Sample records for airborne high spectral

  1. Study and Simulation of Remote Sensing System: COMPACT Airborne Spectral Sensor (COMPASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    1 Study and Simulation of Remote Sensing System: COMPACT Airborne Spectral Sensor (COMPASS) Paper............................................................................................ 5 COMPACT Airborne Spectral Sensor (COMPASS............................................................................................... 9 (FOUO) COMPASS Megacollect Data

  2. Airborne Multiwavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) Observations During TCAP 2012: Vertical Proles of Optical and Microphysical Properties of a Smoke/Urban Haze Plume Over the Northeastern Coast of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Kolgotin, A.; Hair, John; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David; Rogers, R. R.; Hare, Rich; Cleckner, Craig; Obland, Michael; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Berg, Larry K.; Schmid, Beat

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present rst measurements with the rst airborne multiwavelength High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2), developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was operated during the Department of Energy (DOE) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012. We observed out ow of urban haze and fresh biomass burning smoke from the East Coast of the US out over the West Atlantic Ocean. Lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm were ... sr indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. Extinctionrelated Angstrom exponents were 1.5{2 pointing at comparably small particles. Our novel automated, unsupervised data inversion algorithm retrieves particle e*ective radii of approximately 0.2 *m, which is in agreement with the large Angstrom exponents. We nd reasonable agreement to particle size parameters obtained from situ measurements carried out with the DOE G-1 aircraft that ew during the lidar observations.

  3. airborne spectral measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fred G. Osterwisch 1996-01-01 152 First Measurement of the rho Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We report on a precision...

  4. airborne high energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne high energy First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of Geomatics...

  5. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairbanks, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dallmann, Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Desgeorges, Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  6. AIRBORNE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The second major experiment was the Texas Air Quality Union 2007 Joint Assembly Acapulco, Mexico May 22-25, 2007 Environmental Sciences Department Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX

  7. Radiometry High Spectral Resolution Fourier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations:Radiological Threat Reduction2High

  8. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH-ALTITUDE CLOUDS OCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH The impact of high-altitude clouds along an electro- optical sensor line of sight has been studied, F-91761 Palaiseau, France, email : karine.caillault@onera.fr KEYWORDS: sensor performance

  9. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  10. High Performance Computing with a Conservative Spectral Boltzmann Solver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Computing with a Conservative Spectral Boltzmann Solver Jeffrey R. Haack and Irene the structure of the collisional formulation for high performance computing environments. The locality in space on high performance computing resources. We also use the improved computational power of this method

  11. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  12. Passive Remote Sensing of Clouds from Airborne Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    instrument: the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) · Some spectrometry/radiometry basics · How can we Airborne Measurements? · For climate studies, the high temporal and spatial variability of aerosols vertical profiles of radiative flux: where is radiative energy being deposited? · Combined with in situ

  13. COLLECTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES BY A HIGH-GRADIENT PERMANENT MAGNETIC METHOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Avens, Larry R [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the use of magnetic force in collection of airborne particles by a high- gradient permanent magnetic separation (HGPMS) device. Three aerosol particles of different magnetic susceptibility (NaCl, CuO, and Fe2O3) were generated in the electrical mobility size range of 10 to 200 nm and were used to study HGPMS collection. One HGPMS matrix element, made of stainless steel wool, was used in the device configuration. Three flow rates were selected to simulate the environmental wind speeds of interest to the study. Magnetic force was found to exhibit an insignificant effect on the separation of NaCl particles, even in the HGPMS configuration. Diffusion was a major mechanism in the removal of the diamagnetic particles; however, diffusion is insignificant under the influence of a high-gradient magnetic field for paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles. The HGPMS showed high-performance collection (> 99%) of paramagnetic CuO and ferromagnetic Fe2O3 particles for particle sizes greater than or equal to 60 nm. As the wind speed increases, the influence of the magnetic force weakens, and the capability to remove particles from the gas stream diminishes. The results suggest that the HGPMS principle could be explored for development of an advanced miniaturized passive aerosol collector.

  14. Fitting Narrow Spectral Lines in High Energy Astrophysics Using Incompatible Gibbs Samplers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    for the data degradation processes (van Dyk et al., 2001). Efficient X-ray Spectral Fitting Hierarchical' & $ % Fitting Narrow Spectral Lines in High Energy Astrophysics Using Incompatible Gibbs Samplers Siemiginowska (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA, aneta

  15. Highly Sparse Reductions to Kernel Spectral Raghvendra Mall1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the traditional k-means techniques. A new spectral clus- tering algorithm based on weighted kernel principal in comparison to the data between clusters. Spectral clustering methods [1,2,3] are generally better than

  16. Spectral Mapping of Protein Torsion Angles National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Spectral Mapping of Protein Torsion Angles National High Magnetic Field Laboratory NMR Spectroscopy spectra. #12;Spectral Mapping of Protein Torsion Angles National High Magnetic Field Laboratory NMR, in recording signals that are dependent on the orientation of the atoms with respect to the magnetic field, we

  17. Multi-element stochastic spectral projection for high quantile estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Jordan, E-mail: jordan.ko@mac.com; Garnier, Josselin

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate quantile estimation by multi-element generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) metamodel where the exact numerical model is approximated by complementary metamodels in overlapping domains that mimic the models exact response. The gPC metamodel is constructed by the non-intrusive stochastic spectral projection approach and function evaluation on the gPC metamodel can be considered as essentially free. Thus, large number of Monte Carlo samples from the metamodel can be used to estimate ?-quantile, for moderate values of ?. As the gPC metamodel is an expansion about the means of the inputs, its accuracy may worsen away from these mean values where the extreme events may occur. By increasing the approximation accuracy of the metamodel, we may eventually improve accuracy of quantile estimation but it is very expensive. A multi-element approach is therefore proposed by combining a global metamodel in the standard normal space with supplementary local metamodels constructed in bounded domains about the design points corresponding to the extreme events. To improve the accuracy and to minimize the sampling cost, sparse-tensor and anisotropic-tensor quadratures are tested in addition to the full-tensor Gauss quadrature in the construction of local metamodels; different bounds of the gPC expansion are also examined. The global and local metamodels are combined in the multi-element gPC (MEgPC) approach and it is shown that MEgPC can be more accurate than Monte Carlo or importance sampling methods for high quantile estimations for input dimensions roughly below N=8, a limit that is very much case- and ?-dependent.

  18. High-efficiency spectral purity filter for EUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An asymmetric-cut multilayer diffracts EUV light. A multilayer cut at an angle has the same properties as a blazed grating, and has been demonstrated to have near-perfect performance. Instead of having to nano-fabricate a grating structure with imperfections no greater than several tens of nanometers, a thick multilayer is grown on a substrate and then cut at an inclined angle using coarse and inexpensive methods. Effective grating periods can be produced this way that are 10 to 100 times smaller than those produced today, and the diffraction efficiency of these asymmetric multilayers is higher than conventional gratings. Besides their ease of manufacture, the use of an asymmetric multilayer as a spectral purity filter does not require that the design of an EUV optical system be modified in any way, unlike the proposed use of blazed gratings for such systems.

  19. Spectral-Galerkin Methods for High-Dimensional PDEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathematics, Purdue University) ... Computer Science, Purdue University) ... and engineering applications require solving high-dimensional partial differential ... Current high-order methods for solving PDEs in multi-dimensions are usually...

  20. Microwave power spectral density and its effects on exciting electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, S.J.; Goss, H.H.; Lapatovich, W.P. [Osram Sylvania Inc., Salem, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a microwave source generating a spectrally dense power spectrum on the operation of an electrodeless high intensity discharge lamp were measured. Spectrally pure sources operating within ISM bands at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz produce stable capacitively coupled discharges useful for producing flicker-free light for numerous applications. The internal plasma temperature distribution and lamp geometry define acoustic resonance modes within the lamp which can be excited with power sidebands. The operation of lamps with commercially available power sources and custom built generators are discussed. Estimates of the spectral purity required for stable operation are provided.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING Sagi Filin1 , Amit@tau.ac.il Commission VIII/8 KEY WORDS: Airborne laser scanning, Geomorphology, Dead Sea, Land Degradation, Sinkholes of collapse sinkholes in high resolution using airborne laser scanning technology. As a study case, we use

  2. A Compressible High-Order Unstructured Spectral Difference Code for Stratified Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junfeng; Miesch, Mark S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel and powerful Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral-difference (CHORUS) code for simulating thermal convection and related fluid dynamics in the interiors of stars and planets. The computational geometries are treated as rotating spherical shells filled with stratified gas. The hydrodynamic equations are discretized by a robust and efficient high-order Spectral Difference Method (SDM) on unstructured meshes. The computational stencil of the spectral difference method is compact and advantageous for parallel processing. CHORUS demonstrates excellent parallel performance for all test cases reported in this paper, scaling up to 12,000 cores on the Yellowstone High-Performance Computing cluster at NCAR. The code is verified by defining two benchmark cases for global convection in Jupiter and the Sun. CHORUS results are compared with results from the ASH code and good agreement is found. The CHORUS code creates new opportunities for simulating such varied phenomena as multi-scale solar co...

  3. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  4. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H. (Berkeley, CA); Legros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norm W. (Livermore, CA); Goulding, Fred (Lafayette, CA); Landis, Don (Pinole, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  5. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the grand tour of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

  6. The Running Spectral Index as a Probe of Physics at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Espinosa

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The WMAP results on the scalar spectral index n and its running with scale, though preliminary, open a very interesting window to physics at very high energies. We address the problem of finding simple inflaton potentials well motivated by particle physics which can accommodate WMAP data.

  7. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power large spectral bandwidths. The availability of ultrashort pulses (femto- second) of high-power (petawatt Powers, Isaac Ghebregziabher, and Donald Umstadter* Department of Physics and Astronomy, University

  8. Reduction of the spectral linewidth of semiconductor lasers with quantum wire effects: Spectral properties of GaAlAs double heterostructure lasers in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, Y.; Vahala, K.; Yariv, A.; Lau, K.

    1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral linewidth of a GaAlAs double heterostructure laser placed in a high magnetic field is measured at 190 K. It is found that the power-dependent spectral linewidth is reduced by a factor of 0.6 in a magnetic field of 19 T. This reduction is believed to result mainly from the reduction of the linewidth enhancement factor ..alpha.. due to a quasi-one-dimensional electronic system formed by the high magnetic field (i.e., by quantum wire effects).

  9. Automated landslide mapping using spectral analysis and high-resolution topographic data: Puget Sound lowlands, Washington, and Portland Hills, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perron, Taylor

    Automated landslide mapping using spectral analysis and high-resolution topographic data: Puget Landslide map LiDAR Tualatin Puget Wavelet Landslide inventory maps are necessary for assessing landslide of spectral analysis that utilize LiDAR-derived digital elevation models of the Puget Sound lowlands

  10. Structure of W3(OH) from Very High Spectral Resolution Observations of 5 Centimeter OH Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Lornt O. Sjouwerman

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of methanol and ground-state OH masers at very high spectral resolution have shed new light on small-scale maser processes. The nearby source W3(OH), which contains numerous bright masers in several different transitions, provides an excellent laboratory for high spectral resolution techniques. We present a model of W3(OH) based on EVN observations of the rotationally-excited 6030 and 6035 MHz OH masers taken at 0.024 km/s spectral resolution. The 6.0 GHz masers are becoming brighter with time and show evidence for tangential proper motions. We confirm the existence of a region of magnetic field oriented toward the observer to the southeast and find another such region to the northeast in W3(OH), near the champagne flow. The 6.0 GHz masers trace the inner edge of a counterclockwise rotating torus feature. Masers at 6030 MHz are usually a factor of a few weaker than at 6035 MHz but trace the same material. Velocity gradients of nearby Zeeman components are much more closely correlated than in the ground state, likely due to the smaller spatial separation between Zeeman components. Hydroxyl maser peaks at very long baseline interferometric resolution appear to have structure on scales both smaller than that resolvable as well as on larger scales.

  11. Spectral Evolution of Two High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Y; Dingus, B L; Gonzlez, M M; Preece, R D

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt emission of the gamma-ray bursts is found to be very energetic, releasing ~10^51 ergs in a flash. However, their emission mechanism remains unclear and understanding their spectra is a key to determining the emission mechanism. Many GRB spectra have been analyzed in the sub-MeV energy band, and are usually well described with a smoothly broken power-law model. We present a spectral analysis of two bright bursts (GRB910503 and GRB930506), using BATSE and EGRET spectra that cover more than four decades of energy (30 keV - 200 MeV). Our results show time evolutions of spectral parameters (low-energy & high-energy photon indices and break energy) that are difficult to reconcile with a simple shock-acceleration model.

  12. Spectral Evolution of Two High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Kaneko; R. D. Preece; M. M. Gonzalez; B. L. Dingus; M. S. Briggs

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt emission of the gamma-ray bursts is found to be very energetic, releasing ~10^51 ergs in a flash. However, their emission mechanism remains unclear and understanding their spectra is a key to determining the emission mechanism. Many GRB spectra have been analyzed in the sub-MeV energy band, and are usually well described with a smoothly broken power-law model. We present a spectral analysis of two bright bursts (GRB910503 and GRB930506), using BATSE and EGRET spectra that cover more than four decades of energy (30 keV - 200 MeV). Our results show time evolutions of spectral parameters (low-energy & high-energy photon indices and break energy) that are difficult to reconcile with a simple shock-acceleration model.

  13. Spectrally resolved spatiotemporal features of quantum paths in high-order harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lixin; Zhang, Qingbin; Zhai, Chunyang; Wang, Feng; Shi, Wenjing; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally disentangle the contributions of different quantum paths in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from the spectrally and spatially resolved harmonic spectra. By adjusting the laser intensity and focusing position, we simultaneously observe the spectrum splitting, frequency shift and intensity-dependent modulation of harmonic yields both for the short and long paths. Based on the simulations, we discriminate the physical mechanisms of the intensity-dependent modulation of HHG due to the quantum path interference and macroscopic interference effects. Moreover, it is shown that the atomic dipole phases of different quantum paths are encoded in the frequency shift. In turn, it enables us to retrieve the atomic dipole phases and the temporal chirps of different quantum paths from the measured harmonic spectra. This result gives an informative mapping of spatiotemporal and spectral features of quantum paths in HHG.

  14. Observation of spectral gain narrowing in a high-order harmonic seeded soft-x-ray amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Barszczak Sardinha, A.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Lefrou, T.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Maynard, G. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA Paristech/Ecole Polytechnique/CNRS UMR 7639, F-91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire d'Interaction du Rayonnement X Avec la Matiere, Universite Paris Sud/CNRS UMR 8624, F-91495 Orsay Cedex (France); Department of X-ray Lasers, Institute of Physics, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, Universite Paris Sud/CNRS UMR 8578, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an observation of spectral gain narrowing of a high-order harmonic amplified by a soft-x-ray optical-field-ionized plasma. The temporal coherence and spectral linewidth of both the seeded and unseeded soft-x-ray lasers were experimentally measured using a varying-path-difference interferometer. The results showed that the high-order harmonic is subject to a strong spectral narrowing during its propagation in the plasma amplifier without rebroadening at saturation. This is in good agreement with a radiative transfer calculation including gain narrowing and saturation rebroadening.

  15. Airborne Internet : market & opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhadouria, Anand

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis to evaluate the opportunity for service provider entry and of the airborne internet, to analyze the disruptive impact technology used by AirCell and AeroSat has had on the development of an ...

  16. Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veatch, B.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

  17. Nonadiabatic molecular high-order harmonic generation from polar molecules: Spectral redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian Xuebin; Bandrauk, Andre D. [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) from the polar diatomic molecule HeH{sup 2+} in short intense laser fields is studied numerically. Due to the nonadiabatic response of the molecular dipole to the rapid change of laser intensity, a spectral redshift is predicted in high-intensity and ultrashort laser pulses, contrary to the blueshift observed in the harmonics generated from atoms in long laser pulses. The MHOHG temporal structures are investigated by a wavelet time-frequency analysis, which shows that the enhanced excitation of localized long lifetime excited states shifts the harmonic generation spectrum in the falling part of short laser pulses, due to the presence of a permanent dipole moment, and thus is unique to polar molecules.

  18. High-Order Harmonic Generation Yielding Tunable Extreme-Ultraviolet Radiation of High Spectral Purity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harmonic photon. The universal cutoff in high-order har- monic generation (HHG) processes exists at Ip 3 (ponderomotive) energy of a quasifree electron quivering in the laser field in the neighborhood of the ionic core [9] and for resonance-enhanced wave mixing [10]. In contrast to these studies, in the nonperturbative

  19. A High Spectral Resolution Atlas of Comet 122P/de Vico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anita L. Cochran; William D. Cochran

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 3 and 4 October, 1995, we obtained high spectral resolving power (R=\\lambda/\\Delta\\lambda = 60,000) observations of comet 122P/de Vico using the 2DCoude cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph on the 2.7-m telescope of McDonald Observatory. The spectra cover the wavelength range from 3830A--10192A. The spectra from 3830--5776A are continuous; from 5777--10192A there are increasing interorder gaps. The comet was at a heliocentric distance of 0.66au and a geocentric distance of 1.0au. Comet de Vico has a very high gas-to-dust ratio and the spectra have excellent signal/noise. These two factors combined to yield spectra with a large number of emission lines. We have collected laboratory molecular line lists and have used these line lists in order to identify as many of the detected lines as possible. We have identified 12,219 emission lines and have located another 4,055 lines which we cannot identify. We present representative spectra and identifications along with a description of our plans to make these spectra and identifications available to the community. This atlas should prove a valuable tool for future studies of comets.

  20. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Y; Preece, R; Dingus, B L; Briggs, M S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another...

  1. SOFIA/EXES Observations of Water Absorption in the Protostar AFGL 2591 at High Spectral Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indriolo, Nick; DeWitt, C N; Richter, M J; Boogert, A C A; Harper, G M; Jaffe, D T; Kulas, K R; McKelvey, M E; Ryde, N; Vacca, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high spectral resolution (~3 km/s) observations of the nu_2 ro-vibrational band of H2O in the 6.086--6.135 micron range toward the massive protostar AFGL 2591 using the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Ten absorption features are detected in total, with seven caused by transitions in the nu_2 band of H2O, two by transitions in the first vibrationally excited nu_2 band of H2O, and one by a transition in the nu_2 band of H2{18}O. Among the detected transitions is the nu_2 1(1,1)--0(0,0) line which probes the lowest lying rotational level of para-H2O. The stronger transitions appear to be optically thick, but reach maximum absorption at a depth of about 25%, suggesting that the background source is only partially covered by the absorbing gas, or that the absorption arises within the 6 micron emitting photosphere. Assuming a covering fraction of 25%, the H2O column density and rotational temperature that best fit the observed abs...

  2. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deaton, Juan D. (Menan, ID); Schmitt, Michael J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Warren F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  3. airborne sunphotometer airborne: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    122 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  4. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Kaneko; M. M. Gonzalez; R. Preece; B. L. Dingus; M. S. Briggs

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another case with a extremely high peak energy (\\epeak $\\gtrsim$ 170 MeV). There have been very limited number of GRBs observed at MeV energies and above, and only a few instruments have been capable of observing GRBs in this energy band with such high sensitivity. Thus, our analysis results presented here should also help predict GRB observations with current and future high-energy instruments such as AGILE and GLAST, as well as with ground-based very-high-energy telescopes.

  5. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  6. High-throughput snapshot spectral imaging in two dimensions Andrew R Harvey and David W Fletcher-Holmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andy

    to be the first technique able to spectrally image in snapshot mode with modest resolution and without the need spectral imaging with modest spectral resolution and modest field of view. The second, biologically

  7. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

    2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

  8. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  9. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  10. Optical injection and spectral filtering of high-power UV laser diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schfer, V M; Tock, C J; Lucas, D M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate injection-locking of 120mW laser diodes operating at 397nm. We achieve stable operation with injection powers of ~100uW and a slave laser output power of up to 110mW. We investigate the spectral purity of the slave laser light via photon scattering experiments on a single trapped Ca40 ion. We show that it is possible to achieve a scattering rate indistinguishable from that of monochromatic light by filtering the laser light with a diffraction grating to remove amplified spontaneous emission.

  11. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew D. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto d'Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto d'Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)] [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A., E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  12. Spectral features of the nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductor films in methods of degenerate four-photon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyrev, Yu V; Voronov, Aleksandr V; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic nonlinear response {chi}{sup (3)}{sub ee} of high-temperature superconductor films in methods of degenerate four-photon spectroscopy is calculated. It is shown that the model considering interband electronic transitions in a 'real' band structure with the only fitting parameter (the electron-phonon relaxation rate) well describes all the experimental spectral features of the response, and the methods of degenerate four-photon spectroscopy themselves can reveal, due to the interference character of {chi}{sup (3)}{sub ee}, the presence of the energy gap in the spectrum of states. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRA HARD SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tang Qingwen; Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hou Shujin, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission which occurs after prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. The afterglow inverse Compton emission has long been predicted to be able to produce a high-energy component as well, but previous observations have not clearly revealed such a signature, probably due to the small number of >10 GeV photons even for the brightest GRBs known so far. In this Letter, we report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the >100 MeV emission from the very bright and nearby GRB 130427A. We characterize the time-resolved spectra of the GeV emission from the GRB onset to the afterglow phase. By performing time-resolved spectral fits of GRB 130427A, we found strong evidence of an extra hard spectral component that exists in the extended high-energy emission of this GRB. We argue that this hard component may arise from the afterglow inverse Compton emission.

  14. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our findings and APICD Gen II subsystems for automated collection, deposition and detection of ambient particulate matter. Key findings from the APTA Program include: Ambient biological PM taxonomy; Demonstration of key subsystems needed for autonomous bioaerosol detection; System design; Efficient electrostatic collection; Automated bioagent recognition; Raman analysis performance validating Td<9 sec; Efficient collection surface regeneration; and Development of a quantitative bioaerosol defection model. The objective of the APTA program was to advance the state of our knowledge of ambient background PM composition. Operation of an automated aerosol detection system was enhanced by a more accurate assessment of background variability, especially for sensitive and specific sensing strategies like Raman detection that are background-limited in performance. Based on this improved knowledge of background, the overall threat detection performance of Raman sensors was improved.

  15. A Very High Spectral Resolution Study of Ground-State OH Masers in W3(OH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Walter F. Brisken; Lornt O. Sjouwerman

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLBA observations of the ground-state hydroxyl masers in W3(OH) at 0.02 km s-1 spectral resolution. Over 250 masers are detected, including 56 Zeeman pairs. Lineshapes are predominantly Gaussian or combinations of several Gaussians, with normalized deviations typically of the same magnitude as in masers in other species. Typical FWHM maser linewidths are 0.15 to 0.38 km s-1 and are larger in the 1665 MHz transition than in the other three ground-state transitions. The satellite-line 1612 and 1720 MHz masers show no evidence of sigma^+/-2,3 components. The spatial positions of most masers are seen to vary across the line profile, with many spots showing clear, organized positional gradients. Equivalent line-of-sight velocity gradients in the plane of the sky typically range from 0.01 to 1 km s-1 AU-1 (i.e., positional gradients of 1 to 100 AU (km s-1)-1). Small velocity gradients in the 1667 MHz transition support theoretical predictions that 1667 MHz masers appear in regions with small velocity shifts along the amplification length. Deconvolved maser spot sizes appear to be larger in the line wings but do not support a spherical maser geometry.

  16. The far-infrared--submm spectral energy distribution of high-redshift quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Priddey; Richard G. McMahon

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine submm photometric data of z>4 quasars, to obtain a mean far-infrared (FIR) (rest-frame) spectral energy distribution (SED) of thermal emission from dust, parameterised by a single temperature (T) and power-law emissivity index (beta). Best-fit values are T=41+/-5K, beta=1.95+/-0.3. The redshift spread of this set of quasars is exploited to allow us to sample the SED at a greater number of rest wavelengths than is possible for a single object. This parameterisation is of use to any study that extrapolates from a flux at a single submm wavelength, for example to infer dust masses and FIR luminosities. We then interpret the submm component as arising from dust heated by star-formation in the quasar's host galaxy, and investigate a simple scheme of AGN--host coevolution, in which the timescale for formation of the host galaxy is c.0.5-1.0Gyr, with star formation proceeding at a constant rate c.1000Msol/yr. The luminous quasar phase occurs towards the end of the star-forming period, just before the galaxy's reservoir of cold gas is depleted. Given the youth of the Universe at z=4 (1.6Gyr), the coexistence of a massive black hole and a luminous starburst can be a powerful constraint on models of quasar host-galaxy formation.

  17. Signal processing for airborne bistatic radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Kian P

    The major problem encountered by an airborne bistatic radar is the suppression of bistatic clutter. Unlike clutter echoes for a sidelooking airborne monostatic radar, bistatic clutter echoes are range dependent. Using ...

  18. Spectral and variability properties of LS 5039 from radio to very high-energy gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bosch-Ramon; J. M. Paredes; G. E. Romero

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Microquasars are X-ray binaries with relativistic jets. The microquasar LS 5039 turned out to be the first high-energy gamma-ray microquasar candidate due to its likely association with the EGRET source 3EG J1824-1514. Further theoretical studies supported this association, which could be extended to other EGRET sources. Very recently, Aharonian et al. (2005) have communicated the detection of the microquasar LS 5039 at TeV energies. This fact confirms the EGRET source association and leaves no doubt about the gamma-ray emitting nature of this object. The aim of the present work is to show that, applying a cold-matter dominated jet model to LS 5039, we can reproduce many of the spectral and variability features observed in this source. Jet physics is explored, and some physical quantities are estimated as a by-product of the performed modeling. Although at the moment only LS 5039 has been detected on the entire electromagnetic spectrum, it does not seem unlikely that other microquasars will show similar spectral properties. Therefore, an in-depth study of the first gamma-ray microquasar, on theoretical grounds supported by observations, can render a useful knowledge applicable elsewhere.

  19. A gauge approach to the "pseudogap" phenomenology of the spectral weight in high Tc cuprates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Marchetti; M. Gambaccini

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We assume the t-t'-J model to describe the CuO_2 planes of hole-doped cuprates and we adapt the spin-charge gauge approach, previously developed for the t-J model, to describe the holes in terms of a spinless fermion carrying the charge (holon) and a neutral boson carrying spin 1/2 (spinon), coupled by a slave-particle gauge field. In this framework we consider the effects of a finite density of incoherent holon pairs in the normal state. Below a crossover temperature, identified as the experimental "upper pseudogap", the scattering of the "quanta" of the phase of the holon-pair field against holons reproduces the phenomenology of Fermi arcs coexisting with gap in the antinodal region. We thus obtain a microscopic derivation of the main features of the hole spectra due to pseudogap. This result is obtained through a holon Green function which follows naturally from the formalism and analytically interpolates between a Fermi liquid-like and a d-wave superconductor behavior as the coherence length of the holon pair order parameter increases. By inserting the gauge coupling with the spinon we construct explicitly the hole Green function and calculate its spectral weight and the corresponding density of states. So we prove that the formation of holon pairs induces a depletion of states on the hole Fermi surface. We compare our results with ARPES and tunneling experimental data. In our approach the hole preserves a finite Fermi surface until the superconducting transition, where it reduces to four nodes. Therefore we propose that the gap seen in the normal phase of cuprates is due to the thermal broadening of the SC-like peaks masking the Fermi-liquid peak. The Fermi arcs then correspond to the region of the Fermi surface where the Fermi-liquid peak is unmasked.

  20. Lightning Strikes on Airborne Grounded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malinga, Gilbert Aporu

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    , NOAA, 2014. ........................................................................................ 4 Fig. 1-2 Schematic illustrating airborne wind turbines based on the concept of a tethered buoyant blimp (Altaeros, 2014... of airborne structures of varied diameter. ............................... 73 Table 4-3 Surface electrical charge, tQ induced on cylindrical structures of varied geometry, representing an airborne wind turbine, as a function of elevation...

  1. Highly efficient semiconductor optical amplifier for the 820-860-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Uspenskii, Mikhail B; Shishkin, Viktor A [M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-pass optical amplifier with a gain up to 32 dB at a wavelength of 840 nm is developed. Its high reliability is demonstrated at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of efficient application of this amplifier in MOPA systems are presented. (lasers)

  2. Spectral, temporal and temperature features of the nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductors in transient nonlinear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyrev, Yu V; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that basic properties of the nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) observed in femtosecond and picosecond pump-probe experiments at high and low pump levels in various variants of the pump-probe spectroscopy, including one- and two-photon excited-state probing, can be interpreted by using two assumptions. The spectral and temperature properties of the HTSC response at low pump levels can be explained taking into account the contributions from interband electronic transitions to the dielectric constant. At the same time, drastic variations in the HTSC response kinetics (temporal features) observed at high pump levels (for a typical pump pulse energy of {approx}10{sup -7} J in a focal spot of diameter 150 {mu}m) can be explained by assuming the existence of a 'frozen' (metastable) energy gap in the electronic spectrum of a HTSC. In this case, all the conditions required for the interpretation of a drastic decrease in the relaxation rate of a nonlinear response (degeneracy) are realised due to the specific distribution of the electronic state density immediately after the formation of the energy gap in the electronic spectrum of the HTSC. (review)

  3. Spectral and variability properties of LS 5039 from radio to very high-energy gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosch-Ramon, V; Romero, G E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microquasars are X-ray binaries with relativistic jets. The microquasar LS 5039 turned out to be the first high-energy gamma-ray microquasar candidate due to its likely association with the EGRET source 3EG J1824-1514. Further theoretical studies supported this association, which could be extended to other EGRET sources. Very recently, Aharonian et al. (2005) have communicated the detection of the microquasar LS 5039 at TeV energies. This fact confirms the EGRET source association and leaves no doubt about the gamma-ray emitting nature of this object. The aim of the present work is to show that, applying a cold-matter dominated jet model to LS 5039, we can reproduce many of the spectral and variability features observed in this source. Jet physics is explored, and some physical quantities are estimated as a by-product of the performed modeling. Although at the moment only LS 5039 has been detected on the entire electromagnetic spectrum, it does not seem unlikely that other microquasars will show similar spect...

  4. The Ultraviolet Emission Properties of Five Low-Redshift Active Galactic Nuclei at High Signal to Noise and Spectral Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; John N. Bahcall; Buell T. Jannuzi; Donald P. Schneider; Richard F. Green; George F. Hartig

    1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the ultraviolet (UV) emission line and continuum properties of five low-redshift active galactic nuclei (four luminous quasars: PKS~0405$-$123, H1821+643, PG~0953+414, and 3C273, and one bright Seyfert 1 galaxy: Mrk~205). The HST spectra have higher signal-to-noise ratios (typically $\\sim 60$ per resolution element) and spectral resolution ($R = 1300$) than all previously- published UV spectra used to study the emission characteristics of active galactic nuclei. We include in the analysis ground-based optical spectra covering \\hb\\ and the narrow [O III] $\\lambda\\lambda$4959,5007 doublet. The following new results are obtained: \\lyb/\\lya=0.03$-$0.12 for the four quasars, which is the first accurate measurement of the long-predicted \\lyb\\ intensity in QSOs. The cores of \\lya\\ and C~IV are symmetric to an accuracy of better than 2.5% within about 2000 km s$^{-1}$ of the line peak. This high degree of symmetry of \\lya\\ argues against models in which the broad line cloud velocity field has a significant radial component. The observed smoothness of the \\lya\\ and C~IV line profiles requires at least $\\sim 10^4$ individual clouds if bulk velocity is the only line-broadening mechanism. The overall similarity of the \\lya\\ and C IV $\\lambda$1549 profiles rules out models for the broad line region (BLR) with a radial distribution of virialized....

  5. Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for...

  6. airborne aura big: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Acoustics, Vol. 9, No. 3 (2001) 1215-1225 c IMACS AIRBORNE ACOUSTICS October 1999 Revised 16 April 2000 A recently developed theoretical model of the airborne...

  7. airborne thermal magnetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Acoustics, Vol. 9, No. 3 (2001) 1215-1225 c IMACS AIRBORNE ACOUSTICS October 1999 Revised 16 April 2000 A recently developed theoretical model of the airborne...

  8. First VUV full-Sun spectrum of the transition region with high spectral resolution compared to cool stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardi Peter

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the first full-Sun vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission line profile originating from the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona. It is based on a raster scan of the whole solar disk using SUMER/SOHO. The full-Sun spectrum has a spectral resolution which allows an investigation of details in the line profile as well as a thorough comparison to stellar spectra as obtained, e.g. with FUSE or STIS/HST. The full-Sun spectrum shows enhanced emission in the wings, and is well described by a double Gaussian fit with a narrow and a broad component. It is shown that the broad component is due to structures on the solar surface, especially those related to the magnetic chromospheric network. Thus it is proposed that the broad components of other solar-like stars are also a consequence of the mixture of surface structures, and not necessarily a signature of small-scale heating processes like explosive events, as it is commonly argued. A comparison to spectra of luminous cool stars shows that the line asymmetries of these stars might also be a surface structure effect and not or only partly due to opacity effects in their cool dense winds. These comparisons show the potential of high quality full-Sun VUV spectra and their value for the study of solar-stellar connections. As an example, this study proposes that alpha Cen A has a considerably higher amount of magnetic flux concentrated in the chromospheric magnetic network than the Sun.

  9. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  10. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  11. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  12. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  13. Measurement of high-energy (1060 keV) x-ray spectral line widths with eV accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J. F., E-mail: seelyjf@gmail.com; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Glover, J. L.; Hudson, L. T.; Ralchenko, Y.; Henins, Albert [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Pereira, N. [Ecopulse Inc., P. O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution crystal spectrometer utilizing a crystal in transmission geometry has been developed and experimentally optimized to measure the widths of emission lines in the 1060 keV energy range with eV accuracy. The spectrometer achieves high spectral resolution by utilizing crystal planes with small lattice spacings (down to 2d = 0.099 nm), a large crystal bending radius and Rowland circle diameter (965 mm), and an image plate detector with high spatial resolution (60 ?m in the case of the Fuji TR image plate). High resolution W L-shell and K-shell laboratory test spectra in the 1060 keV range and Ho K-shell spectra near 47 keV recorded at the LLNL Titan laser facility are presented. The Ho K-shell spectra are the highest resolution hard x-ray spectra recorded from a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity laser.

  14. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  15. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  16. Chemistry of airborne particles from metallurgical processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Neil Travis, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne particles fall into one of three size ranges. The nucleation range consists of nanoparticles created from vapor atom collisions. The decisive parameter for particle size and composition is the supercooling of the ...

  17. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  18. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterweck, Gernot [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bucher, Benno [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, 5232 Villigen HSK (Switzerland); Rybach, Ladislaus [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Geophysics, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  19. autoregressive spectral estimation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimation: A Tunable High-Resolution Spectral Estimator CiteSeer Summary: Traditional maximum entropy spectral estimation determines a power spectrum from covariance estimates....

  20. Effect of sampling height on the concentration of airborne fungal spores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levetin, Estelle

    and possible sources of air pollution.8 In addition, it is high enough to avoid vandalism and bothering aeroallergens. Airborne fungal spores are commonly collected from the outdoor air at the rooftop level of high respiration level (1.5 m above the ground) and at roof level (12 m height). Methods: Air samples were

  1. Preliminary calculations on direct heating of a containment atmosphere by airborne core debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct heating of the containment atmosphere by airborne core debris may be a significant source of containment pressurization in those accident sequences where the primary system is still at high pressure when the RPV fails. Vigorous blowdown of the primary system may result in nearly complete relocation of core debris out of the reactor cavity and possibly into the containment atmosphere where the liberation of thermal and chemical energy can directly heat the atmosphere. Rate independent and rate dependent models are developed and exercised parametrically to quantify the possible magnitude and rate of containment pressurization from direct heating. The possible mitigative effects of airborne water and subcompartment heating are also investigated.

  2. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100300 spectral band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K., E-mail: widmann1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 and 135 , respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 m at the 200 setting and better than 40 m for the 135- range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  3. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  4. Analyzing Options for Airborne Emergency Wireless Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schmitt; Juan Deaton; Curt Papke; Shane Cherry

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of large-scale natural or manmade catastrophic events, access to reliable and enduring commercial communication systems is critical. Hurricane Katrina provided a recent example of the need to ensure communications during a national emergency. To ensure that communication demands are met during these critical times, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the guidance of United States Strategic Command has studied infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities associated with an airborne wireless communications capability. Such a capability could provide emergency wireless communications until public/commercial nodes can be systematically restored. This report focuses on the airborne cellular restoration concept; analyzing basic infrastructure requirements; identifying related infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities and offers recommended solutions.

  5. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Whitney; George Neil

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  6. "TOF2H": A precision toolbox for rapid, high density/high coverage hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry via an LC-MALDI approach, covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDX rate analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikamanon, Pornpat; Pun, Elroy; Chou, Wayne; Koter, Marek D; Gershon, Paul D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDXAn integrated data pipeline (Solvent Explorer/TOF2H) has

  7. An Epi-Detected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (E-CARS) Microscope with High Spectral Resolution and High Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    LETTERS An Epi-Detected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (E-CARS) Microscope with High-detected coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (E-CARS) microscope that uses two synchronized picosecond pulse (CARS) microscopy provides a unique approach to imaging chemical and biological samples by using

  8. Quantifying forested stands with the pulsed airborne laser profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whatley, Michael Craig

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) red H. Smeins (Member) Peter T Sprinz (Member) J ~ (Head aries Lee f Departmen ) May 1986 ABSTRACT Quantifying Forested Stands with the Pulsed Airborne Laser Profiler. (May 1986) Michael Craig Whatley, B. S. , Texas A&M University...; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert C. Maggio The use of airborne laser technology to enumerate forested stands was explored. A ground-based simulation laser, mimicing the pulsed airborne laser profiler (PALP) was used to quantify the PALP...

  9. ccpi-airborne_r2 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen AIRBORNE PROCESS(tm)...

  10. airborne science program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering AIRBORNE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL...

  11. airborne oceanographic lidar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Channels Landslides Spatial Cognition The emergence of airborne lidar data cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables...

  12. airborne aura lidar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Channels Landslides Spatial Cognition The emergence of airborne lidar data cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables...

  13. airborne particulate threat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particulate pollution in Beijing. Overall, coal burning and the traffic exhausts, plus mineral aerosol and it could provide the basic information in controlling the air-borne...

  14. airborne fungi particulate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particulate pollution in Beijing. Overall, coal burning and the traffic exhausts, plus mineral aerosol and it could provide the basic information in controlling the air-borne...

  15. airborne particulates european: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particulate pollution in Beijing. Overall, coal burning and the traffic exhausts, plus mineral aerosol and it could provide the basic information in controlling the air-borne...

  16. airborne aerosol prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling, radar, remote sensing, simulator, training. Dr. George; L. Bair; Camber Corporation 44 AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE AND REACTIVE NITROGEN COMPOUNDS IN TAMPA,...

  17. airborne em system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    191 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  18. airborne radioactivity levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bronchial model; Radiation 1. Introduction Inhalation of airborne short-lived radon progeny in the indoor and outdoor environment yields the greatest amount of natural...

  19. airborne rhinovirus detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    181 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  20. airborne releases estimativa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    172 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  1. airborne radioactive materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bronchial model; Radiation 1. Introduction Inhalation of airborne short-lived radon progeny in the indoor and outdoor environment yields the greatest amount of natural...

  2. airborne acidity estimates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    169 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  3. airborne mycobacterium parafortuitum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    223 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  4. airborne allergens assessing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    183 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  5. airborne chemical emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    187 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  6. airborne sunphotometer measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  7. airborne pollutant concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  8. airborne research canister: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    159 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  9. airborne penicillium cfu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    151 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  10. airborne stachybotrys chartarum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    125 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  11. airborne separation assistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  12. airborne particles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    153 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  13. airborne effluent control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    175 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  14. airborne gammaspectrometric systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    166 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  15. airborne laser swath: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    191 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  16. airborne radioactive contamination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bronchial model; Radiation 1. Introduction Inhalation of airborne short-lived radon progeny in the indoor and outdoor environment yields the greatest amount of natural...

  17. airborne aspergillus fumigatus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    176 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  18. airborne refueling demonstration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    158 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  19. airborne nanoparticle exposures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    182 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  20. airborne compositae dermatitis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    150 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  1. airborne organic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    192 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  2. airborne toxic metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    187 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  3. airborne resistivity techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    152 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  4. airborne radiometric measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    105 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  5. airborne mixtures part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P 18 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  6. airborne radionuclide monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    188 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  7. airborne laser altimeter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    211 Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne nitrogen load Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne remote sensing surveys verify vegetation and land surface... radiometry Airborne remote sensing surveys Field Experiments Spatial Modeling ET Estimation 12;Integrated......

  9. airborne experimental test-bed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acoustics, Vol. 9, No. 3 (2001) 1215-1225 c IMACS AIRBORNE ACOUSTICS October 1999 Revised 16 April 2000 A recently developed theoretical model of the airborne acoustic...

  10. Ris-R-1462(EN) Airborne contamination in the indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ris-R-1462(EN) Airborne contamination in the indoor environment and its implications for dose K. Byskov, X.L. Hou, H. Prip, S.K. Olsen, T. Roed Title: Airborne contamination in the indoor environment of contaminant aerosol were examined, and since the previous measurements had indicated that elemental iodine

  11. Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Helmut A.

    Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data Reinhold cartographic feature extraction by the airborne AeS--1 instrument is presented. We extract regions corresponding to cartographic features for the classes built--up area, forest, water and open area. Water

  12. airborne gamma ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne gamma ray First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma...

  13. Lightning Strikes on Airborne Grounded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malinga, Gilbert Aporu

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    LIST OF FIGURES Page Fig. 1-1 Histogram of the average wind speed over a 10 year period at an elevation of a) sH ? 100 m and b) sH ? 600 m, above the mean water level at Montauk, New York. Wind data accessed from the National Buoy Data Center.... The destructive power of lightning discharges to both land-based and airborne systems that cannot adequately dissipate large impulses of energy is well documented (Miyake et al., 1990; Sorensen et al., 1998; Uman and Rakov, 2003). Lightning discharges can...

  14. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF RADIOXENON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring changes in atmospheric radioxenon concentrations is a major tool in the detection of an underground nuclear explosion. Ground based systems like the Automated Radioxenon Sampler /Analyzer (ARSA), the Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer (SAUNA) and the Automatic portable radiometer of isotopes Xe (ARIX), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes by processing and transferring samples into a high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector. The high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector makes these systems highly sensitive to the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe. The standard analysis uses regions of interest (ROI) to determine the amount of a particular radioxenon isotope present. The ROI method relies on the peaks of interest falling within energy limits of the ROI. Some potential problems inherent in this method are the reliance on stable detector gains and a fixed resolution for each energy peak. In addition, when a high activity sample is measured there will be more interference among the ROI, in particular within the 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe regions. A solution to some of these problems can be obtained through spectral fitting of the data. Spectral fitting is simply the fitting of the peaks using known functions to determine the number and relative peak positions and widths. By knowing this information it is possible to determine which isotopes are present. Area under each peak can then be used to determine an overall concentration for each isotope. Using the areas of the peaks several key detector characteristics can be determined: efficiency, energy calibration, energy resolution and ratios between interfering isotopes (Radon daughters).

  15. Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) data management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiberg, J.D.; Blough, D.K.; Daugherty, W.R.; Hucks, J.A.; Gerhardstein, L.H.; Meitzler, W.D.; Melton, R.B.; Shoemaker, S.V.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the Data Management Plan for the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) pro-grain is provided in this document. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been assigned the responsibility of data management for the program, which includes defining procedures for data management and data quality assessment. Data management is defined as the process of planning, acquiring, organizing, qualifying and disseminating data. The AMPS program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (DOE/AN) and is integrated into the overall DOE AN-10.1 technology development program. Sensors used for collecting the data were developed under the on-site inspection, effluence analysis, and standoff sensor program, the AMPS program interacts with other technology programs of DOE/NN-20. This research will be conducted by both government and private industry. AMPS is a research and development program, and it is not intended for operational deployment, although the sensors and techniques developed could be used in follow-on operational systems. For a complete description of the AMPS program, see {open_quotes}Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) Program Plan{close_quotes}. The primary purpose of the AMPS is to collect high-quality multisensor data to be used in data fusion research to reduce interpretation problems associated with data overload and to derive better information than can be derived from any single sensor. To collect the data for the program, three wing-mounted pods containing instruments with sensors for collecting data will be flight certified on a U.S. Navy RP-3A aircraft. Secondary objectives of the AMPS program are sensor development and technology demonstration. Pod system integrators and instrument developers will be interested in the performance of their deployed sensors and their supporting data acquisition equipment.

  16. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. (California Department of Health Services, Berkeley (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  17. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  18. Measurement of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Fukushima I reactor accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMullin, S; Green, M P; Henning, R; Holmes, R; Vorren, K; Wilkerson, J F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 days following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products I-131 and Cs-137 were measured with maximum activities of 4.2 +/- 0.6 mBq/m^2 and 0.42 +/- 0.07 mBq/m^2 respectively. Additional activity from I-131, I-132, Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137 and Te-132 were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

  19. Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartley, P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring in accordance with the Westinghouse Hanford Company Chemical Hygiene Plan.

  20. A real-time airborne scatterometer data processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisor, Gary James

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A REAL-TIME AIRBORNE SCATTEROMETER DATA PROCES'SOR A Thesis by Gary James Reisor Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M Vniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major... Subject: Electrical Fngineering A REAL-TIME AIRBORNE SCATTEROMETER DATA PROCESSOR A Thesis by Gary James Reisor Approved as to style and content by: arrman o Committee Hea o Depa tment em er Mem er August 1976 ABSTRACT A Real-time Airborne...

  1. Spectral Operators of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 10, 2014 ... a thorough study on a new class of matrix valued functions, coined as spectral operators of ..... not self-adjoint. ...... 9 (1981) 11351151.

  2. airborne laser scanner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A glacier inventory for South Tyrol, Italy, based on airborne laser-scanner data Geosciences Websites...

  3. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hospodsky, Denina

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

  4. airborne moisture-indicating microorganisms: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF A COLD FRONT AS REVEALED BY AIRBORNE 95 GHZ RADAR Bart cold front moved through the Texas Panhandle . . The front was intercepted by an armada of mobile-defined dryline and a...

  5. Airborne coastal current survey system for difficult to access areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Cheryl Elaine

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an airborne current measurement system that can provide a near-synoptic view of near-bottom currents in extremely hostile wave and current environments is described. A helicopter is used as the support platform from which...

  6. Epidemiology of Airborne Virulent Rhodococcus equi at Horse Breeding Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuskie, Kyle Ryan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pneumonia, resulting in disease and sometimes death of foals. Infection is thought to occur by inhalation of dust contaminated with virulent R equi. A recent study of 3 horse breeding farms in Ireland found airborne...

  7. accidental airborne releases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fred A. Kruse; Joseph W. Boardman; Jonathan F. Huntington 2003-01-01 347 AUGUST 1961 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 285 ACCURACY OF THE AIRBORNE ECONOMICAL RADIOMETER CiteSeer Summary:...

  8. affects on the transport of airborne emissions. This information...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    due to airborne material. Detailed analyses (CRWMS M&O 1995a, 1997b) of the local wind characteristics in the study area led to the choice of Site 1 as the meteorological...

  9. An airborne digital processor for radar scatterometer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeadon, David Steven

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN AIRBORNE DIGITAL PROCESSOR FOR RADAR SCATTEROMETER DATA A Thesis by DAVID STEVEN YEADON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977... Major Subject: Electrical Engineering AN AIRBORNE DIGITAL PROCESSOR FOR RADAR SCATTEROMETER DATA A Thesis by DAVID STEVEN YEADON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman o Committee) Head of epartment) ( (Member ) (Member) August 1977...

  10. Simulated performance of an airborne lidar wind shear detection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Kenneth Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRBORNE LIDAR WIND SHEAR DETECTION SYSTEM A Thesis by KENNETH SCOTT GRIFFITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1987 Major Subject: Physics SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRBORNE LIDAR WIND SHEAR DETECTION SYSTEM A Thesis by KENNETH SCOTT GRIFFITH Approved as to style and content by: e . atta ar (Chair an of Committee) T omas . air, III (Member) ic...

  11. Design and calibration of the PHARUS polarimetric airborne SAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoeij, P. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHARUS system uses a phased array antenna with solid state amplifiers. The project consisted of two phases, a definition phase and a realization phase. The definition phase consisted of the actual realization of a SAR research system called PHARS, which made its first successful testflight in November 1990. The research system is based on the concept of a wide beamwidth antenna, rigidly fixed to the aircraft. Pulse compression and a high PRF ensure sufficient sensitivity in this system, which is equipped with a 160 Watt peak pulse power solid state transmitter. The processing is done off-line. In the realization phase the polarimetric PHARUS system has been developed. The design is based on the experience gained with the PHARS system. The system uses a phased array with dual polarized patch radiators and is equipped with solid state amplifiers. This paper will give an overview of the PHARUS design and operational use. Apart from the use as an advanced polarimetric airborne SAR, there is the perspective of using PHARUS as a demonstrator for ESA`s future ASAR system. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Biraud, Sebastien

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  13. airborne noise emitted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The light intensity noise was measured as a function of wavelength within the light emitting diode spectral emission line. The spectral noise density is found to increase Wetzel,...

  14. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from condensation of vaporized material and subsequent rapid formation of aggregates. Particles of larger size, resulting from ejection of melted material or fragments from the cutting zone, were also observed. This study presents data regarding the metal cutting rate, particle size distribution, and their generation rate, while using different cutting tools and metals. The study shows that respirable particles constitute only a small fraction of the released kerf.

  15. Spectral diagonal ensemble Kalman filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasanick, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of ensemble Kalman filter is developed, which is based on replacing the sample covariance in the analysis step by its diagonal in a spectral basis. It is proved that this technique improves the aproximation of the covariance when the covariance itself is diagonal in the spectral basis, as is the case, e.g., for a second-order stationary random field and the Fourier basis. The method is extended by wavelets to the case when the state variables are random fields, which are not spatially homogeneous. Efficient implementations by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) are presented for several types of observations, including high-dimensional data given on a part of the domain, such as radar and satellite images. Computational experiments confirm that the method performs well on the Lorenz 96 problem and the shallow water equations with very small ensembles and over multiple analysis cycles.

  16. Genetic refinement of cloud-masking algorithms for the multi-spectral thermal imager (MTI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, K. L. (Karen L.); Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Harvey, N. R. (Neal R.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Brumby, Steven P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-spectral Thermal Imager (MTI) is a high-performance remote-sensing satellite designed, owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, with a dual mission in environmental studies and in nonproliferation. It has enhanced spatial and radiometric resolutions and state-of-the-art calibration capabilities. This instrumental development puts a new burden on retrieval algorithm developers to pass this accuracy on to the inferred geophysical parameters. In particular, the atmospheric correction scheme assumes the intervening atmosphere will be modeled as a plane-parallel horizontally-homogeneous medium. A single dense-enough cloud in view of the ground target can easily offset reality from the calculations, hence the need for a reliable cloud-masking algorithm. Pixel-scale cloud detection relies on the simple facts that clouds are generally whiter, brighter, and colder than the ground below; spatially, dense clouds are generally large on some scale. This is a good basis for searching multispectral datacubes for cloud signatures. However, the resulting cloud mask can be very sensitive to the choice of thresholds in whiteness, brightness, temperature, and connectivity. We have used a genetic algorithm trained on (MODIS Airborne Simulator-based) simulated MTI data to design a cloud-mask. Its performance is compared quantitatively to hand-drawn training data and to the EOS/Terra MODIS cloud mask.

  17. Literature Review on Spectral Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Mengna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guan & Kulis. Kernel k-means, Spectral Clustering andspectral clustering and k-means clustering and spectralRelationship with kernel K-means algorithm

  18. Development of a new airborne humidigraph system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Schmid, Beat; Chand, Duli; Hubbe, John M.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Nelson, Danny A.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling and measurements of aerosol properties is complicated by the hygroscopic behavior of the aerosols adding significant uncertainty to our best estimates of the direct effect aerosols exert on the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Airborne measurements of aerosol hygroscopicity are particularly challenging but critically needed. This motivated the development of a newly designed system which can measure the dependence of the aerosol light scattering coefficient (?sp) on relative humidity (RH), known as f(RH), in real-time at a rapid rate (<10 s) on an aerial platform. The new system has several advantages over existing systems. It consists of three integrating nephelometers and humidity conditioners for simultaneous measurement of the ?sp at three different RHs. The humidity is directly controlled in exchanger cells without significant temperature disturbances and without particle dilution, heating or loss of volatile compounds. The single-wavelength nephelometers are illuminated by LED-based light sources thereby minimizing heating of the sample stream. The flexible design of the RH conditioners, consisting of a number of specially designed exchanger cells (driers or humidifiers), enables us to measure f(RH) under hydration or dehydration conditions (always starting with the aerosol in a known state) with a simple system re-configuration. These exchanger cells have been characterized for losses of particles using latex spheres and laboratory generated ammonium sulfate aerosols. Residence times of 6 - 9 s in the exchangers and subsequent lines is sufficient for most aerosols to attain equilibrium with the new water vapor content. The performance of this system has been assessed aboard DOEs G-1 research aircraft during test flights over California, Oregon, and Washington.

  19. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Airborne Wind Energy Based on Dual Airfoils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Airborne Wind Energy Based on Dual Airfoils Mario Zanon, Sebastien Gros, Joel Andersson and Moritz Diehl Abstract--The Airborne Wind Energy paradigm Airborne Wind Energy enables flight in higher-altitude, stronger wind layers, the extra drag generated

  1. Control of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control & Moving Horizon Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control & Moving arising in the Airborne Wind Energy paradigm, an essential one is the control of the tethered airfoil], [3], the Airborne Wind Energy (AWE) paradigm shift proposes to get rid of the structural elements

  2. Airborne Infrared Target Tracking with the Nintendo Wii Remote Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckett, Andrew 1984-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    AIRBORNE INFRARED TARGET TRACKING WITH THE NINTENDO WII REMOTE SENSOR A Thesis by ANDREW WILSON BECKETT Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... of UAS in use today and provide invaluable capabilities to both the military and civil services. UAS are well-suited to the ISR role: large UAS can remain airborne for far longer than the limits of human endurance without needing to be large enough...

  3. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Charles Lindsey

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REMOTE MONITORING OF SOIL MOISTURE USING AIRBORNE MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS A Thesis by CHARLES LINDSEY J(ROLL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REMOTE MONITORING OF SOIL MOISTURE USING AIRBORNE MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS A Thesis by CHARLES LINDSEY KROLL Approved as to style and content by: man o Co mrtt Hca o D artmc c Ill l c r Mem e Member...

  4. Airborne asbestos fiber evaluation: a comparison of three methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studinka, Emil

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AIRBORNE ASBFSTOS FIBER EVALUATION-A CONPARISON OF TliR'E NETHODS A Thesis EYiIL STUDINKA Submitted to the Graduate Co'ilege of Texas ALN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER OF SCIEtiCE December 1979... Najor Subject: Industrial Hygiene AIRBORNE ASBESTOS FIBER EVALUATION-A COMPARISON OF THRFE METHODS A Thesis by EMIL STUDI NKA Approved as to style and content by: ichard B. onzen air ar, of Committee) llaymon L. Johnston (Member) hlilliam P...

  5. The development of a passive dosimeter for airborne benzene vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hager, David William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE DOSIMETER FOR AIRBORNE BENZENE VAPORS A Thesis DAVID NII LIAM HAGER Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the d"gree of MASTER OF SC. IENCE May IB...7B Major Subject: Indus t& ial Hyqiene THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE DOSIMETER FOR AIRBORNE BFNZENE VAPORS A Thesis by DAVID NILLIAM HAGER Approved as to style and content by: Z Chairman of Commi t e~ ~'g C'S~ Head of Department~ Member...

  6. The development of a passive dosimeter for airborne aniline vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Evan

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE DOSIMETER FOR AIRBORNE ANILINE VAPORS A Thesis by James Evan Campbell Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE I...'iay 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE DOSIMETER FOR AIRBORNE ANILINE VAPORS A Thesis by James E van Campbe1 1 Approved as to style and content by: Chairm of Com itt ea of De rtment Member Member May 1977...

  7. Enhanced ultraviolet electroluminescence and spectral narrowing from ZnO quantum dots/GaN heterojunction diodes by using high-k HfO{sub 2} electron blocking layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Xiaoming; Long, Hao; Wang, Haoning; Chen, Zhao; Wan, Jiawei; Liu, Yuping; Fang, Guojia, E-mail: gjfang@whu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Li, Songzhan [Key Lab of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Feng, Yamin [Department of Physics, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Ouyang, Yifang [College of Physical Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated the capability of realizing enhanced ZnO-related UV emissions by using the low-cost and solution-processable ZnO quantum dots (QDs) with the help of a high-k HfO{sub 2} electron blocking layer (EBL) for the ZnO QDs/p-GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Full-width at half maximum of the LED devices was greatly decreased from ?110 to ?54?nm, and recombinations related to nonradiative centers were significantly suppressed with inserting HfO{sub 2} EBL. The electroluminescence of the ZnO QDs/HfO{sub 2}/p-GaN LEDs demonstrated an interesting spectral narrowing effect with increasing HfO{sub 2} thickness. The Gaussian fitting revealed that the great enhancement of the Zn{sub i}-related emission at ?414?nm whereas the deep suppression of the interfacial recombination at ?477?nm should be the main reason for the spectral narrowing effect.

  8. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, high concentrations of methanol and monoterpenes were found above some of these regions. These observations demonstrate the ability to measure fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft, and suggest the utility of measurements using fast response chemical sensors to constrain emission inventories and map out source distributions for a much broader array of trace gases than was observed in this study. This paper reports the first regional direct eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene. The emissions of VOCs measured from aircraft with 2 km spatial resolution can quantify the distribution of major sources providing the observations required for testing statewide emission inventories of these important trace gases. These measurements will be used in a future study to assess BVOC emission models and their driving variable datasets.

  9. Aerosol plume transport and transformation in high spectral resolution lidar measurements and WRF-Flexpart simulations during the MILAGRO Field Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) experiences high loadings of atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic sources, biomass burning and wind-blown dust. This paper uses a combination of measurements and numerical ...

  10. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    high spectral absorptivity in the solar spectrum and low spectral emissivity in the infrared spectrum, as well as excellent durability at elevated temperatures in open air....

  11. Mitigating Geomagnetic Noise in Airborne Magnetic Surveys using GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Mitigating Geomagnetic Noise in Airborne Magnetic Surveys using GPS S. Skone Department and tropospheric effects on GPS. She has developed software for mitigation of atmospheric effects and is currently in this frequency band must be modeled, or measured, and mitigated. Despite reduction of many error sources for MAD

  12. The study of cirrus clouds using airborne and satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry Glynne

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cirrus clouds are known to play a key role in the earth's radiation budget, yet are one of the most uncertain components of the earth-atmosphere system. With the development of instruments such as the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer...

  13. airborne carbon 14c: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne carbon 14c First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 PERSPECTIVE PERSPECTIVE Blowin'...

  14. Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, L.M.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

  15. airborne differential absorption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne differential absorption First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of...

  16. Reduction of the field spectrum linewidth of a multiple quantum well laser in a high magnetic field: spectral properties of quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahala, K.; Arakawa, Y.; Yariv, A.

    1987-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The field spectrum linewidth of a multiple quantum well laser immersed in a high magnetic field is measured at room temperature and at 165 K. The low-temperature measurements show a decrease of linewidth with increasing magnetic field. We believe this behavior results from the formation of a totally discrete electronic state space. Measurements of the low-temperature luminescence spectrum show that the emission is split into two peaks by the high field with the higher energy peak responsible for lasing action.

  17. Measurement of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. MacMullin; G. K. Giovanetti; M. P. Green; R. Henning; R. Holmes; K. Vorren; J. F. Wilkerson

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 days following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products I-131 and Cs-137 were measured with maximum activities of 4.2 +/- 0.6 mBq/m^3 and 0.42 +/- 0.07 mBq/m^3 respectively. Additional activity from I-131, I-132, Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137 and Te-132 were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

  18. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identication is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identication is possible. We show that unique identication becomes less likely as p increases.

  19. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  20. Spectral tailoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  1. Effective Spectral Function for Quasielastic Scattering on Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bodek; M. E. Christy; B. Coopersmith

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral functions that are used in neutrino event generators to model quasielastic (QE) scattering from nuclear targets include Fermi gas, Local Thomas Fermi gas (LTF), Bodek-Ritchie Fermi gas with high momentum tail, and the Benhar-Fantoni two dimensional spectral function. We find that the $\

  2. Undecidability of the Spectral Gap (short version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toby Cubitt; David Perez-Garcia; Michael M. Wolf

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral gap -- the difference in energy between the ground state and the first excited state -- is one of the most important properties of a quantum many-body system. Quantum phase transitions occur when the spectral gap vanishes and the system becomes critical. Much of physics is concerned with understanding the phase diagrams of quantum systems, and some of the most challenging and long-standing open problems in theoretical physics concern the spectral gap, such as the Haldane conjecture that the Heisenberg chain is gapped for integer spin, proving existence of a gapped topological spin liquid phase, or the Yang-Mills gap conjecture (one of the Millennium Prize problems). These problems are all particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: Given a quantum many-body Hamiltonian, is the system it describes gapped or gapless? Here we show that this problem is undecidable, in the same sense as the Halting Problem was proven to be undecidable by Turing. A consequence of this is that the spectral gap of certain quantum many-body Hamiltonians is not determined by the axioms of mathematics, much as Goedels incompleteness theorem implies that certain theorems are mathematically unprovable. We extend these results to prove undecidability of other low temperature properties, such as correlation functions. The proof hinges on simple quantum many-body models that exhibit highly unusual physics in the thermodynamic limit.

  3. A 100-micron polarimeter for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D.P.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Platt, S.R.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consideration is given to the design and performance of the 100-micron polarimeter proposed for use on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The polarimeter specifications are listed. The polarimeter design and data reduction techniques are based on the work of Hildebrand et al. (1984) and Dragovan (1986). The polarimeter has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and systematic measurement errors below 0.2 percent. 20 refs.

  4. Conventional and synthetic aperature processing for airborne ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.M. [Airborne Environmental Surveys, Santa Maria, CA (United States); Simkins, W.L.; Brown, R.D. [MSB Technologies, Inc., Rome, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past four years Airborne Environmental Surveys (AES), a Division of Era Aviation, Inc. has used unique and patented airborne Frequency-Modulated, Continuous Wave (FM-CW) radars and processes for detecting and mapping subsurface phenomena. Primary application has focused on the detection of man-made objects in landfills, hazardous waste sites (some of which contain unexploded ordinance), and subsurface plumes of refined free-floating hydrocarbons. Recently, MSB Technologies, Inc. (MSB) has developed a form of synthetic aperture radar processing (SAR), called GPSAR{trademark}, that is tailored especially for the AES radars. Used as an adjunct to more conventional airborne ground-penetrating radar data processing techniques, GPSAR takes advantage of the radars` coherent transmission and produces imagery that is better focused and more accurate in determining an object`s range and true depth. This paper describes the iterative stages of data processing and analysis used with the radars and shows the added advantages that GPSAR processing offers.

  5. Effectiveness of bomber deployed autonomous airborne vehicles in finding rail mobile SS-24s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abey, A.E.; Erickson, S.A.; Norquist, P.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulation predictions of the effectiveness of autonomous airborne vehicles in finding rail mobile SS-24s are presented. Effectiveness is discussed for several autonomous airborne vehicle endurances and survivabilities for the search area southwest of Moscow. The effect of where the Soviets place the SS-24s on the rail network was also investigated. The simulation predicts significant variations in the ability of a multi-autonomous airborne vehicle system to find SS-24s with these parameters. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Initial Results from an Automated High Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    . P. Hedrick, and J.P. Garcia University of Wisconsin 1225 W. Dayton Street, Madison Wisconsin 53706 for continuous remote untended operation as an Internet appliance. - Transceiver Design: Laser light goes through Measurements: Calibrated measurements begin at z=75 m. - Narrow field-of-view: Nearly eliminates solar

  7. High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 2325, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    powders for SSC layer paste 'Multi-scale' particles clearly show much better light absorption Multi-scale vs. Mono-scale Structures Coating Process Development Coating of SSC...

  9. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  10. The Broad Band Spectral Energy Distributions of SDSS Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Huaizhen; Jiang, Yunguo; Yi, Tingfeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compiled the radio, optical, and X-ray data of blazars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, and presented the distribution of luminosities and broad band spectral indices. The distribution of luminosities shows that the averaged luminosity of flat-spectral radio quasars (FSRQs) is larger than that of BL Lacs objects. On the other hand, the broad band spectral energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and low energy peaked BL Lac objects (LBLs) objects have similar spectral properties, but high energy peaked BL Lac objects (HBLs) have a distinct spectral property. This may be due to that different subclasses of blazars have different intrinsic environments and are at different cooling levels. Even so, a unified scheme also is revealed from the color-color diagram, which hints that there are similar physical processes operating in all objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions or beaming parameter.

  11. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  12. A glacier inventory for South Tyrol, Italy, based on airborne laser-scanner data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerschner, Hanns

    A glacier inventory for South Tyrol, Italy, based on airborne laser-scanner data Christoph KNOLL-mail: christoph.knoll@uibk.ac.at ABSTRACT. A new approach to glacier inventory, based on airborne laser supervision. Earlier inventories, from 1983 and 1997, are used to compare changes in area, volume

  13. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

  14. Entwicklung eines Qualittsmodells fr die Generierung von Digitalen Gelndemodellen aus Airborne Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Laser Scanning Dr. sc. ETH Jrg Lthy Zrich, 2008 #12;#12;Diese Publikation ist eine editierte Version Gelndemodellen aus Airborne Laser Scanning A B H A N D L U N G zur Erlangung des Titels DOKTOR DER WISSENSCHAFTEN Qualittsmodells fr die Generierung von Digitalen Gelndemodellen aus Airborne Laser Scanning Copyright 2008

  15. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Key goals were to assess the nature of these relationships as they varied between sensors

  16. airborne gamma-ray spectra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne gamma-ray spectra First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic Airborne...

  17. Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

  18. A Relaxation Strategy for the Optimization of Airborne Wind Energy Sebastien Gros, M. Zanon and Moritz Diehl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Relaxation Strategy for the Optimization of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Sebastien Gros, M. Zanon and Moritz Diehl Abstract-- Optimal control is recognized by the Airborne Wind Energy (AWE problem. Keywords : airborne wind energy, optimal control, non- convex optimization, flight control I

  19. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  20. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, Robert J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Putnam, Marie H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idaho Falls, ID); Helmer, Richard G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Goodwin, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Pocatello, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  1. Observations and modeling of ice cloud shortwave spectral albedo during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    a range of solar zenith angle (23°­53°) and high (46­90) and low (5­15) optical thicknesses. The retrieved Flux Radiometer (SSFR) irradiance and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Airborne]. The scattering and absorption of solar radiation reduces the amount of energy reaching the surface and thus has

  2. Time-resolved spectroscopy on epitaxial graphene in the infrared spectral range: relaxation dynamics and saturation behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Time-resolved spectroscopy on epitaxial graphene in the infrared spectral range: relaxation graphene samples performed in a wide spectral range, namely from the near signatures of the highly doped graphene layers at the interface to Si

  3. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  4. Final report. Electro-Seise, Inc., Airborne Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of an airborne microgravity and electric field sensing technology developed by Electro-Seise, Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas. The test involved the use of a single engine airplane to gather data over the Teapot Dome oil field along a tight grid spacing and along thirty (30) survey lines. The resultant gravity structure maps, based on the field data, were found to overlay the known structure of Teapot Dome. In addition, fault maps, based on the field data, were consistent with the known fault strike at Teapot Dome. Projected hydrocarbon thickness maps corresponded to some of the known production histories at RMOTC. Exceptions to the hydrocarbon thickness maps were also found to be true.

  5. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  6. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  7. Clean enough for industry? An airborne geophysical case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Beard, L.P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from two airborne geophysical surveys of the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were extremely valuable in deciding whether a 1000-acre (400 hectare) parcel of the ORR should be released to the City of Oak Ridge for industrial development. Our findings, based on electromagnetic and magnetic data, were incorporated in the federally mandated Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS), and in general supported claims that this land was never used as a hazardous waste disposal site. We estimated the amount of iron required to produce each anomaly using a simple dipole model. All anomalies with equivalent sources greater than approximately 1000 kg of iron were checked in the field, and the source of all but one identified as either a bridge, reinforced concrete debris, or a similarly benign object. Additionally, some smaller anomalies (equivalent sources of roughly 500 kg) have been checked; thus far, these also have innocuous sources. Airborne video proved invaluable in identifying logging equipment as the source of some of these anomalies. Geologic noise may account for some of the remaining anomalies. Naturally occurring accumulations of magnetic minerals in the soil on the ORR have been shown to produce anomalies which, at a sensor height of 30 m, are comparable to the anomaly produced by about 500 kg of iron. By comparison, the electronic noise of the magnetic gradiometer, 0.01--0.02 nT/m, is equivalent to only about 50--100 kg of iron at a 30 m sensor height. The electromagnetic data, combined with field mapping of karst structures, provided evidence of a northeast-southwest striking conduit spanning the parcel. The possible existence of a karst conduit led the EAS authors to conclude that this is a ``sensitive hydrologic setting.`` We conclude that aerial geophysics is an extremely cost-effective, and efficient technique for screening large tracts of land for environmental characterization.

  8. Spectral shift reactor control method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1987-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes the method of operating a pressurized-water fissile-material-fueled spectral-shift nuclear reactor in such manner that short-term reactivity requirement variations can be satisfied without making control rod or chemical shim changes. The reactor includes a pressure vessel enclosing a reactor core and having an inlet and an outlet for circulating a water coolant moderator in heat transfer relationship with the core. The core comprises fuel assemblies disposed therein for generating heat by nuclear fission. The reactor provided with neutron-absorbing control rods which are vertically movable into and out of the core so that movement of the control rods into the core will substantially decrease reactivity and withdrawal of the control rods from the core will substantially increase reactivity. The control rods when inserted into the core displace an equivalent volume of the water coolant moderator. The reactor also provides neutron-spectral-shift rods which have a lower absorptivity for neutrons than the control rods, the neutron-spectral shift rods when inserted into the core displacing an equaivalent volume of the water coolant moderator. The neutron-spectral-shift rods comprises two different types of rods, a first of the different types of the neutron-spectral-shift rods comprising displacer rods which have a low absorptivity for neutrons, the remainder of the neutron-spectral-shift rods comprising gray rods which have an absorption for neutrons which is intermediate the neutron absorption of the control rods and the low neutron absorption of the displacer rods. Each neutron-spectral-shift displacer rod comprises a hollow thin-walled Zircaloy member containing a filling of solid or annular zirconium- or aluminum-containing material for providing internal support and mass for the thin-walled tubular member.

  9. Design and development of an airborne microwave radiometer for atmospheric sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarito, Michael P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite-based passive microwave remote sensing is a valuable tool for global weather monitoring and prediction. This thesis presents the design and development of a low-cost airborne weather sensing instrument to ...

  10. The metal content of airborne particles in Edinburgh: application to epidemiological research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbs, L R; Beverland, Iain J; Heal, Mathew R; Agius, Raymond M; Elton, Robert A; Fowler, D; Cape, Neil

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metals are putative causative agents in the association between ill health and exposure to airborne particles. We present preliminary results from an epidemiological study using exposure metrics of metal contained in ...

  11. Modeling Plot-Level Biomass and Volume Using Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Ryan D.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program provides a diverse selection of data used to assess the status of the nations forested areas using sample locations dispersed throughout the country. Airborne...

  12. New Chemical Aerosol Characterization Methods- Examples Using Agricultural and Urban Airborne Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lijun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explored different chemical characterization methods of agricultural and urban airborne particulate matter. Three different field campaigns are discussed. For the agricultural aerosols, measurement of the chemical composition of size...

  13. Multisensor Fusion of Ground-based and Airborne Remote Sensing Data for Crop Condition Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huihui

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the performances of the optical sensors and instruments carried on both ground-based and airborne platforms were evaluated for monitoring crop growing status, detecting the vegetation response to aerial applied herbicides...

  14. Design of a small fast steering mirror for airborne and aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulet, Michael Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a small advanced fast steering mirror (sAFSM) for airborne and aerospace platforms. The sAFSM provides feedback-controlled articulation of two rotational axes for precision ...

  15. Algorithms and Software Tools for Extracting Coastal Morphological Information from Airborne LiDAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yige

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ALGORITHMS AND SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR EXTRACTING COASTAL MORPHOLOGICAL INFORMATION FROM AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA A Thesis by YIGE GAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Geography ALGORITHMS AND SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR EXTRACTING COASTAL MORPHOLOGICAL INFORMATION FROM AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA A Thesis by YIGE GAO...

  16. An investigation of three problems concerning the analysis of airborne asphalt fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Larry Teal

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THREE PROBLEMS CONCERNING THE ANALYSIS OF AIRBORNE ASPHALT FUMES A Thesis by LARRY TEAL LAIRD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene AN INVESTIGATION OF THREE PROBLEMS CONCERNING THE ANALYSIS OF AIRBORNE ASPHALT FUMES A Thesis by LARRY T. LAIRD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairm of Committee) (Head of Department...

  17. Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, J R

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI. Finally, an appendix provides detail describing the magnitude and spatial extent of the surface shock expected from an underground nuclear explosion. If there is a seismic event or other data to suggest there has been a nuclear explosion in violation of the CTBT, an OSI may be conducted to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred and to gather information which may be useful in identifying the party responsible for conducting the explosion. The OSI must be conducted in the area where the event that triggered the inspection request occurred, and the inspected area must not exceed 1,000 square kilometers, or be more than 50 km on aside (CTBT Protocol, Part II, Paragraphs 2 and 3). One of the guiding principles for an inspection is that it be effective, minimally intrusive, timely, and cost-effective [Hawkins, Feb 1998]. In that context, MSIR is one of several technologies that can be used during an aircraft overflight to identify ground regions of high interest in a timely and cost-effective manner. This allows for an optimized inspection on the ground. The primary purpose for MSIR is to identify artifacts and anomalies that might be associated with a nuclear explosion, and to use the location of those artifacts and anomalies to reduce the search area that must be inspected from the ground. The MSIR measurements can have additional utility. The multi-spectral measurements of the ground can be used for terrain classification, which can aid in geological characterization of the Inspected Area. In conditions of where light smoke or haze is present, long-wave infrared imaging can provide better imaging of the ground than is possible with standard visible imagery.

  18. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  19. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  20. Exposure to airborne metals and particulate matter and risk for youth adjudicated for criminal activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, Erin N., E-mail: Erin.Haynes@uc.edu [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Chen, Aimin, E-mail: Aimin.Chen@uc.edu [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Ryan, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Ryan@uc.edu [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Succop, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Succop@uc.edu [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Wright, John, E-mail: John.Wright@uc.edu [College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)] [College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Dietrich, Kim N., E-mail: Kim.Dietrich@uc.edu [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Antisocial behavior is a product of multiple interacting sociohereditary variables, yet there is increasing evidence that metal exposure, particularly, manganese and lead, play a role in its epigenesis. Other metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury, and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, such as fine particulate matter ({<=}2.5 {mu}m) have been associated with neurological deficits, yet largely unexplored with respect to their relationship with delinquent behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ecological relationship between county-wide reported airborne emissions of air metals, particulate matter, and youth adjudicated for criminal activity. Metal exposure data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency AirData. Population statistics were obtained from the United States Census 2000 and adjudication data was obtained from the Courts of Common Pleases from each Ohio County. Simple correlations were calculated with the percentage of adjudications, all covariates, and estimated metal air emissions. Separate negative binomial regression models for each pollutant were used to provide an estimated risk ratio of pollutant emissions on the risk of adjudication for all Ohio counties adjusting for urban-rural residence, percentage of African Americans, median family income, percentage of family below poverty, percentage of high school graduation in 25 years and older populations, and population density. Metal emissions and PM in 1999 were all correlated with adjudication rate (2003-2005 average). Metal emissions were associated with slightly higher risk of adjudication, with about 3-4% increased risk per natural log unit of metal emission except chromium. The associations achieved statistical significance for manganese and mercury. The particulate matter {<=}2.5 and {<=}10 {mu}m emissions had a higher risk estimate, with 12% and 19% increase per natural log unit emission, respectively, and also achieved statistical significance. In summary, airborne exposure to manganese, mercury, and particulate matter are associated with increased risk of adjudication. Causality cannot be proven in observational studies such as this one, but the association warrants further examination in other research studies. Comprehensive epidemiologic investigations of metal exposure in pediatric populations should include social health outcomes, including measures of delinquent or criminal activity. Furthermore, the influence of metals on the neurotoxic pathway leading to delinquent activity should be further explored. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate the relationship between air pollutants and adjudication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Manganese, mercury, and particulate matter are associated with risk of adjudication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further research of metal exposure should include social health outcomes.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  2. Spectral Thompson Sampling Tomas Kocak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spectral Thompson Sampling Tom´as Koc´ak SequeL team INRIA Lille - Nord Europe France Michal Valko Thompson Sampling (TS) has surged a lot of interest due to its good empirical performance, in particular that our algorithm is com- petitive on both synthetic and real-world data. 1 Introduction Thompson Sampling

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  4. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  5. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Chico quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Chico, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 3026.4 line miles are in the quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  6. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  7. Airborne radioactive effluent study at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, R.L.; Broadway, J.A.; Sensintaffar, E.L.; Kirk, W.P.; Kahn, B.; Garrett, A.J.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Clean Air Act, Sections 112 and 122 as amended in 1977, the Office of Radiation Programs (OPR) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency is currently developing standards for radionuclides emitted to the air by several source categories. In order to confirm source-term measurements and pathway calculations for radiation exposures to humans offsite, the ORP performs field studies at selected facilities that emit radionuclides. This report describes the field study conducted at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), a laboratory operated by E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company for the US Department of Energy. This purpose of the study at ARP was to verify reported airborne releases and resulting radiation doses from the facility. Measurements of radionuclide releases for brief periods were compared with measurements performed by SRP staff on split samples and with annual average releases reported by SRP for the same facilities. The dispersion model used by SRP staff to calculate radiation doses offsite was tested by brief environmental radioactivity measurements performed simultaneously with the release measurements, and by examining radioactivity levels in environmental samples. This report describes in detail all measurements made and data collected during the field study and presents the results obtained. 34 references, 18 figures, 49 tables.

  8. Airborne infrared observations and analyses of a large forest fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearns, J.R.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E.; Sanford, B.P.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive IR spatial images and spectral signatures were gathered from an active large brush and forest fire by the Flying Infrared Signatures Technology Aircraft of the U.S. Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. Infrared images give the apparent temperatures of actively burning and burned over regions and aid in identifying the type and intensity of the fire. Spectral signatures of hot regions from interferometer and spatial data can also be used to determine apparent fire temperatures. Gasesous combustion products in the fire plume are quantitatively identified by the IR absorption spectra at 1-cm/sup -1/ resolution using the hot fire emission as the radiation source. Concentrations of CO were measured at 50 times higher than ambient levels. The applicability of these techniques to gathering data relevant to important environmental and military problems, including atmospheric pollution from fires and possible short-term climatic effects due to fires ignited in a nuclear exchange, is discussed.

  9. Flame Spectral Analysis for Boiler Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalfe, C. I.; Cole, W. E.; Batra, S. K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLAME SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR BOILER CONTROL CHRISTOPHER I. METCALFE WILLIAM E. COLE SUSHIL K. BATRA Tecogen, Inc. ( A Subsidiary of Thermo Electron Corporation) Waltham, Massachusetts ABSTRACT SPECTRAL FLAME ANALYSIS FOR BURNER CONTROL During...

  10. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  11. Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

  12. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of Contents and more related content is available Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral associating soft­hard­harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation

  13. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 1. Technique and NO sub 2 observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic measurements of column abundances of NO{sub 2} were carried out from the NASA DC-8 airplane during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January and February 1989. Stratospheric airmasses inside and close to the polar vortex were found to be highly depleted of NO{sub 2} with lowest vertical column abundances of NO{sub 2} below 2 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} compared to abundances of 3-5 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}2} south of 50{degree}N in winter (WMO, 1985).

  14. Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using-term measurements Radon progeny a b s t r a c t We developed the theoretical basis for long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny. The work was separated into two parts

  15. Comparison of airborne and surface particulate size distributions in specific Hanford Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottley, D.B.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Settled dust from nuclear operations may be contaminated with radionuclides and become resuspended and subsequently breathed. This is the predominate radionuclide inhalation hazard scenario in nuclear facilities that have been deactivated and no longer have liquid in their process systems that may become directly airborne in accident situations. Comparisons were made between indoor ambient airborne particulate size distribution and that of resuspended dust that could become contaminated and subsequently airborne during decommissioning operations at selected nuclear facilities on the Hanford Site. Results indicate that only 5% of the particles, by count, above the breathing zone are greater than ten (10) {mu}m in size and that the particulates that could be resuspended into the breathing zone had a mean aerodynamic equivalent diameter of four (4) {mu}m or less.

  16. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Paciesas, William S. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  17. Spectral energy distribution for GJ406

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ya. V. Pavlenko; H. R. A. Jones; Yu. Lyubchik; J. Tennyson; D. J. Pinfield

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of modelling the bulk of the spectral energy distribution (0.35 - 5 micron) for GJ406 (M6V). Synthetic spectra were calculated using the NextGen, Dusty and Cond model atmospheres and incorporate line lists for H2O, TiO, CrH, FeH, CO, MgH molecules as well as the VALD line list of atomic lines. A comparison of synthetic and observed spectra gives Tef = 2800 +/- 100 K. We determine M$_bol = 12.13 +/- 0.10 for which evolutionary models by Baraffe et al. (2003) suggest an age of around 0.1 -- 0.35 Gyr consistent with its high activity. The age and luminosity of GJ406 correspond to a wide range of plausible masses (0.07 -- 0.1 Msun).

  18. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy...

  19. Development of a high-precision ADS-B based conflict alerting system for operations in the airport environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunzi, Fabrice

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) as the future source of aircraft surveillance worldwide provides an opportunity to introduce high-precision airborne conflict alerting systems for ...

  20. Monitoring temperate glaciers by high resolution Pol-InSAR data: First analysis of Argentire E-SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Monitoring temperate glaciers by high resolution Pol-InSAR data: First analysis of Argentire E to measure temperate glacier velocities and surface characteristics by airborne interferometric Alpine glaciers. Simultaneously to the acquisition of repeat pass interferometric, polarimetric and multi

  1. Monolithically integrated near-infrared and mid-infrared detector array for spectral imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    detector test results ensure the high quality of material suitable for near-infrared/QWIP dual-band focal. A CTIS records spatial and spectral information by imaging a scene through an optical relay system

  2. Exploiting pitch dynamics for speech spectral estimation using a two-dimensional processing framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tianyu Tom

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of obtaining an accurate spectral representation of speech formant structure when the voicing source exhibits a high fundamental frequency. Our work is inspired by auditory perception and ...

  3. Savannah River Site Ingestion Pathway Methodology Manual for Airborne Radioactive Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, A.W. III

    2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual documents a recommended methodology for determining the ingestion pathway consequences of hypothetical accidental airborne radiological releases from facilities at the Savannah River Site. Both particulate and tritiated radioactive contaminants are addressed. Other approaches should be applied for evaluation of routine releases.

  4. DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES burdens of wind turbines. To detect damage of rotor blades, several research projects focus on an acoustic, rotor blade, wind turbine INTRODUCTION There are several publications of non destructive damage

  5. Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues: XAS XANES EXAFS Antimony Particulate matter Brake linings a b s t r a c t Insights into the speciation of Sb in samples of brake linings, brake pad wear residues, road dust, and atmospheric particulate

  6. LAAS Ionosphere Spatial Gradient Threat Model and Impact of LGF and Airborne Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    LAAS Ionosphere Spatial Gradient Threat Model and Impact of LGF and Airborne Monitoring Ming Luo of users for the current Category I LAAS architecture. In the ionosphere threat model used by previous-case ionosphere conditions. In this paper, the ionosphere threat model is reexamined based on WAAS and IGS data

  7. 3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic was implemented by mechanical scanning a co-located transmitter and receiver using the classic synthetic aperture, silicone rubber, and foam plastics, in an attempt to overcome bad mechanical impedance matching between

  8. airborne gamma-ray spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gamma-ray spectrometer First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic Airborne...

  9. airborne gamma-ray surveying: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne gamma-ray surveying First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic...

  10. airborne gamma-ray measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne gamma-ray measurements First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic...

  11. Elemental composition of airborne particulates in uranium mining and milling operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Carvalho, S.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne particulates were collected through filters in occupational areas of the uranium mining and milling complex located in Pocos de Caldas, Brazil. The filters were analyzed by microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) combined with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) of the incident protons. The results are discussed in the paper. 4 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  12. Light transmittance in forest canopies determined using airborne laser altimetry and in-canopy quantum measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Light transmittance in forest canopies determined using airborne laser altimetry and in Abstract The vertical distribution of light transmittance was derived from field and laser altimeter-directed laser light than of direct solar radiation from typical elevation angles. Transects of light

  13. Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fushimi, K; Sakama, M; Sakaguchi, Y

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

  14. Statistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of the Workshop was to initiate a statistical research program relevant to setting air quality standardsStatistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter Lawrence H. Cox NRCSET e c h n i c a l R e p o r t S e r i e s NRCSE-TRS No. 041 January 10, 2000 The NRCSEwas

  15. LONG-TERM DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS USING LR 115 DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    LONG-TERM DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS USING LR 115 DETECTORS dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e. 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not the radon (222 Rn) gas itself. Accordingly, long-term measure- ments of the concentrations of radon progeny

  16. Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Fushimi; S. Nakayama; M. Sakama; Y. Sakaguchi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plan t was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

  17. Airborne lead and other elements derived from local fires in the Himalayas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.I.; Grimm, T.C.; Nasta, M.A.

    1981-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion of wood and yak dung for heating and cooking in a populated Nepal Himalayan valley contributes significantly to the ambient airborne concentrations of lead, copper, aluminum, magnesium, and elemental and organic carbon. A comparison of the concentrations of these elements in fresh snow with corresponding values in air suggests that the pollution aerosol is confined to the valley, with pristine air aloft.

  18. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  19. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  20. Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

    2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

  1. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  2. Holographic Quenches and Fermionic Spectral Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Callebaut; B. Craps; F. Galli; D. C. Thompson; J. Vanhoof; J. Zaanen; Hongbao Zhang

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using holographic methods we investigate the behaviour of fermionic spectral functions of strongly coupled 2+1 dimensional field theories as both temperature and chemical potential are quenched.

  3. Spectral shift reactor control method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1987-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The method is described of closely controlling the reactor water coolant temperature of an operating spectral-shift nuclear reactor, the reactor comprising a core formed of fuel assemblies through which the reactor water coolant flows; different types of elongated elements operable to be controllably moved into and out of the core; one type of the elongated elements comprising control rods formed of neutron absorbing material and operable to decrease reactivity through neutron absorption when inserted into the core; another of the types of elongated elements comprising displacer rods formed of material which has a low absorption for neutrons and which have overall neutron-absorbing and moderating characteristics essentially not exceeding those of hollow tubular Zircaloy members with a filling zirconium oxide or aluminum oxide, the displacer rods operating to displace an equivalent volume of water coolant fluid from the core when inserted therein to decrease reactivity and to increase reactivity when moved from the core.

  4. Spectral Diagnostics of Active Prominences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labrosse, N; Vial, J C; Labrosse, Nicolas; Gouttebroze, Pierre; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active prominences exhibit plasma motions, resulting in difficulties with the interpretation of spectroscopic observations. These solar features being strongly influenced by the radiation coming from the solar disk, Doppler dimming or brightening effects may arise, depending on which lines are observed and on the velocity of the plasma. Interlocking between the different atomic energy levels and non local thermodynamic equilibrium lead to non-trivial spectral line profiles, and this calls for complex numerical modelling of the radiative transfer in order to understand the observations. We present such a tool, which solves the radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium for H, He I, He II, and Ca II, in moving prominences where radial plasma motions are taking place. It is found that for isothermal, isobaric prominence models, the He II resonance lines are very sensitive to the Doppler effect and show a strong Doppler dimming. The Ca II lines are not very sensitive to the Doppler effect for the prominence m...

  5. X-ray Spectral Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Strohmayer; E. E. Fenimore; T. Murakami; A. Yoshida

    1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the spectral characteristics of a sample of 22 bright gamma-ray bursts detected with the gamma-ray burst sensors aboard the satellite Ginga. This instrument employed a proportional and scintillation counter to provide sensitivity to photons in the 2 - 400 keV range, providing a unique opportunity to characterize the largely unexplored X-ray properties of gamma-ray bursts. The photon spectra of the Ginga bursts are well described by a low energy slope, a bend energy, and a high energy slope. In the energy range where they can be compared, this result is consistent with burst spectral analyses obtained from the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Observatory. However, below 20 keV we find evidence for a positive spectral number index in approximately 40% of our burst sample, with some evidence for a strong rolloff at lower energies in a few events. There is a correlation (Pearson's r = -0.62) between the low energy slope and the bend energy. We find that the distribution of spectral bend energies extends below 10 keV. The observed ratio of energy emitted in the X-rays relative to the gamma-rays can be much larger than a few percent and, in fact, is sometimes larger than unity. The average for our sample is 24%.

  6. Spectral statistics for scaling quantum graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Dabaghian

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The explicit solution to the spectral problem of quantum graphs is used to obtain the exact distributions of several spectral statistics, such as the oscillations of the quantum momentum eigenvalues around the average, $\\delta k_{n}=k_{n}-\\bar k_{n}$, and the nearest neighbor separations, $s_{n}=k_{n}-k_{n-1}$.

  7. Iterative Speech Enhancement With Spectral Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Dallas, University of

    Iterative Speech Enhancement With Spectral Constraints John H. Hansen and Mark A. Clements Georgia iterative speech enhancementtechnique based on spectral constraints is presented in this paper estimate of a speech waveform in additive white noise. Thenew approach applies inter- and intra

  8. Gauge Invariant Spectral Cauchy Characteristic Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey J. Handmer; Bla Szilgyi; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present gauge invariant spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction. We compare gravitational waveforms extracted from a head-on black hole merger simulated in two different gauges by two different codes. We show rapid convergence, demonstrating both gauge invariance of the extraction algorithm and consistency between the legacy Pitt null code and the much faster Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  9. Fuzzy logic approach to supervised segmentation of forest regions infested by Southern Pine Beetle using color airborne images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Kit-Tong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital image processing technique and fuzzy logic approach are used to identify forest areas infested with Southern Pine Beetle, SPB, using normal color airborne imageries in this research. This research will be used as a front end of a larger...

  10. A fast-time study on increasing the capacity of continuous descent approaches through airborne precision spacing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weitz, Lesley Anne

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Center (LaRC) in Hampton, Virginia, two parallel research efforts have focusedon terminal area research: one is Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), and the other is the Quiet Aircraft Technologies (QAT) project. The APS objective is to increase...

  11. Method for the assessment of airborne off-target pesticide spray concentrations due to aircraft wing-tip vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Sergio Eduardo

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a method for assessing airborne concentrations caused by off-target pesticide drift. Concentrations are bounded by the worst credible circumstances within a normal aircraft pesticide spraying. It is assumed...

  12. Airborne and ground based measurements of volatile organic compounds using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry in Texas and Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, Edward Charles

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) are reported from recent airborne and surface based field campaigns. The Southeast Texas Tetroon Study (SETTS) was a project within...

  13. airborne dustfall episodes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite advanced very high resolution radiometer, and the distribution and transport of dust clouds were analyzed. The ground...

  14. airborne combustion products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: on "Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPS)" held in San Antonio, TX, January 2001. Department are appropriate for manufacture of high-quality,...

  15. airborne fine particles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system consisting of an array of high precision scintillator Time of Flight and silica Aerogel Counters, is discussed. The performances achieved in the beam tests are...

  16. airborne particles pm10: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system consisting of an array of high precision scintillator Time of Flight and silica Aerogel Counters, is discussed. The performances achieved in the beam tests are...

  17. airborne radar observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ionospheric modication by high power radio waves Physics Websites Summary: with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the rst observations of articial irregularities by...

  18. Experimental use of airborne sensors in the measurement of Mississippi River outflow into the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Don

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ZNENTAL USE OP AIRBORNE SENSORS IN THE MEASUREMBNZ OP MISSISSIPPI RIVER OUTPLO? INTO THE GULP OP I'IEXICO DON 'WAKEN Lieutenant Commander U ~ ST Navy Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... . . . . , . , 39 2 Freight-data--handling - -o- ~ . . ----. ------58 Vo. -ARQZSXS OP. RBSULTS o -~ ~ ~ o ~ o '~ o=. oo ~ ? o =-'- 63 Airborne Sensor Evaluation , . . . . . . 63 l. Xnfrared Xmagery o . . . . '. . ~ , 63 Ultraviolet Imagery ~ ~ . o ' 65 3. Aerial...

  19. An investigation of sea surface temperature patterns in the Gulf of Mexico as determined by an airborne infrared sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drennan, Kirby Lee

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF SEA SURFACE TF"PERATURE PATTERNS IN THE GULF OF IKXICO AS DETERMINED BY AN AIRBORNE INFRARED SENSOR A Thesis by KIRBY IEE DRENNAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas API University in partial tulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of 14IASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Physical Oceanography AN INVESTIGATION OF SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE PATIERNS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AS DETERMINED BY AN AIRBORNE INFRARED SENSOR A Thesis by KIRBY LEE DRENNAN Approved...

  20. Spectral Diagnostics of Active Prominences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Labrosse; Pierre Gouttebroze; Jean-Claude Vial

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active prominences exhibit plasma motions, resulting in difficulties with the interpretation of spectroscopic observations. These solar features being strongly influenced by the radiation coming from the solar disk, Doppler dimming or brightening effects may arise, depending on which lines are observed and on the velocity of the plasma. Interlocking between the different atomic energy levels and non local thermodynamic equilibrium lead to non-trivial spectral line profiles, and this calls for complex numerical modelling of the radiative transfer in order to understand the observations. We present such a tool, which solves the radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium for H, He I, He II, and Ca II, in moving prominences where radial plasma motions are taking place. It is found that for isothermal, isobaric prominence models, the He II resonance lines are very sensitive to the Doppler effect and show a strong Doppler dimming. The Ca II lines are not very sensitive to the Doppler effect for the prominence models considered here. We illustrate how the code makes it possible to retrieve the plasma thermodynamic parameters by comparing computed and observed line profiles of hydrogen and helium resonance lines in a quiescent prominence.

  1. Apparatus for real-time airborne particulate radionuclide collection and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smart, John E. (West Richland, WA); Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus for collecting and analyzing an airborne particulate radionuclide having a filter mounted in a housing, the housing having an air inlet upstream of the filter and an air outlet downstream of the filter, wherein an air stream flows therethrough. The air inlet receives the air stream, the filter collects the airborne particulate radionuclide and permits a filtered air stream to pass through the air outlet. The improvement which permits real time counting is a gamma detecting germanium diode mounted downstream of the filter in the filtered air stream. The gamma detecting germanium diode is spaced apart from a downstream side of the filter a minimum distance for a substantially maximum counting detection while permitting substantially free air flow through the filter and uniform particulate radionuclide deposition on the filter.

  2. A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

  3. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  4. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  5. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  6. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kotula, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  7. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  8. Spectral equivalences from Bethe Ansatz equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorey, P; Tateo, R; Dorey, Patrick; Dunning, Clare; Tateo, Roberto

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation for the potential $x^6+\\alpha x^2 +l(l+1)/x^2$ has many interesting properties. For certain values of the parameters l and alpha the equation is in turn supersymmetric (Witten), quasi-exactly solvable (Turbiner), and it also appears in Lipatov's approach to high energy QCD. In this paper we signal some further curious features of these theories, namely novel spectral equivalences with particular second- and third-order differential equations. These relationships are obtained via a recently-observed connection between the theories of ordinary differential equations and integrable models. Generalised supersymmetry transformations acting at the quasi-exactly solvable points are also pointed out, and an efficient numerical procedure for the study of these and related problems is described. Finally we generalise slightly and then prove a conjecture due to Bessis, Zinn-Justin, Bender and Boettcher, concerning the reality of the spectra of certain PT-symmetric quantum-mecha...

  9. Spectral energy distributions of selfgravitating QSO discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwin Sirko; Jeremy Goodman

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of steady accretion discs at high accretion rates, as appropriate for bright QSOs, under the assumption that the outer parts are heated sufficiently to maintain marginal gravitational stability, presumably by massive stars formed within the disc. The SED is independent of the nature of these auxiliary sources if their inputs are completely thermalized. Standard assumptions are made for angular momentum transport, with an alpha parameter less than unity. With these prescriptions, the luminosity of the disc is sensitive to its opacity, in contrast to standard discs powered by release of orbital energy alone. Compared to the latter, our discs have a broader SED, with a second peak in the near-infrared that is energetically comparable to the blue bump. The energy in the second peak increases with the outer radius of the disc, provided that the accretion rate is constant with radius. By comparing our computed SEDs with observed ones, we limit the outer radius of the disc to be less than 10^5 Schwarzschild radii, or about one parsec, in a typical QSO. We also discuss some properties of our minimum-Q discs in the regions where auxiliary heating is dominant (10^3-10^5 Schwarzschild radii).

  10. airborne gamma survey: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352,...

  11. airborne imaging spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352,...

  12. airborne laser mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provide such high resolution soil at 50m resolution with an L-band passive microwave radiometer, using data collected from the recent Walker, Jeff 6 SilviLaser 2008, Sept. 17-19,...

  13. airborne laser altimetry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239,...

  14. airborne gamma spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352,...

  15. airborne fallout mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provide such high resolution soil at 50m resolution with an L-band passive microwave radiometer, using data collected from the recent Walker, Jeff 2 Objective landslide detection...

  16. Running spectral index from inflation with modulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu, E-mail: takeshi.kobayashi@ipmu.jp, E-mail: fuminobu.takahashi@ipmu.jp [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that a large negative running spectral index, if confirmed, might suggest that there are abundant structures in the inflaton potential, which result in a fairly large (both positive and negative) running of the spectral index at all scales. It is shown that the center value of the running spectral index suggested by the recent CMB data can be easily explained by an inflaton potential with superimposed periodic oscillations. In contrast to cases with constant running, the perturbation spectrum is enhanced at small scales, due to the repeated modulations. We mention that such features at small scales may be seen by 21 cm observations in the future.

  17. Warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies: I. A global view and frequency of occurrence of warm absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laha, Sibasish; Dewangan, Gulab C; Chakravorty, Susmita; Kembhavi, Ajit K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. Our goal is to characterise the warm absorber (WA) properties along the line-of-sight to the active nucleus. We significantly detect WAs in $65\\%$ of the sample sources. Our results are consistent with WAs being present in at least half of the Seyfert galaxies in the nearby Universe, in agreement with previous estimates . We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range $0.5<\\log\\xi<1.5$ which we interpret as a thermally unstable region for WA clouds. This may indicate that the warm absorber flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds rather than a continuous medium. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe K$\\alpha$ lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission l...

  18. Warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies: I. A global view and frequency of occurrence of warm absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laha, Sibasish; Dewangan, Gulab C; Chakravorty, Susmita; Kembhavi, Ajit K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. Our goal is to characterise the warm absorber (WA) properties along the line-of-sight to the active nucleus. We significantly detect WAs in $65\\%$ of the sample sources. Our results are consistent with WAs being present in at least half of the Seyfert galaxies in the nearby Universe, in agreement with previous estimates . We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range $0.5warm absorber flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds rather than a continuous medium. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe K$\\alpha$ lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission l...

  19. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  20. Gamma-analysis of airborne particulates sampled in Youzhno-Sakhalinsk town at March - April 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Tertyshnik; V. P. Martynenko; F. A. Andreev; G. B. Artemyev

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The experience of discovery of the radioactive products which have released into atmosphere of Sakhalin region from Fukushima Daiichi accident is presented. Sampling of airborne particulates and atmosphere fallout was carried out by means of the air ventilation set and horizontal gauze planchs, respectively. The HPGe detector was used for gamma analyses of the airborne samples. Since 23 March we confidently measured 131I in the airborne samples, after 03.04.2011 we also registered a rise of activity 137Cs and 134Cs. 132Te and 132I were discovered in ashen sample of the planch, which had exposed in Youzhno-Kurilk from 14 to 17 March. The effect of the pairs production when in the samples 208Tl presence, which emits gamma-quanta of 2615 keV, causes a rise in apparatus spectra of the peak corresponding to energy 1593 keV, which could be in error ascribed to 140La. It had been experimentally shown that the systematic reduction of 134Cs content in measuring samples due to effect of gamma - gamma coincidence did not exceed 7 % (for the detector and geometry of the measurement used).

  1. Color and spectral analysis of daylight in southern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier Hernndez-andrs; Javier Romero; Juan L. Nieves; Raymond L. Lee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the colorimetric and spectral characteristics of 2600 daylight spectra (global spectral irradiances on a horizontal surface) measured for all sky states during a 2-year period at Granada, Spain. We describe in detail the chromaticity coordinates, correlated color temperatures (CCT), luminous efficacies, and relative UV and IR contents of Granada daylight. The chromaticity coordinates of Granada daylight lie far above the CIE locus at high CCTs (?9000 K), and a CCT of 5700 K best typifies this daylight. Our principalcomponents analysis shows that Granada daylight spectra can be adequately represented by using sixdimensional linear models in the visible, whereas seven-dimensional models are required if we include the UV or near-IR. Yet on average only three-dimensional models are needed to reconstruct spectra that are colorimetrically indistinguishable from the original spectra. 2001 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 010.1290, 330.1710, 330.1730. 1.

  2. Spatial and spectral filtering of supercontinuum emission generated in microstructure fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhou, Ping; Tarasevitch, A P; Linde, D von der [Institut fur Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Universitat Essen, Essen (Germany); Kondrat'ev, Yu N; Shevandin, V S; Dukel'skii, K V; Khokhlov, A V [All-Russian Scientific Centre 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute', St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bagayev, S N [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Smirnov, Valerii B [Russian Center of Laser Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The mode structure of supercontinuum emission generated by femtosecond pulses of Ti:sapphire laser radiation in microstructure fibres is studied. The long-wavelength (720 - 900 nm) and visible (400 - 600 nm) parts of supercontinuum are shown to be emitted in spectrally separable isolated spatial modes. These spectrally sliced single modes of supercontinuum emission possess a high spatial quality, verified by efficient nonlinear-optical frequency conversion. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  3. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geosciences Division, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA; Hammack, R.W.

    2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  4. Stabilized Semi-Implicit Spectral Deferred Correction Methods for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words and phrases. spectral defect correction, spectral-Galerkin method, method of lines, Allen-Cahn and ...... [21] Anita T. Layton and Michael L. Minion.

  5. anomalous gluon spectral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    non-perturbative gluon spectral functions at finite temperature in quenched QCD with the maximum entropy method. We also provide a closed loop equation for the spectral function...

  6. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stork, Christopher L. (Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark H. (Middletown, DE)

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  7. Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridriksson, Joel Karl

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

  8. Automatic Construction of Building Footprints from Airborne LIDAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    data are essential for construc- tion of urban landscape models, assessment of urban heat island effect for extraction of building footprints. Manual derivation of building geometric data from a remote sensing image due to the influence of sun shadow and relief displacement of high buildings in remote sensing images

  9. Spectral classification of stars based on LAMOST spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Bo; Wan, Jun-Chen; Deng, Li-Cai; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we select the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of stars from the LAMOST data andmap theirMK classes to the spectral features. The equivalentwidths of the prominent spectral lines, playing the similar role as the multi-color photometry, form a clean stellar locus well ordered by MK classes. The advantage of the stellar locus in line indices is that it gives a natural and continuous classification of stars consistent with either the broadly used MK classes or the stellar astrophysical parameters. We also employ a SVM-based classification algorithm to assignMK classes to the LAMOST stellar spectra. We find that the completenesses of the classification are up to 90% for A and G type stars, while it is down to about 50% for OB and K type stars. About 40% of the OB and K type stars are mis-classified as A and G type stars, respectively. This is likely owe to the difference of the spectral features between the late B type and early A type stars or between the late G and early K type stars are very we...

  10. New H-band Stellar Spectral Libraries for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora, O; Prieto, C Allende; Carrera, R; Koesterke, L; Edvardsson, B; Castelli, F; Plez, B; Bizyaev, D; Cunha, K; Perez, A E Garcia; Gustafsson, B; Holtzman, J A; Lawler, J E; Majewski, S R; Manchado, A; Meszaros, Sz; Shane, N; Shetrone, M; Smith, V V; Zasowski, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey--III (SDSS--III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high resolution (R $\\sim$ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ($>$ 100) spectra in the H$-$band spectral region ($\\sim$1.5$-$1.7 $\\mu$m) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed specific spectral libraries with effective temperature ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analysis of the survey data. The spectral libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS--III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASS$\\epsilon$T spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of stellar spectral libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASS$\\epsilon$T ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$5500 K) grids of synthetic spectra cover a wide range of metallicity ($-$2.5 $\\leq...

  11. Introductory Remarks: ARM AVP Workshop on Advances in Airborne Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergyBPA-Film-Collection Sign In AbouttoTwo

  12. Spectral and High-Order Methods with ... - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    trigonometric functions), the equivalent form does not exist and the codes given in this section will not ...... curate point values uj+1/2. For finite ...... where the readers will find many model problems in mechanics, vibrations, linear and nonlinear...

  13. Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing:DOE NationalCommittee

  14. analysis reveals high: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in spectral lines covering a large temperature range from 104 K to 106 K. The spectral analysis revealed that a sudden heating from an energy deposition is followed by a high...

  15. Undecidability of the Spectral Gap (short version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubitt, Toby; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral gap -- the difference in energy between the ground state and the first excited state -- is one of the most important properties of a quantum many-body system. Quantum phase transitions occur when the spectral gap vanishes and the system becomes critical. Much of physics is concerned with understanding the phase diagrams of quantum systems, and some of the most challenging and long-standing open problems in theoretical physics concern the spectral gap, such as the Haldane conjecture that the Heisenberg chain is gapped for integer spin, proving existence of a gapped topological spin liquid phase, or the Yang-Mills gap conjecture (one of the Millennium Prize problems). These problems are all particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: Given a quantum many-body Hamiltonian, is the system it describes gapped or gapless? Here we show that this problem is undecidable, in the same sense as the Halting Problem was proven to be undecidable by Turing. A consequence of this is that the spectral gap...

  16. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Boye, Clinton A. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Descour, Michael R. (Tucson, AZ)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  17. PetrovGalerkin Spectral Elements 1 A PetrovGalerkin Spectral Element Technique for Heterogeneous Porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in spirit to a mixed finite element method or a PetrovGalerkin scheme. If the sequence of orthogonal commonly used for finite element approximations [14]. The technique proceeds by integrating against ``testPetrovGalerkin Spectral Elements 1 A PetrovGalerkin Spectral Element Technique for Heterogeneous

  18. Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

  19. Structural Analysis of Laplacian Spectral Properties in Complex Electric Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preciado, Victor M; Verghese, George C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent interest for power grid architectures, we study the relationship between structural features of electrical transmission networks and the behavior of certain dynamical processes taking place in the network. The spectrum of the Laplacian matrix plays a key role in a wide range of networked dynamical problems, from transient stability analysis to distributed control. Using methods from algebraic graph theory and convex optimization, we study the relationship between structural features of the network and spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We illustrate our results by studying the influence of structural properties on the Laplacian eigenvalues of the American (western states), Spanish and French high-voltage transmission networks.

  20. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  1. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  2. The particulate and vapor phase components of airborne polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal gasification pilot plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brink, Eric Jon

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the hot gases flow into a condenser where they are (1-3, 7) cooled and the liquid sulfur 1s removed. The final steps 1n the gasif1cation process are to compr ess the methanated gas from appr oximately 140 psig to pipel1ne pr essure of 1000 psig...THE PARTICULATE AND VAPOR PHASE COMPONENTS OF AIRBORNE POLYAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS(PAHs) IN COAL GASIFICATION PILOT PLANTS A Thesis by ERIC JON BRINK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment...

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME V)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYouQualityAirborne Carbon Measurements

  4. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  5. Soft X-ray spectral variability of AM Herculis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Beuermann; E. El Kholy; K. Reinsch

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Polars (AM Herculis binaries) are a prominent class of bright soft X-ray sources, many of which were discovered with ROSAT. We present a homogenous analysis of all the pointed ROSAT PSPC observations of polars subdivided into two papers that discuss the prototype polar AM Her in detail and summarize the class properties of all other polars. We derive the high-state soft X-ray flux and short-term spectral variability of AM Her using a new detector response matrix and a confirmed flux calibration of the ROSAT PSPC below 0.28 keV. The best-fit mean single-blackbody temperature and integrated bright-phase energy flux of AM Her in its April 1991 high state are 27.2 +/- 1.0 eV and (2.6 +/- 0.6) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1, respectively. The total blackbody flux of a multi-temperature model that fits both the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components is Fbb = (4.5 +/- 1.5) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1. The total accretion luminosity at a distance of 80 pc, Lbb = (2.1 +/- 0.7) x 10^33 erg s-1, implies an accretion rate of Mdot = (2.4 +/- 0.8) x 10^-10 Msun yr^-1 for an 0.78 Msun white dwarf. The soft X-ray flux displays significant variability on time scales down to 200 ms. Correlated spectral and count-rate variations are seen in flares on time scales down to 1 s, demonstrating the heating and cooling associated with individual accretion events. Our spectral and temporal analysis provides direct evidence for the blobby accretion model and suggests a connection between the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components.

  6. Health physics manual of good practices for the prompt detection of airborne plutonium in the workplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities on the prompt detection of airborne plutonium in the workplace. Information is first given to aid in detection systems that will function effectively in various workplaces. Steps in designing a system are covered: its general requirements, the plotting of workplace sources of plutonium, and methods of determining workplace airflow patterns. Guidance is provided on the proper numbers and locations of probe sites, the orientation of probes for representative sampling, and the mixture of stationary and portable probes. Recommendations for delivery in sampling systems include examination of particle loss and self-absorption problems, methods of eliminating air leakage in the system, and optimization of decontamination capabilities. System flow rate, requirements in a collection medium, burial loss and pressure drop, and prudent frequency of renewing the collection medium are among air sampling considerations covered. After a discussion of controlling airflow and of vacuum sources and system backups, the checkpoints to ensure system reliability are listed. The manual then discusses instrument specifications that provide correct airborne plutonium concentrations and reliably activate alarms. Focusing on the interrelationship of all components, essential factors in instrument reliability are addressed: the regulatory lower limit of detection and performance specifications of detectors and filters, maintenance and calibration requirements, and features of commonly used plutonium air-sampling instruments. Finally, the manual advises on establishing a documentation program to archive and evaluate the performance of a plutonium air-sampling program.

  7. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  8. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Christine M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Joseph C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark W. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  9. The Blazar Spectral Sequence and GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Maraschi; G. Ghisellini; F. Tavecchio

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status and understanding of the "spectral sequence" of blazars is discussed in the perspective of the upcoming GLAST launch. The vast improvement in sensitivity will allow to i) determine more objectively the "average" gamma-ray properties of classes objects ii) probe more deeply the ratio between accretion power and jet power in different systems.

  10. Conditionally Convergent Spectral Sequences Contents Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 Half-plane spectral sequences with entering di erentials. 20 ... By popular demand, this paper presents material that has long circulated in. preprint ...... we de ne spectra Ys, uniquely up to homotopy, by the exact triangles. X. 1 s !X. sf. s !

  11. 2, 13171350, 2002 Influence of spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    effects and they are a key factor in bal- ancing global climate (e.g. Houghton et al., 1996 is the most important solar20 spectral radiation for the formation of newly formed aerosols. In the end we are amongst other constituents responsible for light scattering, cloud formation and heterogeneous chemical

  12. Evaluation of DART 3D model in the thermal domain using satellite/airborne imagery and ground-based measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Evaluation of DART 3D model in the thermal domain using satellite/airborne imagery and ground ISSN0143-1161print/ISSN1366-5901, DOI:10.1080/01431161.2010.524672 jean to energy fluxes at the earth's surface. Its physical magnitude is defined as the effective kinetic

  13. A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling which included various single- layer and multilayer cloud conditions. Overall, the CO2-slicing method

  14. Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Kaiguang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for realtime remote sensing platforms, e.g., to provide timely information for urgent applications. This study aims to develop an airborne profiling LiDAR system, featured with on-the-fly data processing, for near real- or real- time forest inventory...

  15. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessmentUse of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research SUSAN K. MAXWELLa , JAYMIE R. MELIKERb AND PIERRE GOOVAERTSc a U.S. Geological

  16. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  17. Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear. Introduction The radon-related absorbed dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218-term measurements of the concentrations of radon progeny or the equilibrium factor F, among other information

  18. EMAG2: A 2arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mller, Dietmar

    grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2EMAG2: A 2arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, I-19020 Fezzano, Italy [1] A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from

  19. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  20. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, New York 10024-5192 (United States); Dullemond, Cornelis P., E-mail: thomas.peters@ita.uni-heidelberg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  1. A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on a 38 kDa pre?HDL (Lp1-AI) particle . A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on...

  2. The Fourth Workshop on Recent Advances in Spectral Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chuanju

    $C^0$ tensor product finite element systems ..................................................................................................... 14 Sobolev-orthogonal polynomial approximations and the fully diagonalized spectral A multistep Legendre-Gauss spectral collocation method for nonlinear Volterra integral equations with delays

  3. Apprentice Program Alternate Proof of the Spectral Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    Math REU Apprentice Program Alternate Proof of the Spectral Theorem Julian Hartman September 17 in the apprentice class but not in this manner. Because the Spectral Theorem is such a fundamental theorem in linear

  4. OIL PRICE IMPACT ON FINANCIAL MARKETS: CO-SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR EXPORTING VERSUS IMPORTING COUNTRIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    relationship between oil and stock markets, which parallels the one between high oil prices and macroeconomicOIL PRICE IMPACT ON FINANCIAL MARKETS: CO-SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR EXPORTING VERSUS IMPORTING://www.economie.polytechnique.edu/ mailto:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00822070,version1-14May2013 #12;1 Oil price impact

  5. (10) Biscuit quality assessment by spectral imaging Jens Michael Carstensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weight humidity measurements. The data set includes biscuits from different lines and both hot and cooled. The imaging system, VideometerLab (www.videometer.com) captures 18 high resolution spectral images representations may be estimated in both the biscuit center region and in the edge/corner region. CIELAB

  6. Higher-Order Spectral/HP Finite Element Technology for Structures and Fluid Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallala, Venkat Pradeep

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This study deals with the use of high-order spectral/hp approximation functions in the ?nite element models of various nonlinear boundary-value and initial-value problems arising in the ?elds of structural mechanics and ?ows of viscous...

  7. Spectral functionals, nonholonomic Dirac operators, and noncommutative Ricci flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vacaru, Sergiu I. [Science Department, University 'Al. I. Cuza' Iasi, 54. Lascar Catargi street, Iasi, 700107 (Romania) and Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science, 222 College Street, 2nd Floor, Toronto M5T 3J1 (Canada)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a noncommutative generalization of the Ricci flow theory in the framework of spectral action approach to noncommutative geometry. Grisha Perelman's functionals are generated as commutative versions of certain spectral functionals defined by nonholonomic Dirac operators and corresponding spectral triples. We derive the formulas for spectral averaged energy and entropy functionals and state the conditions when such values describe (non)holonomic Riemannian configurations.

  8. Construction of spectral functions for medium nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur M. Ankowski; Jan T. Sobczyk

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is aimed at improving the description of lepton-nucleus interactions in the sub-GeV energy range. Approximate spectral functions for oxygen, calcium, and argon are constructed and used to obtain the electron cross sections in a given scattering angle. Comparison with a sample of available experimental data shows satisfactory agreement. Discrepancy between the presented model and the systematic computations available for oxygen [O. Benhar et al., Phys. Rev. D 72, 053005 (2005)] is also found to be very small. Analysis of appropriate kinematical regions leads to the conclusion that the obtained argon spectral function should describe well neutrino scattering in the 800-MeV energy region. Several approximations used in the model are critically reviewed. All the details needed to implement the presented approach in Monte Carlo simulations are given.

  9. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Krll

    2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  10. Generalized spectral decomposition for stochastic nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nouy, Anthony [Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics (GeM), Nantes Atlantic University, Ecole Centrale Nantes, UMR CNRS 6183, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, B.P. 92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: anthony.nouy@univ-nantes.fr; Le Maitre, Olivier P. [LIMSI-CNRS, BP133, F-91403 Orsay (France); DEN/DM2S/SFME, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay (France)], E-mail: olm@limsi.fr

    2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extension of the generalized spectral decomposition method for the resolution of nonlinear stochastic problems. The method consists in the construction of a reduced basis approximation of the Galerkin solution and is independent of the stochastic discretization selected (polynomial chaos, stochastic multi-element or multi-wavelets). Two algorithms are proposed for the sequential construction of the successive generalized spectral modes. They involve decoupled resolutions of a series of deterministic and low-dimensional stochastic problems. Compared to the classical Galerkin method, the algorithms allow for significant computational savings and require minor adaptations of the deterministic codes. The methodology is detailed and tested on two model problems, the one-dimensional steady viscous Burgers equation and a two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion problem. These examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms which exhibit convergence rates with the number of modes essentially dependent on the spectrum of the stochastic solution but independent of the dimension of the stochastic approximation space.

  11. Spectral statistics for weakly correlated random potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frdric Klopp

    2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study localization and derive stochastic estimates (in particular, Wegner and Minami estimates) for the eigenvalues of weakly correlated random discrete Schr\\"odinger operators in the localized phase. We apply these results to obtain spectral statistics for general discrete alloy type models where the single site perturbation is neither of finite rank nor of fixed sign. In particular, for the models under study, the random potential exhibits correlations at any range.

  12. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  13. Wavelet Packets for multi-and hyper-spectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehler, Martin

    Wavelet Packets for multi- and hyper-spectral imagery J. J. Benedetto, W. Czaja, M. Ehler, C. Flake spatial and spectral data distribution we combine the Wavelet Packet Transform with the linear dimension reduction method of Principal Component Analysis. Each spectral band is decomposed by means of the Wavelet

  14. Spectral Label Fusion Christian Wachinger1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golland, Polina

    off. The segmentation with spectral label fusion, which fuses image and label information, leadsSpectral Label Fusion Christian Wachinger1,2 and Polina Golland1 1 Computer Science and Artificial a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering

  15. Fast numerical treatment of nonlinear wave equations by spectral methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skjaeraasen, Olaf [ProsTek, Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, N-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Newman, D. L. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented that accelerates spectral methods for numerical solution of a broad class of nonlinear partial differential wave equations that are first order in time and that arise in plasma wave theory. The approach involves exact analytical treatment of the linear part of the wave evolution including growth and damping as well as dispersion. After introducing the method for general scalar and vector equations, we discuss and illustrate it in more detail in the context of the coupling of high- and low-frequency plasma wave modes, as modeled by the electrostatic and electromagnetic Zakharov equations in multiple dimensions. For computational efficiency, the method uses eigenvector decomposition, which is particularly advantageous when the wave damping is mode-dependent and anisotropic in wavenumber space. In this context, it is shown that the method can significantly speed up numerical integration relative to standard spectral or finite difference methods by allowing much longer time steps, especially in the limit in which the nonlinear Schroedinger equation applies.

  16. Pulsar Emission above the Spectral Break - A Stacked Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NASA's Fermi space telescope has provided us with a bountiful new population of gamma-ray sources following its discovery of 150 new gamma-ray pulsars. One common feature exhibited by all of these pulsars is the form of their spectral energy distribution, which can be described by a power law followed by a spectral break occurring between $\\sim$1 and $\\sim$8 GeV. The common wisdom is that the break is followed by an exponential cut-off driven by radiation/reaction-limited curvature emission. The discovery of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar, the only pulsar so far detected at very high energies (E$>$100GeV), contradicts this "cutoff" picture. Here we present a new stacked analysis with an average of 4.2 years of data on 115 pulsars published in the 2nd LAT catalog of pulsars. This analysis is sensitive to low-level $\\sim$100 GeV emission which cannot be resolved in individual pulsars but can be detected from an ensemble.

  17. Absolute spectral radiance responsivity calibration of sun photometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Qiuyun; Zheng Xiaobing; Zhang Wei; Wang Xianhua; Li Jianjun; Li Xin [Key Laboratory of Optical Calibration and Characterization, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Zhengqiang [Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq 59655 (France) and State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Institute of Remote Sensing Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sun photometers are designed to measure direct solar irradiance and diffused sky radiance for the purpose of atmospheric parameters characterization. A sun photometer is usually calibrated by using a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source for its band-averaged radiance responsivity, which normally has an uncertainty of 3%-5% at present. Considering the calibration coefficients may also change with time, a regular high precision calibration is important to maintain data quality. In this paper, a tunable-laser-based facility for spectral radiance responsivity calibration has been developed at the Key Laboratory of Optical Calibration and Characterization, Chinese Academy of Sciences. A reference standard radiance radiometer, calibrated against cryogenic radiometer, is used to determine the radiance from a laser-illuminated integrating sphere source. Spectral radiance responsivity of CIMEL CE318-2 sun photometer is calibrated using this new calibration system with a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.8%. As a validation, the derived band-averaged radiance responsivity are compared to that from a Goddard Space Flight Center lamp-based sphere calibration and good agreements (difference <1.4%) are found from 675 to 1020 nm bands.

  18. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman microspectroscopy using spectral focusing with glass dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha-Mendoza, Israel; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola [School of Biosciences and School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate experimentally that coherent anti-Stokes Raman microspectroscopy with high spectral resolution is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses chirped up to a few picoseconds by glass elements of known group-velocity dispersion without significant intensity losses. By simply choosing the length of the glass, the chirp of Stokes and pump pulses is tailored to obtain a spectral resolution given by the Fourier limit of the chirped pulse duration. We show that for chirped pulse durations shorter than or comparable to the Raman coherence time, maximum signal occurs for a pump arriving after the Stokes pulse, a time-ordering effect confirmed by numerical simulations.

  19. Airborne Multisensor Pod System, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo, G.M.; Sanford, N.M. [eds.] [eds.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.

  20. Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

  1. An overview of airborne radioactive emissions at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, F.A.; Dvorak, R.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strict control is essential over any emissions of radioactivity in the ventilation exhaust from facilities where radioactive materials may become airborne. At Los Alamos National Laboratory there are 87 stacks exhausting ventilation air to the environment from operations with a potential for radioactive emissions. These stacks cover the diverse operations at all Laboratory facilities where radioactive materials are handled and require continuous sampling/monitoring to detect levels of contamination. An overview is presented of the operations, associated ventilation exhaust cleanup systems, and analysis of the emissions. In keeping with the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable concept, emissions of radionuclides are reduced whenever practicable. A specific example describing the reduction of emissions from the linear accelerator beam stop area at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility during 1985 by a factor of 8 over previous emissions is presented.

  2. The Spectral Backbone of Excitation Transport in Ultra-Cold Rydberg Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholak, Torsten; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral structure underlying excitonic energy transfer in ultra-cold Rydberg gases is studied numerically, in the framework of random matrix theory, and via self-consistent diagrammatic techniques. Rydberg gases are made up of randomly distributed, highly polarizable atoms that interact via strong dipolar forces. Dynamics in such a system is fundamentally different from cases in which the interactions are of short range, and is ultimately determined by the spectral and eigenvector structure. In the energy levels' spacing statistics, we find evidence for a critical energy that separates delocalized eigenstates from states that are localized at pairs or clusters of atoms separated by less than the typical nearest-neighbor distance. We argue that the dipole blockade effect in Rydberg gases can be leveraged to manipulate this transition across a wide range: As the blockade radius increases, the relative weight of localized states is reduced. At the same time, the spectral statistics -- in particular, the den...

  3. Semiclassical Analysis of Spectral Singularities and Their Applications in Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Mostafazadeh

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by possible applications of spectral singularities in optics, we develop a semiclassical method of computing spectral singularities. We use this method to examine the spectral singularities of a planar slab gain medium whose gain coefficient varies due to the exponential decay of the intensity of pumping beam inside the medium. For both singly- and doubly-pumped samples, we obtain universal upper bounds on the decay constant beyond which no lasing occurs. Furthermore, we show that the dependence of the wavelength of the spectral singularities on the value of the decay constant is extremely mild. This is an indication of the stability of optical spectral singularities.

  4. Atmospheric parameters, spectral indexes and their relation to CPV spectral performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez, Rubn, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Antn, Ignacio, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Askins, Steve, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Sala, Gabriel, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es [Instituto de Energa Solar - Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Instituto de Energa Solar, ETSI Telecomunicacin, Ciudad Universitaria 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Mass and atmosphere components (basically aerosol (AOD) and precipitable water (PW)) define the absorption of the sunlight that arrive to Earth. Radiative models such as SMARTS or MODTRAN use these parameters to generate an equivalent spectrum. However, complex and expensive instruments (as AERONET network devices) are needed to obtain AOD and PW. On the other hand, the use of isotype cells is a convenient way to characterize spectrally a place for CPV considering that they provide the photocurrent of the different internal subcells individually. Crossing data from AERONET station and a Tri-band Spectroheliometer, a model that correlates Spectral Mismatch Ratios and atmospheric parameters is proposed. Considering the amount of stations of AERONET network, this model may be used to estimate the spectral influence on energy performance of CPV systems close to all the stations worldwide.

  5. Airborne protected military satellite communications : analysis of open-loop pointing and closed-loop tracking with noisy platform attitude information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deike, William D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. military assets' increasing need for secure global communications has led to the design and fabrication of airborne satellite communication terminals that operate under protected security protocol. Protected transmission ...

  6. Spectral engineering of coupled open-access microcavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatten, L C; Smith, J M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open-access microcavities are emerging as a new approach to confine and engineer light down to the {\\lambda}^3 regime. Indeed, they offer direct access to a highly confined electromagnetic field while maintaining tunability of the system and flexibility on the light emitter studied. In this article, we present the first development beyond the single open-access cavity design using a Focused Ion Beam fabrication method. Based on experimental and theoretical investigation, we demonstrate the engineering of the coupling between two open-access microcavities with radius of curvature of 6 {\\mu}m. We study the evolution of spectral, spatial and polarisation properties through a transition from isolated to coupled cavities. Normal mode splittings up to 20 meV are observed for total mode volumes around 10 {\\lambda}^3 . This work is of importance for future development of photonic circuits for quantum computation, optical meta-materials and lab-on-a-chip sensing.

  7. A comparative study of collection efficiencies using 0.80 and 1.2 micrometer pore size filters in evaluating airborne asbestos dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Grady Lynn

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. RO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A Thesis by GRADY LYNN HOLT Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974. Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene A COMPARATIVE . TUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. BO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A...

  8. A comparative study of collection efficiencies using 0.80 and 1.2 micrometer pore size filters in evaluating airborne asbestos dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Grady Lynn

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. RO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A Thesis by GRADY LYNN HOLT Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974. Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene A COMPARATIVE . TUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. BO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A...

  9. Spectral statistics of nearly unidirectional quantum graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maram Akila; Boris Gutkin

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy levels of a quantum graph with time reversal symmetry and unidirectional classical dynamics are doubly degenerate and obey the spectral statistics of the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble. These degeneracies, however, are lifted when the unidirectionality is broken in one of the graph's vertices by a singular perturbation. Based on a Random Matrix model we derive an analytic expression for the nearest neighbour distribution between energy levels of such systems. As we demonstrate the result agrees excellently with the actual statistics for graphs with a uniform distribution of eigenfunctions. Yet, it exhibits quite substantial deviations for classes of graphs which show strong scarring.

  10. Theoretical aspects of relativistic spectral features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    2006-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The inner parts of black-hole accretion discs shine in X-rays which can be monitored and the observed spectra can be used to trace strong gravitational fields in the place of emission and along paths of light rays. This paper summarizes several aspects of how the spectral features are influenced by relativistic effects. We focus our attention onto variable and broad emission lines, origin of which can be attributed to the presence of orbiting patterns -- spots and spiral waves in the disc. We point out that the observed spectrum can determine parameters of the central black hole provided the intrinsic local emissivity is constrained by theoretical models.

  11. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  12. Instanton effects and quantum spectral curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Kallen; Marcos Marino

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a spectral problem associated to the quantization of a spectral curve arising in local mirror symmetry. The perturbative WKB quantization condition is determined by the quantum periods, or equivalently by the refined topological string in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili (NS) limit. We show that the information encoded in the quantum periods is radically insufficient to determine the spectrum: there is an infinite series of instanton corrections, which are non-perturbative in \\hbar, and lead to an exact WKB quantization condition. Moreover, we conjecture the precise form of the instanton corrections: they are determined by the standard or un-refined topological string free energy, and we test our conjecture successfully against numerical calculations of the spectrum. This suggests that the non-perturbative sector of the NS refined topological string contains information about the standard topological string. As an application of the WKB quantization condition, we explain some recent observations relating membrane instanton corrections in ABJM theory to the refined topological string.

  13. Self-averaging characteristics of spectral fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Braun; Fritz Haake

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral form factor as well as the two-point correlator of the density of (quasi-)energy levels of individual quantum dynamics are not self-averaging. Only suitable smoothing turns them into useful characteristics of spectra. We present numerical data for a fully chaotic kicked top, employing two types of smoothing: one involves primitives of the spectral correlator, the second a small imaginary part of the quasi-energy. Self-averaging universal (like the CUE average) behavior is found for the smoothed correlator, apart from noise which shrinks like $1\\over\\sqrt N$ as the dimension $N$ of the quantum Hilbert space grows. There are periodically repeated quasi-energy windows of correlation decay and revival wherein the smoothed correlation remains finite as $N\\to\\infty$ such that the noise is negligible. In between those windows (where the CUE averaged correlator takes on values of the order ${1\\over N^2}$) the noise becomes dominant and self-averaging is lost. We conclude that the noise forbids distinction of CUE and GUE type behavior. Surprisingly, the underlying smoothed generating function does not enjoy any self-averaging outside the range of its variables relevant for determining the two-point correlator (and certain higher-order ones). --- We corroborate our numerical findings for the noise by analytically determining the CUE variance of the smoothed single-matrix correlator.

  14. Radio morphology and spectral analysis of cD galaxies in rich and poor galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Giacintucci; T. Venturi; M. Murgia; D. Dallacasa; R. Athreya; S. Bardelli; P. Mazzotta; D. J. Saikia

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a radio morphological study and spectral analysis for a sample of 13 cD galaxies in rich and poor clusters of galaxies.} Our study is based on new high sensitivity Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 1.28 GHz, 610 MHz and 235 MHz, and on archival data. From a statistical sample of cluster cD galaxies we selected those sources with little information available in the literature and promising for the detection of aged radio emission. Beyond the high sensitivity images for all 13 radio galaxies, we present also a detailed spectral analysis for 7 of them. We found a variety of morphologies and linear sizes, as typical for radio galaxies in the radio power range sampled here (low to intermediate power radio galaxies). The spectral analysis shows that 10/13 radio galaxies have steep radio spectrum, with spectral index $\\alpha \\ge 1$. In general, the radiative ages and growth velocities are consistent with previous findings that the evolution of radio galaxies at the cluster centres is affected by the dense external medium (i.e. low growth velocities and old ages. We suggest that the dominant galaxies in A 2622 and MKW 03s are dying radio sources, which at present are not fed by nuclear activity. On the other hand, the spectacular source at the centre of A 2372 might be a very interesting example of restarted radio galaxy. For this source we estimated a life cycle of the order of 10$^6$ yr.

  15. Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

  16. Periodic Schrdinger operators with local defects and spectral pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Cancs; Virginie Ehrlacher; Yvon Maday

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This article deals with the numerical calculation of eigenvalues of perturbed periodic Schr\\"odinger operators located in spectral gaps. Such operators are encountered in the modeling of the electronic structure of crystals with local defects, and of photonic crystals. The usual finite element Galerkin approximation is known to give rise to spectral pollution. In this article, we give a precise description of the corresponding spurious states. We then prove that the supercell model does not produce spectral pollution. Lastly, we extend results by Lewin and S\\'er\\'e on some no-pollution criteria. In particular, we prove that using approximate spectral projectors enables one to eliminate spectral pollution in a given spectral gap of the reference periodic Sch\\"odinger operator.

  17. Shear viscosity and spectral function of the quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaharu Iwasaki; Hiromasa Ohnishi; Takahiko Fukutome

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the shear viscosity of the quark matter by using the Kubo-Mori formula. It is found that the shear viscosity is expressed in terms of the quark spectral function. If the spectral function is approximated by a modified Bright-Wigner type, the viscosity decreases as the width of the spectral function increases. We also discuss dependence of the shear viscosity on the temperature and the density.

  18. A UNSTRUCTURED NODAL SPECTRAL-ELEMENT METHOD FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    [19] S. J. Sherwin and G. E. Karniadakis. A triangular spectral element method; applications to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Comput. Methods...

  19. Parallel spectral-element direction splitting method for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 14, 2014 ... [10] George E. Karniadakis, Spencer J. Sherwin, Spectral/hp Element Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics, Oxford University Press,...

  20. An Infrared Spectral Database for Detection of Gases Emitted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database for Detection of Gases Emitted by Biomass Burning. An Infrared Spectral Database for Detection of Gases Emitted by Biomass Burning. Abstract: We report the construction of...

  1. DESCRIPTION OF A SPECTRAL ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MONITORING NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spectral atmospheric radiation data. The large cylindricalexisting integrated net radiation data is of impor- tance,infrared radiation intensities. The data is permanently

  2. On the application of the spectral projected gradient method in ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    On the application of the spectral projected gradient method in image segmentation. 7. (a) cameraman 204 204. (b) carplate 285 224. (c) granite 225 נ...

  3. Applications and Efficient Computation of Spectral Coefficients for Digital Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Mitchell

    75275 (214)7682861 FAX:(214)7683085 mitch@seas.smu.edu, nair@seas.smu.edu Abstract Spectral methods

  4. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Euntaek Lee, Ri-Liang Heng, and Laurent Pilon Mechanical andE. Lee, R. -L. Heng, and L. Pilon, 2013. Spectral Optical

  5. Spectral Characteristic Evolution: A New Algorithm for Gravitational Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey J. Handmer; Bla Szilgyi

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectral algorithm for solving the full nonlinear vacuum Einstein field equations in the Bondi framework. Developed within the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC), we demonstrate spectral characteristic evolution as a technical precursor to Cauchy Characteristic Extraction (CCE), a rigorous method for obtaining gauge-invariant gravitational waveforms from existing and future astrophysical simulations. We demonstrate the new algorithm's stability, convergence, and agreement with existing evolution methods. We explain how an innovative spectral approach enables a two orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency.

  6. atom spectral energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y. Polatoglu 2008-04-01 3 Inhomogeneous spectral moment sum rules for the retarded Green function and self-energy of strongly correlated electrons or ultracold fermionic...

  7. A masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Anstreicher

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 16, 2003 ... Abstract: We introduce a new masked spectral bound for the maximum-entropy sampling problem. This bound is a continuous generalization of...

  8. Consequences of Flooding on Spectral Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Rudolf; Normann Mertig; Steffen Lck; Arnd Bcker

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study spectral statistics in systems with a mixed phase space, in which regions of regular and chaotic motion coexist. Increasing their density of states, we observe a transition of the level-spacing distribution P(s) from Berry-Robnik to Wigner statistics, although the underlying classical phase-space structure and the effective Planck constant remain unchanged. This transition is induced by flooding, i.e., the disappearance of regular states due to increasing regular-to-chaotic couplings. We account for this effect by a flooding-improved Berry-Robnik distribution, in which an effectively reduced size of the regular island enters. To additionally describe power-law level repulsion at small spacings, we extend this prediction by explicitly considering the tunneling couplings between regular and chaotic states. This results in a flooding- and tunneling-improved Berry-Robnik distribution which is in excellent agreement with numerical data.

  9. Topologically Universal Spectral Hierarchies of Quasiperiodic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological properties of energy spectra of general one-dimensional quasiperiodic systems, describing also Bloch electrons in magnetic fields, are studied for an infinity of irrational modulation frequencies corresponding to irrational numbers of flux quanta per unit cell. These frequencies include well-known ones considered in works on Fibonacci quasicrystals. It is shown that the spectrum for any such frequency exhibits a self-similar hierarchy of clusters characterized by universal (system-independent) values of Chern topological integers which are exactly determined. The cluster hierarchy provides a simple and systematic organization of all the spectral gaps, labeled by universal topological numbers which are exactly determinable, thus avoiding their numerical evaluation using rational approximants of the irrational frequency. These numbers give both the quantum Hall conductance of the system and the winding number of the edge-state energy traversing a gap as a Bloch quasimomentum is varied.

  10. The Spectral Structure of Correlator Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam C. Lichtl

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In lattice QCD spectrum calculations, it is desirable to obtain multiple excited state energies in each symmetry channel. Typically, one constructs several interpolating operators for the symmetry channel of interest, forms the `correlator matrix' of all possible two-point functions, and uses the variational method to obtain as many energy levels as possible. We present a detailed look at this last step, starting from a discussion of the symmetry properties and spectral structure of the correlator matrix. We continue by motivating and describing the variational method, before discussing some conceptual and practical challenges concerning the light baryon sector. We conclude by mentioning some alternate spectrum extraction methods currently under study. Throughout, we attempt to quantify all approximations and assumptions, and we illustrate our points using a nucleon correlator matrix estimated on dynamical two-flavor lattice data.

  11. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  12. Fast Spectral Fitting of Hard X-Ray Bremsstrahlung from Truncated Power-Law Electron Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Brown; J. Kasparova; A. M. Massone; M. Piana

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard X-Ray bremsstrahlung continuum spectra, such as from solar flares, are commonly described in terms of power-law fits, either to the photon spectra themselves or to the electron spectra responsible for them. In applications various approximate relations between electron and photon spectral indices are often used for energies both above and below electron low-energy cutoffs. We examine the form of the exact relationships in various situations, and for various cross-sections, showing that empirical relations sometimes used can be highly misleading and consider how to improve fitting procedures. We obtain expressions for photon spectra from single, double and truncated power-law electron spectra for a variety of cross-sections and for the thin and thick target models and simple analytic expressions for the Bethe-Heitler cases. We show that above a low-energy cutoff the Kramers and Bethe-Heitler results match reasonably well with results for exact cross-sections up to energies around 100 keV; that below the low-energy cutoff, Kramers and other constant spectral index forms commonly used are very poor approximations to accurate results; but that our analytical forms are a very good match. Analytical forms of the Bethe-Heitler photon spectra from general power-law electron spectra are an excellent match to exact results for both thin and thick targets and they enable much faster spectral fitting than evaluation of the full spectral integrations.

  13. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: FOUR YEARS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruber, David; Von Ahlefeld, Victoria Weller; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, Dave; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cleveland, William H. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 triggered GRBs. Four different spectral models were fitted to the data, resulting in a compendium of more than 7500 spectra. The analysis was performed similarly but not identically to Goldstein et al. All 487 GRBs from the first two years have been re-fitted using the same methodology as that of the 456 GRBs in years three and four. We describe, in detail, our procedure and criteria for the analysis and present the results in the form of parameter distributions both for the observer-frame and rest-frame quantities. The data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  14. Single particle spectral function in iron pnictide superconductors within two band model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rani, Luxmi, E-mail: Luxmiphyiitr@gmail.com; Ajay, E-mail: Luxmiphyiitr@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Saharanpur Campus, Saharanpur- 247001 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly discovered iron based superconductors have shown a great deal of interest in the condensed matter physics community around the world to explore the experimental and theoretical aspects of electronic properties of these materials to underline the technological potential. These materials have a layered tetragonal crystal structure and generally show small anisotropy. Based on ARPES data to understand the band structure of these systems, we present a theoretical tight binding model and numerical computation of the single particle spectral function within two orbital per site for iron pnictide superconductors. The two band tight binding model Hamiltonian containing various orbitals hopping energies, intra- and inter- band electronic correlations and Hunds coupling energy in Fe 3d orbitals has been used. The expressions of single particle spectral function have been obtained by employing the Greens function equation of motion approach within BCS-mean-field approximation. The spectral function is numerically computed at different k-points of Brillouin zone in extended s-wave paring symmetry. It is noticed that the behavior of electronic states is different at different k-points of Brillouin zone and highly influenced by onsite Coulomb interactions. Further, It is predicted that the presence of onsite coulomb correlation suppress the spectral weight close to Fermi level in iron pnictide systems. On the basis of numerical computation we have compared our theoretical results with recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopic ARPES data.

  15. The Spectral Backbone of Excitation Transport in Ultra-Cold Rydberg Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Scholak; Thomas Wellens; Andreas Buchleitner

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral structure underlying excitonic energy transfer in ultra-cold Rydberg gases is studied numerically, in the framework of random matrix theory, and via self-consistent diagrammatic techniques. Rydberg gases are made up of randomly distributed, highly polarizable atoms that interact via strong dipolar forces. Dynamics in such a system is fundamentally different from cases in which the interactions are of short range, and is ultimately determined by the spectral and eigenvector structure. In the energy levels' spacing statistics, we find evidence for a critical energy that separates delocalized eigenstates from states that are localized at pairs or clusters of atoms separated by less than the typical nearest-neighbor distance. We argue that the dipole blockade effect in Rydberg gases can be leveraged to manipulate this transition across a wide range: As the blockade radius increases, the relative weight of localized states is reduced. At the same time, the spectral statistics -- in particular, the density of states and the nearest neighbor level spacing statistics -- exhibits a transition from approximately a 1-stable L\\'evy to a Gaussian orthogonal ensemble. Deviations from random matrix statistics are shown to stem from correlations between interatomic interaction strengths that lead to an asymmetry of the spectral density and profoundly affect localization properties. We discuss approximations to the self-consistent Matsubara-Toyozawa locator expansion that incorporate these effects.

  16. Metallicities of M Dwarf Planet Hosts from Spectral Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob L. Bean; G. Fritz Benedict; Michael Endl

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first spectroscopic metallicities of three M dwarfs with known or candidate planetary mass companions. We have analyzed high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of these stars which we obtained at McDonald Observatory. Our analysis technique is based on spectral synthesis of atomic and molecular features using recently revised cool-star model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis code. The technique has been shown to yield results consistent with the analyses of solar-type stars and allows measurements of M dwarf [M/H] values to 0.12 dex precision. From our analysis, we find [M/H] = -0.12, -0.32, and -0.33 for GJ 876, GJ 436, and GJ 581 respectively. These three M dwarf planet hosts have sub-solar metallicities, a surprising departure from the trend observed in FGK-type stars. This study is the first part of our ongoing work to determine the metallicities of the M dwarfs included in the McDonald Observatory planet search program.

  17. Emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless indium halide lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, M.; Hochi, A.; Horii, S.; Matsuoka, T. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrodeless HID lamp excited by microwave has been intensively investigated because of its long life, high efficacy and environmental aspect. This study reports excellent emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless HID lamp containing indium halides. The authors investigate InI and InBr as ingredients, and measure the microwave excited spectra and luminous intensities of lamps which are made from spherical silica glass in 10--40 mm outer diameter and with various amounts of halides. It is well known that such indium halides in the usual metal-halide lamps have strong blue line emission at 410 and 451nm. But, in the authors` microwave excited lamps, continuous spectrum can be observed in addition in the visible region. Increasing input of power of microwave makes this continuous spectrum stronger. Below 1kW microwave input power, the spectrum of InBr lamp almost resembled the CIE standard illuminant D65. As a consequence of the spectrum, they found that the color rendering and the duv of InBr lamp were excellent as high as 95 and smaller than 0.002, respectively, in the region of 400--800W input power. The efficacy higher than 100 lm/W was further achieved at 400W. The authors confirm that the microwave excited indium halides lamps can be applicable to many fields of lighting.

  18. 2D radiative modelling of He I spectral lines formed in solar prominences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Leger; F. Paletou

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results of 2D radiative modelling of He I lines in solar prominences, using a new numerical code developed by us (Leger, Chevallier and Paletou 2007). It treats self-consistently the radiation transfer and the non-LTE statistical equilibrium of H and, in a second stage, the one of He using a detailed atomic model. Preliminary comparisons with new visible plus near-infrared observations made at high spectral resolution with THeMIS are very satisfactory.

  19. Blind Spectral-GMM Estimation for Underdetermined Instantaneous Audio Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Blind Spectral-GMM Estimation for Underdetermined Instantaneous Audio Source Separation Simon.ozerov@telecom-paristech.fr Abstract. The underdetermined blind audio source separation prob- lem is often addressed in the time. Other approaches which are not blind assume a more structured model, like the Spectral Gaussian Mixture

  20. Information processing with longitudinal spectral decomposition of ultrafast pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Information processing with longitudinal spectral decomposition of ultrafast pulses Robert E of waveforms depending on whether their frequency response is or is not known a priori. Ultrafast pulses prove synthesis and detection relying on longitudinal spectral decomposition of subpicosecond optical pulses

  1. On Transforming Spectral Peaks in Voice Conversion Elizabeth Godoy 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    On Transforming Spectral Peaks in Voice Conversion Elizabeth Godoy 1 , Olivier Rosec1 , Thierry.chonavel@telecom-bretagne.eu Abstract This paper explores the benefits of transforming spectral peaks in voice conversion. First, in examining classic GMM- based transformation with cepstral coefficients, we show that the lack of transformed

  2. Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfven Wave Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfv´en Wave Turbulence Xi Cheng, Zhihong Lin energy sources at large spatial scales. The energy of these non- linearly interacting Alfven waves. 2000). The wave-particle energy exchange rates of these channels depend on the spectral properties near

  3. Spectral Embedded Clustering Feiping Nie1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

    , K-means and Discrimi- native K-means. The experiments on many real- world data sets show that SEC significantly out- performs the existing spectral clustering methods as well as K-means clustering related have been developed such as K-means clustering, mixture models [McLachlan and Peel, 2000], spectral

  4. Spectral Embedded Clustering Feiping Nie1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Dong

    methods, such as spectral clustering, Clustering with local and global regularization, K-means and Discrimi- native K-means. The experiments on many real- world data sets show that SEC significantly out- performs the existing spectral clustering methods as well as K-means clustering related methods. 1

  5. Hidden Markov model approach to spectral analysis for hyperspectral imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jenny (Qian)

    divergence (HMMID), is derived to characterize spectral properties. To evaluate the performance of this new). The experimental results show that the HMMID per- forms better than the other three measures in characterizing characterization; spectral information divergence. Paper 990515 received Dec. 27, 1999; revised manuscript received

  6. Efficient spectral-Galerkin method III. polar and cylindrical geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    spectral-collocation or spectral-tau methods (see, for instance, [9], [5], [6], [10], and. [7]), but ..... The direct computation of elements of A, B, and C is very involved, but it can be ...... at infinity, or orthogonal rational functions introduced in [4]. ... will converge in a finite number of steps, independent of the discretization parame-.

  7. Custom Spectral Shaping for EMI Reduction in Electronic Ballasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waveforms, resulting in the elimination of power spectral density (PSD) distortion and reduced peak currents power and light color, increase lifetime and realize smaller and lighter ballasts. With such a source used extensively to reduce EMI in power supplies [1-10]. The power spectral density (PSD) is spread

  8. Faculty Database User Instructions Spectral Fusion Designs Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xi

    Faculty Database User Instructions Spectral Fusion Designs Page 1 Faculty, Staff, and Student Instructions Introduction The Faculty Database is a tool created by Spectral Fusion Designs (SFD faculty, staff, or graduate students must be added to the Faculty Database by departmental administrators

  9. Investigation into Spectral Parameters as they Impact CPV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPV industry is well aware that performance of triple junction cells depends on spectral conditions but there is a lack of data quantifying this spectral dependence at the module level. This paper explores the impact of precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and optical air mass on multiple CPV module technologies on-sun in Golden, CO.

  10. SPECTRAL MEASUREMENTS OF INFRARED SKY RADIANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    displace conventional air conditioning. In order to computeduring periods of high air conditioning load. SAMPLES OF THE

  11. Spectral oximetry assessed with high-speed ultra-high-resolution optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagemann, Larry

    We use Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) data to assess retinal blood oxygen saturation. Three-dimensional disk-centered retinal tissue volumes were assessed in 17 normal healthy subjects. After removing ...

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  13. World IMACS / MODSIM Congress, Cairns, Australia 13-17 July 2009 http://mssanz.org.au/modsim09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    for mapping soils range from multi-spectral scanning, airborne gamma-ray spectrometry, hyper-spectral remote

  14. Spatial Spectral Estimation forSpatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modeling and ControlReactor Modeling and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarrott, Carl

    Spatial Spectral Estimation forSpatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modeling and ControlReactor in Magnox nuclear reactors l Establish safe operating limits l Issues: ­ Subset of measurements ­ Control Modeling and Control Carl Scarrott Granville Tunnicliffe-Wilson Lancaster University, UK c

  15. Estimating the spectral indices of correlated astrophysical foregrounds by a second-order statistical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bonaldi; L. Bedini; E. Salerno; C. Baccigalupi; G. De Zotti

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first tests of a new method, the Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) based on second-order statistics, to estimate the mixing matrix, a key ingredient to separate astrophysical foregrounds superimposed to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In the present application, the mixing matrix is parameterized in terms of the spectral indices of Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust emissions, while the free-free spectral index is prescribed by basic physics, and is thus assumed to be known. We consider simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and white stationary noise at the nominal levels for the PLANCK satellite, and realistic foreground emissions, with a position dependent synchrotron spectral index. We work with two sets of PLANCK frequency channels: the low frequency set, from 30 to 143 GHz, complemented with the Haslam 408 MHz map, and the high frequency set, from 217 to 545 GHz. The concentration of intense free-free emission on the Galactic plane introduces a steep dependence of the spectral index of the global Galactic emission with Galactic latitude, close to the Galactic equator. This feature makes difficult for the CCA to recover the synchrotron spectral index in this region, given the limited angular resolution of PLANCK, especially at low frequencies. A cut of a narrow strip around the Galactic equator (|b|<3 deg), however, allows us to overcome this problem. We show that, once this strip is removed, the CCA allows an effective foreground subtraction, with residual uncertainties inducing a minor contribution to errors on the recovered CMB power spectrum.

  16. The Spectra of T Dwarfs I: Near-Infrared Data and Spectral Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam J. Burgasser; J. Davy Kirkpatrick; Michael E. Brown; I. Neill Reid; Adam Burrows; James Liebert; Keith Matthews; John E. Gizis; Conard C. Dahn; David G. Monet; Roc M. Cutri; Michael F. Skrutskie

    2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-infrared spectra for a sample of T dwarfs, including eleven new discoveries made using the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These objects are distinguished from warmer (L-type) brown dwarfs by the presence of methane absorption bands in the 1--2.5 $\\micron$ spectral region. A first attempt at a near-infrared classification scheme for T dwarfs is made, based on the strengths of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the shapes of the 1.25, 1.6, and 2.1 $\\micron$ flux peaks. Subtypes T1 V through T8 V are defined, and spectral indices useful for classification are presented. The subclasses appear to follow a decreasing T$_{eff}$ scale, based on the evolution of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the properties of L and T dwarfs with known distances. However, we speculate that this scale is not linear with spectral type for cool dwarfs, due to the settling of dust layers below the photosphere and subsequent rapid evolution of spectral morphology around T$_{eff}$ $\\sim$ 1300--1500 K. Similarities in near-infrared colors and continuity of spectral features suggest that the gap between the latest L dwarfs and earliest T dwarfs has been nearly bridged. This argument is strengthened by the possible role of CH$_4$ as a minor absorber shaping the K-band spectra of the latest L dwarfs. Finally, we discuss one peculiar T dwarf, 2MASS 0937+2931, which has very blue near-infrared colors (J-K$_s$ = $-0.89\\pm$0.24) due to suppression of the 2.1 $\\micron$ peak. The feature is likely caused by enhanced collision-induced H$_2$ absorption in a high pressure or low metallicity photosphere.

  17. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  18. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  19. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  20. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  1. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, J Diaz; Knecht, A; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on March 11, 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima nuclear reactor complex. On March 17-18, 2011 we detected the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. The highest detected activity to date is <~32 mBq/m^3 of 131-I.

  2. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  3. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SOFT-MASK ESTIMATION AND LOG-SPECTRAL ENHANCEMENT FOR ROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alwan, Abeer

    A NOVEL APPROACH TO SOFT-MASK ESTIMATION AND LOG-SPECTRAL ENHANCEMENT FOR ROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION-- Speech Recognition, Feature Extraction, Speech Enhancement, Mask Estimation, Median Filtering. 1 enhancement. Reliable SPPs provide clues about the spectro-temporal location of speech and are thus a highly

  4. Salt-and-Pepper Noise The purpose of this challenge is to illustrate that spectral filtering methods may not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Salt-and-Pepper Noise The purpose of this challenge is to illustrate that spectral filtering methods may not always be successful when the noise in the image is highly non-Gaussian. We consider salt of the noise). Salt-and-pepper noise can, e.g., be used to model defects in the CCD or in the transmission

  5. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  6. Maximum Entropy Analysis of the Spectral Functions in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asakawa; T. Hatsuda; Y. Nakahara

    2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    First principle calculation of the QCD spectral functions (SPFs) based on the lattice QCD simulations is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the Bayesian inference theory and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM), which is a useful tool to extract SPFs from the imaginary-time correlation functions numerically obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Three important aspects of MEM are (i) it does not require a priori assumptions or parametrizations of SPFs, (ii) for given data, a unique solution is obtained if it exists, and (iii) the statistical significance of the solution can be quantitatively analyzed. The ability of MEM is explicitly demonstrated by using mock data as well as lattice QCD data. When applied to lattice data, MEM correctly reproduces the low-energy resonances and shows the existence of high-energy continuum in hadronic correlation functions. This opens up various possibilities for studying hadronic properties in QCD beyond the conventional way of analyzing the lattice data. Future problems to be studied by MEM in lattice QCD are also summarized.

  7. Effect of solid-phase amorphization on the spectral characteristics of europium-doped gadolinium molybdate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kiselev, A. P.; Kurmasheva, D. M.; Red'kin, B. S.; Sinitsyn, V. V., E-mail: sinitsyn@issp.ac.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is proposed for detecting spectral characteristics of optically inactive molybdates of rare-earth elements by their doping with rare-earth ions whose luminescence lies in the transparency region of all structural modifications of the sample. Gadolinium molybdate is chosen as the object of investigations, while europium ions are used as an optically active and structurally sensitive admixture. It is shown that after the action of a high pressure under which gadolinium molybdate passes to the amorphous state, the spectral characteristics of Gd{sub 1.99}Eu{sub 0.01}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} (GMO:Eu) change radically; namely, considerable line broadening is observed in the luminescence spectra and the luminescence excitation spectra, while the long-wave threshold of optical absorption is shifted considerably (by approximately 1.1 eV) towards lower energies. It is found that by changing the structural state of GMO:Eu by solid-state amorphization followed by annealing, the spectral characteristics of the sample can be purposefully changed. This is extremely important for solving the urgent problem of designing high-efficiency light-emitting diodes producing 'white' light.

  8. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  9. Spectral indices in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inyong Cho; Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2015-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the scalar and the tensor spectral indices of the quadratic inflation model in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. We find the EiBI corrections to the spectral indices are of second and first order in the slow-roll approximation for the scalar and the tensor perturbations respectively. This is very promising since the quadratic inflation model in general relativity provides a very nice fit for the spectral indices. Together with the suppression of the tensor-to-scalar ratio EiBI inflation is well along with the observational data.

  10. Spectrally isomorphic Dirac systems: graphene in electromagnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vit Jakubsky

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the new one-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonians that are spectrally isomorphic (not isospectral) with the known exactly solvable models. Explicit formulas for their spectra and eigenstates are provided. The operators are utilized for description of Dirac fermions in graphene in presence of an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field. We discuss explicit, physically relevant, examples of spectrally isomorphic systems with both non-periodic and periodic electromagnetic barriers. In the latter case, spectrally isomorphic two- and three-gap systems associated with the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur hierarchy are considered.

  11. Quark Spectral Function above T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin Sixue; Chang Lei [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu Yuxin [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Roberts, Craig D. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy method is used to calculate the dressed-quark spectral density from the self-consistent solution of the rainbow-truncated gap equation of QCD at temperatures above T{sub c}, the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration. We find that, besides the normal and plasmino modes, the spectral function exhibits an essentially nonperturbative zero mode at the temperatures above but near T{sub c}. In the vicinity of T{sub c}, this long-wavelength mode contains the bulk of the spectral strength. So long as this mode persists, the system may reasonably be described as a strongly-coupled state of matter.

  12. Spectral Lags of Gamma-Ray Bursts from Primordial Black Hole (PBH) Evaporations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. N. Ukwatta; J. H. MacGibbon; W. C. Parke; K. S. Dhuga; A. Eskandarian; N. Gehrels; L. Maximon; D. C. Morris

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), which may have been created in the early Universe, are predicted to be detectable by their Hawking radiation. PBHs with an initial mass of 5.0 * 10^14 g should be expiring today with a burst of high energy particles. Evaporating PBHs in the solar neighborhood are candidate Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) progenitors. We propose spectral lag, which is the temporal delay between the high energy photon pulse and the low energy photon pulse, as a possible method to detect PBH evaporation events with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory.

  13. Spectral and temperature features of coherent picosecond nonlinear response of HTSCs at low excitation levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyrev, Yu V; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shuvalov, V V [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that for the appropriate choice of the spectral measurement range (the choice of the coincidence point for the pumping component frequencies in the methods of biharmonic pumping and degenerate four-photon spectroscopy), the spectral and temperature features of the picosecond nonlinear response of high-temperature super-conductors (HTSCs) caused by interband transitions in the electronic spectrum with a metastable energy gap are stable with respect to the excitation level. The character of these features is determined by the resonance component of the total nonlinear response, which is formed at initial HTSC temperatures below the phase transition point (when the energy gap appears in the electronic spectrum). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Single-particle spectral density of a Bose gas in the two-fluid hydrodynamic regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arahata, Emiko; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Griffin, Allan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Bose superfluids, the single-particle Green's function can be directly related to the superfluid velocity-velocity correlation function in the hydrodynamic regime. An explicit expression for the single-particle spectral density was originally written down by Hohenberg and Martin in 1965, starting from the two-fluid equations for a superfluid. We give a simple derivation of their results. Using these results, we calculate the relative weights of first and second sound modes in the single-particle spectral density as a function of temperature in a uniform Bose gas. We show that the second sound mode makes a dominant contribution to the single-particle spectrum in a relatively high-temperature region. We also discuss the possibility of experimental observation of the second sound mode in a Bose gas by photoemission spectroscopy.

  15. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors previous work [K. Taguchi et al., Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects, Med. Phys. 38(2), 10891102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

  16. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Short, Robert W. (Rochester, NY); Craxton, Stephen (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  17. area spectral surveys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A Revolutionary TEchnique for Mid-Infrared Surveys Idea: Spectral chopping enables large-area line-surveys from Biology and...

  18. Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migdall, Alan

    metrologia Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements must be created in pairs, the VIS channel is also stimulated. In this Metrologia, 1998, 35, 295-300 295

  19. Direct Experimental Determination of Spectral Densities of Molecular Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo A. Pachon; Paul Brumer

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  20. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachn, Leonardo A. [Grupo de Fsica Atmica y Molecular, Instituto de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medelln (Colombia); Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry and Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry and Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  1. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  2. Goodwillie calculus and algebras over a spectral operad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Luis Alexandre Meira Fernandes Alves

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this thesis is to apply the theory of Goodwillie calculus to the category Algo of algebras over a spectral operad. Its first part generalizes many of the original results of Goodwillie in [14] so that ...

  3. Optimal Reduced Sets for Sparse Kernel Spectral Raghvendra Mall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Spectral clustering methods [1], [2] and [3] are generally better than the traditional k-means techniques present within the group are more similar to each other in comparison to the data between clusters

  4. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  5. Spectral Clustering Gene Ontology Terms to Group Genes by Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Spectral Clustering Gene Ontology Terms to Group Genes by Function Nora Speer, Christian Spieth12, 2005. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;2 N. Speer, C. Spieth, and A. Zell part-of is-a GO

  6. Temporal Profiles and Spectral Lags of XRF 060218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, E W; Stamatikos, M; Zhang, B; Norris, J; Gehrels, N; Zhang, J; Dai, Z G; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Stamatikos, Mike; Zhang, Bing; Norris, Jay; Gehrels, Neil; Zhang, Jin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral and temporal properties of the non-thermal emission ofthe nearby XRF 060218 in 0.3-150 keV band are studied. We show that both the spectral energy distribution and the light curve properties suggest the same origin of the non-thermal emission detected by {\\em Swift} BAT and XRT. This event has the longest pulse duration and spectral lag observed to date among the known GRBs. The pulse structure and its energy dependence are analogous to typical GRBs. By extrapolating the observed spectral lag to the {\\em CGRO/BATSE} bands we find that the hypothesis that this event complies with the same luminosity-lag relation with bright GRBs cannot be ruled out at $2\\sigma$ significance level. These intriguing facts, along with its compliance with the Amati-relation, indicate that XRF 060218 shares the similar radiation physics as typical GRBs.

  7. X-RAY SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN NGC 3783

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, R. C.

    NGC 3783 was observed for approximately 210 ks by Suzaku and in this time showed significant spectral and flux variability at both short (20 ks) and long (100 ks) timescales. The full observation is found to consist of ...

  8. Direct Experimental Determination of Spectral Densities of Molecular Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachon, Leonardo A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  9. An improved spectral graph partitioning algorithm for mapping parallel computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient use of a distributed memory parallel computer requires that the computational load be balanced across processors in a way that minimizes interprocessor communication. We present a new domain mapping algorithm that extends recent work in which ideas from spectral graph theory have been applied to this problem. Our generalization of spectral graph bisection involves a novel use of multiple eigenvectors to allow for division of a computation into four or eight parts at each stage of a recursive decomposition. The resulting method is suitable for scientific computations like irregular finite elements or differences performed on hypercube or mesh architecture machines. Experimental results confirm that the new method provides better decompositions arrived at more economically and robustly than with previous spectral methods. We have also improved upon the known spectral lower bound for graph bisection.

  10. COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 6, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and Adjoint Methods Professor Jeroen Tromp Princeton...

  11. Estimation of Large Spectral Function and Its Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Yuan

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    in this work. Be- cause random waves in seas are not necessarily spreading in the same direction, the spectra representing the wave energy must consist of an argument denoting different spreading directions. Therefore, we consider a directional spectral density... to repre- sent ocean energy, denoted by S(?, ?), and the degree of sea severity is defined as the area under the directional spectral density function. Let 12?ga 2 j denote the time average of wave energy at any frequency interval ?? and any directional...

  12. A Spectral Conjugate Gradient Method for Unconstrained Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birgin, E. G. [Department of Computer Science, IME-USP, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1010 - Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)], E-mail: egbirgin@ime.usp.br; Martinez, J. M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, IMECC-UNICAMP, University of Campinas, CP 6065, 13081-970 Campinas SP (Brazil)], E-mail: martinez@ime.unicamp.br

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of scaled conjugate gradient algorithms for large-scale unconstrained minimization is defined. The Perry, the Polak-Ribiere and the Fletcher-Reeves formulae are compared using a spectral scaling derived from Raydan's spectral gradient optimization method. The best combination of formula, scaling and initial choice of step-length is compared against well known algorithms using a classical set of problems. An additional comparison involving an ill-conditioned estimation problem in Optics is presented.

  13. Parameterization of temperature and spectral distortions in future CMB experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyril Pitrou; Albert Stebbins

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    CMB spectral distortions are induced by Compton collisions with electrons. We review the various schemes to characterize the anisotropic CMB with a non-Planckian spectrum. We advocate using logarithmically averaged temperature moments as the preferred language to describe these spectral distortions, both for theoretical modeling and observations. Numerical modeling is simpler, the moments are frame-independent, and in terms of scattering the mode truncation is exact.

  14. The Spectral Index Distribution of EGRET Blazars: Prospects for GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; /SLAC

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrinsic distribution of spectral indices in GeV energies of gamma-ray-loud blazars is a critical input in determining the spectral shape of the unresolved blazar contribution to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, as well as an important test of blazar emission theories. We present a maximum-likelihood method of determining the intrinsic spectral index distribution (ISID) of a population of {gamma}-ray emitters which accounts for error in measurement of individual spectral indices, and we apply it to EGRET blazars. We find that the most likely Gaussian ISID for EGRET blazars has a mean of 2.27 and a standard deviation of 0.20. We additionally find some indication that FSRQs and BL Lacs may have different ISIDs (with BL Lacs being harder). We also test for spectral index hardening associated with blazar variability for which we find no evidence. Finally, we produce simulated GLAST spectral index datasets and perform the same analyses. With improved statistics due to the much larger number of resolvable blazars, GLAST data will help us determine the ISIDs with much improved accuracy. Should any difference exist between the ISIDs of BL Lacs and FSRQs or between the ISIDs of blazars in the quiescent and flaring states, GLAST data will be adequate to separate these ISIDs at a significance better than 3{sigma}.

  15. Using Airborne Geophysics to Improve the Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Natural Gas Extraction in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana has seen a boom in drilling for coalbed natural gas (CBNG), the natural gas contained in coal seams. Large quantities of water are coproduced during the extraction process. The water is currently managed by land application (irrigation), returned to shallow groundwater aquifers via infiltration basins, directly discharged to ephemeral or perennial streams, or injected into the deep subsurface via injection wells. At present, there are over 28,000 CBNG wells permitted or drilled in the PRB and it is estimated that another 50,000 to 100,000 new wells will be drilled in the future. Produced water management is a major challenge to the oil and gas industry as well as federal and state regulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods for the large-scale mapping of vadose zone properties. The base maps derived from the AEM data show the location of conductive anomalies within the vadose zone. These conductive anomalies have been identified as conditions related to soil properties, geologic features, saturated areas, and seepage zones. In the PRB, the data can be used to identify suitable locations for constructing impoundments in areas that avoid highly conductive soils where infiltrating water may leach salts through the vadose zone and into shallow aquifers. Hydrologic changes within the vadose zone were evaluated by completing an AEM survey in 2003 and 2004 over two coincident spatial areas. The data were analyzed to determine statistical relationships between the data sets, in particular data outliers which may represent areas of significant change between each year. Some outliers plot near areas of CBNG development. Ultimately, it is hoped that the information from these surveys will identify cost effective treatment or disposal options for produced water that address both production and environmental issues.

  16. ''A far more formidable task'': the 101st Airborne Division's pacification of Thua Thien Province, Republic of Vietnam, 1968-1972

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werkheiser, Edwin Brooks, II

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to identify, describe, and analyze the tactics used by the 101st Airborne Division in the pacification of the Republic of Vietnam's Thua Thien province from 1968 to 1972. Despite the larger calamity of the Vietnam War, the 101st...

  17. Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of Mexico near the spill site. At the time it was called on for this mission, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and extensive survey of atmospheric loadings of hydrocarbon and other organic species air pollution in the Gulf

  18. Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution in the Gulf of Mexico. During May, one of NOAA WP-3D aircraft, equipped with an extensive suite1 Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory within and above the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the Gulf of Mexico on 8 and 10 June 2010

  19. Masclaux, F.G.; Sakwinska, O.; Charrire, N.; Swmaani, E.; Oppliger, A. Concentration of airborne Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total bacteria, and endotoxins in pig farms. Annals of Occupational of airborne Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total bacteria and endotoxins in pig farms. FREDERIC G bacteria, bioaerosols, MRSA CC398, occupational health, swine confinement buildings, quantitative PCR 1

  20. 12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE RADAR IN THE CONVECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE, is the availability of in situ thermodynamic and kinematic observations, and the direct observation of horizontal, as part of IHOP_02 (The International Water Vapor Project, Weckwerth et al 2003). The key radar

  1. Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating surface emissions. Until recently, dedicated research-grade instruments have been required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG columns · Quantifying local to regional GHG enhancements for emissions inventory verificationAbstract Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating with another Cessna 210 over Central California quantified enhancements in CO2 and CH4 from urban

  2. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Weed quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve anamolous areas attributable to gamma radiation in the uranium spectral window, and twenty-three in the thorium channel, have been recognized and delineated on the Weed quadrangle. The majority of the uranium anomalies are located in the southwestern part of the map sheet. Most of these are correlated with the pre-Cretaceous metamorphic rock system and the Mesozoic granitic rocks intrusive into it. Of the twenty-three anomalous areas of increased gamma radiation in the thorium spectral window, most are located in the northeast and the east center in a north-south trending belt. However, this apparent alignment is probably fortuitous as the individual anomalies are correlated with several different rock formations. Three are correlated with upper Cretaceous marine sediments, six with Ordovician marine sediments, two with Mesozoic granitic intrusives, and two with Silurian marine sediments. In the northwestern part of the quadrangle, four thorium radiation anomalies are delineated over exposures of upper Jurassic marine rocks. Anomaly 6, in the southwest, warrants attention as it suggests strong radiation in the uranium channel with little or no thorium radiation. The uranium/thorium and uranium/potassium ratio anomalies are also strong, supporting the likelihood of uranium enrichment. The feature is located on line 540, fiducials 7700 to 7720. Anomaly 7, on line 540, fiducials 8390 to 8420, shows similar characteristics although a minor thorium excursion is present. Anomaly 10, on line 3010 fiducials 9820 to 9840, is also characterized by a strong uranium radiation spike, with minor thorium radiation. The uranium/thorium and uranium/potassium ratio anomalies are well defined and relatively intense.

  3. Gravitational quantum effects on power spectra and spectral indices with higher-order corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Zhu; Anzhong Wang; Gerald Cleaver; Klaus Kirsten; Qin Sheng

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The uniform asymptotic approximation method provides a powerful, systematically-improved, and error-controlled approach to construct accurate analytical approximate solutions of mode functions of perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, designed especially for the cases where the relativistic linear dispersion relation is modified after gravitational quantum effects are taken into account. These include models from string/M-Theory, loop quantum cosmology and Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz quantum gravity. In this paper, we extend our previous studies of the first-order approximations to high orders for the cases where the modified dispersion relation (linear or nonlinear) has only one-turning point (or zero). We obtain the general expressions for the power spectra and spectral indices of both scalar and tensor perturbations up to the third-order, at which the error bounds are $\\lesssim 0.15\\%$. As an application of these formulas, we calculate the power spectra and spectral indices in the slow-roll inflation with a nonlinear power-law dispersion relation. To check the consistency of our formulas, we further restrict ourselves to the relativistic case, and calculate the corresponding power spectra, spectral indices and runnings to the second-order. Then, we compare our results with the ones obtained by the Green function method, and show explicitly that the results obtained by these two different methods are consistent within the allowed errors.

  4. Stellar parameters of early M dwarfs from ratios of spectral features at optical wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maldonado, J; Micela, G; Scandariato, G; Damasso, M; Stelzer, B; Barbieri, M; Bedin, L R; Biazzo, K; Bignamini, A; Borsa, F; Claudi, R U; Covino, E; Desidera, S; Esposito, M; Gratton, R; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Lanza, A F; Maggio, A; Molinari, E; Pagano, I; Perger, M; Pillitteri, I; Piotto, G; Poretti, E; Prisinzano, L; Rebolo, R; Ribas, I; Shkolnik, E; Southworth, J; Sozzetti, A; Mascareo, A Suarez

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) Low-mass stars have been recognised as promising targets in the search for rocky, small planets with the potential of supporting life. Doppler search programmes using high-resolution spectrographs like HARPS or HARPS-N are providing huge quantities of optical spectra of M dwarfs. We aim to calibrate empirical relationships to determine stellar parameters for early M dwarfs (spectral types M0-M4.5) using the same spectra that are used for the radial velocity determinations. Our methodology consists in the use of ratios of pseudo equivalent widths of spectral features as a temperature diagnostic. Stars with effective temperatures obtained from interferometric estimates of their radii are used as calibrators. Empirical calibrations for the spectral type are also provided. Combinations of features and ratios of features are used to derive calibrations for the stellar metallicity. Our methods are then applied to a large sample of M dwarfs that are being observed in the framework of the HARPS search for ...

  5. Composition, Mineralogy, and Porosity of Multiple Asteroid Systems from Visible and Near-infrared Spectral Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Sean S; Emery, Joshua P; Enriquez, J Emilio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the SOAR telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA IRTF with the SpeX spectragraph. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. We perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- ...

  6. Measurement of the Spectral Function of $^{40}$Ar through the $(e,e^\\prime p)$ reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ankowski; R. Beminiwattha; O. Benhar; D. G. Crabb; D. B. Day; F. Garibaldi; G. Garvey; D. Gaskell; C. Giusti; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; C. M. Jen; X. Jiang; D. Keller; C. E. Keppel; R. Lindgren; J. M. Link; N. Liyanage; C. Mariani; A. Meucci; G. B. Mills; L. Myers; M. L. Pitt; O. A. Rondon; M. Sakuda; B. Sawatzky; P. A. Souder; G. M. Urciuoli; S. Wood; J. Zhang

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The interpretation of the signals detected by high precision experiments aimed at measuring neutrino oscillations requires an accurate description of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections. One of the key element of the analysis is the treatment of nuclear effects, which is one of the main sources of systematics for accelerator based experiments such as the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). A considerable effort is currently being made to develop theoretical models capable of providing a fully quantitative description of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections in the kinematical regime relevant to LBNE. The approach based on nuclear many-body theory and the spectral function formalism has proved very successful in explaining the available electron scattering data in a variety of kinematical conditions. The first step towards its application to the analysis of neutrino data is the derivation of the spectral functions of nuclei employed in neutrino detectors, in particular argon. We propose a measurement of the coincidence $(e,e^\\prime p)$ cross section on argon. This data will provide the experimental input indispensable to construct the argon spectral function, thus paving the way for a reliable estimate of the neutrino cross sections. In addition, the analysis of the $(e,e^\\prime p)$ data will help a number of theoretical developments, like the description of final-state interactions needed to isolate the initial-state contributions to the observed single-particle peaks, that is also needed for the interpretation of the signal detected in neutrino experiments.

  7. Estimating the spectral indices of correlated astrophysical foregrounds by a second-order statistical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaldi, A; Salerno, E; Baccigalupi, C; De Zotti, G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first tests of a new method, the Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) based on second-order statistics, to estimate the mixing matrix, a key ingredient to separate astrophysical foregrounds superimposed to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In the present application, the mixing matrix is parameterized in terms of the spectral indices of Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust emissions, while the free-free spectral index is prescribed by basic physics, and is thus assumed to be known. We consider simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and white stationary noise at the nominal levels for the PLANCK satellite, and realistic foreground emissions, with a position dependent synchrotron spectral index. We work with two sets of PLANCK frequency channels: the low frequency set, from 30 to 143 GHz, complemented with the Haslam 408 MHz map, and the high frequency set, from 217 to 545 GHz. The concentration of intense free-free emission on the Galactic plane introduces a ste...

  8. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spitler, Mark T. (Concord, MA); Ehret, Anne (Malden, MA); Stuhl, Louis S. (Bedford, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  9. Nonlinear Legendre Spectral Finite Elements for Wind Turbine Blade Dynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a numerical implementation and examination of new wind turbine blade finite element model based on Geometrically Exact Beam Theory (GEBT) and a high-order spectral finite element method. The displacement-based GEBT is presented, which includes the coupling effects that exist in composite structures and geometric nonlinearity. Legendre spectral finite elements (LSFEs) are high-order finite elements with nodes located at the Gauss-Legendre-Lobatto points. LSFEs can be an order of magnitude more efficient that low-order finite elements for a given accuracy level. Interpolation of the three-dimensional rotation, a major technical barrier in large-deformation simulation, is discussed in the context of LSFEs. It is shown, by numerical example, that the high-order LSFEs, where weak forms are evaluated with nodal quadrature, do not suffer from a drawback that exists in low-order finite elements where the tangent-stiffness matrix is calculated at the Gauss points. Finally, the new LSFE code is implemented in the new FAST Modularization Framework for dynamic simulation of highly flexible composite-material wind turbine blades. The framework allows for fully interactive simulations of turbine blades in operating conditions. Numerical examples showing validation and LSFE performance will be provided in the final paper.

  10. Spectral properties of electrons in fractal nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Hernando; Miroslav Sulc; Jiri Vanicek

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of promising applications of fractal nanostructures, we analyze the spectra of quantum particles in the Sierpinski carpet and study the non-correlated electron gas in this geometry. We show that the spectrum exhibits scale invariance with almost arbitrary spacing between energy levels, including large energy gaps at high energies. These features disappear in the analogous random fractal---where Anderson localization dominates---and in the regular lattice of equally sized holes---where only two length scales are present. The fractal structure amplifies microscopic effects, resulting in the presence of quantum behavior of the electron gas even at high temperatures. Our results demonstrate the potential of fractal nanostructures to improve the light-matter interaction at any frequency, with possible applications, e.g., in the development of solar cells with a wide absorption spectrum, artificial photosynthesis, or nanometamaterials with tailored Fermi levels and band gaps, operating in a wide range of frequencies, and with extended operating temperature range.

  11. Atlas of Atomic Spectral Lines of Neptunium Emitted by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeKalb, E.L. and Edelson, M. C.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Np-237 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 230-700 nm wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on the methodology used in collecting the data. The Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program has been charged with the task of developing optical spectroscopic methods to analyze the composition of spent nuclear fuels. Such materials are highly radioactive even after prolonged 'cooling' and are chemically complex. Neptunium (Np) is a highly toxic by-product of nuclear power generation and is found, in low abundance, in spent nuclear fuels. This atlas of the optical emission spectrum of Np, as produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopic source, is part of a general survey of the ICP emission spectra of the actinide elements. The ICP emission spectrum of the actinides originates almost exclusively from the electronic relaxation of excited, singly ionized species. Spectral data on the Np ion emission spectrum (i.e., the Np II spectrum) have been reported by Tomkins and Fred [1] and Haaland [2]. Tomkins and Fred excited the Np II spectrum with a Cu spark discharge and identified 114 Np lines in the 265.5 - 436.3 nm spectral range. Haaland, who corrected some spectral line misidentifications in the work of Tomkins and Fred, utilized an enclosed Au spark discharge to excite the Np II spectrum and reported 203 Np lines within the 265.4 - 461.0 nm wavelength range.

  12. K-corrections and spectral templates of Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Peter E; Hsiao, E.Y.; Conley, A.; Howell, D.A.; Sullivan, M.; Pritchet, C.J.; Carlberg, R.G.; Nugent, P.E.; Phillips, M.M.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of large dedicated Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) surveys, K-corrections of SNe Ia and their uncertainties have become especially important in the determination of cosmological parameters. While K-corrections are largely driven by SN Ia broadband colors, it is shown here that the diversity in spectral features of SNe Ia can also be important. For an individual observation, the statistical errors from the inhomogeneity in spectral features range from 0.01 (where the observed and rest-frame filters are aligned) to 0.04 (where the observed and rest-frame filters are misaligned). To minimize the systematic errors caused by an assumed SN Ia spectral energy distribution (SED), we outline a prescription for deriving a mean spectral template time series that incorporates a large and heterogeneous sample of observed spectra. We then remove the effects of broadband colors and measure the remaining uncertainties in the K-corrections associated with the diversity in spectral features. Finally, we present a template spectroscopic sequence near maximum light for further improvement on the K-correction estimate. A library of ~;;600 observed spectra of ~;;100 SNe Ia from heterogeneous sources is used for the analysis.

  13. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

    2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

  14. High-gravity central stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Rauch

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    NLTE spectral analyses of high-gravity central stars by means of state-of-the-art model atmosphere techniques provide information about the precursor AGB stars. The hydrogen-deficient post-AGB stars allow investigations on the intershell matter which is apparently exhibited at the stellar surface. We summarize recent results from imaging, spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry.

  15. Non-invasive material discrimination using spectral x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Andrew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78715-0162 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354-1793 (United States); McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Jarman, Ken D.; White, Tim A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354-1793 (United States); Deinert, Mark R., E-mail: mdeinert@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78715-0162 (United States)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Current radiographic methods are limited in their ability to determine the presence of nuclear materials in containers or composite objects. A central problem is the inability to distinguish the attenuation pattern of high-density metals from those with a greater thickness of a less dense material. Here, we show that spectrally sensitive detectors can be used to discriminate plutonium from multiple layers of other materials using a single-view radiograph. An inverse algorithm with adaptive regularization is used. The algorithm can determine the presence of plutonium in simulated radiographs with a mass resolution per unit area of at least 0.07?g?cm{sup ?2}.

  16. Non-invasive material discrimination using spectral x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; White, Timothy A.; Deinert, Mark

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Current radiographic methods are limited in their ability to determine the presence of nuclear materials in containers or composite objects. A central problem is the inability to distinguish the attenuation pattern of high-density metals from those with a larger greater thickness of a less- dense material. Here we show that spectrally sensitive detectors can be used to discriminate plutonium from multiple layers of other materials using a single-view radiograph. An inverse algorithm with adaptive regularization is used. The algorithm can determine the presence of plutonium in simulated radiographs with a mass resolution per unit area of at least 0.07 gcm^-2.

  17. Scattering of an ultrashort electromagnetic radiation pulse by an atom in a broad spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astapenko, V. A., E-mail: astval@mail.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The scattering of an ultrashort electromagnetic pulse by atomic particles is described using a consistent quantum-mechanical approach taking into account excitation of a target and nondipole electromagnetic interaction, which is valid in a broad spectral range. This approach is applied to the scattering of single- and few-cycle pulses by a multielectron atom and a hydrogen atom. Scattering spectra are obtained for ultrashort pulses of different durations. The relative contribution of 'elastic' scattering of a single-cycle pulse by a hydrogen atom is studied in the high-frequency limit as a function of the carrier frequency and scattering angle.

  18. Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Vishnu; Bottke, William; Cloutis, Ed; Izawa, Matt; O'Brien, Dave; Mann, Paul; Cuddy, Matt; Corre, Lucille Le; Gaffey, Michael; Fujihara, Gary

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the spectral and compositional properties of Chelyabinsk meteorite to identify its possible parent body in the main asteroid belt. Our analysis shows that the meteorite contains two spectrally distinct but compositionally indistinguishable components of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material. Our X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the two lithologies of the Chelyabinsk meteorite are extremely similar in modal mineralogy. The meteorite is compositionally similar to LL chondrite and its most probable parent asteroid in the main belt is a member of the Flora family. Intimate mixture of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material from Chelyabinsk provides a spectral match with (8) Flora, the largest asteroid in the Flora family. The Baptistina family and Flora family overlap each other in dynamical space. Mineralogical analysis of (298) Baptistina and 9 small family members shows that their surface compositions are similar to LL chondrites, although their absorptio...

  19. Spectral Noise Correlations of an Ultrafast Frequency Comb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Schmeissner; Jonathan Roslund; Claude Fabre; Nicolas Treps

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavity-based noise detection schemes are combined with ultrafast pulse shaping as a means to diagnose the spectral correlations of both the amplitude and phase noise of an ultrafast frequency comb. The comb is divided into ten spectral regions, and the distribution of noise as well as the correlations between all pairs of spectral regions are measured against the quantum limit. These correlations are then represented in the form of classical noise matrices, which furnish a complete description of the underlying comb dynamics. Their eigendecomposition reveals a set of theoretically predicted, decoupled noise modes that govern the dynamics of the comb. Finally, the matrices contain the information necessary to deduce macroscopic noise properties of the comb.

  20. The spectral index and its running in axionic curvaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Fuminobu, E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a sizable running spectral index suggested by the recent SPT data can be explained in the axionic curvaton model with a potential that consists of two sinusoidal contributions of different height and period. We find that the running spectral index is generically given by dn{sub s}/dln k ? 2?/?N (n{sub s}?1), where ?N is the e-folds during one period of modulations. In the string axiverse, axions naturally acquire a mass from multiple contributions, and one of the axions may be responsible for the density perturbations with a sizable running spectral index via the curvaton mechanism. We note that the axionic curvaton model with modulations can also accommodate the red-tilted spectrum with a negligible running, without relying on large-field inflation.

  1. Resummation and the semiclassical theory of spectral statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan P. Keating; Sebastian Mller

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the question as to why, in the semiclassical limit, classically chaotic systems generically exhibit universal quantum spectral statistics coincident with those of Random Matrix Theory. To do so, we use a semiclassical resummation formalism that explicitly preserves the unitarity of the quantum time evolution by incorporating duality relations between short and long classical orbits. This allows us to obtain both the non-oscillatory and the oscillatory contributions to spectral correlation functions within a unified framework, thus overcoming a significant problem in previous approaches. In addition, our results extend beyond the universal regime to describe the system-specific approach to the semiclassical limit.

  2. Spectral analysis for semi-infinite mass-spring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael del Rio; Luis O. Silva

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how the spectrum of a Jacobi operator changes when this operator is modified by a certain finite rank perturbation. The operator corresponds to an infinite mass-spring system and the perturbation is obtained by modifying one interior mass and one spring of this system. In particular, there are detailed results of what happens in the spectral gaps and which eigenvalues do not move under the modifications considered. These results were obtained by a new tecnique of comparative spectral analysis and they generalize and include previous results for finite and infinite Jacobi matrices.

  3. Shear spectral sum rule in a nonconformal gravity dual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, Todd; Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Lee, Su Houng [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sum rule which relates a stress-energy tensor correlator to thermodynamic functions is examined within the context of a simple nonconformal gravity dual. Such a sum rule was previously derived using AdS/CFT for conformal N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, but we show that it does not generalize to the nonconformal theory under consideration. We provide a generalized sum rule and numerically verify its validity. A useful by-product of the calculation is the computation of the spectral density in a strongly coupled nonconformal theory. Qualitative features of the spectral densities and implications for lattice measurements of transport coefficients are discussed.

  4. Fourier-Based Spectral Analysis with Adaptive Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Khilko

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite being the most popular methods of data analysis, Fourier-based techniques suffer from the problem of static resolution that is currently believed to be a fundamental limitation of the Fourier Transform. Although alternative solutions overcome this limitation, none provide the simplicity, versatility, and convenience of the Fourier analysis. The lack of convenience often prevents these alternatives from replacing classical spectral methods - even in applications that suffer from the limitation of static resolution. This work demonstrates that, contrary to the generally accepted belief, the Fourier Transform can be generalized to the case of adaptive resolution. The generalized transform provides backward compatibility with classical spectral techniques and introduces minimal computational overhead.

  5. Data driven analytic continuation for one particle spectral functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun [Ames Laboratory

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceeding, an idea is outlined suggesting a generic treatment on any type of input data for a numerical analytic continuation problem, which is needed when dynamical information is to be extracted from a calculationally convenient one particle imaginary time Green function. The quality of the resulting spectral function will rely only on the data to be treated, viz, data-driven. This is different from the Maximum Entropy or the Stochastic method which relies on an entropy term to guide convergence of the resulting spectral function.

  6. A Digital Low Dispersion Spectral Library Covering the 3500-7500AA Region Using the SAAO Radcliffe 1.9m Telescope's Cassegrain Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have created a digital spectral library, using low resolution optical spectra, of photometric and spectral standard stars. The data were acquired using the Cassegrain Spectrograph installed on the 1.9m Radcliffe telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory. The library consists of optical wavelength (~ 3500-7500AA) spectra for main sequence and giant stars encompassing those most commonly observed in the Galaxy, namely the late-B, A-, F-, G-, K-, and early- to mid-M stars. We intend that our standard star spectra will be especially useful for spectral classification of stars in the field and Galactic clusters alike, and will have high pedagogic value when included into representative Introductory Astronomy or Stellar Astronomy curricula for undergraduate astronomy major and minor programs. We exploit the spectral library in order to derive spectral types for seventy-six optically and X-ray selected members of the young open cluster NGC 6475. Comparison of spectral-type, optical and infrared phot...

  7. Reliability checks on the Indo-US Stellar Spectral Library using Artificial Neural Networks and Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinder P. Singh; Manabu Yuasa; Nawo Yamamoto; Ranjan Gupta

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indo-US coud\\'{e} feed stellar spectral library (CFLIB) made available to the astronomical community recently by Valdes et al. (2004) contains spectra of 1273 stars in the spectral region 3460 to 9464 \\AA at a high resolution of 1 \\AA FWHM and a wide range of spectral types. Cross-checking the reliability of this database is an important and desirable exercise since a number of stars in this database have no known spectral types and a considerable fraction of stars has not so complete coverage in the full wavelength region of 3460-9464 \\AA resulting in gaps ranging from a few \\AA to several tens of \\AA. In this paper, we use an automated classification scheme based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to classify all 1273 stars in the database. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) is carried out to reduce the dimensionality of the data set before the spectra are classified by the ANN. Most importantly, we have successfully demonstrated employment of a variation of the PCA technique to restore the missing data in a sample of 300 stars out of the CFLIB.

  8. A study utilizing a reaction involving DFP (Diisopropyl Fluorophosphate) and hydroxylamine or 2 - PAM (2 - Formyl - 1 -Methylpyridinium Oxime) for application to field evaluations of airborne concentrations of Organophosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatnick, Neil Stephen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY UTILIZING A REACTION INVOLVING DFP (DIISOPROPYL FLUOROPHOSPHATE) AND HYDROXYLAMLZ QR 2 - PAM (2 - FOR4IYL - 1 - METHYLPYRIDINIUM OXIME) FQR APPLICATIQN TO FIELD EVALUATIONS OF AIRBORNE CONCENTRATIONS OF ORGANOPHOSPHATES A Thesis... (DIISOPROPYL FLUOROPHOSPHATE) AND HYDROXYLAMINE OR 2 - PAM (2 ? FQRMYL - I ? METHYLPRIDINIUM OXIME) FQR APPLICATION TO FIELD EVALUATIONS OF AIRBORNE CQNCENTRATIQNS OF ORGANOPHOSPHATES A Thesis by NEIL STEPHEN BLATNICK Approved as to style and content by...

  9. Introduction to workshop on spectral control and converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.W.; Schwartz, R.J.

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop focused on the portion of the TPV system that involves the photovoltaic energy converter and the spectral control element that affects subband-gap photon energy recovery. The discussion was divided into three major topic areas: status of the technology, status of the infrastructure, and champions of the technology. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bottke, William F.

    Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family Vishnu and compositional properties of Chelyabinsk meteorite to identify its pos- sible parent body in the main asteroid analysis confirms that the two lithologies of the Chelyabinsk mete- orite are extremely similar in modal

  11. Spectral imaging of proton aurora and twilight at Troms, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Spectral imaging of proton aurora and twilight at Troms, Norway M. Galand,1 J. Baumgardner,1 D, which offers a unique opportunity to investigate the Ha to Hb Balmer decrement in proton aurora locations (Troms, Poker Flat, Svalbard) in proton aurora is presented. Lummerzheim and Galand [2001] find

  12. Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs Romain Boulet 10 Dec 2009 Abstract- cyclic graphs. An odd (resp. even) sun is a graph obtained by appending a pendant vertex to each vertex of an odd (resp. even) cycle. A broken sun is a graph obtained by deleting pendant vertices of a sun

  13. Distinct spinon and holon dispersions in photoemission spectral functions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ARTICLES Distinct spinon and holon dispersions in photoemission spectral functions from one particles) called spinons and holons. Experimentalists have long sought to verify this effect. Angle quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon­holon two-peak- like structure. Despite extensive ARPES experiments

  14. Spectral learning of linear dynamics from generalised-linear observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a non-linear and non-Gaussian observation process. We use this approach to obtain estimates to the generalised-linear regression model [8]), where the expected value of an observation is given by a monotonicSpectral learning of linear dynamics from generalised-linear observations with application

  15. A spectral graph based approach to analyze hyperspectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    A spectral graph based approach to analyze hyperspectral data Blake Hunter Department of Mathematics, UCLA 520 Portola Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90095 Email: blakehunter@math.ucla.edu Yifei Lou Department of Mathematics, UCLA 520 Portola Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90095 Email: bertozzi

  16. Spectral background and transmission characteristics of fiber optic imaging bundles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gmitro, Arthur F.

    Spectral background and transmission characteristics of fiber optic imaging bundles Joshua Anthony August 2008 The emission and transmission properties of three commercially produced coherent fiber optic optical fibers are used in many imaging applications to allow the flexible relay of image planes over

  17. Running of scalar spectral index in multi-field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the running of the scalar spectral index in general multi-field slow-roll inflation. By incorporating explicit momentum dependence at the moment of horizon crossing, we can find the running straightforwardly. At the same time, we can distinguish the contributions from the quasi de Sitter background and the super-horizon evolution of the field fluctuations.

  18. Introduction Speech and non-speech exhibit similar spectrally contrastive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Lori L.

    in 3 noise conditions Perception of coarticulated speech with contrastively enhanced spectrotemporal Conclusions General, non-speech-specific contrast enhancement can benefit recognition of coarticulated speechIntroduction Speech and non-speech exhibit similar spectrally contrastive context effects on speech

  19. INCORPORATING SPECTRAL SUBTRACTION AND NOISE TYPE FOR UNVOICED SPEECH SEGREGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, DeLiang "Leon"

    , monaural speech enhancement methods enhance noisy speech based on certain assumptions or models of speech and interference [8]. Speech enhancement methods improve speech quality. However, they have a limited abilityINCORPORATING SPECTRAL SUBTRACTION AND NOISE TYPE FOR UNVOICED SPEECH SEGREGATION Ke Hu and De

  20. Spectral Decision Diagrams Using Graph Transformations Mitchell Thornton Rolf Drechsler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Mitchell

    Spectral Decision Diagrams Using Graph Transformations #3; Mitchell Thornton Rolf Drechsler Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Siemens AG Mississippi State University Corporate Technology Mississippi State, MS 39762 81730 Munich, Germany mitch@ece.msstate.edu rolf.drechsler@mchp.siemens