National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for airborne high spectral

  1. Final Technical Report for Interagency Agreement No. DE-SC0005453 “Characterizing Aerosol Distributions, Types, and Optical and Microphysical Properties using the NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP)”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols and aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics are required to: 1) determine aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, 2) compute radiative flux and heating rate profiles, 3) assess model simulations of aerosol distributions and types, and 4) establish the ability of surface and space-based remote sensors to measure the indirect effect. Consequently the ASR program calls for a combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements to determine aerosol properties and aerosol influences on clouds and radiation. As part of our previous DOE ASP project, we deployed the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 King Air aircraft during major field experiments in 2006 (MILAGRO and MaxTEX), 2007 (CHAPS), 2009 (RACORO), and 2010 (CalNex and CARES). The HSRL provided measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm). These measurements were typically made in close temporal and spatial coincidence with measurements made from DOE-funded and other participating aircraft and ground sites. On the RACORO, CARES, and CalNEX missions, we also deployed the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). RSP provided intensity and degree of linear polarization over a broad spectral and angular range enabling column-average retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Under this project, we analyzed observations and model results from RACORO, CARES, and CalNex and accomplished the following objectives. 1. Identified aerosol types, characterize the vertical distribution of the aerosol types, and partition aerosol optical depth by type, for CARES and CalNex using HSRL data as we have done for previous missions. 2. Investigated aerosol microphysical and macrophysical properties using the RSP. 3. Used the aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles measured by the HSRL

  2. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M; Manuzzato, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-06-28

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  3. ARM: Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, high sensitivity mode, co-polarized mode Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; Iosif 1 ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin ...

  4. Final Report: High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Studies with the ARM UAV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revercomb, Henry E.

    1999-12-31

    The active participation in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV) science team that was anticipated in the grant proposal was indefinitely delayed after the first year due to a programmatic decision to exclude the high spectral resolution observations from the existing ARM UAV program. However, this report shows that substantial progress toward the science objectives of this grant have made with the help of separate funding from NASA and other agencies. In the four year grant period (including time extensions), a new high spectral resolution instrument has been flown and has successfully demonstrated the ability to obtain measurements of the type needed in the conduct of this grant. In the near term, the third water vapor intensive observing period (WVIOP-3) in October 2000 will provide an opportunity to bring the high spectral resolution observations of upwelling radiance into the ARM program to complement the downwelling radiance observations from the existing ARM AERI instruments. We look forward to a time when the ARM-UAV program is able to extend its scope to include the capability for making these high spectral resolution measurements from a UAV platform.

  5. Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPACE Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during MPACE Eloranta, Edwin University of Wisconsin Category: Field Campaigns Cloud properties were derived from data acquired with University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar during its 6-week MPACE deployment. This poster presents statistics on: 1) the altitude and temperature distribution of optical depth and cloud phase. 2) the dependence of lidar depolarization and backscatter phase function on

  6. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  7. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revercomb, Henry; Tobin, David; Knuteson, Robert; Borg, Lori; Moy, Leslie

    2009-06-17

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004.

  8. High-efficiency spectral purity filter for EUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N.

    2006-05-23

    An asymmetric-cut multilayer diffracts EUV light. A multilayer cut at an angle has the same properties as a blazed grating, and has been demonstrated to have near-perfect performance. Instead of having to nano-fabricate a grating structure with imperfections no greater than several tens of nanometers, a thick multilayer is grown on a substrate and then cut at an inclined angle using coarse and inexpensive methods. Effective grating periods can be produced this way that are 10 to 100 times smaller than those produced today, and the diffraction efficiency of these asymmetric multilayers is higher than conventional gratings. Besides their ease of manufacture, the use of an asymmetric multilayer as a spectral purity filter does not require that the design of an EUV optical system be modified in any way, unlike the proposed use of blazed gratings for such systems.

  9. Final Report- Low Cost High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar absorbing coating is a key enabling technology to achieve hightemperature high-efficiency concentrating solar power operation. A high-performance solar absorbing material must simultaneously meet all the following three stringent requirements: high thermal efficiency (usually measured by figure of merit), hightemperature durability, and oxidation resistance. The objective of this research is to employ a highly scalable process to fabricate and coat black oxide nanoparticles onto solar absorber surface to achieve ultra-high thermal efficiency.

  10. Designing and optimizing highly efficient grating for high-brightness laser based on spectral beam combining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying-Ying E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Wang, Li-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xue-Chun E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn

    2015-03-14

    A highly efficient nano-periodical grating is theoretically investigated for spectral beam combining (SBC) and is experimentally implemented for attaining high-brightness laser from a diode laser array. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis with the S matrix method is employed to optimize the parameters of the grating. According the optimized parameters, the grating is fabricated and plays a key role in SBC cavity. The diffraction efficiency of this grating is optimized to 95% for the output laser which is emitted from the diode laser array. The beam parameter product of 3.8 mm mrad of the diode laser array after SBC is achieved at the output power of 46.3 W. The optical-to-optical efficiency of SBC cavity is measured to be 93.5% at the maximum operating current in the experiment.

  11. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  12. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  13. Solid optical ring interferometer for high-throughput feedback-free spectral analysis and filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrak, B.; Peiris, M.; Muller, A.

    2015-02-15

    We describe a simple and inexpensive optical ring interferometer for use in high-resolution spectral analysis and filtering. It consists of a solid cuboid, reflection-coated on two opposite sides, in which constructive interference occurs for waves in a rhombic trajectory. Due to its monolithic design, the interferometers resonance frequencies are insensitive to environmental disturbances over time. Additional advantages are its simplicity of alignment, high-throughput, and feedback-free operation. If desired, it can be stabilized with a secondary laser without disturbance of the primary signal. We illustrate the use of the interferometer for the measurement of the spectral Mollow triplet from a quantum dot and characterize its long-term stability for filtering applications.

  14. Predicting the spectral effects of soils on high concentrating photovoltaic systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting the spectral effects of soils on high concentrating photovoltaic systems Patrick D. Burton a,⇑ , Bruce H. King b , Daniel Riley b a Chemical and Biological Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0734, USA b Photovoltaic and Distributed Systems Integration Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0951, USA Received 28 March 2014; received in revised form 14 November 2014; accepted 21 November 2014 Available online 15 December

  15. Retrieval Using Texture Features in High Resolution Multi-spectral Satellite Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsam, S D; Kamath, C

    2004-01-22

    Texture features have long been used in remote sensing applications to represent and retrieve image regions similar to a query region. Various representations of texture have been proposed based on the Fourier power spectrum, spatial co-occurrence, wavelets, Gabor filters, etc. These representations vary in their computational complexity and their suitability for representing different region types. Much of the work done thus far has focused on panchromatic imagery at low to moderate spatial resolutions, such as images from Landsat 1-7 which have a resolution of 15-30 m/pixel, and from SPOT 1-5 which have a resolution of 2.5-20 m/pixel. However, it is not clear which texture representation works best for the new classes of high resolution panchromatic (60-100 cm/pixel) and multi-spectral (4 bands for red, green, blue, and near infra-red at 2.4-4 m/pixel) imagery. It is also not clear how the different spectral bands should be combined. In this paper, we investigate the retrieval performance of several different texture representations using multi-spectral satellite images from IKONOS. A query-by-example framework, along with a manually chosen ground truth dataset, allows different combinations of texture representations and spectral bands to be compared. We focus on the specific problem of retrieving inhabited regions from images of urban and rural scenes. Preliminary results show that (1) the use of all spectral bands improves the retrieval performance, and (2) co-occurrence, wavelet and Gabor texture features perform comparably.

  16. Observation of spectral gain narrowing in a high-order harmonic seeded soft-x-ray amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Barszczak Sardinha, A.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Lefrou, T.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Maynard, G.

    2010-06-15

    We report an observation of spectral gain narrowing of a high-order harmonic amplified by a soft-x-ray optical-field-ionized plasma. The temporal coherence and spectral linewidth of both the seeded and unseeded soft-x-ray lasers were experimentally measured using a varying-path-difference interferometer. The results showed that the high-order harmonic is subject to a strong spectral narrowing during its propagation in the plasma amplifier without rebroadening at saturation. This is in good agreement with a radiative transfer calculation including gain narrowing and saturation rebroadening.

  17. Ultraviolet high-spectral-resolution Doppler lidar for measuring wind field and aerosol optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imaki, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-10-01

    An ultraviolet incoherent Doppler lidar that incorporates the high-spectral-resolution (HSR) technique has been developed for measuring the wind field and aerosol optical properties in the troposphere. An injection seeded and tripled Nd:YAG laser at an ultraviolet wavelength of 355 nm was used in the lidar system. The HRS technique can resolve the aerosol Mie backscatter and the molecular Rayleigh backscatter to derive the signal components. By detecting the Mie backscatter, a great increase in the Doppler filter sensitivity was realized compared to the conventional incoherent Doppler lidars that detected the Rayleigh backscatter. The wind velocity distribution in a two-dimensional cross section was measured. By using the HSR technique, multifunction and absolute value measurements were realized for aerosol extinction, and volume backscatter coefficients; the laser beam transmittance, the lidar ratio, and the backscatter ratio are derived from these measurements.

  18. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  19. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  20. Spectral methods for global atmospheric flow applied to the modified AFIT (Air Force Institute of Technology) fallout prediction model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.L.

    1986-09-01

    This thesis predicted the airborne spatial distribution of a high-explosive-generated dust cloud. A comparison of predicted cloud center positions to experimental data collected from an aircraft flying through the dust cloud center at various times and altitudes was also studied. The analysis was accomplished using a model called AFGL which produces global complex spectral coefficients. Spectral coefficients were applied as inp fallout prediction model (called REDRAM) to predict dust mass/cu. m.

  1. Effects of vacuum exposure on stress and spectral shift of high reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolz, C.J.; Taylor, J.R.; Eickelberg, W.K.; Lindh, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Laser Separation (AVLIS) program operates the world`s largest average power dye laser; the dye laser beams are combined, formatted, and transported in vacuum. The optical system is aligned at atmosphere, while the system must meet requirements in vacuum. Therefore, coating performance must be characterized in both atmosphere and vacuum. Changes in stress and spectral shift in ambient and vacuum environments are reported for conventional and dense multilayer dielectric coatings.

  2. Effects of vacuum exposure on stress and spectral shift of high reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolz, C.J.; Taylor, J.R.; Eickelberg, W.K.; Lindh, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Laser Separation (AVLIS) program operates the world's largest average power dye laser; the dye laser beams are combined, formatted, and transported in vacuum. The optical system is aligned at atmosphere, while the system must meet requirements in vacuum. Therefore, coating performance must be characterized in both atmosphere and vacuum. Changes in stress and spectral shift in ambient and vacuum environments are reported for conventional and dense multilayer dielectric coatings.

  3. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  4. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; et al

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore » >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  5. Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veatch, B.D.

    1994-06-01

    In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

  6. First Measurement of the {rho} Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Specht, H.J.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-04-28

    We report on a precision measurement of low-mass muon pairs in 158 AGeV indium-indium collisions at the CERN SPS. A significant excess of pairs is observed above the yield expected from neutral meson decays. The unprecedented sample size of 360 000 dimuons and the good mass resolution of about 2% allow us to isolate the excess by subtraction of the decay sources. The shape of the resulting mass spectrum is consistent with a dominant contribution from {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{yields}{rho}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation. The associated space-time averaged {rho} spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. This may rule out theoretical models linking hadron masses directly to the chiral condensate.

  7. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  8. Combining harmonic generation and laser chirping to achieve high spectral density in Compton sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terzić, Balša; Reeves, Cody; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2016-04-25

    Recently various laser-chirping schemes have been investigated with the goal of reducing or eliminating ponderomotive line broadening in Compton or Thomson scattering occurring at high laser intensities. Moreover, as a next level of detail in the spectrum calculations, we have calculated the line smoothing and broadening expected due to incident beam energy spread within a one-dimensional plane wave model for the incident laser pulse, both for compensated (chirped) and unchirped cases. The scattered compensated distributions are treatable analytically within three models for the envelope of the incident laser pulses: Gaussian, Lorentzian, or hyperbolic secant. We use the new results tomore » demonstrate that the laser chirping in Compton sources at high laser intensities: (i) enables the use of higher order harmonics, thereby reducing the required electron beam energies; and (ii) increases the photon yield in a small frequency band beyond that possible with the fundamental without chirping. We found that this combination of chirping and higher harmonics can lead to substantial savings in the design, construction and operational costs of the new Compton sources. This is of particular importance to the widely popular laser-plasma accelerator based Compton sources, as the improvement in their beam quality enters the regime where chirping is most effective.« less

  9. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  10. ccpi1-airborne | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process pdf-580kb (withdrawn) Mustang Clean ... Louis, Missouri Project Fact Sheet Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process ...

  11. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  12. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  13. Inversion of Airborne Contaminants in a Regional Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akcelik, V.; Biros, G.; Draganescu, A.; Ghattas, O.; Hill, J.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.; /SLAC /Pennsylvania U. /Texas U. /Sandia

    2007-01-10

    We are interested in a DDDAS problem of localization of airborne contaminant releases in regional atmospheric transport models from sparse observations. Given measurements of the contaminant over an observation window at a small number of points in space, and a velocity field as predicted for example by a mesoscopic weather model, we seek an estimate of the state of the contaminant at the beginning of the observation interval that minimizes the least squares misfit between measured and predicted contaminant field, subject to the convection-diffusion equation for the contaminant. Once the ''initial'' conditions are estimated by solution of the inverse problem, we issue predictions of the evolution of the contaminant, the observation window is advanced in time, and the process repeated to issue a new prediction, in the style of 4D-Var. We design an appropriate numerical strategy that exploits the spectral structure of the inverse operator, and leads to efficient and accurate resolution of the inverse problem. Numerical experiments verify that high resolution inversion can be carried out rapidly for a well-resolved terrain model of the greater Los Angeles area.

  14. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 1. Lidar intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowdle, D.A. ); Rothermel, J. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Post, M.J. )

    1991-03-20

    An airborne continuous wave (CW) focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar were used to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than {approximately}50% near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  15. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  16. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  17. Overview spectra and axial distribution of spectral line intensities in a high-current vacuum arc with CuCr electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisnyak, M.; Pipa, A. V.; Gorchakov, S. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de; Iseni, S.; Franke, St.; Khapour, A.; Methling, R.; Weltmann, K.-D. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de

    2015-09-28

    Spectroscopic investigations of free-burning vacuum arcs in diffuse mode with CuCr electrodes are presented. The experimental conditions of the investigated arc correspond to the typical system for vacuum circuit breakers. Spectra of six species Cu I, Cu II, Cu III, Cr I, Cr II, and Cr III have been analyzed in the wavelength range 350–810 nm. The axial intensity distributions were found to be strongly dependent on the ionization stage of radiating species. Emission distributions of Cr II and Cu II can be distinguished as well as the distributions of Cr III and Cu III. Information on the axial distribution was used to identify the spectra and for identification of overlapping spectral lines. The overview spectra and some spectral windows recorded with high resolution are presented. Analysis of axial distributions of emitted light, which originates from different ionization states, is presented and discussed.

  18. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  19. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  20. ccpi1-airborne | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process [pdf-580kb] (withdrawn) Mustang Clean Energy, LLC, A Subsidiary of the Peabody Energy, St. Louis, Missouri Project Fact Sheet Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process (Withdrawn) [PDF-675KB] (Oct

  1. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  2. AIRBORNE RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cartmell, T.R.; Gifford, J.F.

    1959-08-01

    An ionization chamber used for measuring the radioactivity of dust present in atmospheric air is described. More particularly. the patent describes a device comprising two concentric open ended, electrically connected cylinders between which is disposed a wire electrcde. A heating source is disposed inside of the cylinder to circulate air through the space between the two cylinders by convective flow. A high voltage electric field between the wire electrcde of the electrically connected cylinder will cause ionization of the air as it passes therethrough.

  3. Spectral shape deformation in inverse spin Hall voltage in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}|Pt bilayers at high microwave power levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lustikova, J. Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-02-21

    We report on the deformation of microwave absorption spectra and of the inverse spin Hall voltage signals in thin film bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum at high microwave power levels in a 9.45-GHz TE{sub 011} cavity. As the microwave power increases from 0.15 to 200 mW, the resonance field shifts to higher values, and the initially Lorentzian spectra of the microwave absorption intensity as well as the inverse spin Hall voltage signals become asymmetric. The contributions from opening of the magnetization precession cone and heating of YIG cannot well reproduce the data. Control measurements of inverse spin Hall voltages on thin-film YIG|Pt systems with a range of line widths underscore the role of spin-wave excitations in spectral deformation.

  4. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K. Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2014-11-15

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  5. Category:Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Category Edit History Category:Airborne Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Airborne Gravity Survey...

  6. ccpi-airborne_r2 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 AIRBORNE PROCESS(tm) COMMERCIAL SCALE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM MUSTANG CLEAN ENERGY, LLC, a subsidiary of PEABODY ENERGY ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI PROJECT FACT SHEET Airborne Process(tm)...

  7. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  8. Modification of modulated plasma plumes for the quasi-phase-matching of high-order harmonics in different spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Sobirov, B.; Reyimbaev, S.; Sherniyozov, H.; Usmanov, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2015-01-15

    We demonstrate the technique allowing the fine tuning of the distance between the laser-produced plasma plumes on the surfaces of different materials, as well as the variation of the sizes of these plumes. The modification of plasma formations is based on the tilting of the multi-slit mask placed between the heating laser beam and target surface, as well as the positioning of this mask in the telescope placed on the path of heating radiation. The modulated plasma plumes with the sizes of single plume ranging between 0.1 and 1 mm were produced on the manganese and silver targets. Modification of the geometrical parameters of plasma plumes proved to be useful for the fine tuning of the quasi-phase-matched high-order harmonics generated in such structures during propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses. We show the enhancement of some groups of harmonics along the plateau range and the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonic by variable modulation of the plasma.

  9. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise: Capabilities Capabilities Capabilities Sandia continues to advance the next generation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems with highly integrated, miniaturized, and fully mission-capable radar systems to impact tactical Surveillance and Reconnaissance (S&R) capabilities Sandia has a broad range of engineering, testing and analysis capabilities for Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems.

  11. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Eloranta, Ed

    2004-12-01

    The HSRL provided calibrated vertical profiles of optical depth, backscatter cross section and depoloarization at a wavelength of 532 nm. Profiles were acquired at 2.5 second intervals with 7.5 meter resolution. Profiles extended from an altitude of 100 m to 30 km in clear air. The lidar penetrated to a maximum optical depth of ~ 4 under cloudy conditions. Our data contributed directly to the aims of the M-PACE experiment, providing calibrated optical depth and optical backscatter measurements which were not available from any other instrument.

  12. Radiometry High Spectral Resolution Fourier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith, R. O. Knuteson, F. A. Best, R. G. Dedecker, T. P. Dirkx, R. ... behavior are being used to derive cloud microphysical properties (Smith et al. 1993). ...

  13. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  14. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  15. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  16. HST Rotational Spectral Mapping Of Two L-Type Brown Dwarfs: Variability In And Out Of Water Bands Indicates High-Altitude Haze Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Showman, Adam P.; Karalidi, Theodora; Flateau, Davin; Heinze, Aren N.

    2014-12-17

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.

  17. HST ROTATIONAL SPECTRAL MAPPING OF TWO L-TYPE BROWN DWARFS: VARIABILITY IN AND OUT OF WATER BANDS INDICATES HIGH-ALTITUDE HAZE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Karalidi, Theodora; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Showman, Adam P.; Flateau, Davin; Heinze, Aren N.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759–1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon and Marley and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers—the driver of the variability—must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.

  18. HST Rotational Spectral Mapping Of Two L-Type Brown Dwarfs: Variability In And Out Of Water Bands Indicates High-Altitude Haze Layers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at othermore » wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.« less

  19. Airborne measured analytic signal for UXO detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamey, T.J.; Holladay, J.S. [Aerodat Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Mahler, R. [Industrieanlagen Betriebsgesellschaft, Deutschland (Australia)

    1997-10-01

    The Altmark Tank Training Range north of Haldensleben, Germany has been in operation since WWI. Weapons training and testing has included cavalry, cannon, small arms, rail guns, and tank battalions. Current plans are to convert the area to a fully digital combat training facility. Instead of using blank or dummy ordnance, hits will be registered with lasers and computers. Before this can happen, the 25,000 ha must be cleared of old debris. In support of this cleanup operation, Aerodat Inc., in conjunction with IABG of Germany, demonstrated a new high resolution magnetic survey technique involving the measurement of 3-component magnetic gradient data. The survey was conducted in May 1996, and covered 500 ha in two blocks. The nominal line spacing was 10 m, and the average sensor altitude was 7 m. The geologic column consisted of sands over a sedimentary basin. Topographic relief was generally flat with approximately 3 m rolling dunes and occasional man-made features such as fox holes, bunkers, tank traps and reviewing stands. Trees were sparse and short (2-3 metres) due to frequent burn off and tank activity. As such, this site was nearly ideal for low altitude airborne surveying.

  20. Overview of the first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: Conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.N.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure three-dimensional winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, the authors describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from September experiments.

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME VI) 2015.10.01, Biraud, AAF ARM...

  2. ccpi-airborne_r2 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 AIRBORNE PROCESS(tm) COMMERCIAL SCALE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM MUSTANG CLEAN ENERGY, LLC, a subsidiary of PEABODY ENERGY ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI PROJECT FACT SHEET Airborne Process(tm) Commercial Scale Demonstration Program (Withdrawn) [PDF-675KB] (Oct 2008

  3. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzari, Rmi Li, Jingfeng Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO{sub 2} are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO{sub 2}(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  4. Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1998-10-23

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

  5. XPS Spectral Database - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JCAP20130222-220.jpg XPS Spectral Database Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device

  6. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  7. Mutagenicity of airborne particles from a nonindustrial town in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barale, R.; Zucconi, D.; Giorgelli, F.; Carducci, A.L.; Tonelli, M.; Loprieno, N.

    1989-01-01

    The mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter collected in Pisa, a small nonindustrial town located in Italy, has been monitored over 1 year using the Ames Salmonella Test. Airborne particulate was collected on fiberglass filters using a Hi-Vol sampler and extracted by sonication and Soxhlet acetone extraction in sequence. TA 98 and TA 100 salmonella strains gave positive results with the great majority of samples. The mutagenicity trend fits with a harmonic regression with a peak during December/January and inversely correlates with the temperature. No correlations were observed with other meteorological conditions such as wind, cloud, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, and humidity. The ratio between mutagenicity/microgram of particulate matter with S9 and that without S9 remains more or less constant regardless of seasonal fluctuations, suggesting that during cold months quantitative increases of mutagens onto particulate matter have probably occurred. The comparison of air mutagenicity in different sites suggests that motor vehicle exhaust fumes are the major source of air pollution. Finally, because of high-traffic volume, air mutagenicity at street level is comparable to that observed in several metropolitan areas all over the world.

  8. Analyzing Options for Airborne Emergency Wireless Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schmitt; Juan Deaton; Curt Papke; Shane Cherry

    2008-03-01

    In the event of large-scale natural or manmade catastrophic events, access to reliable and enduring commercial communication systems is critical. Hurricane Katrina provided a recent example of the need to ensure communications during a national emergency. To ensure that communication demands are met during these critical times, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the guidance of United States Strategic Command has studied infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities associated with an airborne wireless communications capability. Such a capability could provide emergency wireless communications until public/commercial nodes can be systematically restored. This report focuses on the airborne cellular restoration concept; analyzing basic infrastructure requirements; identifying related infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities and offers recommended solutions.

  9. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  10. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR and Synthetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems What is SAR? Areas of Expertise Images VideoSAR Publications Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Pathfinder Airborne ISR and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems Tactical Eyes for the Warfighter Tactical Eyes for the Warfighter Actionable Intelligence for the Decision Maker Actionable Intelligence for the Decision Maker All Weather, Persistent, Optical Like All Weather, Persistent, Optical Like

  12. New Airborne Technology Measures Ocean Surface Currents for Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emergency Rescue Missions New Airborne Technology Measures Ocean Surface Currents for Offshore Energy Production and Emergency Rescue Missions April 11, 2016 - 10:40am ...

  13. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  14. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurement on the North Slope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Airborne Carbon Measurement on the North Slope During the summer of 2015, a research campaign gave scientists insight into trends and variability of trace gases in the atmosphere ...

  15. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase I) Notes Fugro, Inc. performed an airborne geophysical survey using the DIGHEM (Digital Helicopter ElectroMagnetics) aircraft over a 937 km2 survey grid. An coplanar...

  16. Spectral tailoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  17. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  18. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 1. Algorithm description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J. ); Bowdle, D.A. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Woodfield, A.A. )

    1991-03-20

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kingdom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 {mu}m using an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). The heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: Set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  19. Spectral utilization in thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clevenger, M.B.; Murray, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    Multilayer assemblies of epitaxially-grown, III-V semiconductor materials are being investigated for use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion applications. It has been observed that thick, highly-doped semiconductor layers within cell architectures dominate the parasitic free-carrier absorption (FCA) of devices at wavelengths above the bandgap of the semiconductor material. In this work, the wavelength-dependent, free-carrier absorption of p- and n-type InGaAs layers grown epitaxially onto semi-insulating (SI) InP substrates has been measured and related to the total absorption of long-wavelength photons in thermophotovoltaic devices. The optical responses of the TPV cells are then used in the calculation of spectral utilization factors and device efficiencies.

  20. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  1. CALIOPE and TAISIR airborne experiment platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chocol, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    Between 1950 and 1970, scientific ballooning achieved many new objectives and made a substantial contribution to understanding near-earth and space environments. In 1986, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began development of ballooning technology capable of addressing issues associated with precision tracking of ballistic missiles. In 1993, the Radar Ocean Imaging Project identified the need for a low altitude (1 km) airborne platform for its Radar system. These two technologies and experience base have been merged with the acquisition of government surplus Aerostats by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The CALIOPE and TAISIR Programs can benefit directly from this technology by using the Aerostat as an experiment platform for measurements of the spill facility at NTS.

  2. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  3. ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral radiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave spectral radiance The rate at which the spectrally resolved radiant energy in the longwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in a particular direction per unit area perpendicular to the direction of radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  4. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral radiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral radiance The rate at which the spectrally resolved radiant energy in the shortwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in a particular direction per unit area perpendicular to the direction of radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 submitted) in the past four years. We will continue our airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling in the SGP. The goals of this measurement program are to...

  6. Spatio-spectral image analysis using classical and neural algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, S.; Gisler, G.R.; Theiler, J.

    1996-12-31

    Remote imaging at high spatial resolution has a number of environmental, industrial, and military applications. Analysis of high-resolution multi-spectral images usually involves either spectral analysis of single pixels in a multi- or hyper-spectral image or spatial analysis of multi-pixels in a panchromatic or monochromatic image. Although insufficient for some pattern recognition applications individually, the combination of spatial and spectral analytical techniques may allow the identification of more complex signatures that might not otherwise be manifested in the individual spatial or spectral domains. We report on some preliminary investigation of unsupervised classification methodologies (using both ``classical`` and ``neural`` algorithms) to identify potentially revealing features in these images. We apply dimension-reduction preprocessing to the images, duster, and compare the clusterings obtained by different algorithms. Our classification results are analyzed both visually and with a suite of objective, quantitative measures.

  7. High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  9. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  10. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  11. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  12. Airborne megawatt class free-electron laser for defense and security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Whitney; David Douglas; George Neil

    2005-03-01

    An airborne megawatt (MW) average power Free-Electron Laser (FEL) is now a possibility. In the process of shrinking the FEL parameters to fit on ship, a surprisingly lightweight and compact design has been achieved. There are multiple motivations for using a FEL for a high-power airborne system for Defense and Security: Diverse mission requirements can be met by a single system. The MW of light can be made available with any time structure for time periods from microseconds to hours, i.e. there is a nearly unlimited magazine. The wavelength of the light can be chosen to be from the far infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV) thereby best meeting mission requirements. The FEL light can be modulated for detecting the same pattern in the small fraction of light reflected from the target resulting in greatly enhanced targeting control. The entire MW class FEL including all of its subsystems can be carried by large commercial size airplanes or on an airship. Adequate electrical power can be generated on the plane or airship to run the FEL as long as the plane or airship has fuel to fly. The light from the FEL will work well with relay mirror systems. The required R&D to achieve the MW level is well understood. The coupling of the capabilities of an airborne FEL to diverse mission requirements provides unique opportunities.

  13. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  14. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  15. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Biraud, Sebastien

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  16. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  17. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  18. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-10

    international intercomparisons among NMIs. Ultimately, the spectral irradiance can be realized with expanded measurement uncertainties of far less than 1 % over a wide spectral range. Thus, for customers with high demands on low measurement uncertainties, it is possible to calibrate their working standards directly against the blackbody-radiator, taking into account the higher necessary effort. In special cases it is possible to calibrate the customer's spectroradiometric facilities directly in front of the blackbody-radiator. In the context of the European Metrology Research Project Traceability for surface spectral solar ultraviolet radiation, the traceability chain will be improved and adapted.

  19. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  20. Innovative Office Lighting System with Integrated Spectrally...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office Lighting System with Integrated Spectrally Adaptive Control Innovative Office Lighting System with Integrated Spectrally Adaptive Control Lead Performer: Philips Research ...

  1. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (BER) Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences Longwave spectral brightness temperature,Longwave spectral ...

  2. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from

  3. "Airborne Wind Energy - Harnessing a Vast, Untapped Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source" | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab November 14, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "Airborne Wind Energy - Harnessing a Vast, Untapped Renewable Energy Source" Dr. Kenneth Jensen Makani Power Inc. At just 500 m above the ground, the average power density of the wind is double that at 100 m where wind turbines typically reside. This makes high-altitude wind one of the most concentrated forms of renewable energy after hydro-power. Building conventional wind turbines at

  4. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limtedmore » number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X

  5. BEO Tram Spectral Data 2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret; Serbin, Shawn

    2015-06-10

    Visible to near-infrared (350-1100nm) vegetation spectral reflectance data collected on the BEO automated tram measurement platform during the 2014 growing season. The spectra were collected using a PP Systems UniSpec-DC instrument and was processed to at-surface reflectance and interpolated to 1nm.

  6. Dynamics, Spectral Geometry and Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghelea, Dan

    2011-02-10

    The paper is an informal report on joint work with Stefan Haller on Dynamics in relation with Topology and Spectral Geometry. By dynamics one means a smooth vector field on a closed smooth manifold; the elements of dynamics of concern are the rest points, instantons and closed trajectories. One discusses their counting in the case of a generic vector field which has some additional properties satisfied by a still very large class of vector fields.

  7. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  8. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  9. Breast tissue decomposition with spectral distortion correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Huanjun; Zhao, Bo; Baturin, Pavlo; Behroozi, Farnaz; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of an accurate measurement of water, lipid, and protein composition of breast tissue using a photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT) with spectral distortion corrections. Methods: Thirty-eight postmortem breasts were imaged with a cadmium-zinc-telluride-based photon-counting spectral CT system at 100 kV. The energy-resolving capability of the photon-counting detector was used to separate photons into low and high energy bins with a splitting energy of 42 keV. The estimated mean glandular dose for each breast ranged from 1.8 to 2.2 mGy. Two spectral distortion correction techniques were implemented, respectively, on the raw images to correct the nonlinear detector response due to pulse pileup and charge-sharing artifacts. Dual energy decomposition was then used to characterize each breast in terms of water, lipid, and protein content. In the meantime, the breasts were chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein components to provide a gold standard for comparison with dual energy decomposition results. Results: The accuracy of the tissue compositional measurement with spectral CT was determined by comparing to the reference standard from chemical analysis. The averaged root-mean-square error in percentage composition was reduced from 15.5% to 2.8% after spectral distortion corrections. Conclusions: The results indicate that spectral CT can be used to quantify the water, lipid, and protein content in breast tissue. The accuracy of the compositional analysis depends on the applied spectral distortion correction technique.

  10. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Spectral Responsivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectral Responsivity Spectral responsivity (SR) measurement is an important part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) photovoltaic (PV) device performance assessment process. Spectral responsivity systems measure how a device responds to selected narrow (spectral) bands of irradiance. Responsivity is measured in units of amps per watt versus wavelength and reported in terms of quantum efficiency (QE) - a measure of how efficiently a device converts incoming photons to charge

  11. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  12. New Approaches to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approaches to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne Measurements Rick Flagan Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Support: NSF, ONR, Davidow Foundation Differential Mobility Analysis Air Sample Aerosol Charger/Neutralizer (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization) Sheath Air Q sh ~ 10 Q a Volumetric flow rate Q s Exhaust Q ex =Q sh Differential Mobility Analyzer DMA (Aerodynamic Analog of Sector Mass

  13. Real-Time Airborne Particle Analyzer - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Real-Time Airborne Particle Analyzer Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Particle analysis is useful for determining chemical compositions in a wide range of disciplines, from ascertaining the source of a petroleum sample to duplicating a fragrance. The technique is appealing to a broad cross section of analytical sciences, but its applications are limited because, for existing equipment, sample size

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Areas of Expertise Capabilities Capabilities Sandia's Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) breadth of capabilities include everything from mission planning to system design and integration to data collection and analysis. Hardware Hardware Sandia has over 30 years of experience in the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and other Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) hardware components. Modes and Frequencies

  15. Introductory Remarks: ARM AVP Workshop on Advances in Airborne Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introductory Remarks: ARM AVP Workshop on Advances in Airborne Instrumentation Warren Wiscombe ARM Chief Scientist Brookhaven National Lab ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Genesis of this workshop * ARM UAV mutated into ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) in 2006 * Several key people believed strongly that AVP should have an instrument development component * Greg McFarquhar wrote the AVP whitepaper with three goals: - routine flights over ARM sites -

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  17. Template:SpectralImagingSensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is the 'Spectral Imaging Sensor' template. To define a new Spectral Imaging Sensor, please use the Spectral Imaging Sensor Form. Parameters Name - Full, spelled-out name...

  18. Micro-Electron Spin Resonance for Airborne Soot Measurement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Micro-Electron Spin Resonance for Airborne Soot Measurement Micro-Electron Spin Resonance for Airborne Soot Measurement A real-time method for airborne soot concentration measurement using a miniaturized electron spin resonance sensor is presented. deer08_white.pdf (1.09 MB) More Documents & Publications Certification Package Status Table_12_11_08.xls Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor and Controls for

  19. DOE/SC-ARM-15-032 ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Airborne Carbon Measurements Project BC black carbon CARVE NASA Carbon in Arctic ... observations to regional scales, but focused on Alaska as a whole (Figure 2 and Figure 3). ...

  20. DOE-HDBK-3010-94; DOE Handbook Airborne Release Fractions/Rates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10-94 December 1994 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2000 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONSRATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume I - Analysis of ...

  1. DOE-HDBK-3010-94; Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3010-94 December 1994 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONSRATES AND RESPIRABLE ... Nozzle arrangement in the system is in accordance with NFPA standards and will blanket a ...

  2. Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, J R

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI

  3. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predicted to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.

  4. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predictedmore » to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.« less

  5. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Paciesas, William S. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  6. Spectral output of Z-machine implosions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G. C.; Chrien, Robert E.; Peterson, D. L.; Watt, R. G.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Sanford, T. W. L.

    2001-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine has developed into a reproducible, high power (>200 TW), high temperature (>200 eV) driver for radiation physics experiments. Imploding cylindrical wire arrays on the Z-machine produce a radiation source with a bolometric temperature of about 200 eV. By surrounding the z-pinch implosion with a vacuum hohlraum a nearly Planckian source of about 140 eV temperature is created with peak radiation powers of about 200 terawatts and integrated energy of 2 megajoules or more. In this energy rich environment we can field a dozen experiments all being driven by an identical source. In addition to 'standard' vacuum hohlraums we also use dynamic hohlraums consisting of two nested wire arrays converging onto an axially centered foam cylinder. Radiation flowing from the ends on the cylinder indicates a Planckian source temperature well over 200 eV. Only two experiments can be fielded on a dynamic hohlraum (one on each end) but the higher source temperature justifies the added complexity of the set-up. We routinely use arrays of filtered silicon photodiodes (SiD) and filtered photocathode x-ray diodes (XRD) to determine the temperature of the source. Three different techniques for unfolding spectra from the XRD and SiD detector data are being used. They are: (1) Treat each detector independently and find the Planckian temperature for a given source size and solid angle that would give the measured detector signal, (2) Use all detector signals and detector spectral responses simultaneously and find a spectrum that best fits the observed data, (3) Use all detector signals and averaged detector spectral responses and find a histogram spectrum that best fits the observed data. When used as complementary set of analysis tools these techniques generate remarkably consistent results showing nearly Planckian behavior on our vacuum hohlraum experiments.

  7. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    engineering data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): engineering data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral ...

  8. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  9. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  10. ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral brightness temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral brightness temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave spectral brightness temperature A descriptive measure of radiation in terms of the temperature of a hypothetical black body emitting an identical amount of radiation at the same spectrally resolved wavelengths. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the

  11. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Tools » Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally enhanced lighting (SEL) is a cost-effective, low-risk design method for achieving significant energy savings. It entails shifting the color of lamps from the warmer to the cooler (whiter) end of the color spectrum, more closely matching daylight. Studies show that, with this color shift, occupants perceive lighting to be brighter and they are able to see more clearly. Since SEL provides the

  12. Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-10-06

    Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

  13. Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-05-01

    A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

  14. Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H.; Barhen, J.

    1997-04-01

    A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

  15. Development of spectral interferometry for shock characterization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interferometry for shock characterization in energetic materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of spectral interferometry for shock characterization in ...

  16. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  17. Synthesis, spectral characterization, and single crystal structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis, spectral ... Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Crystallography Reports; Journal Volume: ...

  18. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  19. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmore » that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.« less

  20. Multi-center airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) is an airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar designed to acquire remote multi-dimensional measurements of winds and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. These measurements enable study of atmospheric dynamic processes and features at scales of motion that may be undersampled by, or may be beyond the capability of, existing or planned sensors. MACAWS capabilities enable more realistic assessments of concepts in global tropospheric wind measurement with satellite Doppler lidar, as well as a unique capability to validate the NASA Scatterometer currently scheduled for launch in late 1996. MACAWS consists of a Joule-class CO{sub 2} coherent Doppler lidar on a ruggedized optical table, a programmable scanner to direct the lidar beam in the desired direction, and a dedicated inertial navigation system to account for variable aircraft attitude and speed. MACAWS was flown for the first time in September 1995, over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western US. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  2. Airborne soil organic particles generated by precipitation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Bingbing; Harder, Tristan H.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Piens, Dominique S.; China, Swarup; Kovarik, Libor; Keiluweit, Marco; Arey, Bruce W.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-05-02

    Airborne organic particles play a critical role in Earth’s climate1, public health2, air quality3, and hydrological and carbon cycles4. However, sources and formation mechanisms for semi-solid and solid organic particles5 are poorly understood and typically neglected in atmospheric models6. Laboratory evidence suggests that fine particles can be formed from impaction of mineral surfaces by droplets7. Here, we use chemical imaging of particles collected following rain events in the Southern Great Plains, Oklahoma, USA and after experimental irrigation to show that raindrop impaction of soils generates solid organic particles. We find that after rain events, sub-micrometre solid particles, with a chemicalmore » composition consistent with soil organic matter, contributed up to 60% of atmospheric particles. Our irrigation experiments indicate that intensive water impaction is sufficient to cause ejection of airborne soil organic particles from the soil surface. Chemical imaging and micro-spectroscopy analysis of particle physico-chemical properties suggest that these particles may have important impacts on cloud formation and efficiently absorb solar radiation. Lastly, we suggest that raindrop-induced formation of solid organic particles from soils may be a widespread phenomenon in ecosystems such as agricultural systems and grasslands where soils are exposed to strong, episodic precipitation events8.« less

  3. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  4. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  5. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  6. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  7. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  8. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV) Campaign Links Final Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) 2008.10.01, Biraud, AAF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV) 2013.10.01 - 2015.09.30 Lead Scientist : Sebastien Biraud For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM ACME observations and

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics - CAST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsCo-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics - CAST Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics - CAST 2014.01.01 - 2014.02.28 Lead Scientist : Geraint Vaughan For data sets, see below. Abstract CAST (Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics) was a research project funded by the UK's Natural Environment

  11. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reports (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports We report on a 5-year multi-institution and multi-agency airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, with

  12. A comparison between satellite and airborne multispectral data for the assessment of Mangrove areas in the eastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, E.P.; Edwards, A.J.; Mumby, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite (SPOT XS and Landsat TM) and airborne multispectral (CASI) imagery was acquired from the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies. The descriptive resolution and accuracy of each image type is compared for two applications: mangrove habitat mapping and the measurement of mangrove canopy characteristics (leaf area index and canopy closure). Mangroves could be separated from non-mangrove vegetation to an accuracy of only 57% with SPOT XS data but better discrimination could be achieved with either Landsat TM or CASI (in both cases accuracy was >90%). CASI data permitted a more accurate classification of different mangrove habitats than was possible using Landsat TM. Nine mangrove habitats could be mapped to an accuracy of 85% with the high-resolution airborne data compared to 31% obtained with TM. A maximum of three mangrove habitats were separable with Landsat TM: the accuracy of this classification was 83%. Measurement of mangrove canopy characteristics is achieved more accurately with CASI than with either satellite sensor, but high costs probably make it a less cost-effective option. The cost-effectiveness of each sensor is discussed for each application.

  13. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stork, Christopher L.; Van Benthem, Mark H.

    2009-02-17

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  14. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which spectrally resolved radiant energy at wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above

  15. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    direct normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance The narrow spectral range of measurements coming directly from the sun whose wavelength falls within the solar range of 0.4 and 4 {mu}m. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream

  16. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  17. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck ...

  18. Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for...

  19. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): channel 1 data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  20. ARM: Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM: Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, moderate sensitivity mode, cross-polarized mode Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, moderate ...

  1. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    summary data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): summary data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  2. Solar spectral optical properties of pigments--Part II: survey...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar spectral optical properties of ... K (absorption) as functions ofwavelength in the solar spectral range of 300 to 2500 nm. ...

  3. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

  4. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

  5. A spectral filtering procedure for Eddy-resolving simulations with a spectral element ocean model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, J.G.; Iskandarani, M.; Haidvogel, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    This report introduces a new filtering method designed to control the growth of nonlinear instabilities in the spectral element solution of nonlinear turbulent oceanic flow model.

  6. The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 rocheleau_uhawaii_kickoff.pdf (340.84 KB) More Documents & Publications Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy Effects of Impurities of Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effect of System and Air Contaminants on

  7. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  8. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Gentry, Stephen M.; Boye, Clinton A.; Grotbeck, Carter L.; Stallard, Brian R.; Descour, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  9. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  10. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  11. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  12. Evolution of the spectral index after inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari, A.A.; Abbassi, A.H. E-mail: ahabbasi@modares.ac.ir

    2014-09-01

    In this article we investigate the time evolution of the adiabatic (curvature) and isocurvature (entropy) spectral indices after inflation era for all cosmological scales with two different initial conditions. For this purpose, we first extract an explicit equation for the time evolution of the comoving curvature perturbation (which may be known as the generalized Mukhanov-Sasaki equation). It would be cleared that the evolution of adiabatic spectral index severely depends on the initial conditions moreover, as expected it is constant only for the super-Hubble scales and adiabatic initial conditions. Additionally, the adiabatic spectral index after recombination approaches a constant value for the isocurvature perturbations. Finally, we re-investigate the Sachs-Wolfe effect and show that the fudge factor  1/3 in the adiabatic ordinary Sachs-Wolfe formula must be replaced by 0.4.

  13. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusionreaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  14. Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Norm Stanley; Larry Radke; Charles Smeltzer

    2007-09-01

    On July 11, 2007, a surface, high-explosive test (<20,000 lb TNT-equivalent) was carried out at the National Security Test Range (NSTR) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. Aircraft-mounted rapid response (1-sec) particulate monitors were used to measure airborne PM-10 concentrations directly in the dust cloud and to develop a PM-10 emission factor that could be used for subsequent tests at the NSTR. The blast produced a mushroom-like dust cloud that rose approximately 2,500–3,000 ft above ground level, which quickly dissipated (within 5 miles of the source). In general, the cloud was smaller and less persistence than expected, or that might occur in other areas, likely due to the coarse sand and subsurface conditions that characterize the immediate NSTR area. Maximum short time-averaged (1-sec) PM-10 concentrations at the center of the cloud immediately after the event reached 421 µg m-3 but were rapidly reduced (by atmospheric dispersion and fallout) to near background levels (~10 µg m-3) after about 15 minutes. This occurred well within the INL Site boundary, about 8 km (5 miles) from the NSTR source. These findings demonstrate that maximum concentrations in ambient air beyond the INL Site boundary (closest is 11.2 km from NSTR) from these types of tests would be well within the 150 µg m-3 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM-10. Aircraft measurements and geostatistical techniques were used to successfully quantify the initial volume (1.64E+9 m3 or 1.64 km3) and mass (250 kg) of the PM-10 dust cloud, and a PM-10 emission factor (20 kg m-3 crater soil volume) was developed for this specific type of event at NSTR. The 250 kg of PM-10 mass estimated from this experiment is almost seven-times higher than the 36 kg estimated for the environmental assessment (DOE-ID 2007) using available Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1995) emission factors. This experiment demonstrated that advanced aircraft-mounted instruments operated by

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Surface spectral albedo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSurface spectral albedo ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Surface spectral albedo 2002.08.14 - 2002.08.20 Lead Scientist : Alexander Trishchenko Data Availability Analysis of the data collected during IOP is not completed yet. Preliminary results will be presented during the IRF workshop on 8-10 October, 2002. Data will be available at the following URL (

  16. Logarithmic compression methods for spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunham, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    A method is provided for logarithmic compression, transmission, and expansion of spectral data. A log Gabor transformation is made of incoming time series data to output spectral phase and logarithmic magnitude values. The output phase and logarithmic magnitude values are compressed by selecting only magnitude values above a selected threshold and corresponding phase values to transmit compressed phase and logarithmic magnitude values. A reverse log Gabor transformation is then performed on the transmitted phase and logarithmic magnitude values to output transmitted time series data to a user.

  17. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  18. On the possibility of simultaneous emission of an autonomous cw HF-DF chemical laser in two spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashkin, A S; Gurov, L V; Katorgin, B I; Petrova, S N; Polinovsky, D V

    2008-05-31

    The efficiencies of different fuel compositions used in the combustion chamber of an autonomous cw chemical HF-DF laser for obtaining high specific energy parameters during simultaneous lasing in HF and DF molecules in two spectral ranges are theoretically analysed. It is shown that mirrors with the reflectance above 99% in these spectral ranges can be manufactured in principle. (lasers)

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Peoria, Decater, Belleville Quadrangles, (IL). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Peoria, Decatur, and Belleville, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton procession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results.

  20. Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) (5.3 MB) More Documents & Publications Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Grade

  1. BBHRP Assessment Using Ground and Satellite-based High Spectral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Observations Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison DeSlover, Daniel University of Wisconsin Holz, Robert University of Wisconsin, CIMMS Knuteson, Robert...

  2. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  3. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  4. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  5. Noise power spectral density of a fibre scattered-light interferometer with a semiconductor laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T

    2013-10-31

    Spectral characteristics of the noise intensity fluctuations at the output of a scattered-light interferometer, caused by phase fluctuations of semiconductor laser radiation are considered. This kind of noise is one of the main factors limiting sensitivity of interferometric sensors. For the first time, to our knowledge, the expression is obtained for the average noise power spectral density at the interferometer output versus the degree of a light source coherence and length of the scattering segment. Also, the approximate expressions are considered which determine the power spectral density in the low-frequency range (up to 200 kHz) and in the limiting case of extended scattering segments. The expression obtained for the noise power spectral density agrees with experimental normalised power spectra with a high accuracy. (interferometry of radiation)

  6. 3D model generation using an airborne swarm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R. A.; Punzo, G.; Macdonald, M.; Dobie, G.; MacLeod, C. N.; Summan, R.; Pierce, G.; Bolton, G.

    2015-03-31

    Using an artificial kinematic field to provide co-ordination between multiple inspection UAVs, the authors herein demonstrate full 3D modelling capability based on a photogrammetric system. The operation of the system is demonstrated by generating a full 3D surface model of an intermediate level nuclear waste storage drum. Such drums require periodic inspection to ensure that drum distortion or corrosion is carefully monitored. Performing this inspection with multiple airborne platforms enables rapid inspection of structures that are inaccessible to on-surface remote vehicles and are in human-hazardous environments. A three-dimensional surface-meshed model of the target can then be constructed in post-processing through photogrammetry analysis of the visual inspection data. The inspection environment uses a tracking system to precisely monitor the position of each aerial vehicle within the enclosure. The vehicles used are commercially available Parrot AR. Drone quadcopters, controlled through a computer interface connected over an IEEE 802.11n (WiFi) network, implementing a distributed controller for each vehicle. This enables the autonomous and distributed elements of the control scheme to be retained, while alleviating the vehicles of the control algorithms computational load. The control scheme relies on a kinematic field defined with the target at its centre. This field defines the trajectory for all the drones in the volume relative to the central target, enabling the drones to circle the target at a set radius while avoiding drone collisions. This function enables complete coverage along the height of the object, which is assured by transitioning to another inspection band only after completing circumferential coverage. Using a swarm of vehicles, the time until complete coverage can be significantly reduced.

  7. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME V)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V) Campaign Links Science Plan Images Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) 2008.10.01, Biraud, AAF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME V) 2015.06.01 - 2015.09.15 Lead Scientist : Sebastien Biraud For data sets, see below. Abstract The ARM Aerial Facility Gulfstream-159 will alternate between four flights

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RSP Measurements govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements 2012.07.01 - 2012.07.31 Lead Scientist : Chris Hostetler For data sets, see below. Abstract The deployment of the

  10. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports.

  11. Spectral Asymmetry Due to Magnetic Coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.

    2008-05-06

    The use of magnetic coordinates is ubiquitous in toroidal plasma physics, but the distortion in Fourier spectra produced by these coordinates is not well known. A spatial symmetry of the field is not always represented by a symmetry in the Fourier spectrum when magnetic coordinates are used because of the distortion of the toroidal angle. The practical importance of spectral distortion is illustrated with a tokamak example.

  12. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Young, Jack P.

    1998-01-01

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferrably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0.degree., an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head.

  13. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  14. MODIS Airborne simulator (MAS) Final Report for CLASIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Arnold; Steven Platnick

    2010-11-24

    The MAS was flown aboard the NASA ER-2 for the CLASIC field experiment, and for all data collected, provided calibrated and geolocated (Level-1B) radiance data for its 50 spectral bands (ranging in wavelength for 0.47 to 14.3 m). From the Level-1B data, as directed in the Statement of Work, higher order (Level-2) data products were derived. The Level-2 products include: a) cloud optical thickness, b) cloud effective radius, c) cloud top height (temperature), d) cloud fraction, e) cloud phase products. Preliminary Level-1B and Level-2 products were provided during the field experiment (typically within one or two days of data collection). Final version data products were made available in December 2008 following considerable calibration analysis. Data collection, data processing (to Level-2), and discussion of the calibration work are summarized below.

  15. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI)*, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) cooperated to produce a spectral solar radiation data base representing a range of atmospheric conditions (or climates) that is applicable to several different types of solar collectors. Data that are included in the data base were collected at FSEC from October 1986 to April 1988, and at PG&E from April 1987 to April 1988. FSEC operated one EPRI and one SERI spectroradiometer almost daily at Cape Canaveral, which contributed nearly 2800 spectra to the data base. PG&E operated one EPRI spectroradiometer at San Ramon, Calif., as resources permitted, contributing nearly 300 spectra to the data base. SERI collected about 200 spectra in the Denver/Golden, Colo., area form November 1987 to February 1988 as part of a research project to study urban spectral solar radiation, and added these data to the data base. *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  16. Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) for remote sensing cloud studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, G.S.; Grotbeck, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    A Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) has been developed as are relatively inexpensive ({approximately}$IM/copy), well-calibrated,imaging radiometer for aircraft studies of cloud properties. The instrument is designed to fly on an Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) platform at altitudes from the surface up to 20 km. MPIR is being developed to support the Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle portion of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurements program (ARM/UAV). Radiation-cloud interactions are the dominant uncertainty in the current General Circulation Models used for atmospheric climate studies. Reduction of this uncertainty is a top scientific priority of the US Global Change Research Program and the ARM program. While the DOE`s ARM program measures a num-ber of parameters from the ground-based Clouds and Radiation Testbed sites, it was recognized from the outset that other key parameters are best measured by sustained airborne data taking. These measurements are critical in our understanding of global change issues as well as for improved atmospheric and near space weather forecasting applications.

  17. Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (April 1984) | Department of Energy Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) (3.25 MB) More Documents & Publications Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count

  18. Spectral statistics in noninteracting many-particle systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, L.; Relano, A.; Retamosa, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Faleiro, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E.U.I.T. Industrial, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28012 Madrid (Spain); Molina, R.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik Komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    It is widely accepted that the statistical properties of energy level spectra provide an essential characterization of quantum chaos. Indeed, the spectral fluctuations of many different systems like quantum billiards, atoms, or atomic nuclei have been studied. However, noninteracting many-body systems have received little attention, since it is assumed that they must exhibit Poisson-like fluctuations. Apart from a heuristic argument of Bloch, there are neither systematic numerical calculations nor a rigorous derivation of this fact. Here we present a rigorous study of the spectral fluctuations of noninteracting identical particles moving freely in a mean field emphasizing the evolution with the number of particles N as well as with the energy. Our results are conclusive. For N{>=}2 the spectra of these systems exhibit Poisson fluctuations provided that we consider sufficiently high excitation energies. Nevertheless, when the mean field is chaotic there exists a critical energy scale L{sub c}; beyond this scale, the fluctuations deviate from the Poisson statistics as a reminiscence of the statistical properties of the mean field.

  19. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  20. Spectral method for a kinetic swarming model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.; Motsch, Sebastien

    2015-04-28

    Here we present the first numerical method for a kinetic description of the Vicsek swarming model. The kinetic model poses a unique challenge, as there is a distribution dependent collision invariant to satisfy when computing the interaction term. We use a spectral representation linked with a discrete constrained optimization to compute these interactions. To test the numerical scheme we investigate the kinetic model at different scales and compare the solution with the microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of the Vicsek model. Lastly, we observe that the kinetic model captures key features such as vortex formation and traveling waves.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    total downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, at specrally-resolved wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, is being emitted upwards and downwards into a radiation field and transferred across a surface area (real or imaginary) in a hemisphere of directions. Categories Radiometric Instruments

  2. Hyper-spectral scanner design and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.; Moses, J.; Smith, R.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An earlier project produced rough designs for key components of a compact hyper-spectral sensor for environmental and ecological measurements. Such sensors could be deployed on unmanned vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for measurements important to agriculture, the environment, and ecologies. This represents an important advance in remote sensing. Motorola invited us to propose an add-on, proof-of-principle sensor for their Comet satellite, whose primary mission is to demonstrate a channel of the IRIDIUM satellite communications system. Our project converted the preliminary designs from the previous effort into final designs for the telescope, camera, computer and interfaces that constitute the hyper-spectral scanning sensor. The work concentrated on design, fabrication, preliminary integration, and testing of the electronic circuit boards for the computer, data compression board, and interface board for the camera-computer and computer-modulator (transmitter) interfaces.

  3. Spectral geometry of {kappa}-Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrea, Francesco

    2006-06-15

    After recalling Snyder's idea [Phys. Rev. 71, 38 (1947)] of using vector fields over a smooth manifold as 'coordinates on a noncommutative space', we discuss a two-dimensional toy-model whose 'dual' noncommutative coordinates form a Lie algebra: this is the well-known {kappa}-Minkowski space [Phys. Lett. B 334, 348 (1994)]. We show how to improve Snyder's idea using the tools of quantum groups and noncommutative geometry. We find a natural representation of the coordinate algebra of {kappa}-Minkowski as linear operators on an Hilbert space (a major problem in the construction of a physical theory), study its 'spectral properties', and discuss how to obtain a Dirac operator for this space. We describe two Dirac operators. The first is associated with a spectral triple. We prove that the cyclic integral of Dimitrijevic et al. [Eur. Phys. J. C 31, 129 (2003)] can be obtained as Dixmier trace associated to this triple. The second Dirac operator is equivariant for the action of the quantum Euclidean group, but it has unbounded commutators with the algebra.

  4. PICK-UP ION DISTRIBUTIONS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRAL CURVATURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Randol, B. M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Moebius, E. S.; Zank, G. P.; Frisch, P. C.

    2012-05-20

    This paper focuses on the analysis and significance of the spectral curvature of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) detected by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer. The flux versus energy spectrum is analytically expressed in terms of the source proton distributions, namely: (1) the solar wind kappa distribution of protons and (2) the coexisting filled spherical shell distribution of pick-up ions (PUIs). The influence of PUIs on the spectral index and curvature is modeled and investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that (1) the PUI speed upper limit is restricted by the Earthward PUI velocity vector, (2) the PUI distribution causes a positive spectral curvature, and (3) the exact expressions of the spectral index and curvature can be used to extract information about the governing parameters of the parent proton distributions. The sky maps of the spectral curvature reveal a possible band-like configuration of positive spectral curvature that is missing in the original flux sky maps. This band can be roughly separated into the north/south polar regions and two ecliptic meridional 'columns' located around the ecliptic longitudes {approx}5 Degree-Sign and {approx}150 Degree-Sign . The geometric locus between the two cones with noseward axis, and apertures {approx}60 Degree-Sign and {approx}120 Degree-Sign , configures the band-like region of (1) the positive curvature and (2) the maximum values of PUI distribution. Indeed, the observed curvature band is highly correlated with PUI distributions, and is possibly caused by the influence of PUIs on bending the spectrum from linear (log-log scale) to concave upward, thus increasing its spectral curvature.

  5. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RF Kristensen; JF Beausang; DM DePoy

    2004-06-28

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1 mm to 100 mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  6. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan T. Kristensen; John F. Beausang; David M. DePoy

    2003-12-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1mm to 100mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  7. Spectral structures and their generation mechanisms for solar radio type-I bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwai, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Masuda, S.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2014-07-01

    The fine spectral structures of solar radio type-I bursts were observed by the solar radio telescope AMATERAS. The spectral characteristics, such as the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth, of the individual burst elements were satisfactorily detected by the highly resolved spectral data of AMATERAS with the burst detection algorithm that is improved in this study. The peak flux of the type-I bursts followed a power-law distribution with a spectral index of 2.9-3.3, whereas their duration and bandwidth were distributed more exponentially. There were almost no correlations between the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth. That means there was no similarity in the shapes of the burst spectral structures. We defined the growth rate of a burst as the ratio between its peak flux and duration. There was a strong correlation between the growth rate and peak flux. These results suggest that the free energy of type-I bursts that is originally generated by nonthermal electrons is modulated in the subsequent stages of the generation of nonthermal electrons, such as plasma wave generation, radio wave emissions, and propagation. The variation of the timescale of the growth rate is significantly larger than that of the coronal environments. These results can be explained by the situation wherein the source region may have the inhomogeneity of an ambient plasma environment, such as the boundary of open and closed field lines, and the superposition of entire emitted bursts was observed by the spectrometer.

  8. REGULATION OF THE SPECTRAL PEAK IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-02-20

    Observations indicate that the peak of a gamma-ray burst spectrum forms in the opaque region of an ultrarelativistic jet. Recent radiative transfer calculations support this picture and show that the spectral peak is inherited from initially thermal radiation, which is changed by heating into a broad photon distribution with a high-energy tail. We discuss the processes that regulate the observed position of the spectral peak E {sub pk}. The opaque jet has three radial zones: (1) the Planck zone r < R {sub P} where a blackbody spectrum is enforced; this zone ends where the Thomson optical depth decreases to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5}, (2) the Wien zone R {sub P} < r < R {sub W} with a Kompaneets parameter y >> 1 where radiation has a Bose-Einstein spectrum, and (3) the Comptonization zone r > R {sub W} where the radiation spectrum develops a high-energy tail. Besides the initial jet temperature, an important factor regulating E {sub pk} is internal dissipation (of bulk motions and magnetic energy) at large distances from the central engine. Dissipation in the Planck zone reduces E {sub pk}, and dissipation in the Wien zone can increase E {sub pk}. In jets with subdominant magnetic fields, the predicted E {sub pk} varies around 1 MeV up to a maximum value of about 10 MeV. If the jet carries an energetically important magnetic field, E {sub pk} can be additionally increased by dissipation of magnetic energy. This increase is suggested by observations, which show E {sub pk} up to about 20 MeV. We also consider magnetically dominated jets; then a simple model of magnetic dissipation gives E {sub pk} Almost-Equal-To 30 {Gamma}{sub W} keV where {Gamma}{sub W} is the jet Lorentz factor at the Wien radius R {sub W}.

  9. Airborne Open Polar/Imaging Nephelometer for Ice Particles in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... light because of the choice of a high-power, ... the non-sphericity andor shape of the scattering particles. ... These data illustrate the future potential of the ...

  10. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  11. Spectral line broadening in magnetized black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Shoom, Andrey A.; Tzounis, Christos E-mail: ashoom@ualberta.ca

    2014-07-01

    We consider weakly magnetized non-rotating black holes. In the presence of a regular magnetic field the motion of charged particles in the vicinity of a black hole is modified. As a result, the position of the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) becomes closer to the horizon. When the Lorentz force is repulsive (directed from the black hole) the ISCO radius can reach the gravitational radius. In the process of accretion charged particles (ions) of the accreting matter can be accumulated near their ISCO, while neutral particles fall down to the black hole after they reach 6M radius. The sharp spectral line Fe α, emitted by iron ions at such orbits, is broadened when the emission is registered by a distant observer. In this paper we study this broadening effect and discuss how one can extract information concerning the strength of the magnetic field from the observed spectrum.

  12. Spatially resolved spectral-imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloom, Joshua Simon; Tyson, John Anthony

    2016-02-09

    A spatially resolved spectral device comprising a dispersive array to receive an incident light comprising a principal ray. The dispersive array comprising a plurality of dichroic layers, each of the plurality of dichroic layers disposed in a path of a direction of the principal ray. Each of the plurality of dichroic layers configured to at least one of reflect or transmit a different wavelength range of the incident light. The device further comprising a detection array operatively coupled with the dispersive array. The detection array comprising a photosensitive component including a plurality of detection pixels, each of the plurality of detection pixels having a light-receiving surface disposed parallel to the direction of the principal ray to detect a respective one of the different wavelength ranges of incident light reflected from a corresponding one of the plurality of dichroic layers.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise: Missions Missions Change Detection Change Detection Facilities and Border Protection Facilities and Border Protection Crevasse Detection Crevasse Detection Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Space Missions Space Missions High-Resolution Terrain Elevation Mapping High-Resolution Terrain Elevation Mapping Maritime/Littoral Maritime/Littoral Vehicle and Dismount Tracking Vehicle and Dismount Tracking Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Targeting Reconnaissance,

  14. MOJAVE: Monitoring of jets in active galactic nuclei with VLBA experiments. XI. Spectral distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Pushkarev, Alexander B.; Savolainen, Tuomas; Homan, Daniel C.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2014-06-01

    with distance can be explained with radiative losses if the jets are collimating or with the evolution of the high-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum if the jets are conical. This interpretation is supported by a significant correlation with the age of the component and the spectral index, with older components having steeper spectra.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  16. Ground-based retrievals of optical depth, effective radius, and composition of airborne mineral dust above the Sahel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retrievals of optical depth, effective radius, and composition of airborne mineral dust above the Sahel Dave Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin - Madison Aerosol Working Group Breakout Session 10 March 2008 ARM STM, Norfolk, VA Background and Objectives * Many airborne minerals have absorption features in the thermal infrared (8-13 µm) * These absorption features can be used to determine the "radiatively relevant" mineral composition of atmospheric

  17. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  18. Apparatus for real-time airborne particulate radionuclide collection and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smart, John E.; Perkins, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus for collecting and analyzing an airborne particulate radionuclide having a filter mounted in a housing, the housing having an air inlet upstream of the filter and an air outlet downstream of the filter, wherein an air stream flows therethrough. The air inlet receives the air stream, the filter collects the airborne particulate radionuclide and permits a filtered air stream to pass through the air outlet. The improvement which permits real time counting is a gamma detecting germanium diode mounted downstream of the filter in the filtered air stream. The gamma detecting germanium diode is spaced apart from a downstream side of the filter a minimum distance for a substantially maximum counting detection while permitting substantially free air flow through the filter and uniform particulate radionuclide deposition on the filter.

  19. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24 (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24 We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow ...

  20. Solar spectral optical properties of pigments--Part I: model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar spectral optical properties of ... Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Solar Energy Materials and ...

  1. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. ...

  2. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  3. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  4. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a geophysical sensor system based on a remotely operated model helicopter (ROH) and to evaluate the efficacy of the system for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is a geophysical survey system that uses a ROH as the survey vehicle. We have selected the ROH because of its advantages over fixed wing and ground based vehicles. Lower air speed and superior maneuverability of the ROH make it better suited for geophysical surveys than a fixed wing model aircraft. The ROH can fly close to the ground, allowing detection of weak or subtle anomalies. Unlike ground based vehicles, the ROH can traverse difficult terrain while providing a stable sensor platform. ROH does not touch the ground during the course of a survey and is capable of functioning over water and surf zones. The ROH has been successfully used in the motion picture industry and by geology companies for payload bearing applications. The only constraint to use of the airborne system is that the ROH must remain visible to the pilot. Obstructed areas within a site can be characterized by relocating the base station to alternate positions. GAUSS consists of a ROH with radio controller, a data acquisition and processing (DAP) system, and lightweight digital sensor systems. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a DAP and sensors suitable for ROH operation. We have constructed these subsystems and integrated them to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system, referred to as the ``pre-prototype``. We have performed test surveys with the pre-prototype to determine the functionality of the and DAP and sensor subsystems and their suitability for airborne application. The objective of the Phase II effort will be to modify the existing subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. Efficacy of the prototype for geophysical survey of hazardous sites will then be determined.

  5. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIsaac, Charles V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idaho Falls, ID); Grafwallner, Ervin G. (Arco, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Pocatello, ID); Randolph, Peter D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  6. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  7. Airborne reconnaissance VIII; Proceedings of the meeting, San Diego, CA, August 21, 22, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkel, P.; Lagesse, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    Various papers on sensors and ancillary equipment, technological advances, development and testing, and intelligence extraction and exploitation in airborne reconnaissance are presented. The topics discussed include: the CA-810 modern trilens camera, PC-183B standoff imaging system, ruggedized MMW radiometer sensor for surveillance applications, application of biocular viewers to airborne reconnaissance, KA-102 film/EO standoff system, KS-146A camera development and flight test results, electrooptical imaging for film cameras, and new generation advanced IR linescan sensor system. Also addressed are: evolution of real time airborne reconnaissance, computer-controlled operation of reconnaissance cameras, miniature focus sensor, microprocessor-controller autofocus system, camera flight tests and image evaluation, LM-230A cost-effective test system, information management for tactical reconnaissance, performance modeling of infrared linescanners and FLIRs, USAF tactical reconnaissance - Grenada, sensor control and film annotation for long-range standoff reconnaissance, laser beam recording on film, meteorological effects on image quality, and optimization of photographic information transfer by CRT.

  8. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammack, R. W.

    2006-12-28

    subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  9. Investigation into Spectral Parameters as they Impact CPV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-03-01

    The CPV industry is well aware that performance of triple junction cells depends on spectral conditions but there is a lack of data quantifying this spectral dependence at the module level. This paper explores the impact of precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and optical air mass on multiple CPV module technologies on-sun in Golden, CO.

  10. Propagation of spectral functions and dilepton production at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Gy.; Kaempfer, B.; Zetenyi, M.

    2012-06-15

    The time evolution of vector meson spectral functions is studied within a BUU-type transport model. Applications focus on {rho} and {omega} mesons being important pieces for the interpretation of the dielectron invariant mass spectrum. Since the evolution of the spectral functions is driven by the local density, the inmedium modifications turn out to compete, in this approach, with the known vacuum contributions.

  11. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Nagendra; Glenn, Nancy F

    2009-07-01

    Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: What is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar? What is Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)? What is Synthetic Aperture Radar? Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Often, this imagery must be acquired at night or during inclement weather. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides such a capability. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex

  15. Spectral ellipsometry of a nanodiamond composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yastrebov, S. G. Gordeev, S. K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I. A.; Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2006-07-15

    Optical properties of a nanodiamond composite were analyzed by methods of spectral ellipsometry in the range of photon energies 1.4-5 eV, which are characteristic of {pi}-{pi}* transitions in amorphous carbon. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding nanodiamond powder with subsequent binding of diamond nanoparticles by pyrocarbon formed as a result of the heterogeneous chemical reaction of methane decomposition. The dispersion curves of the imaginary and real parts of the dielectric function were reconstructed. It is shown that the imaginary part of the dielectric function can be represented as the sum of two components generated by the two types of {pi}-{pi}* optical transitions. The maximum contribution of the transitions of the first and second types manifests itself at energies of 2.6 and 5.6 eV, respectively, which correspond to peaks in optical density at 2.9 and 6.11 eV. It was established that the main specific features of the normalized optical density of the nanodiamond composite almost coincide with those for poly(para-phenylenevinylene). It was found that the energy of a {sigma} + {pi} plasmon of the pyrocarbon component of the nanodiamond composite is 24.2 eV. On the basis on this value, the pyrocarbon density matrix was estimated to be 2 g/cm{sup 3}. Within the concepts of optimum filling of an elementary volume by carbon atoms in an amorphous material with such a density, the allotropic composition of the pyrocarbon matrix was restored.

  16. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A.; Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D.

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  17. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: FOUR YEARS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruber, David; Von Ahlefeld, Victoria Weller; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, Dave; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cleveland, William H. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2014-03-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 triggered GRBs. Four different spectral models were fitted to the data, resulting in a compendium of more than 7500 spectra. The analysis was performed similarly but not identically to Goldstein et al. All 487 GRBs from the first two years have been re-fitted using the same methodology as that of the 456 GRBs in years three and four. We describe, in detail, our procedure and criteria for the analysis and present the results in the form of parameter distributions both for the observer-frame and rest-frame quantities. The data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  18. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or 0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or 0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  19. AMIP Simulation with the CAM4 Spectral Element Dynamical Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Katherine J; Lauritzen, Peter; Mishra, Saroj; Neale, Rich; Taylor, Mark; Tribbia, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the climate produced by the Community Earth System Model, version 1, running with the new spectral-element atmospheric dynamical core option. The spectral-element method is congured to use a cubed-sphere grid, providing quasi-uniform resolution over the sphere, increased parallel scalability and removing the need for polar filters. It uses a fourth order accurate spatial discretization which locally conserves mass and moist total energy. Using the Atmosphere Model Intercomparison Project protocol, we compare the results from the spectral-element dy- namical core with those produced by the default nite-volume dynamical core and with observations.

  20. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  1. COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adjoint Methods | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 6, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and Adjoint Methods Professor Jeroen Tromp Princeton University Presentation: Office presentation icon WC06FEB2013_JTromp.ppt Harnessing high-performance computers and accurate numerical methods to better constrain physical properties of Earth's interior is rapidly becoming one of the most important research topics in

  2. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  3. INTERPRETATION OF AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETIC DATA IN THE 600 AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CUMMINS GD

    2010-11-11

    As part of the 200-PO-1 Phase I geophysical surveys, Fugro Airborne Surveys was contracted to collect airborne electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic surveys of the Hanford Site 600 Area. Two helicopter survey systems were used with the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} time domain portion flown between June 19th and June 20th, 2008, and the RESOLVE{reg_sign} frequency domain portion was flown from June 29th to July 1st, 2008. Magnetic data were acquired contemporaneously with the electromagnetic surveys using a total-field cesium vapor magnetometer. Approximately 925 line kilometers (km) were flown using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} II system and 412 line kilometers were flown using the RESOLVE{reg_sign} system. The HeliGEOTEM system has an effective penetration of roughly 250 meters into the ground and the RESOLVE system has an effective penetration of roughly 60 meters. Acquisition parameters and preliminary results are provided in SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site. Airborne data are interpreted in this report in an attempt to identify areas of likely preferential groundwater flow within the aquifer system based on the presence of paleochannels or fault zones. The premise for the interpretation is that coarser-grained intervals have filled in scour channels created by episodic catastrophic flood events during the late Pleistocene. The interpretation strategy used the magnetic field anomaly data and existing bedrock maps to identify likely fault or lineament zones. Combined analysis of the magnetic, 60-Hz noise monitor, and flight-altitude (radar) data were used to identify zones where EM response is more likely due to cultural interference and or bedrock structures. Cross-sectional and map view presentations of the EM data were used to identify more electrically resistive zones that likely correlate with coarser-grained intervals. The resulting interpretation identifies one major northwest-southeast trending

  4. Sampling airborne microorganisms. Summary report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatigny, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    In response to a rapidly increasing awarness of problems in air pollution and air hygiene, considerable emphasis has been placed on sampling of gaseous and particulate contaminants. Although included in the latter category, airborne microbes have not been considered major air pollutants as have chemical aerosols. They have been of some concern in extramural environments (plant diseases) and of considerable interest in intramural (hospital surgical theaters) environments. The intrinsic characteristics of microbes make them difficult to collect and assay quantitatively. The collection instrumentation available tends to be less sophisticated, though no less diverse, than that for other particulates and to require more processing after collection.

  5. Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vapor Radiometer Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based

  6. Computerized Mathematical Models of Spray Washout of Airborne Contaminants (Radioactivity) in Containment Vessels.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-23

    Version 01 Distribution is restricted to the United States Only. SPIRT predicts the washout of airborne contaminants in containment vessels under postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. SPIRT calculates iodine removal constants (lambdas) for post-LOCA containment spray systems. It evaluates the effect of the spectrum of drop sizes emitted by the spray nozzles, the effect of drop coalescence, and the precise solution of the time-dependent diffusion equation. STEAM-67 routines are included for calculating the properties ofmore » steam and water according to the 1967 ASME Steam Tables.« less

  7. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal

  8. Gravitational collapse of scalar fields via spectral methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, H. P. de; Rodrigues, E. L.; Skea, J. E. F.

    2010-11-15

    In this paper we present a new numerical code based on the Galerkin method to integrate the field equations for the spherical collapse of massive and massless scalar fields. By using a spectral decomposition in terms of the radial coordinate, the field equations were reduced to a finite set of ordinary differential equations in the space of modes associated with the Galerkin expansion of the scalar field, together with algebraic sets of equations connecting modes associated with the metric functions. The set of ordinary differential equations with respect to the null coordinate is then integrated using an eighth-order Runge-Kutta method. The numerical tests have confirmed the high accuracy and fast convergence of the code. As an application we have evaluated the whole spectrum of black hole masses which ranges from infinitesimal to large values obtained after varying the amplitude of the initial scalar field distribution. We have found strong numerical evidence that this spectrum is described by a nonextensive distribution law.

  9. Spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emission from stratified jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Matsumoto, Jin; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Tolstov, Alexey; Mao, Jirong; Dainotti, Maria; Mizuta, Akira

    2014-07-10

    We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral directions. Propagation of thermal photons injected at a high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that the presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to the nonthermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra, as well as the polarization degree, tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multicomponent jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts irrespective of the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral (θ) positions. The degree of polarization associated with the emission is significant (>few percent) at a wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring film spectral properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Burrows, Paul E.; Garbuzov, Dmitri Z.; Bulovic, Vladimir

    1999-12-21

    Film spectral properties are measured by projecting chopped monochromatic light onto a luminescent film sample deposited on a substrate, and coupling through use of immersion oil the reflection of light therefrom to a light detector.