borosilicate glass that is being developed for the reprocessing wastes. Epsilon metal is being developed as a waste form for the noble metals from a number of waste streams in the aqueous reprocessing of used nuclear fuel (UNF) - (1) the {var_epsilon}-metal from the UDS, (2) soluble Tc (ion-exchanged), and (3) soluble noble metals (TRUEX raffinate). Separate immobilization of these metals has benefits other than allowing an increase in the glass waste loading. These materials are quite resistant to dissolution (corrosion) as evidenced by the fact that they survive the chemically aggressive conditions in the fuel dissolver. Remnants of {var_epsilon}-metal particles have survived in the geologically natural reactors found in Gabon, Africa, indicating that they have sufficient durability to survive for {approx} 2.5 billion years in a reducing geologic environment. Additionally, the {var_epsilon}-metal can be made without additives and incorporate sufficient foreign material (oxides) that are also present in the UDS. Although {var_epsilon}-metal is found in fuel and Gabon as small particles ({approx}10 {micro}m in diameter) and has survived intact, an ideal waste form is one in which the surface area is minimized. Therefore, the main effort in developing {var_epsilon}-metal as a waste form is to develop a process to consolidate the particles into a monolith. Individually, these metals have high melting points (2617 C for Mo to 1552 C for Pd) and the alloy is expected to have a high melting point as well, perhaps exceeding 1500 C. The purpose of the work reported here is to find a potential commercial process with which {var_epsilon}-metal plus other components of UDS can be consolidated into a solid with minimum surface area and high strength Here, we report the results from the preliminary evaluation of spark-plasma sintering (SPS), hot-isostatic pressing (HIP), and microwave sintering (MS). Since bulk {var_epsilon}-metal is not available and companies could not handle radioactive materials, we prepared mixtures of the five individual metal powders (Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Re) and baddeleyite (ZrO{sub 2}) to send the vendors of SPS, HIP, and MS. The processed samples were then evaluated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for bulk density and phase assemblage with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and phase composition with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Physical strength was evaluated qualitatively. Results of these scoping tests showed that fully dense cermet (ceramic-metal composite) materials with up to 35 mass% of ZrO{sub 2} were produced with SPS and HIP. Bulk density of the SPS samples ranged from 87 to 98% of theoretical density, while HIP samples ranged from 96 to 100% of theoretical density. Microwave sintered samples containing ZrO{sub 2} had low densities of 55 to 60% of theoretical density. Structurally, the cermet samples showed that the individual metals alloyed in to {var_epsilon}-phase - hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) alloy (4-95 mass %), the {alpha}-phase - face-centered-cubic (FCC) alloy structure (3-86 mass %), while ZrO{sub 2} remained in the monoclinic structure of baddeleyite. Elementally, the samples appeared to have nearly uniform composition, but with some areas rich in Mo and Re, the two components with the highest melting points. The homogeneity in distribution of the elements in the alloy is significantly improved in the presence of ZrO{sub 2}. However, ZrO{sub 2} does not appear to react with the alloy, nor was Zr found in the alloy.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Zumhoff, Mac R.

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 13, NO. 2, MAY 2000 181 Evaluating the Impact of Process Changes on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 13, NO. 2, MAY 2000 181 Evaluating--Cluster tools are highly integrated machines that can perform a sequence of semiconductor manufacturing. In addition, we present an integrated simulation model that in- cludes a process model. For a given scheduling

Rubloff, Gary W.

236

Testing Protocols and Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI-Resnet Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing Protocols & Results: Testing Protocols & Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI/RESNET Development Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting: Combustion Safety in Tight Houses Jim Fitzgerald Center for Energy and Environment Building Performance Institute Page 2  Weatherization, custom windows & central air conditioning  Attic insulation, wall insulation, and attic air sealing - borrowed specs from energy programs and used weatherization contractors  Average house leakage: 7.8 ACH50 before 5.4 ACH50 after MSP secret: this Airport Sound Program does weatherization work to reduce sound All Tightening of Existing Homes Can Affect Combustion Appliance Safety Tightening work was done on 3000 homes with no testing, what could possibly go wrong?

237

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE estimates that if algae fuel replaced all the petroleumalgae feedstock instead of the lipid is converted to fuelsfuels production from microalgae The detail conversion process is the same as green waste-to-liquid process introduced earlier and algae

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Process design and evaluation of value-added chemicals production from biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three different biodiesel production processes were simulated using the SuperPro Designer program. The process for producing biodiesel from soybean oil and methanol was designed using commercial chemical catal...

A. -Ra Go; Jae Wook Ko; Sang Jun Lee

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Mr. Glyn Trenchard, Team Lead for Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of River Protection, Mr. Paul Rutland, RPP System Planning Manager for Washington River Protection Solutions, and Mr. Ernie Lee,

240

Evaluation of Aqueous and Powder Processing Techniques for Production of Pu-238-Fueled General Purpose Heat Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu-238 fueled General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Fabricating GPHSs with the current process has remained essentially unchanged since its development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the fields of chemistry, manufacturing, ceramics, and control systems. At the Department of Energys request, alternate manufacturing methods were compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product. An expert committee performed the evaluation with input from four national laboratories experienced in Pu-238 handling.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels from Supercritical Fluid Processing with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Supercritical transesterification processing permits efficient fuel system and combustion chamber designs to optimize fuel utilization in diesel engines.,

242

Vibration and rattle impact due to low frequency noise investigated at Dulles airport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A noise study was conducted at Washington Dulles International Airport to further investigate the noise and vibration impact of thrust reversers and start of takeoff roll on communities near runways. Two different houses located on the airport property were instrumented with outdoor and indoor microphones and accelerometers mounted inside on walls windows and floor. This presentation will discuss both the experimental design and data obtained from the two different structures. Correlations between plane types outdoor signatures and acceleration levels are considered. The outdoor signatures and acceleration levels are used to investigate the conditions under which rattle of a loosely coupled window is observed. Additionally the design of a subsequent subjective study to examine the effects of rattle on human perception will be discussed. The combination of the objective measurements with the results of the subjective study is intended to give a better understanding of community impact due to airport noise. [Work is supported by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Exploratory and Foundational Program of the Applied Research Laboratory Penn State University.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Preliminary evaluation of a concept using microwave energy to improve an adsorption-based, natural gas clean-up process  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation performed to: (1) determine if microwave energy could be used to regenerate a zeolite adsorbent and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of using microwave energy to improve the desorption phase of a pressure swing adsorption process applied to upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Microwave regeneration was evaluated by comparing the adsorption characteristics of a zeolite preconditioned by heating under vacuum to the characteristics of the same zeolite after various lengths of exposure to microwave energy. The applicability of microwave regeneration to natural gas cleanup was evaluated by measuring the rise in adsorbent temperature resulting from the microwave exposure. Microwave energy consumed by heating the adsorbent is not productive and must therefore be minimal for a process to be economically viable. Exposure of the methane-saturated chabazite for 2 minutes to microwave energy effectively regenerated the adsorbent, but resulted in a 75{degrees}F (42{degrees}C) rise in adsorbent temperature. This temperature rise indicates that the concept is unacceptable for natural gas processing due to excessive energy consumption.

Grimes, R.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of a dry process for conversion of U-AVLIS product to UF{sub 6}. Milestone U361  

SciTech Connect

A technical and engineering evaluation has been completed for a dry UF{sub 6} production system to convert the product of an initial two-line U-AVLIS plant. The objective of the study has been to develop a better understanding of process design requirements, capital and operating costs, and demonstration requirements for this alternate process. This report summarizes the results of the study and presents various comparisons between the baseline and alternate processes, building on the information contained in UF{sub 6} Product Alternatives Review Committee -- Final Report. It also provides additional information on flowsheet variations for the dry route which may warrant further consideration. The information developed by this study and conceptual design information for the baseline process will be combined with information to be developed by the U-AVLIS program and by industrial participants over the next twelve months to permit a further comparison of the baseline and alternate processes in terms of cost, risk, and compatibility with U-AVLIS deployment schedules and strategies. This comparative information will be used to make a final process flowsheet selection for the initial U-AVLIS plant by March 1993. The process studied is the alternate UF{sub 6} production flowsheet. Process steps are (1) electron-beam distillation to reduce enriched product iron content from about 10 wt % or less, (2) hydrofluorination of the metal to UF{sub 4}, (3) fluorination of UF{sub 4} to UF{sub 6}, (4) cold trap collection of the UF{sub 6} product, (5) UF{sub 6} purification by distillation, and (6) final blending and packaging of the purified UF{sub 6} in cylinders. A preliminary system design has been prepared for the dry UF{sub 6} production process based on currently available technical information. For some process steps, such information is quite limited. Comparisons have been made between this alternate process and the baseline plant process for UF{sub 6} production.

NONE

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An evaluation of factors influencing Salmonella contamination of commercially processed frog legs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was changed to eliminate the severing of the gastrointestinal tract which contributed to contamination of the legs with Salmonella. ln addition, more extensive sanitizing measures were initiated in the processing plant. Under these conditions the incidence... preliminary improvements with respect to processing procedures and equipment sanitation. Samples taken during the second visit represented significant changes in sanitary efforts at the processing plant. These changes were based on observations and test...

Wyatt, Lawrence Eddie

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between alternative solar storage system designs; almost allThe behavior of the storage solar receiver-reactor is baseddaytime (charging) storage process Boeing solar receiver [5J

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Conceptual evaluation of the potential role of fractures in unsaturated processes at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Process Models, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. GeologicalUnsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain,

Hinds, Jennifer J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Nieder-Westermann, Gerald H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Residual Stress Evaluation of Materials Manufactured by High-Energy Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents several applications of the step by step hole drillling method for measuring residual stress distribution introduced in different components manufactured by the high energy process.

J. F. Flavenot; J. Lu

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Grant monitoring by charities: The process of grant-making and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the results of a survey of grant monitoring in 170 UK charities. The monitoring ... Although over 70 per cent of donors monitored grants, a much smaller percentage proceeded to evaluate...

Ken Ashford; Julia Clarke

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Evaluation of coal and its influence on coke quality and the coking process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evaluation of coal batch is considered, along with its influence on coke quality and the coking properties. The quality of the coal available for coking at OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat is ...

G. R. Gainieva; V. I. Byzova; N. N. Nazarov; L. D. Nikitin

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A new FMEA method by integrating fuzzy belief structure and TOPSIS to improve risk evaluation process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) model is a technique used to evaluate ... . This paper aimed to propose a new FMEA model combining technique for order of preference ... overcome the shortcomings of the tr...

Behnam Vahdani; M. Salimi; M. Charkhchian

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comprehensive evaluation of coal-fired power plants based on grey relational analysis and analytic hierarchy process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In China, coal-fired power plants are the main supplier of electricity, as well as the largest consumer of coal and water resources and the biggest emitter of SOx, NOx, and greenhouse gases (GHGs). Therefore, it is important to establish a scientific, reasonable, and feasible comprehensive evaluation system for coal-fired power plants to guide them in achieving multi-optimisation of their thermal, environmental, and economic performance. This paper proposes a novel comprehensive evaluation method, which is based on a combination of the grey relational analysis (GRA) and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), to assess the multi-objective performance of power plants. Unlike the traditional evaluation method that uses coal consumption as a basic indicator, the proposed evaluation method also takes water consumption and pollutant emissions as indicators. On the basis of the proposed evaluation method, a case study on typical 600MW coal-fired power plants is carried out to determine the relevancy rules among factors including the coal consumption, water consumption, pollutant, and GHG emissions of power plants. This research offers new ideas and methods for the comprehensive performance evaluation of complex energy utilisation systems, and is beneficial to the synthesised consideration of resources, economy, and environment factors in system optimising and policy making.

Gang Xu; Yong-ping Yang; Shi-yuan Lu; Le Li; Xiaona Song

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This guide is a subordinate document to the Independent Oversight Appraisal Process Protocols. While the protocols provide general guidance common to all appraisal activities, this document provides additional detail and guidance regarding procedures and methods specific to ES&H appraisals conducted by Independent Oversight. DOE Order 470.2B is an important reference document that defines program requirements and, in particular, defines processes for sites to respond to identified vulnerabilities and to develop corrective action plans. The processes described in this guide are used for all ES&H appraisals, including periodic inspections, special reviews, targeted nuclear safety inspections, or other appraisal activities, because the reviews differ only in detail.

254

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

KESSLER, S.F.

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This is the Technical Progress Report for the twelfth quarter of activities. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) Thirty-nine samples from four run conditions of HTI Run PB-07 were received. Appropriate samples were characterized by proton NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vacuum distillation, and solvent quality tests. (2) The University of Delaware completed their subcontract this quarter. A meeting was held on April 30, 1997 at the University to close out the subcontract. (3) Twelve sets of samples were chosen from the CONSOL sample bank for the study of the insoluble and presumed unreactive material from process stream samples. Each set consists of the whole process stream and the 454 C{sup +} (850 F{sup +}) distillation resid derived from that process stream. Processing data for all samples were compiled. The samples represent four Wilsonville pilot plant runs and two HTI runs.

Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved...

Chau, Chi-Fai

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evaluation of Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry for At-Line Process Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A low-field medium-resolution NMR spectrometer, with an operating frequency of 29 MHz for 1H, has been developed for use in process analysis. The information that is...

Nordon, Alison; McGill, Colin A; Littlejohn, David

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of Seafood Processing Wastes in Prepared Feeds for Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

byproduct consistently provided the highest performance values at 80 percent replacement. The catfish byproduct yielded the lowest fish performance at all levels. This study indicates that dry extrusion of seafood processing wastes can be used to replace a...

Pernu, Benjamin Mark

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

An Evaluation of Proposed Representations of Subgrid Hydrologic Processes in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temporal and spatial scales that characterize surface hydrologic processes provide conceptual and practical difficulties to the development of parameterization schemes for incorporation into climate models. In particular, there is a ...

G. Thomas; A. Henderson-Sellers

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evaluation of ettringite-related swelling mechanisms for treated chromite ore processing residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accelerated one-dimensional unconfined swell tests were conducted for ferrous sulfate chromite ore processing residue (COPR) field-treated samples. The field-treated samples were subjected to wet and dry cycle...

Deok Hyun Moon; Mahmoud Wazne

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept - Task 2: Evaluation of Process Steps.  

SciTech Connect

A novel direct coal liquefaction technology is being investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates under DOE Contract DE-AC22-95PC95050. The novel concept consists of a new approach to coal liquefaction chemistry which avoids some of the inherent limitations of current high-temperature thermal liquefaction processes. The chemistry employed is based on hydride ion donation to solubilize coal at temperatures (350-400{degrees}C) significantly lower than those typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. The process concept being explored consists of two reaction stages. In the first stage, the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second, the products are catalytically upgraded to acceptable refinery feedstocks. The program explores not only the initial solubilization step, but integration of the subsequent processing steps, including an interstage solids-separation step, to produce distillate products. A unique feature of the process concept is that many of the individual reaction steps can be decoupled, because little recycle around the liquefaction system is expected. This allows for considerable latitude in the process design. Furthermore, this has allowed for each key element in the process to be explored independently in laboratory work conducted under Task 2 of the program.

Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A software for performance evaluation and comparison of people detection and tracking methods in video processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Digital video content analysis is an important item for multimedia content-based indexing (MCBI), content-based video retrieval (CBVR) and visual surveillance systems. There are some frequently-used generic object detection and/or tracking (D&T) ... Keywords: Multimedia performance evaluation, People detection, People tracking, Surveillance systems

Bahadir Karasulu; Serdar Korukoglu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Kinetic evaluation of the tri-reforming process of methane for syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conversion of natural gas was carried out via tri-reforming of methane in a fixed bed reactor employing a Ni/?-Al2O3 catalyst. The kinetic evaluations were performed in a temperature range from 923 to 1,123K...

Leonardo J. L. Maciel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of high-level waste pretreatment processes with an approximate reasoning model  

SciTech Connect

The development of an approximate-reasoning (AR)-based model to analyze pretreatment options for high-level waste is presented. AR methods are used to emulate the processes used by experts in arriving at a judgment. In this paper, the authors first consider two specific issues in applying AR to the analysis of pretreatment options. They examine how to combine quantitative and qualitative evidence to infer the acceptability of a process result using the example of cesium content in low-level waste. They then demonstrate the use of simple physical models to structure expert elicitation and to produce inferences consistent with a problem involving waste particle size effects.

Bott, T.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Agnew, S.F.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Laboratory Performance Appraisal Process and Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan Preparation Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0136 0136 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix B J-B-1 ATTACHMENT J.2 APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN FISCAL YEAR 2014 Applicable to the Operation of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory A Department of Energy National Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Modification No.0136 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix B J-B-2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page No. INTRODUCTION J-B-5 I. DETERMINING THE CONTRACTOR'S PERFORMANCE RATING AND PERFORMANCE-BASED FEE AND AWARD TERM ELIGIBILITY (as applicable) J-B-5 Performance Evaluation Methodology J-B-6 Calculating Individual Goal Scores and Letter Grade J-B-8 Determining the Amount of Performance-Based Fee Earned J-B-8

267

Evaluation of improved techniques for the removal of fission products from process wastewater and groundwater: FY 1997 status  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this effort in FY 1997 were to survey local end users of wastewater treatment technology and then to evaluate recently available treatment processes in light of user needs. Survey results indicate that local sites are confronted with a limited, and shrinking, budget for treating aqueous waste streams. Therefore, a process will be selected primarily on the basis of sorbent costs, use of existing equipment, and disposal costs for spent processing materials. Current laboratory testing and economic studies have been directed toward addressing the technical issues specific to the removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from groundwater and process wastewater. This year`s efforts have concentrated on evaluating the engineered form of crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) for near neutral pH applications. Both powder and pellet forms of CST can be obtained through UOP; this task evaluated only the engineered form of the sorbent for wastewater remediation. Preliminary experimental efforts included measuring the average particle size, surface water content, total sodium content, ion exchange capacity, and equilibration mixing time. The as received material contains approximately 10% fines, which adhere to the CST pellet. The cesium and strontium ion-exchange capacities, based on multiple contacts with 50 ppm of the metal, are 0.8 meq/g and 1.1 meq/g, respectively. Batch tests indicated that an equilibrium mixing time of 100 h was required for cesium sorption. Group 2 cations (Sr, Ca, and Mg) required greater than 500 h. Particle diffusion coefficients were estimated for each of these cations from the batch studies.

Bostick, D.T.; DePaoli, S.M.; Guo, B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

An evaluation of Substitute natural gas production from different coal gasification processes based on modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal and lignite will play a significant role in the future energy production. However, the technical options for the reduction of CO2 emissions will define the extent of their share in the future energy mix. The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG) from solid fossil fuels seems to be a very attractive process: coal and lignite can be upgraded into a methane rich gas which can be transported and further used in high efficient power systems coupled with CO2 sequestration technologies. The aim of this paper is to present a modeling analysis comparison between substitute natural gas production from coal by means of allothermal steam gasification and autothermal oxygen gasification. In order to produce SNG from syngas several unit operations are required such as syngas cooling, cleaning, potential compression and, of course, methanation reactors. Finally the gas which is produced has to be conditioned i.e. removal of unwanted species, such as CO2 etc. The heat recovered from the overall process is utilized by a steam cycle, producing power. These processes were modeled with the computer software IPSEpro. An energetic and exergetic analysis of the coal to SNG processes have been realized and compared.

S. Karellas; K.D. Panopoulos; G. Panousis; A. Rigas; J. Karl; E. Kakaras

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Microsoft PowerPoint - To NETL Pittsburgh Site from the Pittsburgh International Airport Directions.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Pittsburgh International Airport the Pittsburgh International Airport 1. Exit airport and follow signs for PITTSBURGH, which will take you onto ROUTE 60 SOUTH. 2. ROUTE 60 becomes ROUTE 22-30, also know as I-279 the "PARKWAY WEST." 3. Stay on Route 22-30/I-279 the "PARKWAY WEST" until you reach EXIT 5B, labeled TRUCK ROUTE 19 SOUTH/ROUTE 51 SOUTH UNIONTOWN Note: This exit is on the FAR RIGHT 19 SOUTH/ROUTE 51 SOUTH, UNIONTOWN. Note: This exit is on the FAR RIGHT just BEFORE the FORT PITT TUNNEL - do not go into the Tunnel. 4. Continue down ROUTE 51 SOUTH for approximately 7.5 miles. 5. Look for a CVS Pharmacy on the right-hand side of the road. SLOW DOWN since you will soon be exiting off ROUTE 51 SOUTH at the CLOVERLEAF EXIT. 6. After passing CVS (2.5 miles) take the very first road to your RIGHT.

271

EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed land transfer to the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority for the development of a general aviation airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download No downloads found for this office.

272

Development and Evaluation of a Novel Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process  

SciTech Connect

This project was aimed at obtaining process engineering and scale-up data at a laboratory scale to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a patented post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture process?the Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP). Unique features of the IVCAP include its ability to be fully-integrated with the power plant?s steam cycle and potential for combined sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal and CO{sub 2} capture. Theoretical and experimental studies of this project were aimed at answering three major technical questions: 1) What additives can effectively reduce the water vapor saturation pressure and energy requirement for water vaporization in the vacuum stripper of the IVCAP? 2) What catalysts can promote CO{sub 2} absorption into the potassium carbonate (PC) solution to achieve an overall absorption rate comparable to monoethanolamine (MEA) and are the catalysts stable at the IVCAP conditions and in the flue gas environment? 3) Are any process modifications needed to combine SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} removal in the IVCAP? Lab-scale experiments and thermodynamic and process simulation studies performed to obtain detailed information pertinent to the above three technical questions produced the following results: 1) Two additives were identified that lower the saturation pressure of water vapor over the PC solution by about 20%. 2) The carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme was identified as the most effective catalyst for promoting CO{sub 2} absorption. The absorption rate into the CO{sub 2}-lean PC solution promoted with 300 mg/L CA was several times slower than the corresponding 5 M MEA solution, but absorption into the CO{sub 2}-rich PC solution was comparable to the CO{sub 2}-rich MEA solution. The tested CA enzymes demonstrated excellent resistance to major flue gas impurities. A technical-grade CA enzyme was stable at 40{degrees}C (104{degrees}F) over a six-month test period, while its half-life was about two months at 50{degrees}C (122{degrees}F). Enzyme immobilization improved the CA enzyme?s thermal stability by up to three times compared to its free counterpart. 3) Two process modifications were proposed to improve the technical performance of the IVCAP for combined SO{sub 2} removal and CO{sub 2} capture. The results from a techno-economic study of a 528 MWe (gross) pulverized coal-fired, subcritical steam power plant revealed that the cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance with the IVCAP was about 30% lower than conventional MEA-based processes. The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of the IVCAP ranged from $40 to 46/MWh, an increase of 60 to 70% compared to a reference power plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The overall conclusion of this study is that the IVCAP is a technically feasible and economically more attractive process than available MEA-based processes. A scale-up study using the slipstream of an actual coal-derived flue gas and development of a more stable CA enzyme are recommended for future studies.

Lu, Yongqi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Ruhter, David; Khodayari, Arezoo; Rood, Mark

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Complete calculation of evaluated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for s-process nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

Present contribution represents a significant improvement of our previous calculation of Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates. Addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, such as ROSFOND and Low-Fidelity Covariance Project, and improvements in data processing techniques allowed us to extend it for entire range of sprocess nuclei, calculate Maxwellian-averaged cross section uncertainties for the first time, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations using ENDF libraries and current Java technologies will be discussed and new results will be presented.

Pritychenko, B.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Site selection and preliminary evaluation of potential solar-industrial-process-heat applications for federal buildings in Texas  

SciTech Connect

The potential for solr process heat applications for federal buildings in Texas is assessed. The three sites considered are Reese Air Force Base, Lubbock; Fort Bliss, El Paso; and Dyess Air Force Base, Abilene. The application at Lubbock is an electroplating and descaling facility for aircraft maintenance. The one at El Paso is a laundry facility. The Abilene system would use solar heat to preheat boiler feedwater makeup for the base hospital boiler plant. The Lubbock site is found to be the most appropriate one for a demonstration plant, with the Abilene site as an alternate. The processes at each site are described. A preliminary evaluation of the potential contribution by solar energy to the electroplating facility at Reese AFB is included. (LEW)

Branz, M A

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

St. Louis Airport site environmental report for calendar year 1989, St. Louis, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1984, continued during 1989 at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. SLAPS and its vicinity properties, including ditches north and south of the site, were designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. The monitoring program at SLAPS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To assess the potential effect of SLAPS on public health, the potential radiation dose was estimated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) during calendar year 1989. 19 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

St. Louis Airport site: Annual site environmental report, Calendar Year 1986. [FUSRAP  

SciTech Connect

During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. The ditches north and south of the site were designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) program to identify, decontaminate, or control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. The site is currently controlled by the St. Louis Airport Authority. The monitoring program measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. The radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an external exposure approximately equivalent to 4.7 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. The dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the SLAPS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose the population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. 12 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms  

SciTech Connect

This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PAPER STUDY EVALUATIONS OF THE INTRODUCTION OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE WASTE STREAMS TO THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper study is to provide guidance on the impact of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) streams from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet and glass waste form. A series of waste processing scenarios was evaluated, including projected compositions of Sludge Batches 8 through 17 (SB8 through SB17), MST additions, CST additions to Tank 40 or to a sludge batch preparation tank (Tank 42 or Tank 51, referred to generically as Tank 51 in this report), streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), and two canister production rates. A wide array of potential glass frit compositions was used to support this assessment. The sludge and frit combinations were evaluated using the predictive models in the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The results were evaluated based on the number of frit compositions available for a particular sludge composition scenario. A large number of candidate frit compositions (e.g., several dozen to several hundred) is typically a good indicator of a sludge composition for which there is flexibility in forming an acceptable waste glass and meeting canister production rate commitments. The MST and CST streams will significantly increase the concentrations of certain components in glass, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2}, to levels much higher than have been previously processed at DWPF. Therefore, several important assumptions, described in detail in the report, had to be made in performing the evaluations. The results of the paper studies, which must be applied carefully given the assumptions made concerning the impact of higher Ti, Zr, and Nb concentrations on model validity, provided several observations: (1) There was difficulty in identifying a reasonable number of candidate frits (and in some cases an inability to identify any candidate frits) when a waste loading of 40% is targeted for Sludge Batches 8, 16, and 17, regardless of the addition of SCIX or SWPF streams. This indicates that the blending strategy for these sludge batches should be reevaluated by Savannah River Remediation (SRR). (2) In general, candidate frits were available to accommodate CST additions to either Tank 40 or Tank 51. A larger number of candidate frits were typically available for the sludge batches when CST is added to Tank 51 rather than Tank 40, meaning that more compositional flexibility would be available for frit selection and DWPF operation. Note however that for SB8 and SB17, no candidate frits were available to accommodate CST going to Tank 40 with and without SWPF streams. The addition of SWPF streams generally improves the number of candidate frits available for processing of a given sludge batch. (3) The change in production rate from 40 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) batches per year (i.e., the current production rate) to 75 SRAT batches per year, without SWPF streams included, had varied results in terms of the number of candidate frits available for processing of a given sludge batch. Therefore, this variable is not of much concern in terms of incorporating the SCIX streams. Note that the evaluation at 75 SRAT batches per year (approximately equivalent to 325 canisters per year) is more conservative in terms of the impact of SCIX streams as compared to a production rate of 400 canisters per year. Overall, the outcome of this paper study shows no major issues with the ability to identify an acceptable glass processing window when CST from the SCIX process is transferred to either Tank 40 or Tank 51. The assumptions used and the model limitations identified in this report must be addressed through further experimental studies, which are currently being performed. As changes occur to the planned additions of MST and CST, or to the sludge batch preparation strategy, additional evaluations will be performed to determine the potential impacts. As stated above, the issues with Sludge Batches 8, 16, and 17 should be further evaluated by SRR. A

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Stone, M.; Koopman, D.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hot-standby for operational MetNet system used by Air Traffic Control (LVNL) at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot-standby for operational MetNet system used by Air Traffic Control (LVNL) at Amsterdam Airport) patterns and OS abstraction library. Java Applet for remote operation and configuration. In commercial provider. They provide integrated design, build and operate solutions to large multi-national clients

Haak, Hein

283

On the evaluation of Fast-SAGD process in naturally fractured heavy oil reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Very recently, Fast-SAGD as a modification of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) has been much attended due to lower cumulative steam oil ratio as well as higher cumulative oil production. However, there are still many suspicions about the successful application of this method in naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) in which faults, fissures, vugs, micro-fractures, poorly interconnected matrix pore structure as well as undesirable wettability are combined with high-viscosity oil. In this communication, initially, Fast-SAGD has been compared with traditional SAGD in an Iranian naturally fractured heavy oil reservoir with oil wet rock using CMG-STARS thermal simulator. Moreover, the effects of operational parameters on Fast-SAGD method have been investigated. In addition, a novel economical model has been established in which all economical parameters including input cash flow costs such as the rate of oil production and oil price, and the output cash flow costs such as capital expenditures (CAPEX), operating expenditures (OPEX), injection material and pipe line tariffs, have been considered. During the optimization of the operational parameters, it was observed that by increasing steam injection rate into both offset and SAGD wells in Fast-SAGD system, ultimate recovery factor (RF) increased, but ultimate net present value (NPV) increased up to an optimal point which could be due to the increased SOR value. By increasing steam injection pressure into offset well, both the ultimate RF and NPV increased up to an optimal point. To optimally select parameters such as the number of cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) cycles, elevation of CSS well and well spacing of SAGD well pair, sensitivity analysis should be performed to achieve the best case economically and technically due to the lack of a decrease or increase trend. In contrast to conventional reservoirs, the performance affected by start-up time at the offset well during Fast-SAGD process in fractured reservoirs indicates that earlier start-up time of steam injection leads to high RF and NPV.

Arash Kamari; Abdolhossein Hemmati-Sarapardeh; Amir H. Mohammadi; Hani Hashemi-Kiasari; Erfan Mohagheghian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT RIVERTON PROCESSING SITE  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated). A few of the key findings include: ? Physical removal of the tailings and associated materials reduced contaminant discharges to groundwater and reduced contaminant concentrations in the near-field plume. ? In the mid-field and far-field areas, residual contaminants are present in the vadose zone as a result of a variety of factors (e.g., evaporation/evapotranspiration from the capillary fringe and water table, higher water levels during tailings disposal, and geochemical processes). ? Vadose zone contaminants are widely distributed above the plume and are expected to be present as solid phase minerals that can serve as secondary sources to the underlying groundwater. The mineral sample collected at the site is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. ? Water table fluctuations, irrigation, infiltration and flooding will episodically solubilize some of the vadose zone secondary source materials and release contaminants to the groundwater for continued down gradient migration extending the overall timeframe for flushing. ? Vertical contaminant stratification in the vadose zone and surficial aquifer will vary from location to location. Soil and water sampling strategies and monitoring well construction details will influence characterization and monitoring data. ? Water flows from the Wind River, beneath the Riverton Processing Site and through the plume toward the Little Wind River. This base flow pattern is influenced by seasonal irrigation and other anthropogenic activities, and by natural perturbations (e.g., flooding). ? Erosion and reworking of the sediments adjacent to the Little Wind River results in high heterogeneity and complex flow and geochemistry. Water flowing into oxbow lakes (or through areas where oxbow lakes were present in the past) will be exposed to localized geochemical conditions that favor chemical reduction (i.e., naturally reduced zones) and other attenuation processes. This attenuation is not sufficient to fully stabilize the plume or to reduce contaminant concentrations in the groundwater to target levels. Consistent with these observations, the team recommended increased emphasis on collecting data in the zones where secondary source minerals are projected to accumulate (e.g., just above the water table) using low cost methods such as x-ray fluorescence. The team also suggested several low cost nontraditional sources of data that have the potential to provide supplemental data (e.g., multispectral satellite imagery) to inform and improve legacy management decisions. There are a range of strategies for management of the legacy contamination in the groundwater and vadose zone near the Riverton Processing Site. These range from the current strategy, natural flushing, to intrusive remedies such as plume scale excavation of the vadose zone and pump & treat. Each option relates to the site specific conditions, issues and opportunities in a unique way. Further, each option has advantages and disadvantages that need to be weighed. Scoping evaluation was performed for three major classes

Looney, B.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture Process for Post-Tenure Peer Review The Department has an elected faculty evaluation committee that does peer reviews of all  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture Process for Post-Tenure Peer Review The Department has an elected faculty evaluation committee that does peer reviews of all tenure-line faculty annual evaluation and Human Development Guidelines approved on August 2, 2011, the committee will now provide peer review

Boas, Harold P.

286

Evaluation of standard durability tests towards the qualification process for the glass-zeolite ceramic waste form  

SciTech Connect

Glass-bonded zeolite is being developed as a potential ceramic waste form for the disposition of radionuclides associated with the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. The utility of several standard durability tests was evaluated as a first step in developing methods and criteria that can be applied towards the process of qualifying this material for acceptance into the DOE Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. The effects of pH, leachant composition, and sample surface-area-to leachant-volume ratios on the durability test results are discussed, in an attempt to investigate the release mechanisms and other physical and chemical parameters that are important for the acceptance criteria, including the establishment of appropriate test methodologies required for product consistency measurements.

Simpson, L.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J. [Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory (Illinois)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Metrics (and Methodologies) for Evaluating Energy and Water Impacts of Alternative Process Cooling Systems in a Typical Chemical Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, kWh/Unit = 0.0039 85.1% February 5 12PM to 1PM Annual Values 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.20 10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 80.0 90.0 100.0 110.0 841 865 889 913 937 961 985 G a l / U n i t P r o d u c e d D...1Metrics (and Methodologies) for Evaluating Energy and Water Impacts of Alternative Process Cooling Systems in a Typical Chemical Plant Presentation to the: May 21, 2014 Thomas P. Carter, P.E. Sr. Program Manager, Heat Rejection Technology...

Carter, T. P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Chapter 29 - Portfolio and Project Planning and Management in the Drug Discovery, Evaluation, Development, and Regulatory Review Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drug discovery, evaluation, development, and regulatory review are complex, lengthy, and costly processes that involve in excess of 10,000 interdependent activities. In order to be successful in biopharmaceutical new product development, one needs a set of general principles that provide guidance in the construction of a Research and Development (R&D) Portfolio, the construction of individual Product Development Plans, and the subsequent updates required to keep the portfolio and product development plans current as learning occurs. The following five Principles of Optimal Product Development form the basis for defining a decision-based operational model, identifying and quantifying the critical information required at each major decision-point, projecting the probabilities of various outcomes, and informing key stakeholders (management, board, and investors) with the clear and concise status information that is needed for effective product development governance.

Charles Grudzinskas; Charles T. Gombar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports  

SciTech Connect

This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

Jones, C.G.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

An evaluation of the benefits of combined steam and fireflooding as a recovery process for heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

Lack of oil mobility is a major problem with in situ combustion field projects, since the combustion front displaces oil into an essentially unheated reservoir. One way of ensuring oil mobility is to utilize steam injection during the early life of the process, and then switch to combustion when heated communication paths have been developed. The in situ combustion characteristics of cores from the Primrose reservoir of Northeastern Alberta were investigated in a comprehensive series of 22 combustion tube tests. The program was carried out in order to evaluate the effectiveness of fireflooding in both cores that had been preheated to the extent that the oil was mobile and in those which were steam-flooded prior to dry combustion. Both normal- and 95% oxygen-enriched air were evaluated. Wet combustion tests were performed utilizing both liquid water and steam injection. The effects of parameters such as pressure, oxygen enrichment and injection flux on the combustion characteristics were examined. This paper will discuss the results of this study, which show that steam co-injection is more effective at lowering the oxygen requirement than was combustion following steam. Additionally, the cores which were preheated exhibited similar oxygen requirements to those which were presteamed to a near-residual saturation.

Moore, R.G.; Laureshen, C.J.; Belgrave, J.D.M.; Ursenbach, M.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Jha, K.N. [Dept. of Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A comparative evaluation of conceptual models for the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, INEL  

SciTech Connect

Geologic and hydrologic data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are used to evaluate the existing ground water monitoring well network completed in the upper portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) beneath the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The USGS data analyzed and compared in this study include: (a) lithologic, geophysical, and stratigraphic information, including the conceptual geologic models intrawell, ground water flow measurement (Tracejector tests) and (c) dedicated, submersible, sampling group elevations. Qualitative evaluation of these data indicate that the upper portion of the SRPA is both heterogeneous and anisotropic at the scale of the ICPP monitoring well network. Tracejector test results indicate that the hydraulic interconnection and spatial configuration of water-producing zones is extremely complex within the upper portion of the SRPA. The majority of ICPP monitoring wells currently are equipped to sample ground water only the upper lithostratigraphic intervals of the SRPA, primarily basalt flow groups E, EF, and F. Depth-specific hydrogeochemical sampling and analysis are necessary to determine if ground water quality varies significantly between the various lithostratigraphic units adjacent to individual sampling pumps.

Prahl, C.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Forecast-Based Decision Support for San Francisco International Airport: A NextGen Prototype System That Improves Operations during Summer Stratus Season  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer, marine stratus encroaches into the approach to San Francisco International Airport (SFO) bringing low ceilings. Low ceilings restrict landings and result in a high number of arrival delays, thus impacting ...

Reynolds, David W.

294

Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico May 22, 2005 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Final EA for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills within TA-73 at LANL Page iii of viii Contents Acronyms and Terms .................................................................................................................. vi 1.0 Purpose and Need ................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Introduction.............................................................................................................

295

Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation: Background and Methods Evaluation: Background and Methods Definition of evaluation: the process of determining the worth or merit of something; if "something" is a program, then it's "program evaluation." Other types of evaluation include: product evaluation (most widely practiced, e.g., Consumer Reports); personnel evaluation; research evaluation; policy studies; art, movie, play, and book reviews. Program evaluation is NOT the same as research although they share many characteristics--Both: Start with questions Use similar methods Provide similar information Program evaluation focuses on decisions. Research focuses on answering questions about phenomena to discover new knowledge and test theories/hypotheses. Research is aimed at truth. Evaluation is aimed at

296

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

297

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course Evaluation and Close-out Process Document Number: ISDP-014 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Vickie Pleau Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-011, ISD History File Acceptance, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 5 I. Purpose To effectively plan and control the process for evaluating and finalizing EOTA ILT, EX and WBT training products, assuring

299

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

St. Louis Airport Site annual site environmental report. Calendar year 1985  

SciTech Connect

During 1985, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. The ditches north and south of the site have been designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) program to identify, decontaminate, or otherwise control sites where low-level radioactive contamination remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. The site is not currently controlled or regulated by DOE or NRC, although radiological monitoring of the site has been authorized by the DOE. The monitoring program at the SLAPS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Potential radiation doses to the public are also calculated. Because the site is not controlled or regulated by the DOE, the DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) are not applicable to SLAPS, but are included as a basis for comparison only. The DOE DCGs and the DOE radiation protection standard have been revised.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

St. Louis airport site annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, St. Louis, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) and surrounding area began in 1984. SLAPS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards; federal, state, and local applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs); and/or DOE derived concentration guidelines (DCGs). Environmental standards, ARARs, and DCGs are established to protect public health and the environment. Results from the 1990 environmental monitoring program demonstrated that the concentrations of contaminants of concern were all below applicable standards, ARARs, and guidelines. Site activities in 1990 were limited to maintenance. SLAPS was in compliance with all applicable regulations during 1990 and has remained in compliance since 1984, when the environmental monitoring program and remedial action began.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Synthesis of biodiesel from vegetable oils wastewater sludge by in-situ subcritical methanol transesterification: Process evaluation and optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel are gaining increased public and scientific attention as an alternative to petroleum diesel fuel, driven by factors such as oil price spikes, energy security and environmental concerns. In this study, low grade wastewater sludge originated from wastewater treatment unit of vegetable oil factory as a viable alternative lipid source for biodiesel production was evaluated. The lipid mass fraction of the dry and ash-free sludge was 12.440.87%, which mainly comprised of C16C18 fatty acids. The in-situ transesterification process under subcritical water and methanol conditions was applied as a green pathway to convert lipids into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The reaction parameters investigated were temperatures (155215C), pressures (5.56.5MPa) and methanol to lipid mass ratios (1:1, 5:1 and 9:1). The highest FAME yield of 92.673.23% was obtained at 215C, 6.5MPa and methanol to lipid mass ratio of 5:1. Statistical analysis based on response surface methodology in 3-factor-3-level central composite designed experiments and analysis of variance were applied to examine the relation between input parameters and the response and to locate the optimum condition. Results showed that 98% of the variability in the response could be adequately explained by the second-order polynomial model. The optimum FAME yield (90.37%) was obtained at 215C, 6.5MPa and methanol to lipid mass ratio of 5.12:1. Experimental validation (N=3) demonstrated satisfactory agreement between the observed and predicted values with an error of at most 3.3%.

Farrel Gunawan; Alfin Kurniawan; Iwan Gunawan; Yi-Hsu Ju; Aning Ayucitra; Felycia E. Soetaredjo; Suryadi Ismadji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, economic and financial considerations, as well as to the determination of the appropriate degree of thermal integration of the power and process subsystems. An overview of steam and gas turbine cycle options for process/power integration typical...

Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

304

Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of the economic impact of hydrogen production by methane decomposition with steam reforming of methane process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There has been considerable interest in the development of more efficient processes to generate hydrogen. Currently, steam methane reforming (SMR) is the most widely applied route for producing hydrogen from natural gas. Researchers worldwide have been working to invent more efficient routes to produce hydrogen. One of the routes is thermocatalytic decomposition of methane (TCDM) - a process that decomposes methane thermally to produce hydrogen from natural gas. TCDM has not yet been commercialized. However, the aim of this work was to conduct an economic and environmental analysis to determine whether the TCDM process is competitive with the more popular SMR process. The results indicate that the TCDM process has a lower carbon footprint. Further research on TCDM catalysts could make this process economically competitive with steam methane reforming.

Kartick C. Mondal; S. Ramesh Chandran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluation of the residual gas tolerance of homogeneous combustion processes with high exhaust-gas recirculation rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of concepts with low emissions and fuel consumption for gasoline engines requires an early knowledge of the combustion process residual gas tolerance. At the Institute...

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. techn. Thomas Lauer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluation of an alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from SRS tank waste using laboratory-scale centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect

An alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from Savannah River Site (SRS) tank waste was evaluated experimentally using a laboratory-scale centrifugal contactor. Single-stage and multistage tests were conducted with this contactor to determine hydraulic performance, stage efficiency, and general operability of the process flowsheet. The results and conclusions of these tests are reported along with those from various supporting tests. Also discussed is the ability to scale-up from laboratory- to plant-scale operation when centrifugal contractors are used to carry out the solvent extraction process. While some problems were encountered, a promising solution for each problem has been identified. Overall, this alkaline-side cesium extraction process appears to be an excellent candidate for removing cesium from SRS tank waste.

Leonard, R. A.; Conner, C.; Liberatore, M. W.; Sedlet, J.; Aase, S. B.; Vandegrift, G. F.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Review of EU airport energy interests and priorities with respect to ICT, energy efficiency and enhanced building operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

settings. CASCADE is aiming also at turning FDD into the actionable information by developing an energy action plan that links Actions-Actors-ISO Standards (ISO, 2011) through a web-based management portal. The developed ICT solutions will be able... performance benchmarks 5. Making an Energy Action Plan that links actors, actions, and ISO standards based on facility specific data and providing cost/benefit (kWh, CO2, Euros). CASCADE approach focuses to the actions which airports can take in order...

Costa, A.; Blanes, L. M.; Donnelly, C.; Keane, M. M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Soils Project Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process with ROTC 1 and ROTC 2, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process the NNSA/NSO Soils Activity uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process is used to establish FALs in accordance with the risk-based corrective action (RBCA) process stipulated in Chapter 445 of the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) as described in the ASTM International (ASTM) Method E1739-95 (NAC, 2008; ASTM, 1995). It is designed to provide a set of consistent standards for chemical and radiological corrective actions.

Matthews, Patrick; Sloop, Christina

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The review process used by U.S. health care plans to evaluate new medical technology for coverage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

RESULTS: In 96% of plans, MDs take part in the medical policy review process for new technology. However, MDs ... over coverage decisions in only 27% of plans. Indemnity plans are more likely to ...

Claudia A. Steiner MD; MPH

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) Application in the Evaluation of Management Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3.1. Mechanisms of Prevention ............................................................................................... 11 2.4. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) ....................... 11 2.5. FMEA Components... ........................................................................................... 15 2.5.5. Risk Priority Number ....................................................................................................... 17 2.6. FMEA Model...

Soguilon, Nenita M.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluating a Negotiated Rulemaking Process at Cape Hatteras National Seashore: Toward Piping Plover and People in One Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes, and citizen participation in them, for building the trust and cooperation needed to hold democratic communities together? (Sabatier, Focht, Lubell, Vedlitz & Matlock, 2005. p. 8). This research seeks to understand how Negotiated Rulemaking...

Merritt, Lavell

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

Evaluation of a process-based ecosystem model for long-term biomass and stand development of Eucalyptus globulus plantations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Versatile process-oriented ecosystem models are discussed as promising tools for the analyses of ecosystem services beyond wood yield, such as catchment water yield,...Eucalyptus globulus plantations in Australia...

Peter Miehle; Rdiger Grote; Michael Battaglia

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

form processing specifically for use by vision applica-tions. The most fundamental of the planned extensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, J. Brolio, A. Hanson, and E. Riseman, "The Schema System," International Journal of Computer Vision, "Detecting Runways in Complex Airport Scenes," Computer Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing, Vol. 51, No:McGraw Hill, 1975, Chapter 5. #12;Figure 10 Los Angeles International -- Excellent runway only. #12;Figure 9

Southern California, University of

315

Techno-economic evaluation of an ammonia-based post-combustion process integrated with a state-of-the-art coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A techno-economic evaluation of the application of an ammonia-based post-combustion CO2 capture system to an existing, state-of-the-art, coal-fired power plant. The study comprised an assessment of the ammonia-based capture process together with a detailed cost analysis, based on which the overall design of the capture process is presented, including a power plant integration strategy and estimates of the specific CO2 capture cost (/tCO2). The evaluations of the power plant and the CO2 capture plant were based on process modeling. The cost analysis was based on the installed cost of each unit in the equipment list derived from the process simulation, which was determined using detailed-factor estimation. We show that the steam required for a CO2 capture efficiency of 90% lowers the electric output from 408.0MWel to 341.8MWel. The capital expenditure related to the retrofit of the reference power plant with CO2 capture is 230M and the operating expenditure is determined to be 66.5M/year, corresponding to a relative capture cost of 35/tCO2. Furthermore, the present work proposes design improvements that may reduce the cost of capture to 31/tCO2.

Henrik Jilvero; Nils-Henrik Eldrup; Fredrik Normann; Klas Andersson; Filip Johnsson; Ragnhild Skagestad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Human Subject Evaluation of Airport Surface Situational Awareness Using Prototypical Flight Deck Electronic Taxi Chart Displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of Instrument Landing Systems has allowed aircraft to safely takeoff and land in low visibility conditions. However, the lack of a means by which pilots can safely navigate on the ground in poor visibility ...

Amar, Marc

317

Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Multi-attribute evaluation and selection of sites for agricultural product warehouses based on an Analytic Hierarchy Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Site selection for companies is a complex and unstructured problem that must be analyzed carefully and properly, since a localization error could drive to bankrupt. This problem has been discussed widely and effectively using multi-attribute methods ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process, Multi-criteria and Multi-attribute methods in agribusiness, Site selection attributes, Site selection problem

J. L. Garca; A. Alvarado; J. Blanco; E. Jimnez; A. A. Maldonado; G. Corts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Train directions from Newark Airport to Nassau Inn or Palmer House Hotel Train is the most convenient way to get to Princeton from EWR. From the terminals at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Train directions from Newark Airport to Nassau Inn or Palmer House Hotel Train is the most), and proceed to track 5. You need the NorthEast Corridor (NEC) train to Trenton (not Long Branch). They go is valid for any train on this route. The ride takes 40-45 minutes, and you exit at Princeton Junction

320

An Expert Elicitation Process in Support of Groundwater Model Evaluation for Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy is implementing corrective actions at facilities where nuclear-related operations were conducted in Nevada. Among the most significant sites being addressed are the locations of underground nuclear tests on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The process for implementing corrective actions for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) locations is defined in Appendix VI of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996, as amended). In broad terms, Appendix VI describes a Corrective Action Investigation followed by a Corrective Action Decision, and implementation of a Corrective Action Plan prior to closure. The Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) is farthest along in the UGTA corrective action process. It includes ten underground tests within the Frenchman Flat topographic basin, in the southeastern portion of the NNSS. Data have been collected from drilling exploration, hydrologic testing, and field and laboratory studies. Modeling has been completed at a variety of scales and focusing on a variety of flow and transport aspects ranging from regional boundary conditions to process dynamics within a single nuclear cavity. The culmination of the investigations is a transport model for the Frenchman Flat CAU (Stoller Navarro Joint Venture, 2009) that has undergone rigorous peer review and been accepted by the State of Nevada, setting the stage for the Corrective Action Decision and progression from the investigation phase to the corrective action phase of the project.

Chapman Jenny,Pohlmann Karl

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report  

SciTech Connect

TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new wastes are generated by the FTE process. and the U. S. Department of Energy has been conducted since 1992 to develop a commercial FTE purification process for produced waters. Numeric process and economic modeling, as well as the laboratory-scale process simulation that confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of the process, was performed by B. C. Technologies, Ltd., and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) from 1992 to 1995. They then conducted a field evaluation from 1995 to 1997 in New Mexico's San Juan Basin at a conventional evaporation facility operated by Amoco Production Company. The results of this evaluation confirmed that the FTE process has significant commercial economic potential. A new facility was designed in 1998, and its construction is expected to begin in 1999.

Ames A. Grisanti; James A. Sorensen

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Evaluation of whole plant grain sorghum silage processing methods and lasalocid sodium levels on stocker calf performance and rumen fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from . 78 to 1. 02 kg daily or 29/. . Feed efficiency was improved by 14/. . 12 It then becomes evident that the grain within the sorghum grain silage must be subjected to some processing method if satisfactory utilization is to be expected.... 83 85. 24 . 52 2. 14 . 09 4. 10 1. 66 Acid detergent fiber, Fecal pH 38. 95 38. 39 6. 85 7. 02 40. 10 1. 49 6. 97 . 05 a, b Different superscripts in same line are different (P&. 05) 52 TABLE 10. EFFECT OF WHOLE PLANT GRAIN SORGHUM SILAGE...

Gutierrez Garza, Gerardo

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Pilot scale evaluation of the BABIU process Upgrading of landfill gas or biogas with the use of MSWI bottom ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biogas or landfill gas can be converted to a high-grade gas rich in methane with the use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as a reactant for fixation of CO2 and H2S. In order to verify results previously obtained at a laboratory scale with 6590kg of bottom ash (BA), several test runs were performed at a pilot scale, using 5001000kg of bottom ash and up to 9.2Nm3/h real landfill gas from a landfill in the Tuscany region (Italy). The input flow rate was altered. The best process performance was observed at a input flow rate of 3.7Nm3/(htBA). At this flow rate, the removal efficiencies for H2S were approximately 99.599%.

P. Mostbauer; L. Lombardi; T. Olivieri; S. Lenz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Market potential of Lappeenranta Airport in the North-West Region of Russia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main target of this research is to evaluate current situation on the Russian market in North-west region and attempt to predict the future of (more)

Mardeev, Arthur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of improved technologies for the removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from process wastewater and groundwater: FY 1995 status  

SciTech Connect

A number of new sorbents are currently being developed for the removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from contaminated, caustic low-level liquid waste (LLLW). These sorbents are potentially promising for use in the cleanup of contaminated groundwater and process wastewater containing the two radionuclides. The goal of this subtask is to evaluate the new sorbents to determine whether their associated treatment technology is more selective for the decontamination of wastewater streams than that of currently available processes. Activities during fiscal year 1995 have included completing the characterization of the standard treatment technology, ion exchange on chabazite zeolite. Strontium and cesium sorption on sodium-modified zeolite was observed in the presence of elevated concentrations of wastewater components: sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The most significant loss of nuclide sorption was noted in the first 0- to 4-meq/L addition of the cations to a wastewater simulant. Radionuclide sorption on the pretreated zeolite was also determined under dynamic flow conditions. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, which was developed at the Savannah River Site, was selected as the first new sorbent to be evaluated for wastewater treatment. Nuclide sorption on this resin was greater when the resin had been washed with ultrapure water and air dried prior to use.

Bostick, D.T.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Burgess, M.W.; McTaggart, D.R.; Taylor, P.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Guo, B. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for decontamination at the St. Louis Downtown Site, St. Louis, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a cleanup program for three groups of properties in the St. Louis, Missouri, area: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) and vicinity properties, and the Latty Avenue Properties, including the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS). The general location of these properties is shown in Figure 1; the properties are referred to collectively as the St. Louis Site. None of the properties are owned by DOE, but each property contains radioactive residues from federal uranium processing activities conducted at the SLDS during and after World War 2. The activities addressed in this environmental evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report are being proposed as interim components of a comprehensive cleanup strategy for the St. Louis Site. As part of the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), DOE is proposing to conduct limited decontamination in support of proprietor-initiated activities at the SLDS, commonly referred to as the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works. The primary goal of FUSRAP activity at the SLDS is to eliminate potential environmental hazards associated with residual contamination resulting from the site's use for government-funded uranium processing activities. 17 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Picel, M.H.; Hartmann, H.M.; Nimmagadda, M.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Williams, M.J. (Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evaluation of wind energy potential and electricity generation at five locations in Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Evaluation of the wind power from the knowledge of the mean monthly wind speeds of a typical year, and for five different locations in Jordan is analyzed and assessed. In addition, an investigation into the feasibility of using five different wind turbines of different rated power ranging from 100kW to 3000kW at each location to be employed in wind farms is examined. The data of the wind speeds over five years are fitted to the Weibull distribution, which is most frequently used and most appropriate, describing frequency distribution for wind moving over Jordan. The annual mean values of the wind speed and the frequency distributions were found for the five locations studied; Ras-Moneef, Azraq south; Safawi, Queen Alia Airport and Aqaba Airport. The locations included the eastern desert regions where wide plain lands are economically feasible to be used for wind farms. It is apparent from the results of the analysis that the highly promising sites of having good wind energy potential are Aqaba and Ras-Moneef, whereas, the desert sites of Safawi and Azraq South have only moderate potential and Queen Alia Airport have a lower potential. The annual mean values of the wind speed and power density of the observed and theoretical distributions are 5.5ms?1 and 160Wm?2 for Ras Moneef, 4.0ms?1 and 175Wm?2 for Azraq South, 4.5ms?1 and 94Wm?2 for Safawi, 3.13ms?1 and 31Wm?2 for Queen Alia Airport and 6.0ms?1 and 215Wm?2 for Aqaba Airport, respectively.

Handri D. Ammari; Saad S. Al-Rwashdeh; Mohammad I. Al-Najideen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.  

SciTech Connect

Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Study of degumming process and evaluation of oxidative stability of methyl and ethyl biodiesel of Jatropha curcas L. oil from three different Brazilian states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes the production of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas oil. The kernel samples provided by Embrapa-PI, were first crushed in a blender and then subjected to extraction with hexane. The oil yield was between 54.710.47 and 64.162.88%. The J.curcas oil was then submitted to two different kinds of degumming, first with water and second with H3PO4 to evaluate the influence of these processes in the yield of the transesterification reaction. Methyl and ethyl biodiesel prepared from the degummed oil with H3PO4 had higher conversions than those prepared with the degummed with water. Therefore, among the processes of degumming studied, H3PO4 was more suitable for the treatment of J.curcas oil. The study shows the results about oxidation stability were good, because the biodiesels methyl and ethyl biodiesel have induction period at 13.51h and 13.03h without antioxidant addition when submitted a Rancimat text. Such biodiesels had their physicochemical parameters defined under the specifications of ANP Resolutions n 14/2012 (ANP- National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels from Brazil). The results showed that J.curcas cultivation in Brazil is an adequate source for biodiesel production, considering the technical standards available.

Francisca Diana da Silva Arajo; Iranildo C. Arajo; Isabella Cristhina G. Costa; Carla Vernica Rodarte de Moura; Mariana H. Chaves; Eugnio Celso E. Arajo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Intensification of biodiesel production from waste goat tallow using infrared radiation: Process evaluation through response surface methodology and artificial neural network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the first time, an efficient simultaneous trans/esterification process for biodiesel synthesis from waste goat tallow with considerable free fatty acids (FFAs) content has been explored employing an infrared radiation assisted reactor (IRAR). The impacts of methanol to tallow molar ratio, IRAR temperature and H2SO4 concentration on goat tallow conversion were evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal conditions, 96.7% FFA conversion was achieved within 2.5h at 59.93wt.% H2SO4, 69.97C IRAR temperature and 31.88:1 methanol to tallow molar ratio. The experimental results were also modeled using artificial neural network (ANN) and marginal improvement in modeling efficiency was observed in comparison with RSM. The infrared radiation strategy could significantly accelerate the conversion process as demonstrated through a substantial reduction in reaction time compared to conventionally heated reactor while providing appreciably high biodiesel yield. Moreover, the in situ water removal using silica-gel adsorbent could also facilitate achieving higher FFA conversion to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Owing to the occurrence of simultaneous transesterification of triglycerides present in goat tallow, overall 98.5wt.% FAME content was determined at optimal conditions in the product biodiesel which conformed to ASTM and EN biodiesel specifications.

R. Chakraborty; H. Sahu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Desalination processes and performance  

SciTech Connect

Different desalination processes are evaluated for feed, capacity, performance, energy requirements, and cost. These include distillation, reverse osmosis, or electrodialysis. Detailed information is given on distillation processes and membrane processes.

Summers, L. J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. Therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream feed stream, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. This strategy is known as 'feed forward statistical process control.' The DWPF depends on chemical analysis of the feed streams from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) where the frit plus adjusted sludge from the SRAT are mixed. The SME is the last vessel in which any chemical adjustments or frit additions can be made. Once the analyses of the SME product are deemed acceptable, the SME product is transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and onto the melter. The SRAT and SME analyses have been analyzed by the DWPF laboratory using a 'Cold Chemical' method but this dissolution did not adequately dissolve all the elemental components. A new dissolution method which fuses the SRAT or SME product with cesium nitrate (CsNO{sub 3}), germanium (IV) oxide (GeO{sub 2}) and cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) into a cesium germanate glass at 1050 C in platinum crucibles has been developed. Once the germanium glass is formed in that fusion, it is readily dissolved by concentrated nitric acid (about 1M) to solubilize all the elements in the SRAT and/or SME product for elemental analysis. When the chemical analyses are completed the acidic cesium-germanate solution is transferred from the DWPF analytic laboratory to the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) where the pH is increased to {approx}12 M to be released back to the tank farm and the 2H evaporator. Therefore, about 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2}/year will be diluted into 1.4 million gallons of recycle. This 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2} may increase to 4 kg/yr when improvements are implemented to attain an annual canister production goal of 400 canisters. Since no Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) exists for germanium in the Tank Farm, the Effluent Treatment Project, or the Saltstone Production Facility, DWPF has requested an evaluation of the fate of the germanium in the caustic environment of the RCT, the 2H evaporator, and the tank farm. This report evaluates the effect of the addition of germanium to the tank farm based on: (1) the large dilution of Ge in the RCT and tank farm; (2) the solubility of germanium in caustic solutions (pH 12-13); (3) the potential of germanium to precipitate as germanium sodalites in the 2H Evaporator; and (4) the potential of germanium compounds to precipitate in the evaporator feed tank. This study concludes that the impacts of transferring up to 4 kg/yr germanium to the RCT (and subsequently the 2H evaporator feed tank and the 2H evaporator) results in <2 ppm per year (1.834 mg/L) which is the maximum instantaneous concentration expected from DWPF. This concentration is insignificant as most sodium germanates are soluble at the high pH of the feed tank and evaporator solutions. Even if sodium aluminosilicates form in the 2H evaporator, the Ge will likely substitute for some small amount of the Si in these structures and will be insignificant. It is recommended that the DWPF continue with their strategy to add germanium as a laboratory chemical to Attachment 8.2 of the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan (WCP).

Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

St. Louis Airport Site. Annual site environmental report, calendar year 1985. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

During 1985, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. The ditches north and south of the site have been designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The monitoring program at the SLAPS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Potential radiation doses to the public are also calculated. Because the site is not controlled or regulated by the DOE, the DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) are not applicable to SLAPS, but are included only as a basis for comparison. The DOE DCGs and the DOE radiation protection standard have been revised. (Appendix B). During 1985, annual average radon levels in air at the SLAPS were below the DCG for uncontrolled areas. External gamma monitoring in 1985 showed measured annual gamma dose rates ranging from 3 to 2087 mrem/y, with the highest value occurring in an area known to be contaminated. The calculated maximum dose at the site boundary, assuming limited occupancy, would be 6 mrem/y. Average annual concentrations of /sup 230/Th, /sup 226/Ra, and total uranium in surface waters remained below the DOE DCG. The on-site groundwater measurements showed that average annual concentrations of /sup 230/Th, /sup 226/Ra and total uranium were within the DOE DCGs. Although there are no DCGs for sediments, all concentrations of total uraniu, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 226/Ra were below the FUSRAP Guidelines.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes: II. St. Louis Airport Storage Site  

SciTech Connect

The St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLASS) became radioactively contaminated as a result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy is considering various remedial action options for the SLASS under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This report describes the results of geochemical investigations, carried out to support the FUSRAP activities and to aid in quantifying various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples from the site were characterized, and sorption ratios for uranium and radium and apparent concentration limit values for uranium were measured in soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. The uranium and radium concentrations in soil samples were significantly above background near the old contaminated surface horizon (now at the 0.3/sup -/ to 0.9/sup -/m depth); the maximum values were 1566 ..mu..g/g and 101 pCi/g, respectively. Below about the 6/sup -/m depth, the concentrations appeared to be typical of those naturally present in soils of this area (3.8 +- 1.2 ..mu..g/g and 3.1 +- 0.6 pCi/g). Uranium sorption ratios showed stratigraphic trends but were generally moderate to high (100 to 1000 L/kg). The sorption isotherm suggested an apparent uranium concentration limit of about 200 mg/L. This relatively high solubility can probably be correlated with the carbonate content of the soil/groundwater systems. The lower sorption ratio values obtained from the sorption isotherm may have resulted from changes in the experimental procedure or the groundwater used. The SLASS appears to exhibit generally favorable behavior for the retardation of uranium solubilized from waste in the site. Parametric tests were conducted to estimate the sensitivity of uranium sorption and solubility to the pH and carbonate content of the system.

Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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341

Administrative Policy Approval Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administrative Policy Approval Process Faculty Handbook Policy Approval Process Policy idea. Faculty Handbook Committee meets during the academic year to discuss and evaluate proposed changes to Handbook policies. Policy changes approved by the Handbook Committee are forwarded to the President

342

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

343

Geoarchaeological investigation of natural formation processes to evaluate context of the clovis component at the Gault site (41BL323), Bell County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles of the sedimentary matrix and therefore subject to the influences of same natural processes (Butzer 1982; Hassan 1985; Isaac 1967; Schiffer 1976, 1987; Shackley 1978; Shipman 1981; Villa 1982; Waters 1992). ____________ This thesis follows... particles of the sedimentary matrix and therefore subject to the influences of same natural processes (Butzer 1982; Hassan 1985; Isaac 1967; Schiffer 1976, 1987; Shackley 1978; Shipman 1981; Villa 1982; Waters 1992). ____________ This thesis follows...

Alexander, Dawn Aileen Joyce

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

345

Evaluation of Mercury Transformations and Trophic Transfer in the San Francisco Bay/Delta: Identifying Critical Processes for the Ecosystem Restoration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Mercury Transformations and Trophic Transfer in the San Francisco Bay of Mercury Transformations and Trophic Transfer in the San Francisco Bay/Delta: Identifying Critical mercury contamination of the San Francisco Bay (SFB) watershed, resulting largely from historic mining

346

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect

The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2  

SciTech Connect

Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function, and taking its asymptotics we prove KPZ universality for the polymer (free energy fluctuation exponent 1/3 and Tracy-Widom GUE limit law). (6) Under intermediate disorder scaling, we recover the Laplace transform of the solution of the KPZ equation with narrow wedge initial data. (7) We provide contour integral formulas for a wide array of polymer moments. (8) This results in a new ansatz for solving quantum many body systems such as the delta Bose gas.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Process evaluation - steam reforming of diesel fuel oil. Final technical report 24 Apr-24 Dec 79 on phases 1-4  

SciTech Connect

This project is an evaluation of a proprietary catalyst as a means of steam-reforming diesel fuel oil (Fed. Spec. VV-F-800B, symbol DF-2). A system for testing the catalyst has been designed, built and successfully used to screen operating conditions of temperature, space velocity, and H2O/C ratio. A duration test has been conducted showing the catalyst capable of steam reforming diesel fuel, but with the production of naphthalene after 30 hours. Hydrogen production remained stable through the 86 hours of the test.

Jarvi, G.A.; Bowman, R.M.; Camara, E.H.; Lee, A.L.

1980-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Parametric and kinetic studies on deactivation and regeneration of hydrotreating catalysts in solvent refined coal upgrading process and an evaluation of the liquid vaporization effects on hydrotreater performance  

SciTech Connect

Catalysts used in hydrotreating the solvent refined coal were rapidly deactivated during the initial stages of processing. The major cause of deactivation appears to be the deposition of carbonaceous material on the catalyst. A simulated aging technique involving a series of reactions on the same batch of catalyst and a model compound activity test were developed and used to study the effects of process conditions, feedstock characteristics, catalyst properties, and catalyst pretreatment on initial catalyst deactivation. The variables shown to increase the rate of deactivation are: increased catalyst loading, high reaction temperature, low hydrogen pressure, unsulfiding the catalyst, and high concentrations of preasphaltenes and insoluble organic matter in the feedstock. The loss in catalyst surface area during the aging process was substantial, being as high as 95%. A simple kinetic model, including a first-order catalyst deactivation rate, was applied to upgrading of two-coal derived feedstocks. A catalyst deactivation mechanism was proposed which involves the adsorption and surface reaction of coke precursors on catalytic active sites. Catalyst regeneration of aged catalysts from the LC-Finer and the ITSL process has been accomplished through oxidative treatment followed by presulfiding. A parametric study has been performed to identify the optimum regeneration conditions. The degree of regeneration appears to be dependent on the feed material and reaction history of the catalyst. Liquid vaporization affects the hydrotreater performance significantly. The hydrotreater is simulated to study the effects of the solvent volatility, hydrogen flow rate, feed concentration, temperature, and pressure. A gradientless reactor system was designed, built, and used to verify the key result ofthe simulation study.

Nalitham, R.V.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products. Task 4.6, Economic evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The principal finding of this study was the high capital cost and poor financial performance predicted for the size and configuration of the plant design presented. The XBi financial assessment gave a disappointingly low base-case discounted cash flow rate of return (DCFRR) of only 8.1% based on a unit capital cost of $900 per ton year (tpy) for their 129,000 tpy design. This plant cost is in reasonable agreement with the preliminary estimates developed by J.E. Sinor Associates for a 117,000 tpy plant based on the FMC process with similar auxiliaries (Sinor, 1989), for which a unit capital costs of $938 tpy was predicted for a design that included char beneficiation and coal liquids upgrading--or about $779 tpy without the liquid upgrading facilities. The XBi assessment points out that a unit plant cost of $900 tpy is about three times the cost for a conventional coke oven, and therefore, outside the competitive range for commercialization. Modifications to improve process economics could involve increasing plant size, expanding the product slate that XBi has restricted to form coke and electricity, and simplifying the plant flow sheet by eliminating marginally effective cleaning steps and changing other key design parameters. Improving the financial performance of the proposed formed coke design to the level of a 20% DCFRR based on increased plant size alone would require a twenty-fold increase to a coal input of 20,000 tpd and a coke production of about 2.6 minion tpy--a scaling exponent of 0.70 to correct plant cost in relation to plant size.

Cohen, L.R. [Xytel-Bechtel, Inc. (United States); Hogsett, R.F. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States); Sinor, J.E. [Sinor (J.E.) Consultants, Inc., Niwot, CO (United States); Ness, R.O. Jr.; Runge, B.D. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Exploratory nondestructive evaluation (NDE) research for advanced materials and processes: Volume 3 -- Interactive multimedia computer based training (IMCBT) for nondestructive evaluation/inspection (NDE/I) personnel. Final report, 1 July 1995--30 April 1998  

SciTech Connect

Interactive Multimedia Computer Based Training (IMCBT) for Nondestructive Inspection (NDE/I) Personnel: Computer Based Training (CBT) is a highly effective method for industrial training that has been growing in popularity. Text, graphics, sound, movies and animation enhance the learning activity. Interactive Multimedia CBT (IMCBT) allows students to learn in an environment where the training material is presented on a computer workstation and uses student interaction and feedback in the learning process. This technology has been used in the aerospace industry for aircraft maintenance and flight training and is growing in many operation training areas. The cost of development of IMCBT material is significantly more expensive than traditional training material, but an hour of IMCBT material can contain more information than an hour of traditional training material since information is transferred faster and with higher retention. Because IMCBT delivers training at lower cost, the overall benefit of IMCBT has been found to be in the range of 40% to 60% cost savings. The application of IMCBT for NDE/I training did show an overwhelmingly positive acceptance of the incorporation of IMCBT for NDE/I personnel within existing training structures. A CD-ROM package called INSPECT (Interactive Student Paced Eddy Current Training) has demonstrate various advanced aspects of potential IMCBT lessons. The INSPECT CD demonstration was reviewed by Air Force and industry professionals, as well as a group of high school students to gauge novice response. The prototype was found to be appealing and to have significant potential as a useful teaching tool. A large majority of the professional reviewers stated they would like to have complete CBT modules like INSPECT for some aspect of their NDE/I training.

Bossi; Knutson, B.; Nerenberg, R.; Deobald, L.; Nelson, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Evaluation of 2.25Cr-1Mo Alloy for Containment of LiCl/KCl Eutectic during the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of uranium from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiner vessels containing a LiCl/KCl eutectic salt has been on-going for 14 and 12 years, respectively, during the pyrometallurgical processing of used nuclear fuel. Although austenitic stainless steels are typically utilized for LiCl/KCl salt systems, the presence of cadmium in the Mk-IV electrorefiner dictates an alternate material. A 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy (ASME SA-387) was chosen due to the absence of nickel in the alloy which has a considerable solubility in cadmium. Using the transition metal impurities (iron, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, and manganese) in the electrorefined uranium products, an algorithm was developed to derive values for the contribution of the transition metals from the various input sources. Weight loss and corrosion rate data for the Mk-V electrorefiner vessel were then generated based on the transition metal impurities in the uranium products. To date, the corrosion rate of the 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy in LiCl/KCl eutectic is outstanding assuming uniform (i.e. non-localized) conditions.

B.R. Westphal; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; D. Vaden; T.A. Johnson; J.C. Wass

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29,...

355

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): New Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County, Wilmington, NC. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Hanover site was located on Gardner Road approximately 500 feet west of the New Hanover County Airport terminal, New Hanover, North Carolina. From 1968 to 1979, the site was used for fire-fighter training purposes. During training exercises, jet fuel, gasoline, petroleum storage bottoms, fuel oil, kerosene, and sorbent materials from oil spill cleanup were burned in a pit. During its active years, water from the pit was allowed to flow onto land surfaces. Inspections conducted after the pit was abandoned showed that most of the standing liquid in the pit was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fighting activities resulted in contamination at several other site areas, including an auto burn area; a railroad tank burn area; an aircraft mock-up area; a fuel tank and pipelines area; and two stained soil areas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration of the aquifer to drinking water quality as a final action for the site. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil and ground water were VOCs, including benzene; and metals, including chromium and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

D. S. Tobiason

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

St. Louis airport site: Annual site environmental report, St. Louis, Missouri, Calendar Year 1988: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The monitoring program at St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To assess the potential effects of SLAPS on public health, the potential radiation dose was estimated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual would receive an external exposure approximately equivalent to 7.5 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is approximately the same as a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of SLAPS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of 1988 monitoring show that SLAPS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 18 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Post Travel Summary Document Number: ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-004, Contractor Travel Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 11_0221 Initial Release ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 3 of 3

359

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues surrounding this process. We concluded that the MP process could be improved for most users by tuning the system configuration. With the approval of both the STRIPES Executive Steering Committee and the STRIPES Project Office, we launched the MP Process Improvement Initiative. After many meetings with members of the STRIPES Team and Working Group, we are ready to "go-live" with this initiative. On October 1 st , 2012 the new MP process will be implemented for use by most field offices.

360

Global evaluation of biofuel potential from microalgae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gas emission evaluation of biodiesel derived from microalgae...Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae ( National...Graph Image Process 28 ( 3...Appendix: Global Evaluation...gas emission evaluation of biodiesel derived...

Jeffrey W. Moody; Christopher M. McGinty; Jason C. Quinn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluating Model Parameterizations of Arctic Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

865-9026 References Clothiaux, E. E., T. P. Ackerman, G. G. Mac, K. P. Moran, R. T. Marchand, M. A. Miller, and B. E. Martner, 2000: Objective determination of cloud heights and...

362

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Supplier Selection Management Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Vendor Selection and Management Process Document Number: ADMP-002 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): ADMF-009 Vendor Audit Plan, ADMF-010 Vendor Audit Checklist, ADMF-011 Vendor Audit Report, ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMF-016 EOTA Vendor List, REG-003 Record Register ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 2 of 9 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1110 Added verbiage and reference for ADMF-016, EOTA Vendor List to process.

364

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process Deviation Document Number: P-010 Rev 11-0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-013 Process Deviation Form, P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action, F-014 Process Deviation Log, ADMP-001 Procurement Process P-010 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0822 Process assigned to new owner. Process and flowchart modified to require completion of all items on F-013. 09_0122 Process and flowchart modified to reflect process modifications.

365

Processing Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

366

The concept of RunwayGuard was developed during techni-cal investigations at some airports in the Persian Gulf region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Persian Gulf region with the aim of increasing operational safety. Appropriate concept evaluation studies

Berlin,Technische Universität

367

Airport sustainability encompasses a wide variety of airport management and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management plan listing potential improvements along with their estimated benefits and costs. Examples is to consider renewable energies. Solar photovoltaic (PV), which uses panels to absorb solar energy, is prob- ably the most commonly implemented type of renewable energy. Solar PV panels can be ground

Minnesota, University of

368

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course/Analysis Initiation Process Document Number: ISDP- 010 Rev 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDP-010, Course Analysis Initiation Process, ISDP-015, WBT/ILT/Ex Design Process ISDP-010 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0512 Modified verbiage for clarification and updated referenced documents.

369

Thermal Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

370

Photolytic Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

371

Bullets found in airport arrest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Just as the United States has brought in new security measures for international flights - including fingerprint screening for some passengers - a scare has shown that even ... even the most basic existing security checks can fail. Security officials at Washington DC's Dulles ...

Michael Hopkin

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process Document Number: ISDP-015 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006A WBT Script Template, ISDF- 007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 6

373

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Development Process Document Number: ISDP-017 Revision 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ITTP-016 WBT Programming ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0223 Made changes to accurately reflect TPP. 11_0414 Added Derivative Classifier to step 12.0 ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 3 of 8

374

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Website Development-Maintenance Process Document Number: ITTP-015 Rev. 11_0419 Document Owner: Benjamin Aragon Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: ITT Referenced Document(s): ITTF-016 Website Development/Maintenance Log, ISDP-002 Training Production Process ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0419 Deleted decision point 2.1 and 2.2, incorporated Notifying Requester into step 2.0, modified verbiage for clarification. ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 3 of 6

375

ASI Supplier Evaluation Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Vendor Evaluation Record Document Number: ADMF-015 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-002, Vendor Selection and Management Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 2 of 4 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1016 Added section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. 08_1110 Removed section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. Do Not Use section will be placed on ADMF-016, Vendor List.

376

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process Document Number: ISDP-005 Rev 11_0718 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: PM2 Referenced Document(s): ISDF-XXX Vision User Guide (currently being developed ) ISDP-005 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0410 Initial Release 10_0630 Process modified to match steps within the TPP 11_0718 Minor editorial changes; changed step 8.0 from Task-to-Training Matrix to "Analysis"-to-Training Matrix.

377

Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

378

Sensitivity Analysis of Proposed LNG liquefaction Processes for LNG FPSO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The four liquefaction processes proposed as a good candidate for LNG FPSO are simulated and evaluated. These processes include a single mixed refrigerant (SMR), (more)

Pwaga, Sultan Seif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Real-time Inter-modal Strategies for Airline Schedule Perturbation Recovery and Airport Congestion Mitigation under Collaborative Decision Making (CDM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

airline operation center (AOC) 13 may cancel more flights,Evaluate Demand vs. Capacity Proposed GDP Advisory AOC SmartCancellation Problem AOC Response (Cancellations) Yes Is the

Zhang, Yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8056 Hydrological principles for sustainable management of forest of the cleanest and most plentiful freshwater supplies, sustaining many downstream communities. Given the ongoing

382

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 2 ILT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-012 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-014 Course Announcement, ISDF-010, After Action Report, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-009, Design/Development Review Checklist, ITTF-014 Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ISDP-011, Exercise Course Implementation Process, ITTP-015 Website Development/Maintenance Process, ISDF-015, ILT/EX Course Support Checklist

383

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t ? [0,1). We prove several results ...

Borodin, Alexei

384

Ionic Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Processes based on the properties of ions, encountered in brackish and seawater, are described and discussed in this chapter. Whereas in distillation the amount and kind of salts contained in the raw feed wate...

Anthony A. Delyannis; Eurydike A. Delyannis

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ecosystem Scale Acoustic Sensing Reveals Humpback Whale Behavior Synchronous with Herring Spawning Processes and Re-Evaluation Finds No Effect of Sonar on Humpback Song Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed ...

Gong, Zheng

387

Help Sheet for Faculty Evaluation Process (Fall 2013) This document is intended to assist faculty and staff as they prepare materials for the Individual Performance Review (IPR) and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faculty and staff as they prepare materials for the Individual Performance Review (IPR) and the faculty, postdoctoral fellows) are evaluated at the department level only. In a nutshell, those who must submit an IPR and Green forms, and IPR and CV. Just as with tenure track faculty, a judgment of merit does not mean

Chu, Xi

388

Help Sheet for Faculty Evaluation Process (Fall 2012) This document is intended to assist faculty and staff as they prepare materials for the Individual Performance Review (IPR) and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faculty and staff as they prepare materials for the Individual Performance Review (IPR) and the faculty, postdoctoral fellows) are evaluated at the department level only. In a nutshell, those who must submit an IPR faculty. Submit Ivory and Green forms, and IPR and CV. Just as with tenure track faculty, a judgment

Vonessen, Nikolaus

389

Deposition Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pulsed Plasma Processing Pulsed Plasma Processing NEW: Downloadable: Invited Talk "Pulsed Metal Plasmas," presented at the 2006 AVS Meeting, San Francisco, California, November 15, 2006. (PDF, file size 8 MB). Plasma Sources for Window Coatings Deposition processes for low-emittance and solar control coatings can be improved through the use of advanced plasma technology developed at LBNL. A new type of constricted glow-discharge plasma source was selected for the 1997 R&D 100 Award. Invented by LBNL researchers Andre Anders, Mike Rubin, and Mike Dickinson, the source was designed to be compatible with industrial vacuum deposition equipment and practice. Construction is simple, rugged and inexpensive. It can operate indefinitely over a wide range of chamber pressure without any consumable parts such as filaments or grids. Several different gases including Argon, Oxygen and Nitrogen have been tested successfully.

390

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 7 3 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-013 Rev. 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-014, Course Announcement Template, ITTF-014, Publication Review and Approval, ISDF-010 After Action Report, ISDF-042 Validation & Acceptance, ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template, ITTP-015, Website Development Maintenance ISDP-013 WBT Course Implementation 11_0512 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0405 Added ISDF-048, After Action Report Calculation Template to process.

391

Biological Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Evaluation Biological Evaluation for the Proposed United States Army Military Training Activities on the Savannah River Site Department of the Army - Fort Gordon Range Control - Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security Location: Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, SC., Savannah River Site Contact Person: Donald S. McLean, 706-840-5522 / 706-791-2422 Submitted by Fort Gordon Range Control Training Facility Coordinator (DPTMS) Prepared By: ___________________________________________________________________ Donald S. McLean, Training Facility Coordinator Fort Gordon Georgia Date: 2 Table of Contents Summary, Page 4 Introduction, Page 6 Project Description, Page 6 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action, Page 7

392

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 1 of 8 1 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Course Implementation Document Number: ISDP-011 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDP-012, ILT Course Implementation, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-010 After Action Report ISDP-011 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-011 Exercise Course Implementation 10_0630 Page 3 of 8

393

Fermentation process  

SciTech Connect

Fermentation process consists essentially of fermenting a 10-45% w/w aqueous slurry of granular starch for the production of ethanol with an ethanol-producing microorganism in the presence of alpha-amylase and glucoamylase, the conduct of said fermentation being characterized by low levels of dextrin and fermentable sugars in solution in the fermentation broth throughout the fermentation, and thereafter recovering enzymes from the fermentation broth for use anew in fermentation of granular starch.

Lutzen, N.W.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electrolytic Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electrolysis is the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. This reaction takes place in a unit called an electrolyzer. Electrolyzers can be small, appliance-size equipment and well-suited for small-scale distributed hydrogen production. Research is also under way to examine larger-scale electrolysis that could be tied directly to renewable or other non-greenhouse gas emitting electricity production. Hydrogen production at a wind farm generating electricity is an example of this.

395

Evaluation Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teacher Logs Teacher Logs Teacher logs are to be collected 'pre' and 'post' program for the purpose of exploring changes in teaching practice that may have resulted from participation in the summer institute. Pre-Program: Identify teachers who will be asked to complete teacher logs plus 2-3 alternates. Telephone these teachers and include the following information: Teacher logs are a relatively new form of evaluating programs. We are using them to help us improve our program and to assess the extent to which the program affects teaching and learning. They have been selected randomly from teacher-participants of the [Name of Program] to help us evaluate our program. Several teachers in this and other programs are being asked to complete logs to assess the overall effectiveness of XX programs nationwide.

396

Techno-Economic Analysis of Coal-Based Hydrogen and Electricity Cogeneration Processes with CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The baseline coal gasification process and the novel membrane and syngas chemical-looping processes are evaluated. ... burner ...

Fanxing Li; Liang Zeng; Liang-Shih Fan

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluating Utility System Operations Using APLUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Evaluating utility System Operations Using APLUS" Sanjay Pethe Sr. Process Engineer TENSA Services, Inc. 6200 Savoy Drive, Ste. 540 Houston, Texas 77036 ABSTRACT The steam system at a recycled paper fiberboard plant in Texas... Figure 1: Schematic of Steam System 86 "Evaluating utility System Operations Using APLUS" Sanjay Pethe Sr. Process Engineer Rajiv Singh Sr. Process Engineer TENSA Services, Inc. 6200 Savoy Drive, Ste. 540 Houston, Texas 77036 TENSA Services, Inc. 6200...

Pethe, S.; Singh, R.

398

Fenleuton:? Development of a Manufacturing Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process research on the synthesis of fenleuton has resulted in the discovery, development, scale-up, and evaluation of three new processes in the pilot plant. ... Several operational and scale-up issues were encountered and resolved, resulting in a cost-effective manufacturing process ready for commercialization. ...

Albert V. Thomas; Hemantkumar H. Patel; Lee A. Reif; Sanjay R. Chemburkar; David P. Sawick; Bhadra Shelat; Mary K. Balmer; Ramesh R. Patel

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

On the definition and design-time analysis of process performance indicators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A key aspect in any process-oriented organisation is the evaluation of process performance for the achievement of its strategic and operational goals. Process Performance Indicators (PPIs) are a key asset to carry out this evaluation, and, therefore, ... Keywords: Automated analysis, Business process management, PPINOT, Process performance indicators, Process performance measurement

Adela Del-RO-Ortega; Manuel Resinas; Cristina Cabanillas; Antonio Ruiz-CortS

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the inability to define the energy calibration accurately. Acronyms ACHIP adaptive chi-processed ASEDRA Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm DNDO Domestic Nuclear Detection Office DRFs Detector Response Functions FINDS Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security FWHM full-width half-maximum GADRAS Gamma Detector Response Analysis Software GUI graphical user interface HEU highly enriched uranium HPGe high purity germanium ID identification NaI Sodium iodide NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NORM Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials ppm parts per million SNL Sandia National Laboratories UF University of Florida WGPu weapons-grade plutonium

Mitchell, Dean James; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ChBE 4505/4525 Chemical Process Design/Biochemical Process Design Basic Curriculum and Learning Outcomes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of flowsheet synthesis and economic analysis and optimization. A complete design on a chemical process, targeting, tradeoffs. To teach students basic skills in process design;economic evaluation, sizing. Economic evaluation of process designs, applications of a) net present value b) time value of money c

Sherrill, David

402

NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions Reduction from Continuous Commissioning (CC) Measures at the Rent-A-Car Facility in the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and CO2) reduction for year 1999 and the projected ones for 2007 and corresponding OSD periods are presented next. Potential Emissions Reductions for 1999 Potential Emissions Reductions for 2007 Emissions Annual (Tons/yr) OSD (Tons/day) Annual... (Tons/yr) OSD (Tons/day) NOX 3.710320 0.012782 1.64387 0.00554 SO2 N/A N/A 1.11594 0.00362 CO2 N/A N/A 1316.468 4.62669 The potential emissions reduction of SO2 and CO2 for the year 1999 was not evaluated because eGRID tables for that year were...

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Evaluating Solar Energy Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the electric and heating loads at a site Size, condition, and efficiency of existing heating systems. After evaluation the site, the next step in the planning process is to...

404

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Dry Process Electrode Fabrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Navitas Systems at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about dry process electrode...

405

Evaluation of Perfluoropolyether Coatings for Environmental Protection of Stone.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) as an environmentally safe coating process. RESS allows (more)

Harris, Robert Bryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Evaluation of Cost Efficiency in Finnish Electricity Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the process of developing an approach to evaluating the cost-efficiency of Finnish electricity distribution companies based on Data Envelopment Analysis...

Pekka J. Korhonen; Mikko J. Syrjnen

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Extensible packet processing architecture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Test Data Post-Processing and Analysis Master Thesis Test Data Post-Processing and Analysis of Link  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Data Post-Processing and Analysis Master Thesis ­ Test Data Post-Processing and Analysis for both downlink and uplink. This is a post-process of LA and HARQ test data and makes analysis by the e standards and Ericsson Research Analyze the data from processing for the final graph Evaluate a suitable

Zhao, Yuxiao

409

Evaluation of production processes for LNG in arctic climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Most of nowadays base load LNG plants are localized in the area around equator, with stable warm air and cooling water temperature. For new (more)

Borlaug, Terje

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Evaluation of Authorization Basis Management Systems and Processes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

explosive operations in AAO and MHC. This realignment of responsibilities can improve the efficiency of authorization basis document development, review, and approval. AAO has been...

411

Financial evaluation and decision making processes for environmental technology projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The convergence of the information age with an improved understanding of the effects humans have on the environment provides exciting new opportunities to improve our impact on the world. Though modem companies collect and ...

Dreher, Jonathan J. (Jonathan Jacob)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Clean Energy Works Portland Pilot Process Evaluation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rtcleanenergyworks.pdf More Documents & Publications Data Collection and Analysis Oregon Recovery Act State Memo Primer on Clean Energy Lending: The Major Components and Options...

413

Evaluation of Packed Columns in Supercritical Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used was 1/4 inch Raschig rings with a surface area of 220 ft 2 /ft 3 . The supercritical systems studied were carbon dioxide/ethanol/water and carbon dioxide/isopropanol/water at 102 atmos pheres and 35 0 C and 102 atmospheres and 40 0 C... to the differences in performance of the two systems. Carbon dioxide is one of the most commonly used supercritical solvents because it is non-toxic and non-flammable. Carbon dioxide is inexpensive rela tive to other solvents and has a conveniently low critical...

Rathkamp, P. J.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

414

Innovative Corridors Initiative: Call for Submission Process and Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on its investment at an acceptable risk, while the publicprivate sector risk to an acceptable level by implementing

Finson, Rachel S.; McCormick, Cynthia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluating mantle and crustal processes using isotope geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical studies are fundamental for understanding how the dynamic Earth works and evolves. These studies place constraints on the composition, formation, age, distribution, evolution and scales of geochemically distinct ...

Saal, Alberto Edgardo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Evaluation of Waste Process Grease as Feedstock for Biodiesel Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Awareness of the depletion of fossil energy reserves, the rising demand for energy in the world and the problems associated with the burning of fossil fuel encourage researchers to find alternative energy sour...

Sanette Marx; Roelf Venter

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Security and Cyber Evaluations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security and Cyber Evaluations Security and Cyber Evaluations Security and Cyber Evaluations Security and Cyber Evaluations within the Office of Enforcement and Oversight implements the independent security performance monitoring functions for DOE. The other half of the Independent Oversight Program is implemented by the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations for safety oversight. The independent oversight function performed by these two offices is delineated in DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, issued on August 30, 2011. This recently revised Order reflects lessons learned in conducting inspections and incorporates earlier and more frequent line management involvement in the inspection planning process. We welcome an opportunity to discuss our inspection process and potential

418

Nuclear weapon reliability evaluation methodology  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of those activities that are normally performed by Sandia National Laboratories to provide nuclear weapon reliability evaluations for the Department of Energy. These reliability evaluations are first provided as a prediction of the attainable stockpile reliability of a proposed weapon design. Stockpile reliability assessments are provided for each weapon type as the weapon is fielded and are continuously updated throughout the weapon stockpile life. The reliability predictions and assessments depend heavily on data from both laboratory simulation and actual flight tests. An important part of the methodology are the opportunities for review that occur throughout the entire process that assure a consistent approach and appropriate use of the data for reliability evaluation purposes.

Wright, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

420

Surveillance Guides - Work Control Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Control Process Work Control Process 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance guide is to provide lines of inquiry for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's work control process. Users should be cognizant that the lines of inquiry need to be further tailored to fit specific facilities or activities in accordance with contractual mechanisms such as Maintenance Implementation Plans, Conduct of Operations Implementation Plans, and the Integrated Safety Management System Description. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations 2.4 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of Core

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Understanding the thermodynamic inefficiencies in combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The thermodynamic inefficiencies associated with any energy conversion process are expressed by the exergy destruction and the exergy losses associated with the process. Combustion processes exhibit very high thermodynamic inefficiencies caused by chemical reaction, heat transfer, friction, and mixing. In this paper, we discuss how to estimate the thermodynamic inefficiencies resulting from each one of these sources. The thermodynamic evaluation can be conducted with the aid of either a conventional exergetic analysis or an advanced one. The latter allows estimation of the potential for improvement of the process being considered and demonstrates the interactions among the components of the system in which combustion takes place. The paper discusses how advanced exergy-based evaluations can be used to reduce the thermodynamic inefficiencies, costs, and environmental impacts associated with energy conversion systems including combustion processes.

George Tsatsaronis; Tatiana Morosuk; Daniela Koch; Max Sorgenfrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. #12;2 Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption Bound-Bound & Bound-Free Processes

Sitko, Michael L.

423

EEO Complaint Process EEO Complaint Process INFORMAL PROCESS-COUNSELING  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Complaint Process Complaint Process EEO Complaint Process INFORMAL PROCESS-COUNSELING National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Civil Rights Equal Employment Opportunity: Collaborating For Mission Success EEO POLICY The Department of Energy (DOE) does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, race, disability (physical or mental), national origin, reprisal, religion, sex (including sexual harassment), sexual orientation, genetic information or any other non-merit factor. DOE is committed to equal employment opportunity principles and practices in all management decisions and personnel practices. The Department is committed to providing equal employment opportunity; eliminating discrimination in employment; and maintaining an environment that

424

Life Improvement of Pot Hardware in Continuous Hot Dipping Processes Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The process of continuous galvanizing of rolled sheet steel includes immersion into a bath of molten zinc/aluminum alloy. The steel strip is dipped in the molten bath through a series of driving motors and rollers which control the speed and tension of the strip, with the ability to modify both the amount of coating applied to the steel as well as the thickness and width of the sheet being galvanized. There are three rolls used to guide the steel strip through the molten metal bath. The rolls that operate in the molten Zn/Al are subject to a severely corrosive environment and require frequent changing. The performance of this equipment, the metallic hardware submerged in the molten Zn/Al bath, is the focus of this research. The primary objective of this research is to extend the performance life of the metallic hardware components of molten Zn/Al pot hardware by an order of magnitude. Typical galvanizing operations experience downtimes on the order of every two weeks to change the metallic hardware submerged in the molten metal bath. This is an expensive process for industry which takes upwards of 3 days for a complete turn around to resume normal operation. Each roll bridle consists of a sink, stabilizer, and corrector roll with accompanying bearing components. The cost of the bridle rig with all components is as much as $25,000 dollars just for materials. These inefficiencies are of concern to the steel coating companies and serve as a potential market for many materials suppliers. This research effort served as a bridge between the market potential and industry need to provide an objective analytical and mechanistic approach to the problem of wear and corrosion of molten metal bath hardware in a continuous sheet galvanizing line. The approach of the investigators was to provide a means of testing and analysis that was both expeditious and cost effective. The consortium of researchers from West Virginia University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed several test apparatuses that were designed to work in concert so that the process of developing and evaluating new materials and material combinations could be carried out in the most effective manner. ORNL focused on the long-term effects of static and dynamic corrosion on the hardware. Their efforts have yielded corrosion data in terms of mass loss for a large database of materials for immersion times in excess of 6000 hours. In addition, they have developed a new series of alloy, designated ORNL Alloy 4-x. Several variants of Alloy 4 were tested for corrosion and wear performance. Another effective method for protecting bearing components is through the use of weld overlays or laser cladding. ORNL worked with several project partners to develop a weld overlay process for cladding of 316L stainless steel with metallic materials that are much more corrosion and wear resistant. This method provides super-alloy performance that is more affordable. WVU was tasked to study wear of the bearing materials along with mechanisms of dross buildup on the roll surface. A small scale screening test apparatus was developed for the purpose quickly evaluating wear performance of candidate superalloys, ceramics, and coatings through the use of a ball-and-seat testing combination. This combination uses a fraction of the material used in full-scale bearing applications. With this system, WVU has been able to conduct hundreds of tests on various combinations of materials that mimic a wide variety of operating conditions for the galvanizing lines. The small scale wear tester was used to perform both direct correlation to galvanizing line conditions and to act as a screening mechanism for prototype-scale testing at WVU?s airport bearing materials testing facility. In addition, the studies on the effect of contact pressure and velocity on the bearing wear rate lead to the design and subsequent patent application for a fixed-shaft roll design that has the potential for increasing the bearing life by a factor of 2. The prototype-scale bearing test apparatus was donated by one of our proje

Xingbo Liu

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evaluating user behavior and strategy during visual exploration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Visualization practitioners have traditionally focused on evaluating the outcome of the visual analytic process, as opposed to studying how that process unfolds. Since user strategy would likely influence the outcome of visual analysis and the nature ... Keywords: exploratory visual analysis, insight-based evaluation

Khairi Reda, Andrew E. Johnson, Jason Leigh, Michael E. Papka

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The human dimension of program evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Social science issues play an important role in the evaluation of demand-side management (DSM) programs. In the very early years of DSM program evaluation in the United States, there was a fair amount of social science research applied to the behavioral aspects of energy efficiency. Since the mid-1980s, however, there has been a heavy emphasis on impact evaluation, technical measurement, and engineering methodologies. Although some have articulated the need to integrate behavioral research into energy evaluation, most emphasis has tended to center on the technical/engineering aspects. Increasingly, however, the realization is growing that it is necessary to integrate important behavioral variables into impact evaluation techniques. In addition, it is being further recognized that behavioral research questions are central to a number of critical evaluation issues: e.g., design of samples for evaluation studies, net energy savings, self-selection bias, free riders and free drivers, persistence of energy savings, process evaluation, and market impact evaluation. Finally, it is increasingly being realized that the utilization of evaluation results relies heavily on behavioral factors. Social science researchers should be poised to expect a greatly expanded role of behavioral research in evaluation. As new techniques are developed and perfected, as the results of impact evaluations become more abundant, and as the gap between technical energy savings potential and realized savings becomes more visible, research regarding the ``human dimension`` of program evaluation will be crucial. This paper provides an overview of the human dimension of program evaluation and focuses on key evaluation issues in demand-side management which will require the use of social science research for addressing these issues.

Vine, E.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Preliminary Impact Evaluation BBNP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Impact Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, 2013.

428

Evaluation Consultant RFP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation Consultant RFP, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

429

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Airport Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search There are lots of things to look for at ORNL, and we've got lots of ways to find them. If you can't find what you need using the tools on this page, let us know and we'll...

430

Massachusetts state airport system plan forecasts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a first step toward updating the forecasts contained in the 1973 Massachusetts State System Plan. It begins with a presentation of the forecasting techniques currently available; it surveys and appraises the ...

Mathaisel, Dennis F. X.

431

Essays on airport and airway congestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Runway and airspace congestion are the primary causes of flight delays in the US. These delays cost airlines and airline customers billions of dollars per year. This thesis consists of two essays. The first essay focuses ...

Schorr, Raphael Avram, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

AirportRoad State St. (SR 26)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G H 10000 250 500 Stop light PURDUE UNIVERSITY W E S T L A F A Y E T T E C A M P U S W i r e l e Intramural Playing Field s Horticulture Park Intramural Playing Field s Intramural Playing Field s Purdue

433

Microsoft Word - Airport_EA_Final.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

garbage, refuse, sludge from a waste treatment plant, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility, and other discarded material, including solid, liquid,...

434

Commentary on industrial processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...crucial for an industrial process, namely: catalyst activity...of catalysis to industrial processes. The papers, however, do...at the heart of successful commercialization of catalytic science and technology...addressed in any industrial process, namely: activity-the...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal...

436

Sustainable Process Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainable Process Chemistry ... Increase energy efficiency ... Implementation of such processes is believed to reduce waste (first principle of Green Chemistry) and increase sustainability. ...

Robert Appell; Dinesh Gala; Yogesh S. Sanghvi

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

437

Draft Seventh Power Plan Process Process Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's webpage: http://www.nwcouncil.org/energy/ Demand Forecast Advisory Committee Reviews the methods, demand for natural gas, oil, and coal Generating Resources Advisory Committee Evaluates the cost, characteristics

438

Dry Process Electrode Fabrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

439

Dry Process Electrode Fabrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

440

Interfacial Processes- Diagnostics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Program Independent Oversight Program Home Office of Security and Cyber Evaluations Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Guidance Documents › Security and Cyber Evaluations › Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Reports › Physical Security › Cyber Security › Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Reports › Prior Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Reports ›Prior Emergency Management Evaluations Reports Contact Us HSS Logo Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Reports Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, September 2013 Independent Oversight Review of Management of Safety Systems at the Oak Ridge Transuranic Waste Processing Center and Associated Feedback and Improvement Processes, September 2013

442

A Case Study applying Process and Project Alignment Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study applying Process and Project Alignment Methodology Paula Ventura Martins1 & Alberto process and (2) analyze projects, starting an SPI effort. In order to evaluate ProPAM, a study case Martins A Case Study Applying & Alberto Rodrigues da Silva Process and Project Alignment Methodology 64

da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

443

Reliability analysis of common hazardous waste treatment processes  

SciTech Connect

Five hazardous waste treatment processes are analyzed probabilistically using Monte Carlo simulation to elucidate the relationships between process safety factors and reliability levels. The treatment processes evaluated are packed tower aeration, reverse osmosis, activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, and activated carbon adsorption.

Waters, R.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Systematic Waste Minimization in Chemical Processes. 1. Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 In MFM, the functional structure of a system is described using a set of interrelated structures for mass, energy, and information flows. ... (1)?Dantus, M. M.; High, K. A. Economic Evaluation for the Retrofit of Chemical Processes through Waste Minimization and Process Integration. ... Price-Targeting Through Iterative Flowsheet Syntheses in Developing Novel Processing Equipment:? Pervaporation ...

Iskandar Halim; Rajagopalan Srinivasan

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 13371348 (2009)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 1337­1348 (2009) Published online 4 February 2009-Ecosystem in Fengqiu, State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese- Ecosystem in Fengqiu, State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science

Flury, Markus

446

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption #12;2 Bound-Bound & Bound

Sitko, Michael L.

447

Apply process integration to waste minimization  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a systematic method for identifying process modifications to minimize waste generation. It is based on the hierarchical decision procedure, which provides a framework for identifying process improvement options and evaluating heat and mass integration opportunities. The article deals specifically with an adaptation of the hierarchical decision approach for use in pollution abatement applications. The article also illustrates the use of the technique by applying it to the fluid catalytic cracking unit at Amoco Oil Co.'s Yorktown, VA, refinery.

Rossiter, A.P.; Spriggs, H.D. (Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, VA (United States)); Klee, H. Jr. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Chapter 5 - Gasification Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary There is a broad range of reactor types that are used in the practical realization of the gasification process. For most purposes, these reactor types can be grouped into one of three categories: moving-bed gasifiers, fluid-bed gasifiers, and entrained-flow gasifiers. Moving-bed processes are the oldest processes, and two processes in particular, the producer gas process and the water gas process, have played an important role in the production of synthesis gas from coal and coke. In moving bed processes, there are the sasol-lurgi dry bottom process, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) slagging gasifier, that are detailed in the chapter along with their applications. Following this, fluid-bed processes are discussed in which the blast has two functions: that of blast as a reactant and that of the fluidizing medium for the bed. The best known fluid-bed gasifiers that have no tar problem are regenerators of catalytic cracking units that often operate under reducing, that is, gasification conditions that can be found in many refineries. HRL process, BHEL gasifier, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) processes, the KBR transport gasifier, agglomerating fluid-bed processes, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) gasifier, the GEE gasification process, the Shell Gasification Process (SGP), Lurgi s Multi-Purpose Gasification process (MPG), etc. are the various processes discussed in the chapter.

Christopher Higman; Maarten van der Burgt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ceramic Processing.qrk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing Processing Manufacturing Technologies The Ceramics and Glass Department devel- ops fabrication processes for ceramic compo- nents used in weapon applications. All phases of ceramic processing, from powders to fin- ished products, are addressed; including pow- der processing, blending, granulation, com- paction, sintering, grinding, metallization, and property measurements. In addition, multilay- er processing techniques are used to fabricate layered electrical devices. Our department has extensive experience in ferroelectric (PZT) and alumina ceramics, including cermet composi- tions (alumina - molybdenum composites) developed for hermetic electrical feedthrus, and alumina ceramics with buried ruthenium oxide based resistors. Capabilities * Perform process development activities for

450

The Partnership Evaluation Framework  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: The Partnership Evaluation Framework: How to evaluate a potential partners business model and identify areas for collaboration.

451

Evaluation report 2006 Evaluation of Research on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on organic farming, i.e. Swedish Farmers' Foundation for Agri- cultural Research (SLF) and the Swedish Board Manager Swedish Farmers' Foundation for Agricultural Research (SLF) Evaluation of Research on Organic

452

Topics in stockpile evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of previously unpublished papers pertinent to Stockpile Evaluation, Reliability, and Safety activities at Sandia.

Mueller, F.W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Microsoft Word - Appendix C - Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rocky Flats Site Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure Rocky Flats Site Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page C-1 Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process Purpose: The purpose of this Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process is to identify hazards and regulatory requirements so that appropriate work control steps, including regulatory agency and/or engineering approvals, are implemented to address and mitigate the hazard and/or meet regulatory requirements. The soil disturbance evaluation process is a part of the Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide (RFSOG) work planning process (Section 12.1), including consideration of the Health and Safety Manual, LMS/POL/S04321 standard for penetration permits. This

454

The CLEAR 2006 evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of the first CLEAR evaluation on CLassification of Events, Activities and Relationships - which took place in early 2006 and concluded with a two day evaluation workshop in April 2006. CLEAR is an international effort to evaluate ...

Rainer Stiefelhagen; Keni Bernardin; Rachel Bowers; John Garofolo; Djamel Mostefa; Padmanabhan Soundararajan

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Independent Oversight Evaluation, Pantex Plant - August 2000 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation, Pantex Plant - August 2000 Evaluation, Pantex Plant - August 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation, Pantex Plant - August 2000 August 2000 Evaluation of Authorization Basis Management Systems and Processes at the Pantex Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Oversight, within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health, performed a follow-up evaluation of the Pantex Plant. The follow-up evaluation focused on the authorization basis process - the hazard analysis and controls that are designed to ensure that facility operations and nuclear weapons operations are safe. Improvements in authorization basis activities have been made in the alignment of responsibilities, increased technical capabilities, and development of processes/standards. Recently developed authorization basis

456

LLNL-TR-411568 Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

568 568 Evaluation of Simulated Precipitation in CCSM3: Annual Cycle Performance Metrics at Watershed Scales Peter J. Gleckler, David C. Bader March 26, 2009 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the

457

Process Analytical Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The book focuses on the relationship of process control to steady-state process characteristics rather than to dynamic process characteristics. ... In a popularizing article, Wold (93) explains how chemical instrumentation and chemometrics provides a formidable toolbox for investigating and analyzing data from chemical processes with the characteristic patterns relating to classes, trends and other relations uncovered in the data interpreted by comparison with patterns from known and well understood systems and processes. ... Web-based molecular processing tools installed on corporate Intranets bring cheminformatics and molecular modeling capabilities directly to the desks of synthetic chemists, giving them direct access molecular structural and property visualization data and analysis. ...

Jerome Workman, Jr.; Mel Koch; Barry Lavine; Ray Chrisman

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

458

Interfacial Processes ? Diagnostics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

459

Nonconforming Material Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 11 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Nonconforming Material / Product Process Document Number: P-011 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-015 Nonconformance Report, REG-003 Record Register, ISDP-002 Training Production Process P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0416 Added verbiage CAR/PAR/IO to Step 2 P-011 Nonconforming Material / Product Process 11_0304 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose To establish the process for nonconforming material to be identified, segregated and dispositioned to prevent its unintended

460

Process Deviation Log  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Deviation Log 09_0730 Process Deviation Log 09_0730 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: P-010, Process Deviation Process Document Number: Process Deviation Log EOTA Employees Melissa Otero N/A Referenced Documents: Parent Document: F-014 Rev. 11_0316 Approvers: Melissa Otero Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Notify of Changes: A 09_0730 11_0316 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change Intitial Release. Revised log to reflect date/date range that PD is in effect. Removed drop-down menu items. Added ECD, Extension Date and Closed Column. F-014 Process Deviation Log 09_0730 Process Deviation # Date Requestor Departme nt Process # Has PD Occurred ? (Y/N) CAR/PAR # Distributio n Date Estimated Closure Date Extension Date Closed Date Comment PD-001 PD-002 PD-003 PD-004 PD-005 PD-006 PD-007 PD-008 PD-009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2004 FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 199, STANDARDS FOR SECURITY Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology A new Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), recently approved by the Secretary of Commerce, will help federal agencies

462

New-Hire Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New-Hire Process careersassetsimagesicon-lego.jpg New-Hire Process Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to the...

463

Chemistry of Combustion Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quantitative description and understanding of combustion processes needs extreme computational efforts and has at ... treatment can give a lot of insight into combustion processes, as demonstrated in the foll...

J. Warnatz

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Semisolid Metal Processing Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Mathematical modeling and simulations of semisolid filling processes remains a critical issue in understanding and optimizing the process. Semisolid slurries are non-Newtonian materials that exhibit complex rheological behavior. There the way these slurries flow in cavities is very different from the way liquid in classical casting fills cavities. Actually filling in semisolid processing is often counter intuitive

Apelian,Diran

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Performance evaluation of multiagent systems: communication criterion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many MultiAgent Systems (MAS) have been developed in various application domains such as computer networks, Internet, industrial applications, automation, process control, air traffic, robotic, simulation, etc. In spite of the rapid growth of the international ... Keywords: communication, graph theory, measurement, methodology, multiagent systems, performance evaluation

Faten Ben Hmida; Wided Lejouad Chaari; Moncef Tagina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Office of Security and Cyber Evaluations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to the Office of Security and Cyber Evaluations The Office of Security and Cyber Evaluations within the Office of Enforcement and Oversight implements the independent security performance monitoring functions for DOE. The other half of the Independent Oversight Program is implemented by the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations for safety oversight. The independent oversight function performed by these two offices is delineated in DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, issued on August 30, 2011. This recently revised Order reflects lessons learned in conducting inspections and incorporates earlier and more frequent line management involvement in the inspection planning process. We welcome an opportunity to discuss our inspection process and potential differences in approach since your last interaction with us.

468

VacuumProcesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processes Processes Manufacturing Technologies The vacuum processing capabilities in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging Laboratory encompass several areas. Capabilities include vacuum, inert gas and hydrogen firing; thermal desorption mass spectroscopy; vacuum out- gassing rate measurement; ion beam milling; and cermet densification. Capabilities * Expertise in the development of cleaning processes and materials characterization of vacuum materials and components * Vacuum and hydrogen firing of components for oxide reduction and cleaning of vacuum components * Large scale cleaning processes, vapor degreasing and vacu- um firing for large vol- ume components * Thermal desorption mass spectroscopy of material and components with controlled tem- perature ramp rates to 1500°C in a UHV

469

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PROCESSING OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR THERMAL INSULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PROCESSING OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR THERMAL INSULATION CHANJOONG KIM was proposed and evaluated for the application of thermal insulation. For the production of polyurethane foam correspondence should be sent. #12;Key Words: Foam; Polyurethane; Thermal insulation; Nucleation; Growth

Kim, Chanjoong

470

Final Vitrification Melter Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter February 2012 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley, New York This page is intentionally blank. WASTE-INCIDENTAL-TO-REPROCESSING EVALUATION FOR THE WVDP VITRIFICATION MELTER CONTENTS Revision 0 i NOTATION (Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Units).................................................. v 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose. ................................................................................................................. 2 1.2 Scope and Technical Basis ....................................................................................... 2

471

Document Control Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Document Control Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 7 1 Document Control Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Document Control Process Document Number: P-001 Rev 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-001 Document Control Template - Process, F-002 Document Control Template - Instruction, F-003 Document Control Template - Screenshot, F-004 Document Control Template - Form, F-005 Document Control Template - Form - Excel, MGTP-002 Skill Set Model, Q-003 EOTA Processes: Sequence and Interaction, P-003, Control of Records P-001 Document Control Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change

472

Manhattan Project: Processes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Processes Processes Uranium Mining, Milling, and Refining Uranium Isotope Separation Plutonium Production Bomb Design, Development, and Production Bomb Testing and Weapon Effects Processes PLEASE NOTE: The Processes pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the industrial processes of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of processes involved in the mission of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all process pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

473

Navy Technology Evaluation Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the Navy Technology Evaluation update at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

474

Enzyme evaluation | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

evaluation Targeted strategies improve efficacy of enzymes to convert biomass to biofuels The Science Biological material derived from plants represents a promising source for...

475

test and evaluation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Office of Test and Evaluation http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsstockpilestewardshiptestcapabilitiesand-eval

476

2Laser Materials Processing LISI Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a common delimitation failure point in laser clad material. The LISI process is somewhere in between surface treatment and laser cladding. In LISI a metal or metal/ceramic mixture is pre effects experienced in cladding and welding operations. Laser Induced Surface Improvement (LISI

Davis, Lloyd M.

477

Evaluations of energy audits and the regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The empirical basis of this article is the energy audit evaluations carried out by AKF over the last decade. These evaluations were undertaken in a rather traditional manner as assessment of the outcome of an intervention, the aim being to answer the question: How much energy was saved as a result of the audit, and what was the result from an economic viewpoint? To a varying degree, information on the decision-making process within the audit schemes (e.g. control and sanctions) and the organisational context was also included. The present article briefly describes the evaluations, then analyses the resulting response by the energy authorities using three decision-making theories: the rational model for decisions, Wilson's dynamic model, and Stigler's agency capture model. It is demonstrated that these three models together explain the fate of the evaluated audit schemes, e.g. why loss-making schemes have been upheld or expanded.

Anders Larsen; Mette Jensen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Evaluation of phase change materials for reconfigurable interconnects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible use of programmable integrated circuit interconnect vias using an indirectly heated phase change material is evaluated. Process development and materials investigations are examined. Devices capable of multiple ...

Khoo, Chee Ying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A Synthesis of Methods for Evaluating Interrelated Investment Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strategic investments are frequently placed in increments through time, while simultaneously impacting other processes. These sources of dependency cause the economic evaluation of these projects to be a compl...

James M. Reeve; William G. Sullivan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Development of standard evaluation plan for survey and investigation of residual radioactivity on site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Development of standard evaluation plan for survey and...investigation plan are needed to...historical records review, process knowledge...expressed as a standard deviation...Development of standard evaluation plan for survey and......

Sang Won Shin; Joo Ho Whang; Su Hong Lee; Jea Min Lee

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "airport evaluation process" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Environmental Aspects, Objectives and Targets Identification Process  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the environmental aspects and associated environmental impacts of the Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) scope of work, evaluate the significance of those environmental aspects based on established criteria, and establish environmental objectives and targets for specific environmental aspects. This report is intended to be used by environmental staff in the evaluation of BSC work packages during the annual risk-based planning process. This report shall be fully reviewed and revised annually during the annual work planning process to reflect changes in BSC operations, facilities, and scope of work. Planned BSC work will be evaluated to determine if the work is covered by a previously defined activity, product or service (see Table 2); if work activities require redefinition or addition of a new activity; and if the significant evaluation for each environment aspect is still valid based on scope of planned work. New workscope initiated during the fiscal year through the Baseline Change Proposal process (i.e., not as part of the annual work plan) also will be reviewed for new environmental aspects and determination of whether the new workscope would change the significance rating of any environmental aspect. If a new environmental aspect is identified in a new work activity, product, or service but the aspect is not determined to be significant (see Section 4), then this report can be changed through an interim change notice (ICN). This report can be changed five times through an ICN before a full revision is required. However, if new workscope causes an environmental aspect to be graded as significant using the evaluation process in Section 4, this report shall be revised though a full review and revision.

R. Green

2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

Economic Evaluation of Radiopharmaceutical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

97-2 Planning Report Economic Evaluation of Radiopharmaceutical Research at NIST U.S Department Radiation Division Physics Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology #12;Economic Evaluation of Standards and Technology by Albert N. Link Professor of Economics University of North Carolina at Greensboro

483

Process / CI Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 1 of 3 6 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Process / Continual Improvement Form Document Number: F-016 Rev 11_0119 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-012, Process / Continual Improvement Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-016 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0425 Corrected minor problems and updated revision number. 11_0119 Merged F-019 Improvement Opportunity Planning Worksheet into this document F-016 Process / Continual Improvement Form 11_0119 Page 3 of 3

484

Electrotechnologies in Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processes Motor drives are mainly used in prime movers (pumps, fans, compressors, etc.) and in materials processing and handling (grinders, conveyors, etc.). EPRI develops and promotes technologies such as industrial heat pumps, freeze concentra tion... the need to disseminate the results of its research and development so that they can be applied broadly across the industrial sector. Specific technology transfer activities in process industries include: o Conferences and workshops o Tech...

Amarnath, K. R.

485

Chapter Ten - Gas Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes the objectives of natural gas liquid (NGL) recovery. It then discusses the value of NGL components, providing the definitions of common gas-processing terminology. In addition, the chapter considers the most common liquid recovery processes, such as lean oil absorption, mechanical refrigeration, Joule-Thomson (J-T) Expansion, and cryogenic (turbo-expander) plants. It also provides guidance on process selection, and it ends by examining fractionation and design considerations.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Rare muon processes  

SciTech Connect

The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Rare muon processes  

SciTech Connect

The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

Cooper, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

In Situ Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing 4.1 Service Oriented Architecture for Data9] Thomas Erl. Service-Oriented Architecture: Concepts,resources. Service Oriented Architecture for Data Management

Childs, Hank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

flame-fusion process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a method of gem synthesis based on Verneuil process (furnace) used in growing synthetic single crystals to distinguish from a melt or flux fusion. Verneuil furnace .

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing