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1

Lagrangian air-mass tracking with smart balloons during ACE-2 Randy Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the boundary layer h = zi). It is the result of entrainment of air from above into the boundary layerLagrangian air-mass tracking with smart balloons during ACE-2 Randy Johnson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Field Research Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 Steven

Businger, Steven

2

An investigation of linear predictability of the duration of air-mass showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the forecaster is concerned. Wl"I III. I I&C S I !1 C&&, '&, I&s r ?lt 'I& . " 1 ", 1 4 il, I, ', ; ', =I I'I' I' O' I' ?&', ' st t t f sICr it c 'v 0 I& &'i' 'I*; ' '. I Citit 4. ''; "', - I' i" 4 c 'I' -', ', . C&ICISII'&/14'I", '* '4&C 7, "te 4 top of c...(. r: S('a(, t t. lf 2 avd T " trl l '1 ttdex' WI d t rttr( d(r? 1959 LKC (t4 'ROA ' 4 9(IOt 042" 04D' ttZ?' IR kts At? 850 mb ?8I'" 02 sf st 700 nab Z95" 58 fts "00 mk RO 6" 10 14 June t 9: o 1P~C AA ' 800 (4 AO( 850 mb 0':lA' "4 kts...

Crites, Frank W

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Influence of Fog and Airmass History on Aerosol Optical, Physical and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2DifferentThe FiveD.CellsandChemical

4

abstracting instructions extent: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solar maximum (by 0.4 mag); and at high airmass (0.25 mag brighter at airmass 1.5). Light pollution (line + continuum) contributes < 0.03 mag in U, ? 0.02 mag in B, ? 0.10 mag in...

5

antigen-presenting cells measured: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tube for outdoors experiments, Luke Clayton for building bits of the flash tester, and Marshall sky and low air-mass conditions, is an excellent match to the AM1.5G standard...

6

Effects of coastal transitions on cloud-to-ground lightning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and negative CG flash rate changed in a more predictable manner for airmass storms than in frontal storms. In the single airmass storm which moved onshore, the flash rate increased, while in the storms which moved offshore, the negative CG flash rates had a... in frontal storms. In the non-frontal storm which moved onshore, the flash rate increased, while in the storms which moved offshore, the flash rate decreased in 80% of the cases. In the storms caused by the passage of fronts, the negative CG flash rate...

Studwell, Aaron Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Haeyo oicdapess Have you noticed a persis-N  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, temperature, and wind information. Cities that have a relative humidity of below 20% for more than three with elevated hu- man mortality. The specific airmass categories are dry polar, dry tem- perate, dry tropical im- pact the frequency of oppressive air masses and associated heat-re- lated mortality rates

Niyogi, Dev

8

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 43194332, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/4319/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In eight samples from urban and rural con- tinental airmasses, the mass loading of amines consistently., 1999; Miyazaki et al., 2010; Sorooshian et al., 2009), and from biomass burn- ing and the incineration in the atmosphere. The amines emitted in the greatest quantity to the atmosphere are thought to be the simple alkyl

Meskhidze, Nicholas

9

Practical free-space quantum key distribution over 10 km in daylight and at night  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have demonstrated quantum key distribution (QKD) over a 10-km, 1-airmass atmospheric range during daylight and at night. Secret random bit sequences of the quality required for the cryptographic keys used to initialize secure communications devices were transferred at practical rates with realistic security. By identifying the physical parameters that determine the system's secrecy efficiency, we infer that free-space QKD will be practical over much longer ranges under these and other atmospheric and instrumental conditions.

Richard J. Hughes; Jane E. Nordholt; Derek Derkacs; Charles G. Peterson

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

A survey of air flow models for multizone structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nanostructured Cobalt Oxide Clusters in Mesoporous Silica as Efficient Oxygen-Evolving Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of integrated artificial photosynthetic systems for the direct conversion of carbon dioxide and water to fuel depends on the availability of efficient and robust catalysts for the chemical transformations. Catalysts need to exhibit turnover frequency (TOF) and density (hence size) commensurate with the solar flux at ground level (1000Wm2, airmass (AM) 1.5)[1]to avoid wasting of incidentsolar photons. For example, a catalyst with a TOF of 100 s1 requires a density of one catalytic site per square nanometer. Catalysts with lower rates or taking up a larger space will require a high-surface-area, nanostructured support that affords tens to hundreds of catalytic sites per square nanometer. Furthermore, catalysts need to operate close to the thermodynamic potential of the redox reaction so that amaximum fraction of the solar photon energy is converted to chemical energy. Stability considerations favor all-inorganic oxide materials, as does avoidance of harsh reaction conditions of pH value or temperature.

Jiao, Feng; Frei, Heinz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Performance Testing using Silicon Devices - Analysis of Accuracy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires accurate measurements of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel (i.e., Plane-of-Array - POA Irradiance) with known measurement uncertainty. Pyranometers are commonly based on thermopile or silicon photodiode detectors. Silicon detectors, including PV reference cells, are an attractive choice for reasons that include faster time response (10 us) than thermopile detectors (1 s to 5 s), lower cost and maintenance. The main drawback of silicon detectors is their limited spectral response. Therefore, to determine broadband POA solar irradiance, a pyranometer calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under clear-sky conditions with respect to a broadband reference radiometer. The pyranometer is then used for various scenarios including varying airmass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not be an issue if all irradiance wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately, the scattering and absorption signature varies widely with wavelength and the calibration factor for the silicon photodiode pyranometer is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper reviews the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field based on measurements from a group of pyranometers mounted on a 1-axis solar tracker. Also we will present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation of Photodiode and Thermopile Pyranometers for Photovoltaic Applications: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately determining PV module performance in the field requires measurement of solar irradiance reaching the PV panel at a high level of accuracy and known uncertainty. Silicon detectors used in various solar energy measuring instruments including reference cells are potentially an attractive choice for multiple reasons that include faster responsivity than thermopile detectors, cheaper cost and lower maintenance. The main drawback though is the fact that the silicon detectors are only spectrally responsive in a narrow part of the solar spectrum. Therefore, to determine broadband solar irradiance a calibration factor that converts the narrowband response to broadband is required. Normally this calibration factor is a single number determined under standard conditions but then used for various scenarios including varying air-mass, panel orientation and atmospheric conditions. This would not have been an issue if all wavelengths that form the broadband spectrum responded uniformly to atmospheric constituents. Unfortunately the scattering and absorption signature varies widely across wavelengths and the calibration factor computed under certain test conditions is not appropriate for other conditions. This paper lays out the issues that will arise from the use of silicon detectors for PV performance measurement in the field. We also present a comparison of simultaneous spectral and broadband measurements from silicon and thermopile detectors and estimated measurement errors when using silicon devices for both array performance and resource assessment.

Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Stoffel, T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Design, implementation, and on-sky performance of an advanced apochromatic triplet atmospheric dispersion corrector for the Magellan adaptive optics system and VisAO camera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the novel design, laboratory verification, and on-sky performance of our advanced triplet atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC), an important component of the Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO), which recently achieved first light in December 2012. High-precision broadband (0.5-1.0 microns) atmospheric dispersion correction at visible wavelengths is essential both for wavefront sensing (WFS) on fainter guide stars, and for performing visible AO science using our VisAO science camera. At 2 airmasses (60 degrees from zenith) and over the waveband 500-1000 nm, our triplet design produces a 57% improvement in geometric rms spot size, a 33% improvement in encircled energy at 20 arcsec radius, and a 62% improvement in Strehl ratio when compared to a conventional doublet design. This triplet design has been fabricated, tested in the lab, and integrated into the MagAO WFS and the VisAO science camera. We present on-sky results of the ADC in operation with the MagAO system. We also present a zero-beam...

Kopon, Derek; Males, Jared R; Gasho, Victor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DISCOVERY OF A DYNAMICAL COLD POINT IN THE HEART OF THE SAGITTARIUS dSph GALAXY WITH OBSERVATIONS FROM THE APOGEE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of the core of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy are explored using high-resolution (R ? 22, 500), H-band, near-infrared spectra of over 1000 giant stars in the central 3 deg{sup 2} of the system, of which 328 are identified as Sgr members. These data, among some of the earliest observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and the largest published sample of high resolution Sgr dSph spectra to date, reveal a distinct gradient in the velocity dispersion of Sgr from 11 to 14 km s{sup –1} for radii >0.°8 from center to a dynamical cold point of 8 km s{sup –1} in the Sgr center—a trend differing from that found in previous kinematical analyses of Sgr over larger scales that suggests a more or less flat dispersion profile at these radii. Well-fitting mass models with either cored and cusped dark matter distributions can be found to match the kinematical results, although the cored profile succeeds with significantly more isotropic stellar orbits than required for a cusped profile. It is unlikely that the cold point reflects an unusual mass distribution. The dispersion gradient may arise from variations in the mixture of populations with distinct kinematics within the dSph; this explanation is suggested (e.g., by detection of a metallicity gradient across similar radii), but not confirmed, by the present data. Despite these remaining uncertainties about their interpretation, these early test data (including some from instrument commissioning) demonstrate APOGEE's usefulness for precision dynamical studies, even for fields observed at extreme airmasses.

Majewski, Steven R.; Hasselquist, Sten; Nidever, David L., E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu, E-mail: sh6cy@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); and others

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the multiscale thermohydrologic model (MSTHM) is to predict the possible range of thermal-hydrologic conditions, resulting from uncertainty and variability, in the repository emplacement drifts, including the invert, and in the adjoining host rock for the repository at Yucca Mountain. Thus, the goal is to predict the range of possible thermal-hydrologic conditions across the repository; this is quite different from predicting a single expected thermal-hydrologic response. The MSTHM calculates the following thermal-hydrologic parameters: temperature, relative humidity, liquid-phase saturation, evaporation rate, air-mass fraction, gas-phase pressure, capillary pressure, and liquid- and gas-phase fluxes (Table 1-1). These thermal-hydrologic parameters are required to support ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]). The thermal-hydrologic parameters are determined as a function of position along each of the emplacement drifts and as a function of waste package type. These parameters are determined at various reference locations within the emplacement drifts, including the waste package and drip-shield surfaces and in the invert. The parameters are also determined at various defined locations in the adjoining host rock. The MSTHM uses data obtained from the data tracking numbers (DTNs) listed in Table 4.1-1. The majority of those DTNs were generated from the following analyses and model reports: (1) ''UZ Flow Model and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]); (2) ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004); (3) ''Calibrated Properties Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169857]); (4) ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]); (5) ''Thermal Conductivity of the Non-Repository Lithostratigraphic Layers'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170033]); (6) ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169862]); (7) ''Heat Capacity Analysis Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170003]).

T. Buscheck

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOI: 10.1126/science.1137959 , 567 (2007);316Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Casciotti,1 Frank Dehairs,7 Marc Elskens,7 Makio Honda,8 David M. Karl,4 David A. Siegel,9 Mary W. Silver,10 Deborah K. Steinberg,11 Jim Valdes,12 Benjamin Van Mooy,1 Stephanie Wilson11 The oceanic biological pump being F = F100(z/100)­b , where z is the trap depth, F100 is the POC flux at 100 m, and b is a unitless

Siegel, David A.

19

LONG-TERM OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO LMXBs: UW CrB (=MS 1603+260) AND V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new optical photometry of two low-mass X-ray binary stars, UW CrB (MS 1603+260) and V1408 Aql (4U 1957+115). UW CrB is an eclipsing binary and we refine its eclipse ephemeris and measure an upper limit to the rate of change of its orbital period, | P-dot | < 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} (unitless). The light curve of UW CrB shows optical counterparts of type I X-ray bursts. We tabulate the times, orbital phases, and fluences of 33 bursts and show that the optical flux in the bursts comes primarily from the accretion disk, not from the secondary star. The new observations are consistent with a model in which the accretion disk in UW CrB is asymmetric and precesses in the prograde direction with a period of {approx}5.5 days. The light curve of V1408 Aql has a low-amplitude modulation at its 9.33 hr orbital period. The modulation remained a nearly pure sine curve in the new data as it was in 1984 and 2008, but its mean amplitude was lower, 18% against 23% in the earlier data. A model in which the orbital modulation is caused by the varying aspect of the heated face of the secondary star continues to give an excellent fit to the light curve. We derive a much improved orbital ephemeris for the system.

Mason, Paul A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Robinson, Edward L.; Bayless, Amanda J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hakala, Pasi J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FIN-21500 Piikkioe, University of Turku (Finland)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z