National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for airmass unitless airmass

  1. ARM: Microwave Radiometer, 3 Channel: airmasses, brightness temperatur...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (BER) Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences Microwave narrowband brightness temperature Dataset File size ...

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    records, and for capturing each of four broad classes of aerosol airmass types: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, and continental aerosols. For instantaneous matchups...

  3. Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) Field Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... believe that this may be the result of a change in air-mass origin arriving at the site. ... 2014. "Rapid transport of East Asian pollution to the deep tropics," Atmospheric ...

  4. Towering Cumulus Stage Mature Stage Dissipating Stage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells are called air-mass thunderstorms. Formed in a warm, humid air mass, a convective cell is a region of strong upward air motion; such a warm, buoyant plume of rising air is...

  5. ARM - VAP Product - 30smplcmask1zwang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unitless lineardepolsnr ( time, height ) East longitude degreeE lon Number of cloud layers unitless numcloudlayers ( time ) Overlap correction unitless overlapcorrection (...

  6. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 4. 2. Measurement of surface-air movements associated with atomic blasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rados, R.M.; Bogert, J.C.; Haig, T.O.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to record continuous measurements of the surface winds in the vicinity of an atomic blast immediately prior to the blast, during passage of the shock wave, and immediately after the blast with special regard to the blast-induced afterwind following local dissipation of the shock wave. From the data obtained, it was concluded that following an atomic explosion there are two specific causes of air-mass movement. One is related to the shock phenomenon and the other to the rising fireball. It can also be concluded that the heated-thermopile-type and strain-gage-type anemometers could be developed to yield more complete data on the air-mass movement at ground level following an atomic explosion.

  7. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2013 [Data Announcements] Rejected! Update to Langley VAP Dismisses Outliers Bookmark and Share An example of a clear day where most values made it through the cloud screening algorithm. An example of a clear day where most values made it through the cloud screening algorithm. A Langley plot is a regression of log (signal) versus airmass. Under appropriate conditions, the Langley regression yields values that represent the response of an instrument in absence of atmosphere (i.e., at the top

  8. ARM - Datastreams - mwr3ctip

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsmwr3ctip Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1182058 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : MWR3CTIP Microwave Radiometer, 3 Channel: airmasses, brightness temperatures (TIP mode) Active Dates 2013.09.25 - 2016.09.02 Originating Instrument Microwave Radiometer, 3 Channel (MWR3C) Measurements Only measurements considered

  9. ARM - Datastreams - mwrtip

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsmwrtip Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025255 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : MWRTIP Microwave Water Radiometer (MWR): airmasses, brightness temperatures (TIP mode) Active Dates 1993.07.21 - 2016.09.02 Originating Instrument Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant

  10. ARM - Datastreams - aoscpcf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dilution slope unitless dilutionslope Dilution flow valve position unitless dilutionvalveposition ( time ) Flow read sccm flowread ( time ) Flow setpoint sccm ...

  11. ARM - Datastreams - 1290bsrwpprecipavg

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... results on field: Transmit power level setting. unitless qctransmitpowerlevelsetting ( mode ) Quality check results on field: Vertical velocity. unitless ...

  12. ARM - Datastreams - aosghg

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    East longitude degreeE lon Value indicates state of the rotary valco valve (range 1 to 8) unitless mpvalveposition ( time ) Arbitrary status. unitless outletvalve ( time ) ...

  13. ARM - Datastreams - irt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on field: Internal Reference Infra-Red Temperature unitless qcrefirtemp ( time ) Quality check results on field: Surface infra-red temperature unitless qcsfcirtemp ( ...

  14. ARM - Datastreams - irt10m

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    check results on field: Surface Infra-Red Temperature unitless qcsfcirtemp ( time ) Quality check results on field: Surface Infra-Red Temperature Maxima unitless ...

  15. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  16. ARM - Datastreams - tps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 basetime Checksum unitless crc ( time, stringlen5 ) Fault indicator unitless faultind ( time ) Instrument...

  17. ARM - Datastreams - aosaeth2spot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon concentration for spot 2 uncorrected for loading factors ngm3 equivalentblackcarbonspot2uncorrected ( time, wavelength ) Aethalometer instrument flags unitless...

  18. ARM - Datastreams - wacrspeccmaskxpol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Units Variable Locator Mask for Spectra unitless LocatorMask ( time, heights ) Radar Doppler Mean Doppler Velocity ms MeanDopplerVelocity ( time, heights ) Calculated...

  19. ARM - Datastreams - wacrspeccmaskcopol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Units Variable Locator Mask for Spectra unitless LocatorMask ( time, heights ) Radar Doppler Mean Doppler Velocity ms MeanDopplerVelocity ( time, heights ) Calculated...

  20. ARM - VAP Product - aosccnavg

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Cloud condensation nuclei Number concentration of CCN 1cm3 NCCN ( time ) Size distribution of activated nuclei unitless...

  1. ARM - Datastreams - aosco

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( time ) Time offset from basetime timeoffset ( time ) Valve position for mass flow controller 1 unitless valvepositionMFC1 ( time ) Valve position mass flow controller 2 ...

  2. ARM - Datastreams - aosso2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ( time ) Time offset from basetime timeoffset ( time ) Valve position for mass flow controller 1 unitless valvepositionMFC1 ( time ) Valve position mass flow controller 2 ...

  3. ARM - Datastreams - aoscpcu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ccmin dilutionflowsetpoint ( time ) Valve position, open or closed. Value of 1open, 0closed, -1error unitless dilutionvalveposition ( time ) Flow setpoint sccm ...

  4. ARM - Datastreams - met

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... field: PWS instantaneous present weather code unitless qcpwspwcodeinst ... Data Browse Plots Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Manacapuru, Amazonas, ...

  5. ARM - Datastreams - sodar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Backscatter, as total intensity of received signal, filtered and range-normalized unitless backscatter ( time, height ) Base time in...

  6. ARM - Datastreams - twr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    qcvaporpressuremean ( time, height ) Quality check results on field: Wind direction vector mean unitless qcwdirvecmean ( time, height ) Quality check results on field: Wind...

  7. ARM - Datastreams - aeriengineer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement Units Variable Ambient blackbody temperature - apex K ABBapexTemp ( time ) Decimal representation of percentage weighting of ambient blackbody apex temperature unitless ...

  8. ARM - Datastreams - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0:00 basetime Record with error unitless errorlatch ( time ) Frequency average, sensor 1 Hz frequency1 ( time ) Frequency average, sensor 2 Hz frequency2 ( time ) Frequency...

  9. ARM - Datastreams - aossmps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ( time ) Sheath flow lmin sheathflow ( time ) Status flag (0normal scan, 1 xxx, 2xxx) unitless statusflag ( time ) Time offset from midnight time ( time ) Time offset ...

  10. ARM - VAP Product - 30baebbr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( time ) Bowen ratio unitless bowenratio ( time ) Soil heat flow 1, corrected for soil moisture Wm2 corrsoilheatflow1 ( time ) Soil heat flow 2, ...

  11. ARM - Datastreams - irt25m

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface skin temperature Instantaneous Surface Infra-red Temperature K instsfcirtemp ( ... check results on field: Surface Infra-Red Temperature unitless qcsfcirtemp ( time ...

  12. ARM - Datastreams - hsrl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... cross section per unit volume 1m raobbetam ( caltime, range ) Radiosonde station ID unitless raobstation ( caltime, sondenamelength ) Radiosonde launch time raobtime ( ...

  13. EnPI V4.0 Algorithm

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... period is summed to determine the annual cost savings. ... SEnPI (unitless) Forecasting (Model year baseline year) Calculation for the model year: ...

  14. ARM - Datastreams - iapmfr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by GPS, time in the form hhmmss. unitless gpstimeutc ( time ) Speed over ground ms groundspeed ( time ) Detector Temperature C headtemp ( time ) Second detector...

  15. ARM - Datastreams - sws

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    qctime ( time ) Quality check results on field: Calibrated spectrum unitless qczenspeccalib ( time, wavelength ) Shutter state (0:open, 1: closed) none shutterclosed (...

  16. ARM - Datastreams - mfraaf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sentences that must be received before clock adjustment. unitless gpsready ( time ) ...rationfactorfilter6 Number of times the clock has been changed since the program started ...

  17. High-efficiency GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K.A.; Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved new record efficiencies, specifically 25.7% under air-mass 0 (AM0) illumination, 29.5% under AM 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination, and 30.2% at 140-180x concentration under AM 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) illumination. These values are the highest two-terminal efficiencies achieved by any solar cell under these illumination conditions. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance. 31 refs.

  18. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Becker, M. R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulationsmore » to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).« less

  19. Ozone and other air quality related variables affecting visibility in the southeast United States. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brittig, J.S.

    1997-07-11

    An analysis of ozone (03) concentrations and several other air quality related variables was performed to assess their relationship with visibility at five urban and semi-urban locations in the Southeast United States during the summer seasons of 1980 to 1996. The role and impact of ozone on aerosols was investigated to ascertain a relationship with visibility. Regional trend analysis of the 1980s reveals an increase in maximum ozone concentration coupled with a decrease in visibility. However, the 1990s shows a leveling off of both ozone and visibility; in both cases the results were not statistically significant at the 5% level. Site specific trends at Nashville Tennessee followed similar trends. To better ascertain the relationships and forcing mechanisms, the analysis was changed from yearly to daily and hourly averaged values. This increased resolution showed a statistically significant inverse relationship between visibility and ozone. Additionally, by performing back trajectory analysis, it was observed that the visibility degraded both by airmass migration over polluted areas and chemical kinetics.

  20. Cosmic Shear Measurements with DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, M. R.

    2015-07-20

    We present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).

  1. Evaluation of Photodiode and Thermopile Pyranometers for Photovoltaic Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-09-01

    Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires measurement of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel at a high level of accuracy and known uncertainty. Silicon detectors used in various solar energy measuring instruments including reference cells are potentially an attractive choice for multiple reasons that include faster responsivity than thermopile detectors, cheaper cost and lower maintenance. The main drawback though is the fact that the silicon detectors are only spectrally responsive in a narrow part of the solar spectrum. Therefore, to determine broadband solar irradiance a calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under standard conditions but then used for various scenarios including varying air-mass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not have been an issue if all wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately the scattering and absorption signature varies widely across wavelengths and the calibration factor computed under certain test conditions is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper lays out the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field. We also present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

  2. Performance Testing using Silicon Devices - Analysis of Accuracy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-06-01

    Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires accurate measurements of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel (i.e., Plane-of-Array - POA Irradiance) with known measurement uncertainty. Pyranometers are commonly based on thermopile or silicon photodiode detectors. Silicon detectors, including PV reference cells, are an attractive choice for reasons that include faster time response (10 us) than thermopile detectors (1 s to 5 s), lower cost and maintenance. The main drawback of silicon detectors is their limited spectral response. Therefore, to determine broadband POA solar irradiance, a pyranometer calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under clear-sky conditions with respect to a broadband reference radiometer. The pyranometer is then used for various scenarios including varying airmass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not be an issue if all irradiance wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately, the scattering and absorption signature varies widely with wavelength and the calibration factor for the silicon photodiode pyranometer is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper reviews the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field based on measurements from a group of pyranometers mounted on a 1-axis solar tracker. Also we will present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

  3. Nanostructured Cobalt Oxide Clusters in Mesoporous Silica as Efficient Oxygen-Evolving Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Feng; Frei, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The development of integrated artificial photosynthetic systems for the direct conversion of carbon dioxide and water to fuel depends on the availability of efficient and robust catalysts for the chemical transformations. Catalysts need to exhibit turnover frequency (TOF) and density (hence size) commensurate with the solar flux at ground level (1000Wm2, airmass (AM) 1.5)[1]to avoid wasting of incidentsolar photons. For example, a catalyst with a TOF of 100 s1 requires a density of one catalytic site per square nanometer. Catalysts with lower rates or taking up a larger space will require a high-surface-area, nanostructured support that affords tens to hundreds of catalytic sites per square nanometer. Furthermore, catalysts need to operate close to the thermodynamic potential of the redox reaction so that amaximum fraction of the solar photon energy is converted to chemical energy. Stability considerations favor all-inorganic oxide materials, as does avoidance of harsh reaction conditions of pH value or temperature.

  4. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, T.S.; et al.

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. We define a natural magnitude system for DES and calculate the systematic errors on stellar magnitudes, when the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput deviate from the natural system. We conclude that the systematic chromatic errors caused by the change of airmass in each exposure, the change of the precipitable water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere over time, and the non-uniformity of instrumental throughput over the focal plane, can be up to 2% in some bandpasses. We compare the calculated systematic chromatic errors with the observed DES data. For the test sample data, we correct these errors using measurements of the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput. The residual after correction is less than 0.3%. We also find that the errors for non-stellar objects are redshift-dependent and can be larger than those for stars at certain redshifts.

  5. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  6. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore » statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  7. Snails, stable iostopes, and southwestern desert paleoclimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, S.E.; Whelan, J.F.; Forester, R.M.; Burdett, J.

    1995-09-01

    Modern and fossil molluscs (snails) occur in many localities in and semi-arid regions throughout the desert southwest. Live terrestrial snails are found under rocks and in forest litter and aquatic taxa inhabit springs, seeps, and/or wetlands. Molluscs uptake local water during their growing season (spring and summer) and incorporate its delta 180 signature into their shells. Preliminary 180 analysis of modem shells from the southern Great Basin indicates that the shells probably reflect meteoric water 180 values during the growing season. This provides a way to estimate the delta 180 value of precipitation and, thereby, the source of the moisture-bearing air masses. Significant 180 variability in shells analyzed include geographic location, elevation, taxonomy, and habitat (terrestrial, spring, or wetland). We found a rough inverse correlation with elevation in modem shells from the Spring Range in southern Nevada. The delta 180 values of modem and fossil shells are also very different; modem values in this location are much higher than those from nearby late Pleistocene-age molluscs suggesting that the Pleistocene summers were variously colder and wetter than today or less evaporative (more humid). Assuming shell material directly reflects the 180 of the growing-season environment, comparison of modem and fossil shell delta 180 values can potentially identify changes in air-mass moisture sources and can help to define seasonal precipitation change through time. Comprehension and quantification of community and isotopic variability in modem gastropods is required to create probabilistic valid transfer functions with fossil materials. Valid inferences about past environmental conditions can then be established with known confidence limits.

  8. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Buscheck

    2004-10-12

    The purpose of the multiscale thermohydrologic model (MSTHM) is to predict the possible range of thermal-hydrologic conditions, resulting from uncertainty and variability, in the repository emplacement drifts, including the invert, and in the adjoining host rock for the repository at Yucca Mountain. Thus, the goal is to predict the range of possible thermal-hydrologic conditions across the repository; this is quite different from predicting a single expected thermal-hydrologic response. The MSTHM calculates the following thermal-hydrologic parameters: temperature, relative humidity, liquid-phase saturation, evaporation rate, air-mass fraction, gas-phase pressure, capillary pressure, and liquid- and gas-phase fluxes (Table 1-1). These thermal-hydrologic parameters are required to support ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]). The thermal-hydrologic parameters are determined as a function of position along each of the emplacement drifts and as a function of waste package type. These parameters are determined at various reference locations within the emplacement drifts, including the waste package and drip-shield surfaces and in the invert. The parameters are also determined at various defined locations in the adjoining host rock. The MSTHM uses data obtained from the data tracking numbers (DTNs) listed in Table 4.1-1. The majority of those DTNs were generated from the following analyses and model reports: (1) ''UZ Flow Model and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]); (2) ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004); (3) ''Calibrated Properties Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169857]); (4) ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]); (5) ''Thermal Conductivity of the Non-Repository Lithostratigraphic Layers'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170033]); (6) ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169862]); (7) ''Heat Capacity

  9. DISCOVERY OF A DYNAMICAL COLD POINT IN THE HEART OF THE SAGITTARIUS dSph GALAXY WITH OBSERVATIONS FROM THE APOGEE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Hasselquist, Sten; Nidever, David L. E-mail: sh6cy@virginia.edu; and others

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of the core of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy are explored using high-resolution (R ? 22, 500), H-band, near-infrared spectra of over 1000 giant stars in the central 3 deg{sup 2} of the system, of which 328 are identified as Sgr members. These data, among some of the earliest observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and the largest published sample of high resolution Sgr dSph spectra to date, reveal a distinct gradient in the velocity dispersion of Sgr from 11 to 14 km s{sup 1} for radii >0.8 from center to a dynamical cold point of 8 km s{sup 1} in the Sgr centera trend differing from that found in previous kinematical analyses of Sgr over larger scales that suggests a more or less flat dispersion profile at these radii. Well-fitting mass models with either cored and cusped dark matter distributions can be found to match the kinematical results, although the cored profile succeeds with significantly more isotropic stellar orbits than required for a cusped profile. It is unlikely that the cold point reflects an unusual mass distribution. The dispersion gradient may arise from variations in the mixture of populations with distinct kinematics within the dSph; this explanation is suggested (e.g., by detection of a metallicity gradient across similar radii), but not confirmed, by the present data. Despite these remaining uncertainties about their interpretation, these early test data (including some from instrument commissioning) demonstrate APOGEE's usefulness for precision dynamical studies, even for fields observed at extreme airmasses.

  10. Mapping and Simulating Systematics Due to Spatially-Varying Observing Conditions in DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leistedt, B.

    2015-07-20

    Spatially-varying depth and characteristics of observing conditions, such as seeing, airmass, or sky background, are major sources of systematic uncertainties in modern galaxy survey analyses, in particular in deep multi-epoch surveys. We present a framework to extract and project these sources of systematics onto the sky, and apply it to the Dark Energy Survey (DES) to map the observing conditions of the Science Verification (SV) data. The resulting distributions and maps of sources of systematics are used in several analyses of DES SV to perform detailed null tests with the data, and also to incorporate systematics in survey simulations. We illustrate the complementarity of these two approaches by comparing the SV data with the BCC-UFig, a synthetic sky catalogue generated by forward-modelling of the DES SV images. We then analyse the BCC-UFig simulation to construct galaxy samples mimicking those used in SV galaxy clustering studies. We show that the spatially-varying survey depth imprinted in the observed galaxy densities and the redshift distributions of the SV data are successfully reproduced by the simulation and well-captured by the maps of observing conditions. The combined use of the maps, the SV data and the BCC-UFig simulation allows us to quantify the impact of spatial systematics on N(z), the redshift distributions inferred using photometric redshifts. We conclude that spatial systematics in the SV data are mainly due to seeing fluctuations and are under control in current clustering and weak lensing analyses. However, they will need to be carefully characterised in upcoming phases of DES in order to avoid biasing the inferred cosmological results. The framework presented is relevant to all multi-epoch surveys, and will be essential for exploiting future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will require detailed null-tests and realistic end-to-end image simulations to correctly interpret the deep, high-cadence observations of the

  11. ARM - Datastreams - pgs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    latitude degreeN lat East longitude degreeE lon Multi-port valve position indicates state of the rotary valco valve (range 1 to 8) unitless mpvalveposition ( time ) Outlet DAC ...

  12. ARM - Datastreams - 30ebbr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0:00:00 0:00 basetime Bowen ratio unitless bowenratio ( time ) Soil heat flow 1, corrected for soil moisture Wm2 corrsoilheatflow1 ( time ) Soil heat flow 2, ...

  13. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... aquifer is outcropping. For example, the green diamonds represent the location where the ... on leaves that is retained after washing (unitless), Table 4.6-8 F V fraction of ...

  14. ARM - VAP Product - qcradbrs1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wm2 MFRSRhemispbroadband ( time ) Air Temperature C TempAir ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt DifSWGSW test unitless aqcDifSW2GSW ( time ) GSWSumSW test...

  15. ARM - VAP Product - qcradbeflux1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wm2 MFRSRhemispbroadband ( time ) Air Temperature C TempAir ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt DifSWGSW test unitless aqcDifSW2GSW ( time ) GSWSumSW test...

  16. ARM - Datastreams - mwacrspeccmaskcopol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field unitless locatormask ( time, range ) East longitude degreeE lon ( time ) Ship pitch, axis starboard-to-port, positive is bow up degree pitch ( time ) Range (center of...

  17. MULTISCALE THERMOHYDROLOGIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Buscheck

    2005-07-07

    geometry of the gravel grains). Thus, given that reasonable invert properties are applied, the ability to predict a reasonable range of relevant MSTHM output parameters for the invert are based on valid predictions of thermal-hydrologic processes in the host rock. The MSTHM calculates the following thermal-hydrologic parameters: temperature, relative humidity, liquid-phase saturation, evaporation rate, air-mass fraction, gas-phase pressure, capillary pressure, and liquid- and gas-phase fluxes. The thermal-hydrologic parameters used to support ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' are identified in Table 1-1. The thermal-hydrologic parameters are determined as a function of position along each of the emplacement drifts and as a function of waste package type. These parameters are determined at various reference locations within the emplacement drifts, including the waste package and drip-shield surfaces and in the invert. The parameters are also determined at various defined locations in the adjoining host rock.

  18. Analysis of the microwave, terahertz, and far infrared spectra of monodeuterated methanol CH{sub 2}DOH up to J = 26, K = 11, and o{sub 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coudert, L. H.; Zemouli, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Klee, S.

    2014-02-14

    The first theoretical approach aimed at accounting for the energy levels of a non-rigid molecule displaying asymmetric-top asymmetric-frame internal rotation is developed. It is applied to a line position analysis of the high-resolution spectrum of the non-rigid CH{sub 2}DOH molecule and allows us to carry out a global analysis of a data set consisting of already available data and of microwave and far infrared transitions measured in this work. The analysis is restricted to the three lowest lying torsional levels (e{sub 0}, e{sub 1}, and o{sub 1}), to K ⩽ 11, and to J ⩽ 26. For the 8211 fitted lines, the unitless standard deviation is 2.4 and 103 parameters are determined including kinetic energy, hindering potential, and distortion effects parameters.

  19. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin

  20. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes

  1. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes

  2. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998

  3. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes

  4. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes

  5. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998