Sample records for airmass unitless airmass

  1. Lagrangian air-mass tracking with smart balloons during ACE-2 Randy Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    Lagrangian air-mass tracking with smart balloons during ACE-2 Randy Johnson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Field Research Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 Steven Balloon designed at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory Field

  2. An investigation of linear predictability of the duration of air-mass showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crites, Frank W

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the forecaster is concerned. Wl"I III. I I&C S I !1 C&&, '&, I&s r ?lt 'I& . " 1 ", 1 4 il, I, ', ; ', =I I'I' I' O' I' ?&', ' st t t f sICr it c 'v 0 I& &'i' 'I*; ' '. I Citit 4. ''; "', - I' i" 4 c 'I' -', ', . C&ICISII'&/14'I", '* '4&C 7, "te 4 top of c...(. r: S('a(, t t. lf 2 avd T " trl l '1 ttdex' WI d t rttr( d(r? 1959 LKC (t4 'ROA ' 4 9(IOt 042" 04D' ttZ?' IR kts At? 850 mb ?8I'" 02 sf st 700 nab Z95" 58 fts "00 mk RO 6" 10 14 June t 9: o 1P~C AA ' 800 (4 AO( 850 mb 0':lA' "4 kts...

  3. abstracting instructions extent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar maximum (by 0.4 mag); and at high airmass (0.25 mag brighter at airmass 1.5). Light pollution (line + continuum) contributes < 0.03 mag in U, ? 0.02 mag in B, ? 0.10 mag in...

  4. antigen-presenting cells measured: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tube for outdoors experiments, Luke Clayton for building bits of the flash tester, and Marshall sky and low air-mass conditions, is an excellent match to the AM1.5G standard...

  5. A classification of Texas thunderstorms according to their cloud-to-ground lightning characteristics during spring 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Stephen Randall

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were positive; the positive flashes exhibited a mean multiplicity of 1.43 and a median peak current of 36.6 kA. Relating the data to storm type revealed that frontal storm lightning was 2-3 times more positive than observed in airmass storms. Negative...

  6. Haeyo oicdapess Have you noticed a persis-N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    , temperature, and wind information. Cities that have a relative humidity of below 20% for more than three with elevated hu- man mortality. The specific airmass categories are dry polar, dry tem- perate, dry tropical im- pact the frequency of oppressive air masses and associated heat-re- lated mortality rates

  7. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 43194332, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/4319/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    . In eight samples from urban and rural con- tinental airmasses, the mass loading of amines consistently., 1999; Miyazaki et al., 2010; Sorooshian et al., 2009), and from biomass burn- ing and the incineration in the atmosphere. The amines emitted in the greatest quantity to the atmosphere are thought to be the simple alkyl

  8. Observing Conditions and Mid-IR Data Quality Rachel Masona, Andre Wonga, b, Tom Geballea, Kevin Volka, Tom Haywardc, Matt Dillmana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    . These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected. Keywords: infrared radiation, infrared

  9. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-001-2013_Well Leakage from CO2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S wn Normalized water saturation for water relative permeability (unitless) S wr Residual water saturation (unitless) k rw Relative permeability to water (unitless) k rg...

  10. Practical free-space quantum key distribution over 10 km in daylight and at night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Hughes; Jane E. Nordholt; Derek Derkacs; Charles G. Peterson

    2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated quantum key distribution (QKD) over a 10-km, 1-airmass atmospheric range during daylight and at night. Secret random bit sequences of the quality required for the cryptographic keys used to initialize secure communications devices were transferred at practical rates with realistic security. By identifying the physical parameters that determine the system's secrecy efficiency, we infer that free-space QKD will be practical over much longer ranges under these and other atmospheric and instrumental conditions.

  11. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 1. Technique and NO sub 2 observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic measurements of column abundances of NO{sub 2} were carried out from the NASA DC-8 airplane during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January and February 1989. Stratospheric airmasses inside and close to the polar vortex were found to be highly depleted of NO{sub 2} with lowest vertical column abundances of NO{sub 2} below 2 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} compared to abundances of 3-5 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}2} south of 50{degree}N in winter (WMO, 1985).

  12. The [open quotes]minihole[close quotes] event on 6. Feb. 1990: Influence of mie-scattering on the evaluation of spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiedler, M.; Frank, H.; Gomer, T.; Hausmann, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Platt, U.

    1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on observations of a minihole ozone depletion event near Kiruna, Sweden on February 6, 1990 in groundbased differential optical absorption spectroscopic measurements. The paper presents a general discussion of the method of zenith scattered sunlight spectroscopy, measurement results for total column ozone, and corrections for interference from polar stratospheric clouds in measurements of such trace gases. Mie scattering can greatly affect the intensity distribution of sunlight scattered at zenith angles, resulting in significant errors in the airmass factor for ozone. When corrections for this scattering are taken into account, no ozone depletion was observed.

  13. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Data Reduction Pipeline for the MMT and Magellan Infrared Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilingarian, Igor; Moran, Sean; Brown, Warren; McLeod, Brian; Fabricant, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the new spectroscopic data reduction pipeline for the multi-object MMT/Magellan Infrared Spectrograph. The pipeline is implemented in idl as a stand-alone package and is publicly available in both stable and development versions. We describe novel algorithms for sky subtraction and correction for telluric absorption. We demonstrate that our sky subtraction technique reaches the Poisson limit set by the photon statistics. Our telluric correction uses a hybrid approach by first computing a correction function from an observed stellar spectrum, and then differentially correcting it using a grid of atmosphere transmission models for the target airmass value. The pipeline provides a sufficient level of performance for real time reduction and thus enables data quality control during observations. We reduce an example dataset to demonstrate the high data reduction quality.

  15. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  16. The consequences of pleistocene climate change on lowland neotropical vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira, P.E.; Colinvaux, P.A. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palynological reconstructions indicate that lowland tropical America was subject to intense cooling during the last ice-age. The descent of presently montane taxa into the lowlands of Amazonia and Minas Gerais indicate temperature depressions ranging from 5[degrees]C to 9[degrees]C cooler-than-present. The strengthened incursion of southerly airmasses caused a reassortment of vegetation throughout Amazonia. Presently allopatric species are found to have been sympatric as novel forest assemblages and formed and dissolved. Modest drying, perhaps a 20% reduction in precipitation, accounts for all the records that show a Pleistocene expansion of savanna. No evidence is found to support the fragmentation of Amazonian forests during glacial times, and the hypothesis of forest refuges as an explanation of tropical speciation is rejected on empirical grounds.

  17. High internal and external quantum efficiency InGaN/GaN solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matioli, Elison; Neufeld, C. J.; Iza, Michael; Cruz, S. C.; Al-Heji, Ali A.; Chen, Xu; Farrell, Rober M.; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven; Mishra, U. K.; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, J. S.; Weisbuch, Claude

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High internal and external quantum efficiency GaN/InGaN solar cells are demonstrated. The internal quantum efficiency was assessed through the combination of absorption and external quantum efficiency measurements. The measured internal quantum efficiency, as high as 97%, revealed an efficient conversion of absorbed photons into electrons and holes and an efficient transport of these carriers outside the device. Improved light incoupling into the solar cells was achieved by texturing the surface. A peak external quantum efficiency of 72%, a fill factor of 79%, a short-circuit current density of 1.06?mA/cm{sup 2} , and an open circuit voltage of 1.89 V were achieved under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrumillumination conditions.

  18. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    factor, unitless Per the Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessment Protocol for Hazardous Waste Combustion Facilities (EPA 1999), BAF-S values for organic chemical COPCs were...

  19. Mid-Infrared Imaging of the Post-AGB Star AC Herculis with the MMT Adaptive Optics System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird M. Close; Beth Biller; William F. Hoffmann; Phil M. Hinz; John H. Bieging; Francois Wildi; Michael Lloyd-Hart; Guido Brusa; Don Fisher; Doug Miller; Roger Angel

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilized the MMT's unique deformable secondary adaptive optics system to produce high-resolution (FWHM=0.3"), very high Strehl mid-infrared (9.8, 11.7 & 18 micron) images of the post-AGB star AC Her. The very high (98+/-2%) Strehls achieved with Mid-IR AO led naturally to an ultra-stable PSF independent of airmass, seeing, or location on the sky. We find no significant difference between AC Her's morphology and our unresolved PSF calibration stars (mu UMa & alpha Her) at 9.8, 11.7, & 18 microns. Our current observations do not confirm any extended Mid-IR structure around AC Her. These observations are in conflict with previously reported Keck (seeing-limited) 11.7 and 18 micron images which suggested the presence of a resolved ~0.6" edge-on circumbinary disk. We conclude that AC Her has no extended Mid-IR structure on scales greater than 0.2" (R<75 AU). These first results of Mid-IR AO science are very encouraging for future high accuracy Mid-IR imaging with this technique.

  20. Evaluation of Photodiode and Thermopile Pyranometers for Photovoltaic Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires measurement of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel at a high level of accuracy and known uncertainty. Silicon detectors used in various solar energy measuring instruments including reference cells are potentially an attractive choice for multiple reasons that include faster responsivity than thermopile detectors, cheaper cost and lower maintenance. The main drawback though is the fact that the silicon detectors are only spectrally responsive in a narrow part of the solar spectrum. Therefore, to determine broadband solar irradiance a calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under standard conditions but then used for various scenarios including varying air-mass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not have been an issue if all wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately the scattering and absorption signature varies widely across wavelengths and the calibration factor computed under certain test conditions is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper lays out the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field. We also present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

  1. Performance Testing using Silicon Devices - Analysis of Accuracy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires accurate measurements of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel (i.e., Plane-of-Array - POA Irradiance) with known measurement uncertainty. Pyranometers are commonly based on thermopile or silicon photodiode detectors. Silicon detectors, including PV reference cells, are an attractive choice for reasons that include faster time response (10 us) than thermopile detectors (1 s to 5 s), lower cost and maintenance. The main drawback of silicon detectors is their limited spectral response. Therefore, to determine broadband POA solar irradiance, a pyranometer calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under clear-sky conditions with respect to a broadband reference radiometer. The pyranometer is then used for various scenarios including varying airmass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not be an issue if all irradiance wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately, the scattering and absorption signature varies widely with wavelength and the calibration factor for the silicon photodiode pyranometer is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper reviews the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field based on measurements from a group of pyranometers mounted on a 1-axis solar tracker. Also we will present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

  2. Precision Determination of Atmospheric Extinction at Optical and Near IR Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Blondin, Stephane; /European Southern Observ. /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The science goals for future ground-based all-sky surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, PanSTARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a per cent or better, and absolute calibration of color measurements that are similarly accurate. This performance will need to be achieved with measurements made from multiple images taken over the course of many years, and these surveys will observe in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a technique to implement a new strategy to directly measure variations of atmospheric transmittance at optical wavelengths and application of these measurements to calibration of ground-based observations. This strategy makes use of measurements of the spectra of a small catalog of bright 'probe' stars as they progress across the sky and back-light the atmosphere. The signatures of optical absorption by different atmospheric constituents are recognized in these spectra by their characteristic dependences on wavelength and airmass. State-of-the-art models of atmospheric radiation transport and modern codes are used to accurately compute atmospheric extinction over a wide range of observing conditions. We present results of an observing campaign that demonstrate that correction for extinction due to molecular constituents and aerosols can be done with precisions of a few millimagnitudes with this technique.

  3. Over 30{percent} efficient InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Kurita, H. [Central Research Laboratory, Japan Energy Corporation, 3-17-35 Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan)] [Central Research Laboratory, Japan Energy Corporation, 3-17-35 Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan); Ohmori, M. [Japan Energy Research Center Company, Ltd., 1-11-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106 (Japan)] [Japan Energy Research Center Company, Ltd., 1-11-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106 (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-terminal monolithic InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell with a new efficiency record of 30.28{percent} is realized with a practical large area of 4 cm{sup 2} under one-sun air-mass 1.5 global illumination. We report improvements of the tandem cell performance by introducing a double-hetero (hereafter DH) structure InGaP tunnel junction, in which the InGaP layers are surrounded by high band gap AlInP barriers. The DH structure by AlInP barriers increase the peak current of InGaP tunnel junction. The AlInP barrier directly below the InGaP top cell, which takes the part of a back surface field (hereafter BSF) layer, is found to be considerably effective in reflecting minority carriers in the top cell. The AlInP BSF layer does not only form a high potential barrier but also prevents the diffusion of zinc from a high doped tunnel junction toward the top cell during epitaxial growth. Furthermore, an InGaP tunnel junction reduces the absorption loss, which exists in a GaAs tunnel junction, and increases the photogenerated current in the GaAs bottom cell. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. DISCOVERY OF A DYNAMICAL COLD POINT IN THE HEART OF THE SAGITTARIUS dSph GALAXY WITH OBSERVATIONS FROM THE APOGEE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Hasselquist, Sten; Nidever, David L., E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu, E-mail: sh6cy@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of the core of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy are explored using high-resolution (R ? 22, 500), H-band, near-infrared spectra of over 1000 giant stars in the central 3 deg{sup 2} of the system, of which 328 are identified as Sgr members. These data, among some of the earliest observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and the largest published sample of high resolution Sgr dSph spectra to date, reveal a distinct gradient in the velocity dispersion of Sgr from 11 to 14 km s{sup –1} for radii >0.°8 from center to a dynamical cold point of 8 km s{sup –1} in the Sgr center—a trend differing from that found in previous kinematical analyses of Sgr over larger scales that suggests a more or less flat dispersion profile at these radii. Well-fitting mass models with either cored and cusped dark matter distributions can be found to match the kinematical results, although the cored profile succeeds with significantly more isotropic stellar orbits than required for a cusped profile. It is unlikely that the cold point reflects an unusual mass distribution. The dispersion gradient may arise from variations in the mixture of populations with distinct kinematics within the dSph; this explanation is suggested (e.g., by detection of a metallicity gradient across similar radii), but not confirmed, by the present data. Despite these remaining uncertainties about their interpretation, these early test data (including some from instrument commissioning) demonstrate APOGEE's usefulness for precision dynamical studies, even for fields observed at extreme airmasses.

  5. Engineer reconnaissance with a video camera: feasibility study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergner, Kirk Michael

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an object; (b) measur' ng the image of the object on the processed photographs; and (c) reducing the measurements to some useful form" (Moffitt and Mikhail, 1988). Pixel: One of the square, or rectangular, light sensitive areas on a solid state pickup... "painted polygons". Rectification: A procedure for eliminating tilt displacements (Moffitt and Mikhail, 1988). In the case of slope distances it implies the use of the horizontal or vertical components. Representative Fraction (RF): A unitless ratio...

  6. DOI: 10.1126/science.1137959 , 567 (2007);316Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    . Casciotti,1 Frank Dehairs,7 Marc Elskens,7 Makio Honda,8 David M. Karl,4 David A. Siegel,9 Mary W. Silver,10 Deborah K. Steinberg,11 Jim Valdes,12 Benjamin Van Mooy,1 Stephanie Wilson11 The oceanic biological pump being F = F100(z/100)­b , where z is the trap depth, F100 is the POC flux at 100 m, and b is a unitless

  7. Analysis of the microwave, terahertz, and far infrared spectra of monodeuterated methanol CH{sub 2}DOH up to J = 26, K = 11, and o{sub 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coudert, L. H., E-mail: laurent.coudert@lisa.u-pec.fr [Laboratoire Inter-universitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR 7583 du CNRS, Universités Paris Est Créteil et Paris Diderot, 61 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Zemouli, M. [Laboratoire d'Études Physico-Chimiques, Université Dr. T. Moulay de Saïda, Saïda 20000 (Algeria)] [Laboratoire d'Études Physico-Chimiques, Université Dr. T. Moulay de Saïda, Saïda 20000 (Algeria); Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR 8523 CNRS - Université Lille I, Bât. P5, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR 8523 CNRS - Université Lille I, Bât. P5, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France); Klee, S. [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The first theoretical approach aimed at accounting for the energy levels of a non-rigid molecule displaying asymmetric-top asymmetric-frame internal rotation is developed. It is applied to a line position analysis of the high-resolution spectrum of the non-rigid CH{sub 2}DOH molecule and allows us to carry out a global analysis of a data set consisting of already available data and of microwave and far infrared transitions measured in this work. The analysis is restricted to the three lowest lying torsional levels (e{sub 0}, e{sub 1}, and o{sub 1}), to K ? 11, and to J ? 26. For the 8211 fitted lines, the unitless standard deviation is 2.4 and 103 parameters are determined including kinetic energy, hindering potential, and distortion effects parameters.

  8. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure (P_6m2) is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structure basedmore »on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit.« less

  9. LONG-TERM OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO LMXBs: UW CrB (=MS 1603+260) AND V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Paul A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Robinson, Edward L.; Bayless, Amanda J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hakala, Pasi J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FIN-21500 Piikkioe, University of Turku (Finland)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new optical photometry of two low-mass X-ray binary stars, UW CrB (MS 1603+260) and V1408 Aql (4U 1957+115). UW CrB is an eclipsing binary and we refine its eclipse ephemeris and measure an upper limit to the rate of change of its orbital period, | P-dot | < 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} (unitless). The light curve of UW CrB shows optical counterparts of type I X-ray bursts. We tabulate the times, orbital phases, and fluences of 33 bursts and show that the optical flux in the bursts comes primarily from the accretion disk, not from the secondary star. The new observations are consistent with a model in which the accretion disk in UW CrB is asymmetric and precesses in the prograde direction with a period of {approx}5.5 days. The light curve of V1408 Aql has a low-amplitude modulation at its 9.33 hr orbital period. The modulation remained a nearly pure sine curve in the new data as it was in 1984 and 2008, but its mean amplitude was lower, 18% against 23% in the earlier data. A model in which the orbital modulation is caused by the varying aspect of the heated face of the secondary star continues to give an excellent fit to the light curve. We derive a much improved orbital ephemeris for the system.

  10. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  11. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  12. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  13. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  14. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  15. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  16. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...