National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for airborne high spectral

  1. Final Technical Report for Interagency Agreement No. DE-SC0005453 “Characterizing Aerosol Distributions, Types, and Optical and Microphysical Properties using the NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP)”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols and aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics are required to: 1) determine aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, 2) compute radiative flux and heating rate profiles, 3) assess model simulations of aerosol distributions and types, and 4) establish the ability of surface and space-based remote sensors to measure the indirect effect. Consequently the ASR program calls for a combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements to determine aerosol properties and aerosol influences on clouds and radiation. As part of our previous DOE ASP project, we deployed the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 King Air aircraft during major field experiments in 2006 (MILAGRO and MaxTEX), 2007 (CHAPS), 2009 (RACORO), and 2010 (CalNex and CARES). The HSRL provided measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm). These measurements were typically made in close temporal and spatial coincidence with measurements made from DOE-funded and other participating aircraft and ground sites. On the RACORO, CARES, and CalNEX missions, we also deployed the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). RSP provided intensity and degree of linear polarization over a broad spectral and angular range enabling column-average retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Under this project, we analyzed observations and model results from RACORO, CARES, and CalNex and accomplished the following objectives. 1. Identified aerosol types, characterize the vertical distribution of the aerosol types, and partition aerosol optical depth by type, for CARES and CalNex using HSRL data as we have done for previous missions. 2. Investigated aerosol microphysical and macrophysical properties using the RSP. 3. Used the aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles measured by the HSRL

  2. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M; Manuzzato, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-06-28

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  3. ARM: Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, high sensitivity mode, co-polarized mode Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; Iosif 1 ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin ...

  4. Final Report: High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Studies with the ARM UAV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revercomb, Henry E.

    1999-12-31

    The active participation in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV) science team that was anticipated in the grant proposal was indefinitely delayed after the first year due to a programmatic decision to exclude the high spectral resolution observations from the existing ARM UAV program. However, this report shows that substantial progress toward the science objectives of this grant have made with the help of separate funding from NASA and other agencies. In the four year grant period (including time extensions), a new high spectral resolution instrument has been flown and has successfully demonstrated the ability to obtain measurements of the type needed in the conduct of this grant. In the near term, the third water vapor intensive observing period (WVIOP-3) in October 2000 will provide an opportunity to bring the high spectral resolution observations of upwelling radiance into the ARM program to complement the downwelling radiance observations from the existing ARM AERI instruments. We look forward to a time when the ARM-UAV program is able to extend its scope to include the capability for making these high spectral resolution measurements from a UAV platform.

  5. Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPACE Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during MPACE Eloranta, Edwin University of Wisconsin Category: Field Campaigns Cloud properties were derived from data acquired with University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar during its 6-week MPACE deployment. This poster presents statistics on: 1) the altitude and temperature distribution of optical depth and cloud phase. 2) the dependence of lidar depolarization and backscatter phase function on

  6. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  7. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revercomb, Henry; Tobin, David; Knuteson, Robert; Borg, Lori; Moy, Leslie

    2009-06-17

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004.

  8. High-efficiency spectral purity filter for EUV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N.

    2006-05-23

    An asymmetric-cut multilayer diffracts EUV light. A multilayer cut at an angle has the same properties as a blazed grating, and has been demonstrated to have near-perfect performance. Instead of having to nano-fabricate a grating structure with imperfections no greater than several tens of nanometers, a thick multilayer is grown on a substrate and then cut at an inclined angle using coarse and inexpensive methods. Effective grating periods can be produced this way that are 10 to 100 times smaller than those produced today, and the diffraction efficiency of these asymmetric multilayers is higher than conventional gratings. Besides their ease of manufacture, the use of an asymmetric multilayer as a spectral purity filter does not require that the design of an EUV optical system be modified in any way, unlike the proposed use of blazed gratings for such systems.

  9. Final Report- Low Cost High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar absorbing coating is a key enabling technology to achieve hightemperature high-efficiency concentrating solar power operation. A high-performance solar absorbing material must simultaneously meet all the following three stringent requirements: high thermal efficiency (usually measured by figure of merit), hightemperature durability, and oxidation resistance. The objective of this research is to employ a highly scalable process to fabricate and coat black oxide nanoparticles onto solar absorber surface to achieve ultra-high thermal efficiency.

  10. Designing and optimizing highly efficient grating for high-brightness laser based on spectral beam combining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying-Ying E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Wang, Li-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xue-Chun E-mail: yangyy@semi.ac.cn

    2015-03-14

    A highly efficient nano-periodical grating is theoretically investigated for spectral beam combining (SBC) and is experimentally implemented for attaining high-brightness laser from a diode laser array. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis with the S matrix method is employed to optimize the parameters of the grating. According the optimized parameters, the grating is fabricated and plays a key role in SBC cavity. The diffraction efficiency of this grating is optimized to 95% for the output laser which is emitted from the diode laser array. The beam parameter product of 3.8 mm mrad of the diode laser array after SBC is achieved at the output power of 46.3 W. The optical-to-optical efficiency of SBC cavity is measured to be 93.5% at the maximum operating current in the experiment.

  11. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  12. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  13. Solid optical ring interferometer for high-throughput feedback-free spectral analysis and filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrak, B.; Peiris, M.; Muller, A.

    2015-02-15

    We describe a simple and inexpensive optical ring interferometer for use in high-resolution spectral analysis and filtering. It consists of a solid cuboid, reflection-coated on two opposite sides, in which constructive interference occurs for waves in a rhombic trajectory. Due to its monolithic design, the interferometers resonance frequencies are insensitive to environmental disturbances over time. Additional advantages are its simplicity of alignment, high-throughput, and feedback-free operation. If desired, it can be stabilized with a secondary laser without disturbance of the primary signal. We illustrate the use of the interferometer for the measurement of the spectral Mollow triplet from a quantum dot and characterize its long-term stability for filtering applications.

  14. Predicting the spectral effects of soils on high concentrating photovoltaic systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting the spectral effects of soils on high concentrating photovoltaic systems Patrick D. Burton a,⇑ , Bruce H. King b , Daniel Riley b a Chemical and Biological Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0734, USA b Photovoltaic and Distributed Systems Integration Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0951, USA Received 28 March 2014; received in revised form 14 November 2014; accepted 21 November 2014 Available online 15 December

  15. Retrieval Using Texture Features in High Resolution Multi-spectral Satellite Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsam, S D; Kamath, C

    2004-01-22

    Texture features have long been used in remote sensing applications to represent and retrieve image regions similar to a query region. Various representations of texture have been proposed based on the Fourier power spectrum, spatial co-occurrence, wavelets, Gabor filters, etc. These representations vary in their computational complexity and their suitability for representing different region types. Much of the work done thus far has focused on panchromatic imagery at low to moderate spatial resolutions, such as images from Landsat 1-7 which have a resolution of 15-30 m/pixel, and from SPOT 1-5 which have a resolution of 2.5-20 m/pixel. However, it is not clear which texture representation works best for the new classes of high resolution panchromatic (60-100 cm/pixel) and multi-spectral (4 bands for red, green, blue, and near infra-red at 2.4-4 m/pixel) imagery. It is also not clear how the different spectral bands should be combined. In this paper, we investigate the retrieval performance of several different texture representations using multi-spectral satellite images from IKONOS. A query-by-example framework, along with a manually chosen ground truth dataset, allows different combinations of texture representations and spectral bands to be compared. We focus on the specific problem of retrieving inhabited regions from images of urban and rural scenes. Preliminary results show that (1) the use of all spectral bands improves the retrieval performance, and (2) co-occurrence, wavelet and Gabor texture features perform comparably.

  16. Observation of spectral gain narrowing in a high-order harmonic seeded soft-x-ray amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Barszczak Sardinha, A.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Lefrou, T.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Maynard, G.

    2010-06-15

    We report an observation of spectral gain narrowing of a high-order harmonic amplified by a soft-x-ray optical-field-ionized plasma. The temporal coherence and spectral linewidth of both the seeded and unseeded soft-x-ray lasers were experimentally measured using a varying-path-difference interferometer. The results showed that the high-order harmonic is subject to a strong spectral narrowing during its propagation in the plasma amplifier without rebroadening at saturation. This is in good agreement with a radiative transfer calculation including gain narrowing and saturation rebroadening.

  17. Ultraviolet high-spectral-resolution Doppler lidar for measuring wind field and aerosol optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imaki, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-10-01

    An ultraviolet incoherent Doppler lidar that incorporates the high-spectral-resolution (HSR) technique has been developed for measuring the wind field and aerosol optical properties in the troposphere. An injection seeded and tripled Nd:YAG laser at an ultraviolet wavelength of 355 nm was used in the lidar system. The HRS technique can resolve the aerosol Mie backscatter and the molecular Rayleigh backscatter to derive the signal components. By detecting the Mie backscatter, a great increase in the Doppler filter sensitivity was realized compared to the conventional incoherent Doppler lidars that detected the Rayleigh backscatter. The wind velocity distribution in a two-dimensional cross section was measured. By using the HSR technique, multifunction and absolute value measurements were realized for aerosol extinction, and volume backscatter coefficients; the laser beam transmittance, the lidar ratio, and the backscatter ratio are derived from these measurements.

  18. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  19. Vibrational spectral signatures of crystalline cellulose using high resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde, Luis; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wang, Hong-Fei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Both the C–H and O–H region spectra of crystalline cellulose were studied using the sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) for the first time. The resolution of HR-BB-SFG-VS is about 10-times better than conventional scanning SFG-VS and has the capability of measuring the intrinsic spectral lineshape and revealing many more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose samples from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the O–H region were unique for the two allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C–H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different spectral signatures of the crystalline cellulose in the O–H and C–H vibrational frequency regions are yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results lead to new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and to understand the basic crystalline structures, as well as variations in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose.

  20. Spectral methods for global atmospheric flow applied to the modified AFIT (Air Force Institute of Technology) fallout prediction model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.L.

    1986-09-01

    This thesis predicted the airborne spatial distribution of a high-explosive-generated dust cloud. A comparison of predicted cloud center positions to experimental data collected from an aircraft flying through the dust cloud center at various times and altitudes was also studied. The analysis was accomplished using a model called AFGL which produces global complex spectral coefficients. Spectral coefficients were applied as inp fallout prediction model (called REDRAM) to predict dust mass/cu. m.

  1. Effects of vacuum exposure on stress and spectral shift of high reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolz, C.J.; Taylor, J.R.; Eickelberg, W.K.; Lindh, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Laser Separation (AVLIS) program operates the world`s largest average power dye laser; the dye laser beams are combined, formatted, and transported in vacuum. The optical system is aligned at atmosphere, while the system must meet requirements in vacuum. Therefore, coating performance must be characterized in both atmosphere and vacuum. Changes in stress and spectral shift in ambient and vacuum environments are reported for conventional and dense multilayer dielectric coatings.

  2. Effects of vacuum exposure on stress and spectral shift of high reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolz, C.J.; Taylor, J.R.; Eickelberg, W.K.; Lindh, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Laser Separation (AVLIS) program operates the world's largest average power dye laser; the dye laser beams are combined, formatted, and transported in vacuum. The optical system is aligned at atmosphere, while the system must meet requirements in vacuum. Therefore, coating performance must be characterized in both atmosphere and vacuum. Changes in stress and spectral shift in ambient and vacuum environments are reported for conventional and dense multilayer dielectric coatings.

  3. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  4. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; et al

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore » >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  5. Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veatch, B.D.

    1994-06-01

    In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

  6. First Measurement of the {rho} Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Specht, H.J.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-04-28

    We report on a precision measurement of low-mass muon pairs in 158 AGeV indium-indium collisions at the CERN SPS. A significant excess of pairs is observed above the yield expected from neutral meson decays. The unprecedented sample size of 360 000 dimuons and the good mass resolution of about 2% allow us to isolate the excess by subtraction of the decay sources. The shape of the resulting mass spectrum is consistent with a dominant contribution from {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{yields}{rho}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation. The associated space-time averaged {rho} spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. This may rule out theoretical models linking hadron masses directly to the chiral condensate.

  7. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  8. Combining harmonic generation and laser chirping to achieve high spectral density in Compton sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terzić, Balša; Reeves, Cody; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2016-04-25

    Recently various laser-chirping schemes have been investigated with the goal of reducing or eliminating ponderomotive line broadening in Compton or Thomson scattering occurring at high laser intensities. Moreover, as a next level of detail in the spectrum calculations, we have calculated the line smoothing and broadening expected due to incident beam energy spread within a one-dimensional plane wave model for the incident laser pulse, both for compensated (chirped) and unchirped cases. The scattered compensated distributions are treatable analytically within three models for the envelope of the incident laser pulses: Gaussian, Lorentzian, or hyperbolic secant. We use the new results tomore » demonstrate that the laser chirping in Compton sources at high laser intensities: (i) enables the use of higher order harmonics, thereby reducing the required electron beam energies; and (ii) increases the photon yield in a small frequency band beyond that possible with the fundamental without chirping. We found that this combination of chirping and higher harmonics can lead to substantial savings in the design, construction and operational costs of the new Compton sources. This is of particular importance to the widely popular laser-plasma accelerator based Compton sources, as the improvement in their beam quality enters the regime where chirping is most effective.« less

  9. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  10. ccpi1-airborne | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process pdf-580kb (withdrawn) Mustang Clean ... Louis, Missouri Project Fact Sheet Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process ...

  11. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  12. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  13. Inversion of Airborne Contaminants in a Regional Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akcelik, V.; Biros, G.; Draganescu, A.; Ghattas, O.; Hill, J.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.; /SLAC /Pennsylvania U. /Texas U. /Sandia

    2007-01-10

    We are interested in a DDDAS problem of localization of airborne contaminant releases in regional atmospheric transport models from sparse observations. Given measurements of the contaminant over an observation window at a small number of points in space, and a velocity field as predicted for example by a mesoscopic weather model, we seek an estimate of the state of the contaminant at the beginning of the observation interval that minimizes the least squares misfit between measured and predicted contaminant field, subject to the convection-diffusion equation for the contaminant. Once the ''initial'' conditions are estimated by solution of the inverse problem, we issue predictions of the evolution of the contaminant, the observation window is advanced in time, and the process repeated to issue a new prediction, in the style of 4D-Var. We design an appropriate numerical strategy that exploits the spectral structure of the inverse operator, and leads to efficient and accurate resolution of the inverse problem. Numerical experiments verify that high resolution inversion can be carried out rapidly for a well-resolved terrain model of the greater Los Angeles area.

  14. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 1. Lidar intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowdle, D.A. ); Rothermel, J. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Post, M.J. )

    1991-03-20

    An airborne continuous wave (CW) focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar were used to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than {approximately}50% near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  15. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  16. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  17. Overview spectra and axial distribution of spectral line intensities in a high-current vacuum arc with CuCr electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisnyak, M.; Pipa, A. V.; Gorchakov, S. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de; Iseni, S.; Franke, St.; Khapour, A.; Methling, R.; Weltmann, K.-D. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de

    2015-09-28

    Spectroscopic investigations of free-burning vacuum arcs in diffuse mode with CuCr electrodes are presented. The experimental conditions of the investigated arc correspond to the typical system for vacuum circuit breakers. Spectra of six species Cu I, Cu II, Cu III, Cr I, Cr II, and Cr III have been analyzed in the wavelength range 350–810 nm. The axial intensity distributions were found to be strongly dependent on the ionization stage of radiating species. Emission distributions of Cr II and Cu II can be distinguished as well as the distributions of Cr III and Cu III. Information on the axial distribution was used to identify the spectra and for identification of overlapping spectral lines. The overview spectra and some spectral windows recorded with high resolution are presented. Analysis of axial distributions of emitted light, which originates from different ionization states, is presented and discussed.

  18. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  19. ccpi1-airborne | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process [pdf-580kb] (withdrawn) Mustang Clean Energy, LLC, A Subsidiary of the Peabody Energy, St. Louis, Missouri Project Fact Sheet Commercial Demonstration of the Airborne Process (Withdrawn) [PDF-675KB] (Oct

  20. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  1. Airborne Imagery Collections Barrow 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cherry, Jessica; Crowder, Kerri

    2015-07-20

    The data here are orthomosaics, digital surface models (DSMs), and individual frames captured during low altitude airborne flights in 2013 at the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The orthomosaics, thermal IR mosaics, and DSMs were generated from the individual frames using Structure from Motion techniques.

  2. AIRBORNE RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cartmell, T.R.; Gifford, J.F.

    1959-08-01

    An ionization chamber used for measuring the radioactivity of dust present in atmospheric air is described. More particularly. the patent describes a device comprising two concentric open ended, electrically connected cylinders between which is disposed a wire electrcde. A heating source is disposed inside of the cylinder to circulate air through the space between the two cylinders by convective flow. A high voltage electric field between the wire electrcde of the electrically connected cylinder will cause ionization of the air as it passes therethrough.

  3. Spectral shape deformation in inverse spin Hall voltage in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}|Pt bilayers at high microwave power levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lustikova, J. Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-02-21

    We report on the deformation of microwave absorption spectra and of the inverse spin Hall voltage signals in thin film bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum at high microwave power levels in a 9.45-GHz TE{sub 011} cavity. As the microwave power increases from 0.15 to 200 mW, the resonance field shifts to higher values, and the initially Lorentzian spectra of the microwave absorption intensity as well as the inverse spin Hall voltage signals become asymmetric. The contributions from opening of the magnetization precession cone and heating of YIG cannot well reproduce the data. Control measurements of inverse spin Hall voltages on thin-film YIG|Pt systems with a range of line widths underscore the role of spin-wave excitations in spectral deformation.

  4. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K. Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2014-11-15

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  5. Category:Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Category Edit History Category:Airborne Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Airborne Gravity Survey...

  6. ccpi-airborne_r2 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 AIRBORNE PROCESS(tm) COMMERCIAL SCALE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM MUSTANG CLEAN ENERGY, LLC, a subsidiary of PEABODY ENERGY ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI PROJECT FACT SHEET Airborne Process(tm)...

  7. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  8. Modification of modulated plasma plumes for the quasi-phase-matching of high-order harmonics in different spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Sobirov, B.; Reyimbaev, S.; Sherniyozov, H.; Usmanov, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2015-01-15

    We demonstrate the technique allowing the fine tuning of the distance between the laser-produced plasma plumes on the surfaces of different materials, as well as the variation of the sizes of these plumes. The modification of plasma formations is based on the tilting of the multi-slit mask placed between the heating laser beam and target surface, as well as the positioning of this mask in the telescope placed on the path of heating radiation. The modulated plasma plumes with the sizes of single plume ranging between 0.1 and 1 mm were produced on the manganese and silver targets. Modification of the geometrical parameters of plasma plumes proved to be useful for the fine tuning of the quasi-phase-matched high-order harmonics generated in such structures during propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses. We show the enhancement of some groups of harmonics along the plateau range and the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonic by variable modulation of the plasma.

  9. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise: Capabilities Capabilities Capabilities Sandia continues to advance the next generation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems with highly integrated, miniaturized, and fully mission-capable radar systems to impact tactical Surveillance and Reconnaissance (S&R) capabilities Sandia has a broad range of engineering, testing and analysis capabilities for Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems.

  11. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  12. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Eloranta, Ed

    2004-12-01

    The HSRL provided calibrated vertical profiles of optical depth, backscatter cross section and depoloarization at a wavelength of 532 nm. Profiles were acquired at 2.5 second intervals with 7.5 meter resolution. Profiles extended from an altitude of 100 m to 30 km in clear air. The lidar penetrated to a maximum optical depth of ~ 4 under cloudy conditions. Our data contributed directly to the aims of the M-PACE experiment, providing calibrated optical depth and optical backscatter measurements which were not available from any other instrument.

  13. Radiometry High Spectral Resolution Fourier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith, R. O. Knuteson, F. A. Best, R. G. Dedecker, T. P. Dirkx, R. ... behavior are being used to derive cloud microphysical properties (Smith et al. 1993). ...

  14. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  15. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  16. HST ROTATIONAL SPECTRAL MAPPING OF TWO L-TYPE BROWN DWARFS: VARIABILITY IN AND OUT OF WATER BANDS INDICATES HIGH-ALTITUDE HAZE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Karalidi, Theodora; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Showman, Adam P.; Flateau, Davin; Heinze, Aren N.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759–1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon and Marley and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers—the driver of the variability—must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.

  17. HST Rotational Spectral Mapping Of Two L-Type Brown Dwarfs: Variability In And Out Of Water Bands Indicates High-Altitude Haze Layers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at othermore » wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.« less

  18. HST Rotational Spectral Mapping Of Two L-Type Brown Dwarfs: Variability In And Out Of Water Bands Indicates High-Altitude Haze Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Hao; Apai, Dániel; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Morley, Caroline V.; Buenzli, Esther; Artigau, Étienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Metchev, Stanimir; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Showman, Adam P.; Karalidi, Theodora; Flateau, Davin; Heinze, Aren N.

    2014-12-17

    We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 μm and 1.7 μm. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 μm displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.

  19. Airborne measured analytic signal for UXO detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamey, T.J.; Holladay, J.S. [Aerodat Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Mahler, R. [Industrieanlagen Betriebsgesellschaft, Deutschland (Australia)

    1997-10-01

    The Altmark Tank Training Range north of Haldensleben, Germany has been in operation since WWI. Weapons training and testing has included cavalry, cannon, small arms, rail guns, and tank battalions. Current plans are to convert the area to a fully digital combat training facility. Instead of using blank or dummy ordnance, hits will be registered with lasers and computers. Before this can happen, the 25,000 ha must be cleared of old debris. In support of this cleanup operation, Aerodat Inc., in conjunction with IABG of Germany, demonstrated a new high resolution magnetic survey technique involving the measurement of 3-component magnetic gradient data. The survey was conducted in May 1996, and covered 500 ha in two blocks. The nominal line spacing was 10 m, and the average sensor altitude was 7 m. The geologic column consisted of sands over a sedimentary basin. Topographic relief was generally flat with approximately 3 m rolling dunes and occasional man-made features such as fox holes, bunkers, tank traps and reviewing stands. Trees were sparse and short (2-3 metres) due to frequent burn off and tank activity. As such, this site was nearly ideal for low altitude airborne surveying.

  20. Overview of the first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: Conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.N.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure three-dimensional winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, the authors describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from September experiments.

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME VI) 2015.10.01, Biraud, AAF ARM...

  2. ccpi-airborne_r2 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 AIRBORNE PROCESS(tm) COMMERCIAL SCALE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM MUSTANG CLEAN ENERGY, LLC, a subsidiary of PEABODY ENERGY ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI PROJECT FACT SHEET Airborne Process(tm) Commercial Scale Demonstration Program (Withdrawn) [PDF-675KB] (Oct 2008

  3. Spectral restoration in high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy based on iterative semi-blind Lucy-Richardson algorithm applied to rutile surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzari, Rmi Li, Jingfeng Jupille, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A new spectral restoration algorithm of reflection electron energy loss spectra is proposed. It is based on the maximum likelihood principle as implemented in the iterative Lucy-Richardson approach. Resolution is enhanced and point spread function recovered in a semi-blind way by forcing cyclically the zero loss to converge towards a Dirac peak. Synthetic phonon spectra of TiO{sub 2} are used as a test bed to discuss resolution enhancement, convergence benefit, stability towards noise, and apparatus function recovery. Attention is focused on the interplay between spectral restoration and quasi-elastic broadening due to free carriers. A resolution enhancement by a factor up to 6 on the elastic peak width can be obtained on experimental spectra of TiO{sub 2}(110) and helps revealing mixed phonon/plasmon excitations.

  4. Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1998-10-23

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

  5. XPS Spectral Database - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JCAP20130222-220.jpg XPS Spectral Database Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device

  6. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  7. Mutagenicity of airborne particles from a nonindustrial town in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barale, R.; Zucconi, D.; Giorgelli, F.; Carducci, A.L.; Tonelli, M.; Loprieno, N.

    1989-01-01

    The mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter collected in Pisa, a small nonindustrial town located in Italy, has been monitored over 1 year using the Ames Salmonella Test. Airborne particulate was collected on fiberglass filters using a Hi-Vol sampler and extracted by sonication and Soxhlet acetone extraction in sequence. TA 98 and TA 100 salmonella strains gave positive results with the great majority of samples. The mutagenicity trend fits with a harmonic regression with a peak during December/January and inversely correlates with the temperature. No correlations were observed with other meteorological conditions such as wind, cloud, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, and humidity. The ratio between mutagenicity/microgram of particulate matter with S9 and that without S9 remains more or less constant regardless of seasonal fluctuations, suggesting that during cold months quantitative increases of mutagens onto particulate matter have probably occurred. The comparison of air mutagenicity in different sites suggests that motor vehicle exhaust fumes are the major source of air pollution. Finally, because of high-traffic volume, air mutagenicity at street level is comparable to that observed in several metropolitan areas all over the world.

  8. Analyzing Options for Airborne Emergency Wireless Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schmitt; Juan Deaton; Curt Papke; Shane Cherry

    2008-03-01

    In the event of large-scale natural or manmade catastrophic events, access to reliable and enduring commercial communication systems is critical. Hurricane Katrina provided a recent example of the need to ensure communications during a national emergency. To ensure that communication demands are met during these critical times, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the guidance of United States Strategic Command has studied infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities associated with an airborne wireless communications capability. Such a capability could provide emergency wireless communications until public/commercial nodes can be systematically restored. This report focuses on the airborne cellular restoration concept; analyzing basic infrastructure requirements; identifying related infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities and offers recommended solutions.

  9. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  10. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR and Synthetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems What is SAR? Areas of Expertise Images VideoSAR Publications Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Pathfinder Airborne ISR and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems Tactical Eyes for the Warfighter Tactical Eyes for the Warfighter Actionable Intelligence for the Decision Maker Actionable Intelligence for the Decision Maker All Weather, Persistent, Optical Like All Weather, Persistent, Optical Like

  12. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase I) Notes Fugro, Inc. performed an airborne geophysical survey using the DIGHEM (Digital Helicopter ElectroMagnetics) aircraft over a 937 km2 survey grid. An coplanar...

  13. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurement on the North Slope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Airborne Carbon Measurement on the North Slope During the summer of 2015, a research campaign gave scientists insight into trends and variability of trace gases in the atmosphere ...

  14. New Airborne Technology Measures Ocean Surface Currents for Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emergency Rescue Missions New Airborne Technology Measures Ocean Surface Currents for Offshore Energy Production and Emergency Rescue Missions April 11, 2016 - 10:40am ...

  15. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  16. Spectral tailoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  17. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  18. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 1. Algorithm description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J. ); Bowdle, D.A. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Woodfield, A.A. )

    1991-03-20

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kingdom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 {mu}m using an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). The heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: Set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  19. Spectral utilization in thermophotovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clevenger, M.B.; Murray, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    Multilayer assemblies of epitaxially-grown, III-V semiconductor materials are being investigated for use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion applications. It has been observed that thick, highly-doped semiconductor layers within cell architectures dominate the parasitic free-carrier absorption (FCA) of devices at wavelengths above the bandgap of the semiconductor material. In this work, the wavelength-dependent, free-carrier absorption of p- and n-type InGaAs layers grown epitaxially onto semi-insulating (SI) InP substrates has been measured and related to the total absorption of long-wavelength photons in thermophotovoltaic devices. The optical responses of the TPV cells are then used in the calculation of spectral utilization factors and device efficiencies.

  20. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  1. CALIOPE and TAISIR airborne experiment platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chocol, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    Between 1950 and 1970, scientific ballooning achieved many new objectives and made a substantial contribution to understanding near-earth and space environments. In 1986, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began development of ballooning technology capable of addressing issues associated with precision tracking of ballistic missiles. In 1993, the Radar Ocean Imaging Project identified the need for a low altitude (1 km) airborne platform for its Radar system. These two technologies and experience base have been merged with the acquisition of government surplus Aerostats by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The CALIOPE and TAISIR Programs can benefit directly from this technology by using the Aerostat as an experiment platform for measurements of the spill facility at NTS.

  2. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  3. ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral radiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave spectral radiance The rate at which the spectrally resolved radiant energy in the longwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in a particular direction per unit area perpendicular to the direction of radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  4. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral radiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral radiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral radiance The rate at which the spectrally resolved radiant energy in the shortwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in a particular direction per unit area perpendicular to the direction of radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 submitted) in the past four years. We will continue our airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling in the SGP. The goals of this measurement program are to...

  6. Spatio-spectral image analysis using classical and neural algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, S.; Gisler, G.R.; Theiler, J.

    1996-12-31

    Remote imaging at high spatial resolution has a number of environmental, industrial, and military applications. Analysis of high-resolution multi-spectral images usually involves either spectral analysis of single pixels in a multi- or hyper-spectral image or spatial analysis of multi-pixels in a panchromatic or monochromatic image. Although insufficient for some pattern recognition applications individually, the combination of spatial and spectral analytical techniques may allow the identification of more complex signatures that might not otherwise be manifested in the individual spatial or spectral domains. We report on some preliminary investigation of unsupervised classification methodologies (using both ``classical`` and ``neural`` algorithms) to identify potentially revealing features in these images. We apply dimension-reduction preprocessing to the images, duster, and compare the clusterings obtained by different algorithms. Our classification results are analyzed both visually and with a suite of objective, quantitative measures.

  7. High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  9. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  10. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  11. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  12. Airborne megawatt class free-electron laser for defense and security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Whitney; David Douglas; George Neil

    2005-03-01

    An airborne megawatt (MW) average power Free-Electron Laser (FEL) is now a possibility. In the process of shrinking the FEL parameters to fit on ship, a surprisingly lightweight and compact design has been achieved. There are multiple motivations for using a FEL for a high-power airborne system for Defense and Security: Diverse mission requirements can be met by a single system. The MW of light can be made available with any time structure for time periods from microseconds to hours, i.e. there is a nearly unlimited magazine. The wavelength of the light can be chosen to be from the far infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV) thereby best meeting mission requirements. The FEL light can be modulated for detecting the same pattern in the small fraction of light reflected from the target resulting in greatly enhanced targeting control. The entire MW class FEL including all of its subsystems can be carried by large commercial size airplanes or on an airship. Adequate electrical power can be generated on the plane or airship to run the FEL as long as the plane or airship has fuel to fly. The light from the FEL will work well with relay mirror systems. The required R&D to achieve the MW level is well understood. The coupling of the capabilities of an airborne FEL to diverse mission requirements provides unique opportunities.

  13. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  14. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  15. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Biraud, Sebastien

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  16. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  17. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  18. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-10

    international intercomparisons among NMIs. Ultimately, the spectral irradiance can be realized with expanded measurement uncertainties of far less than 1 % over a wide spectral range. Thus, for customers with high demands on low measurement uncertainties, it is possible to calibrate their working standards directly against the blackbody-radiator, taking into account the higher necessary effort. In special cases it is possible to calibrate the customer's spectroradiometric facilities directly in front of the blackbody-radiator. In the context of the European Metrology Research Project Traceability for surface spectral solar ultraviolet radiation, the traceability chain will be improved and adapted.

  19. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  20. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (BER) Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences Longwave spectral brightness temperature,Longwave spectral ...

  1. Innovative Office Lighting System with Integrated Spectrally...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office Lighting System with Integrated Spectrally Adaptive Control Innovative Office Lighting System with Integrated Spectrally Adaptive Control Lead Performer: Philips Research ...

  2. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from

  3. "Airborne Wind Energy - Harnessing a Vast, Untapped Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source" | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab November 14, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "Airborne Wind Energy - Harnessing a Vast, Untapped Renewable Energy Source" Dr. Kenneth Jensen Makani Power Inc. At just 500 m above the ground, the average power density of the wind is double that at 100 m where wind turbines typically reside. This makes high-altitude wind one of the most concentrated forms of renewable energy after hydro-power. Building conventional wind turbines at

  4. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limtedmore » number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X

  5. BEO Tram Spectral Data 2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret; Serbin, Shawn

    2015-06-10

    Visible to near-infrared (350-1100nm) vegetation spectral reflectance data collected on the BEO automated tram measurement platform during the 2014 growing season. The spectra were collected using a PP Systems UniSpec-DC instrument and was processed to at-surface reflectance and interpolated to 1nm.

  6. Dynamics, Spectral Geometry and Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghelea, Dan

    2011-02-10

    The paper is an informal report on joint work with Stefan Haller on Dynamics in relation with Topology and Spectral Geometry. By dynamics one means a smooth vector field on a closed smooth manifold; the elements of dynamics of concern are the rest points, instantons and closed trajectories. One discusses their counting in the case of a generic vector field which has some additional properties satisfied by a still very large class of vector fields.

  7. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  8. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  9. Breast tissue decomposition with spectral distortion correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Huanjun; Zhao, Bo; Baturin, Pavlo; Behroozi, Farnaz; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of an accurate measurement of water, lipid, and protein composition of breast tissue using a photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT) with spectral distortion corrections. Methods: Thirty-eight postmortem breasts were imaged with a cadmium-zinc-telluride-based photon-counting spectral CT system at 100 kV. The energy-resolving capability of the photon-counting detector was used to separate photons into low and high energy bins with a splitting energy of 42 keV. The estimated mean glandular dose for each breast ranged from 1.8 to 2.2 mGy. Two spectral distortion correction techniques were implemented, respectively, on the raw images to correct the nonlinear detector response due to pulse pileup and charge-sharing artifacts. Dual energy decomposition was then used to characterize each breast in terms of water, lipid, and protein content. In the meantime, the breasts were chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein components to provide a gold standard for comparison with dual energy decomposition results. Results: The accuracy of the tissue compositional measurement with spectral CT was determined by comparing to the reference standard from chemical analysis. The averaged root-mean-square error in percentage composition was reduced from 15.5% to 2.8% after spectral distortion corrections. Conclusions: The results indicate that spectral CT can be used to quantify the water, lipid, and protein content in breast tissue. The accuracy of the compositional analysis depends on the applied spectral distortion correction technique.

  10. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Spectral Responsivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectral Responsivity Spectral responsivity (SR) measurement is an important part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) photovoltaic (PV) device performance assessment process. Spectral responsivity systems measure how a device responds to selected narrow (spectral) bands of irradiance. Responsivity is measured in units of amps per watt versus wavelength and reported in terms of quantum efficiency (QE) - a measure of how efficiently a device converts incoming photons to charge

  11. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Areas of Expertise Capabilities Capabilities Sandia's Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) breadth of capabilities include everything from mission planning to system design and integration to data collection and analysis. Hardware Hardware Sandia has over 30 years of experience in the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and other Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) hardware components. Modes and Frequencies

  13. Introductory Remarks: ARM AVP Workshop on Advances in Airborne Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introductory Remarks: ARM AVP Workshop on Advances in Airborne Instrumentation Warren Wiscombe ARM Chief Scientist Brookhaven National Lab ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Genesis of this workshop * ARM UAV mutated into ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) in 2006 * Several key people believed strongly that AVP should have an instrument development component * Greg McFarquhar wrote the AVP whitepaper with three goals: - routine flights over ARM sites -

  14. New Approaches to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approaches to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne Measurements Rick Flagan Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Support: NSF, ONR, Davidow Foundation Differential Mobility Analysis Air Sample Aerosol Charger/Neutralizer (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization) Sheath Air Q sh ~ 10 Q a Volumetric flow rate Q s Exhaust Q ex =Q sh Differential Mobility Analyzer DMA (Aerodynamic Analog of Sector Mass

  15. Real-Time Airborne Particle Analyzer - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Real-Time Airborne Particle Analyzer Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Particle analysis is useful for determining chemical compositions in a wide range of disciplines, from ascertaining the source of a petroleum sample to duplicating a fragrance. The technique is appealing to a broad cross section of analytical sciences, but its applications are limited because, for existing equipment, sample size

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  17. Template:SpectralImagingSensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is the 'Spectral Imaging Sensor' template. To define a new Spectral Imaging Sensor, please use the Spectral Imaging Sensor Form. Parameters Name - Full, spelled-out name...

  18. Micro-Electron Spin Resonance for Airborne Soot Measurement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Micro-Electron Spin Resonance for Airborne Soot Measurement Micro-Electron Spin Resonance for Airborne Soot Measurement A real-time method for airborne soot concentration measurement using a miniaturized electron spin resonance sensor is presented. deer08_white.pdf (1.09 MB) More Documents & Publications Certification Package Status Table_12_11_08.xls Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor and Controls for

  19. DOE-HDBK-3010-94; DOE Handbook Airborne Release Fractions/Rates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10-94 December 1994 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2000 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONSRATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume I - Analysis of ...

  20. DOE/SC-ARM-15-032 ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Airborne Carbon Measurements Project BC black carbon CARVE NASA Carbon in Arctic ... observations to regional scales, but focused on Alaska as a whole (Figure 2 and Figure 3). ...

  1. DOE-HDBK-3010-94; Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3010-94 December 1994 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONSRATES AND RESPIRABLE ... Nozzle arrangement in the system is in accordance with NFPA standards and will blanket a ...

  2. Primer on Use of Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging for On-Site Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, J R

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to determine whether a nuclear explosion has occurred in violation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and to gather information which might assist in identifying the violator (CTBT, Article IV, Paragraph 35) Multi-Spectral and Infra Red Imaging (MSIR) is allowed by the treaty to detect observables which might help reduce the search area and thus expedite an OSI and make it more effective. MSIR is permitted from airborne measurements, and at and below the surface to search for anomalies and artifacts (CTBT, Protocol, Part II, Paragraph 69b). The three broad types of anomalies and artifacts MSIR is expected to be capable of observing are surface disturbances (disturbed earth, plant stress or anomalous surface materials), human artifacts (man-made roads, buildings and features), and thermal anomalies. The purpose of this Primer is to provide technical information on MSIR relevant to its use for OSI. It is expected that this information may be used for general background information, to inform decisions about the selection and testing of MSIR equipment, to develop operational guidance for MSIR use during an OSI, and to support the development of a training program for OSI Inspectors. References are provided so readers can pursue a topic in more detail than the summary information provided here. The following chapters will provide more information on how MSIR can support an OSI (Section 2), a short summary what Multi-Spectral Imaging and Infra Red Imaging is (Section 3), guidance from the CTBT regarding the use of MSIR (Section 4), and a description of several nuclear explosion scenarios (Section 5) and consequent observables (Section 6). The remaining sections focus on practical aspects of using MSIR for an OSI, such as specification and selection of MSIR equipment, operational considerations for deployment of MISR equipment from an aircraft, and the conduct of field exercises to mature MSIR for an OSI

  3. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predicted to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.

  4. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predictedmore » to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.« less

  5. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Paciesas, William S. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  6. Spectral output of Z-machine implosions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G. C.; Chrien, Robert E.; Peterson, D. L.; Watt, R. G.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Sanford, T. W. L.

    2001-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine has developed into a reproducible, high power (>200 TW), high temperature (>200 eV) driver for radiation physics experiments. Imploding cylindrical wire arrays on the Z-machine produce a radiation source with a bolometric temperature of about 200 eV. By surrounding the z-pinch implosion with a vacuum hohlraum a nearly Planckian source of about 140 eV temperature is created with peak radiation powers of about 200 terawatts and integrated energy of 2 megajoules or more. In this energy rich environment we can field a dozen experiments all being driven by an identical source. In addition to 'standard' vacuum hohlraums we also use dynamic hohlraums consisting of two nested wire arrays converging onto an axially centered foam cylinder. Radiation flowing from the ends on the cylinder indicates a Planckian source temperature well over 200 eV. Only two experiments can be fielded on a dynamic hohlraum (one on each end) but the higher source temperature justifies the added complexity of the set-up. We routinely use arrays of filtered silicon photodiodes (SiD) and filtered photocathode x-ray diodes (XRD) to determine the temperature of the source. Three different techniques for unfolding spectra from the XRD and SiD detector data are being used. They are: (1) Treat each detector independently and find the Planckian temperature for a given source size and solid angle that would give the measured detector signal, (2) Use all detector signals and detector spectral responses simultaneously and find a spectrum that best fits the observed data, (3) Use all detector signals and averaged detector spectral responses and find a histogram spectrum that best fits the observed data. When used as complementary set of analysis tools these techniques generate remarkably consistent results showing nearly Planckian behavior on our vacuum hohlraum experiments.

  7. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    engineering data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): engineering data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral ...

  8. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  9. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  10. ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral brightness temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral brightness temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave spectral brightness temperature A descriptive measure of radiation in terms of the temperature of a hypothetical black body emitting an identical amount of radiation at the same spectrally resolved wavelengths. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the

  11. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Tools » Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally enhanced lighting (SEL) is a cost-effective, low-risk design method for achieving significant energy savings. It entails shifting the color of lamps from the warmer to the cooler (whiter) end of the color spectrum, more closely matching daylight. Studies show that, with this color shift, occupants perceive lighting to be brighter and they are able to see more clearly. Since SEL provides the

  12. Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-10-06

    Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

  13. Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-05-01

    A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

  14. Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H.; Barhen, J.

    1997-04-01

    A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

  15. Synthesis, spectral characterization, and single crystal structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis, spectral ... Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Crystallography Reports; Journal Volume: ...

  16. Development of spectral interferometry for shock characterization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interferometry for shock characterization in energetic materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of spectral interferometry for shock characterization in ...

  17. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  18. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showed that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.

  19. A new scoring function for top-down spectral deconvolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Liu, Xiaowen

    2014-12-18

    Background: Top-down mass spectrometry plays an important role in intact protein identification and characterization. Top-down mass spectra are more complex than bottom-up mass spectra because they often contain many isotopomer envelopes from highly charged ions, which may overlap with one another. As a result, spectral deconvolution, which converts a complex top-down mass spectrum into a monoisotopic mass list, is a key step in top-down spectral interpretation. Results: In this paper, we propose a new scoring function, L-score, for evaluating isotopomer envelopes. By combining L-score with MS-Deconv, a new software tool, MS-Deconv+, was developed for top-down spectral deconvolution. Experimental results showedmore » that MS-Deconv+ outperformed existing software tools in top-down spectral deconvolution. Conclusions: L-score shows high discriminative ability in identification of isotopomer envelopes. Using L-score, MS-Deconv+ reports many correct monoisotopic masses missed by other software tools, which are valuable for proteoform identification and characterization.« less

  20. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  1. Multi-center airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) is an airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar designed to acquire remote multi-dimensional measurements of winds and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. These measurements enable study of atmospheric dynamic processes and features at scales of motion that may be undersampled by, or may be beyond the capability of, existing or planned sensors. MACAWS capabilities enable more realistic assessments of concepts in global tropospheric wind measurement with satellite Doppler lidar, as well as a unique capability to validate the NASA Scatterometer currently scheduled for launch in late 1996. MACAWS consists of a Joule-class CO{sub 2} coherent Doppler lidar on a ruggedized optical table, a programmable scanner to direct the lidar beam in the desired direction, and a dedicated inertial navigation system to account for variable aircraft attitude and speed. MACAWS was flown for the first time in September 1995, over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western US. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Airborne soil organic particles generated by precipitation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Bingbing; Harder, Tristan H.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Piens, Dominique S.; China, Swarup; Kovarik, Libor; Keiluweit, Marco; Arey, Bruce W.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-05-02

    Airborne organic particles play a critical role in Earth’s climate1, public health2, air quality3, and hydrological and carbon cycles4. However, sources and formation mechanisms for semi-solid and solid organic particles5 are poorly understood and typically neglected in atmospheric models6. Laboratory evidence suggests that fine particles can be formed from impaction of mineral surfaces by droplets7. Here, we use chemical imaging of particles collected following rain events in the Southern Great Plains, Oklahoma, USA and after experimental irrigation to show that raindrop impaction of soils generates solid organic particles. We find that after rain events, sub-micrometre solid particles, with a chemicalmore » composition consistent with soil organic matter, contributed up to 60% of atmospheric particles. Our irrigation experiments indicate that intensive water impaction is sufficient to cause ejection of airborne soil organic particles from the soil surface. Chemical imaging and micro-spectroscopy analysis of particle physico-chemical properties suggest that these particles may have important impacts on cloud formation and efficiently absorb solar radiation. Lastly, we suggest that raindrop-induced formation of solid organic particles from soils may be a widespread phenomenon in ecosystems such as agricultural systems and grasslands where soils are exposed to strong, episodic precipitation events8.« less

  3. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  4. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  5. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  6. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  7. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  8. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV) Campaign Links Final Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) 2008.10.01, Biraud, AAF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV) 2013.10.01 - 2015.09.30 Lead Scientist : Sebastien Biraud For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM ACME observations and

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics - CAST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsCo-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics - CAST Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics - CAST 2014.01.01 - 2014.02.28 Lead Scientist : Geraint Vaughan For data sets, see below. Abstract CAST (Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics) was a research project funded by the UK's Natural Environment

  11. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reports (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports We report on a 5-year multi-institution and multi-agency airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, with

  12. A comparison between satellite and airborne multispectral data for the assessment of Mangrove areas in the eastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, E.P.; Edwards, A.J.; Mumby, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite (SPOT XS and Landsat TM) and airborne multispectral (CASI) imagery was acquired from the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies. The descriptive resolution and accuracy of each image type is compared for two applications: mangrove habitat mapping and the measurement of mangrove canopy characteristics (leaf area index and canopy closure). Mangroves could be separated from non-mangrove vegetation to an accuracy of only 57% with SPOT XS data but better discrimination could be achieved with either Landsat TM or CASI (in both cases accuracy was >90%). CASI data permitted a more accurate classification of different mangrove habitats than was possible using Landsat TM. Nine mangrove habitats could be mapped to an accuracy of 85% with the high-resolution airborne data compared to 31% obtained with TM. A maximum of three mangrove habitats were separable with Landsat TM: the accuracy of this classification was 83%. Measurement of mangrove canopy characteristics is achieved more accurately with CASI than with either satellite sensor, but high costs probably make it a less cost-effective option. The cost-effectiveness of each sensor is discussed for each application.

  13. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stork, Christopher L.; Van Benthem, Mark H.

    2009-02-17

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  14. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance The rate at which spectrally resolved radiant energy at wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above

  15. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    direct normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance The narrow spectral range of measurements coming directly from the sun whose wavelength falls within the solar range of 0.4 and 4 {mu}m. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream

  16. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  17. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck ...

  18. Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for...

  19. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): channel 1 data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  20. ARM: Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM: Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, moderate sensitivity mode, cross-polarized mode Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR): filtered spectral data, moderate ...

  1. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    summary data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): summary data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  2. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

  3. Solar spectral optical properties of pigments--Part II: survey...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar spectral optical properties of ... K (absorption) as functions ofwavelength in the solar spectral range of 300 to 2500 nm. ...

  4. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

  5. A spectral filtering procedure for Eddy-resolving simulations with a spectral element ocean model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, J.G.; Iskandarani, M.; Haidvogel, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    This report introduces a new filtering method designed to control the growth of nonlinear instabilities in the spectral element solution of nonlinear turbulent oceanic flow model.

  6. The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 rocheleau_uhawaii_kickoff.pdf (340.84 KB) More Documents & Publications Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy Effects of Impurities of Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effect of System and Air Contaminants on

  7. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  8. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Gentry, Stephen M.; Boye, Clinton A.; Grotbeck, Carter L.; Stallard, Brian R.; Descour, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  9. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  10. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  11. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  12. Evolution of the spectral index after inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari, A.A.; Abbassi, A.H. E-mail: ahabbasi@modares.ac.ir

    2014-09-01

    In this article we investigate the time evolution of the adiabatic (curvature) and isocurvature (entropy) spectral indices after inflation era for all cosmological scales with two different initial conditions. For this purpose, we first extract an explicit equation for the time evolution of the comoving curvature perturbation (which may be known as the generalized Mukhanov-Sasaki equation). It would be cleared that the evolution of adiabatic spectral index severely depends on the initial conditions moreover, as expected it is constant only for the super-Hubble scales and adiabatic initial conditions. Additionally, the adiabatic spectral index after recombination approaches a constant value for the isocurvature perturbations. Finally, we re-investigate the Sachs-Wolfe effect and show that the fudge factor  1/3 in the adiabatic ordinary Sachs-Wolfe formula must be replaced by 0.4.

  13. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusionreaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  14. Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Norm Stanley; Larry Radke; Charles Smeltzer

    2007-09-01

    On July 11, 2007, a surface, high-explosive test (<20,000 lb TNT-equivalent) was carried out at the National Security Test Range (NSTR) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. Aircraft-mounted rapid response (1-sec) particulate monitors were used to measure airborne PM-10 concentrations directly in the dust cloud and to develop a PM-10 emission factor that could be used for subsequent tests at the NSTR. The blast produced a mushroom-like dust cloud that rose approximately 2,500–3,000 ft above ground level, which quickly dissipated (within 5 miles of the source). In general, the cloud was smaller and less persistence than expected, or that might occur in other areas, likely due to the coarse sand and subsurface conditions that characterize the immediate NSTR area. Maximum short time-averaged (1-sec) PM-10 concentrations at the center of the cloud immediately after the event reached 421 µg m-3 but were rapidly reduced (by atmospheric dispersion and fallout) to near background levels (~10 µg m-3) after about 15 minutes. This occurred well within the INL Site boundary, about 8 km (5 miles) from the NSTR source. These findings demonstrate that maximum concentrations in ambient air beyond the INL Site boundary (closest is 11.2 km from NSTR) from these types of tests would be well within the 150 µg m-3 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM-10. Aircraft measurements and geostatistical techniques were used to successfully quantify the initial volume (1.64E+9 m3 or 1.64 km3) and mass (250 kg) of the PM-10 dust cloud, and a PM-10 emission factor (20 kg m-3 crater soil volume) was developed for this specific type of event at NSTR. The 250 kg of PM-10 mass estimated from this experiment is almost seven-times higher than the 36 kg estimated for the environmental assessment (DOE-ID 2007) using available Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1995) emission factors. This experiment demonstrated that advanced aircraft-mounted instruments operated by

  15. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Surface spectral albedo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSurface spectral albedo ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Surface spectral albedo 2002.08.14 - 2002.08.20 Lead Scientist : Alexander Trishchenko Data Availability Analysis of the data collected during IOP is not completed yet. Preliminary results will be presented during the IRF workshop on 8-10 October, 2002. Data will be available at the following URL (

  17. Logarithmic compression methods for spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunham, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    A method is provided for logarithmic compression, transmission, and expansion of spectral data. A log Gabor transformation is made of incoming time series data to output spectral phase and logarithmic magnitude values. The output phase and logarithmic magnitude values are compressed by selecting only magnitude values above a selected threshold and corresponding phase values to transmit compressed phase and logarithmic magnitude values. A reverse log Gabor transformation is then performed on the transmitted phase and logarithmic magnitude values to output transmitted time series data to a user.

  18. On the possibility of simultaneous emission of an autonomous cw HF-DF chemical laser in two spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashkin, A S; Gurov, L V; Katorgin, B I; Petrova, S N; Polinovsky, D V

    2008-05-31

    The efficiencies of different fuel compositions used in the combustion chamber of an autonomous cw chemical HF-DF laser for obtaining high specific energy parameters during simultaneous lasing in HF and DF molecules in two spectral ranges are theoretically analysed. It is shown that mirrors with the reflectance above 99% in these spectral ranges can be manufactured in principle. (lasers)

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Peoria, Decater, Belleville Quadrangles, (IL). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Peoria, Decatur, and Belleville, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton procession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results.

  20. Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) Calibration Pad Assignments for Spectral Gamma (November 1985) (5.3 MB) More Documents & Publications Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Grade

  1. BBHRP Assessment Using Ground and Satellite-based High Spectral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Observations Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison DeSlover, Daniel University of Wisconsin Holz, Robert University of Wisconsin, CIMMS Knuteson, Robert...

  2. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  3. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  4. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  5. Noise power spectral density of a fibre scattered-light interferometer with a semiconductor laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T

    2013-10-31

    Spectral characteristics of the noise intensity fluctuations at the output of a scattered-light interferometer, caused by phase fluctuations of semiconductor laser radiation are considered. This kind of noise is one of the main factors limiting sensitivity of interferometric sensors. For the first time, to our knowledge, the expression is obtained for the average noise power spectral density at the interferometer output versus the degree of a light source coherence and length of the scattering segment. Also, the approximate expressions are considered which determine the power spectral density in the low-frequency range (up to 200 kHz) and in the limiting case of extended scattering segments. The expression obtained for the noise power spectral density agrees with experimental normalised power spectra with a high accuracy. (interferometry of radiation)

  6. 3D model generation using an airborne swarm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R. A.; Punzo, G.; Macdonald, M.; Dobie, G.; MacLeod, C. N.; Summan, R.; Pierce, G.; Bolton, G.

    2015-03-31

    Using an artificial kinematic field to provide co-ordination between multiple inspection UAVs, the authors herein demonstrate full 3D modelling capability based on a photogrammetric system. The operation of the system is demonstrated by generating a full 3D surface model of an intermediate level nuclear waste storage drum. Such drums require periodic inspection to ensure that drum distortion or corrosion is carefully monitored. Performing this inspection with multiple airborne platforms enables rapid inspection of structures that are inaccessible to on-surface remote vehicles and are in human-hazardous environments. A three-dimensional surface-meshed model of the target can then be constructed in post-processing through photogrammetry analysis of the visual inspection data. The inspection environment uses a tracking system to precisely monitor the position of each aerial vehicle within the enclosure. The vehicles used are commercially available Parrot AR. Drone quadcopters, controlled through a computer interface connected over an IEEE 802.11n (WiFi) network, implementing a distributed controller for each vehicle. This enables the autonomous and distributed elements of the control scheme to be retained, while alleviating the vehicles of the control algorithms computational load. The control scheme relies on a kinematic field defined with the target at its centre. This field defines the trajectory for all the drones in the volume relative to the central target, enabling the drones to circle the target at a set radius while avoiding drone collisions. This function enables complete coverage along the height of the object, which is assured by transitioning to another inspection band only after completing circumferential coverage. Using a swarm of vehicles, the time until complete coverage can be significantly reduced.

  7. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME V)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V) Campaign Links Science Plan Images Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) 2008.10.01, Biraud, AAF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME V) 2015.06.01 - 2015.09.15 Lead Scientist : Sebastien Biraud For data sets, see below. Abstract The ARM Aerial Facility Gulfstream-159 will alternate between four flights

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RSP Measurements govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements 2012.07.01 - 2012.07.31 Lead Scientist : Chris Hostetler For data sets, see below. Abstract The deployment of the

  10. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports.

  11. Spectral Asymmetry Due to Magnetic Coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.

    2008-05-06

    The use of magnetic coordinates is ubiquitous in toroidal plasma physics, but the distortion in Fourier spectra produced by these coordinates is not well known. A spatial symmetry of the field is not always represented by a symmetry in the Fourier spectrum when magnetic coordinates are used because of the distortion of the toroidal angle. The practical importance of spectral distortion is illustrated with a tokamak example.

  12. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Young, Jack P.

    1998-01-01

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferrably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0.degree., an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head.

  13. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  14. MODIS Airborne simulator (MAS) Final Report for CLASIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Arnold; Steven Platnick

    2010-11-24

    The MAS was flown aboard the NASA ER-2 for the CLASIC field experiment, and for all data collected, provided calibrated and geolocated (Level-1B) radiance data for its 50 spectral bands (ranging in wavelength for 0.47 to 14.3 m). From the Level-1B data, as directed in the Statement of Work, higher order (Level-2) data products were derived. The Level-2 products include: a) cloud optical thickness, b) cloud effective radius, c) cloud top height (temperature), d) cloud fraction, e) cloud phase products. Preliminary Level-1B and Level-2 products were provided during the field experiment (typically within one or two days of data collection). Final version data products were made available in December 2008 following considerable calibration analysis. Data collection, data processing (to Level-2), and discussion of the calibration work are summarized below.

  15. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI)*, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) cooperated to produce a spectral solar radiation data base representing a range of atmospheric conditions (or climates) that is applicable to several different types of solar collectors. Data that are included in the data base were collected at FSEC from October 1986 to April 1988, and at PG&E from April 1987 to April 1988. FSEC operated one EPRI and one SERI spectroradiometer almost daily at Cape Canaveral, which contributed nearly 2800 spectra to the data base. PG&E operated one EPRI spectroradiometer at San Ramon, Calif., as resources permitted, contributing nearly 300 spectra to the data base. SERI collected about 200 spectra in the Denver/Golden, Colo., area form November 1987 to February 1988 as part of a research project to study urban spectral solar radiation, and added these data to the data base. *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  16. Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) for remote sensing cloud studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, G.S.; Grotbeck, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    A Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) has been developed as are relatively inexpensive ({approximately}$IM/copy), well-calibrated,imaging radiometer for aircraft studies of cloud properties. The instrument is designed to fly on an Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) platform at altitudes from the surface up to 20 km. MPIR is being developed to support the Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle portion of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurements program (ARM/UAV). Radiation-cloud interactions are the dominant uncertainty in the current General Circulation Models used for atmospheric climate studies. Reduction of this uncertainty is a top scientific priority of the US Global Change Research Program and the ARM program. While the DOE`s ARM program measures a num-ber of parameters from the ground-based Clouds and Radiation Testbed sites, it was recognized from the outset that other key parameters are best measured by sustained airborne data taking. These measurements are critical in our understanding of global change issues as well as for improved atmospheric and near space weather forecasting applications.

  17. Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (April 1984) | Department of Energy Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) Parameter Assignments for Spectral Gamma-Ray Borehole Calibration Models (April 1984) (3.25 MB) More Documents & Publications Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count

  18. Spectral statistics in noninteracting many-particle systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, L.; Relano, A.; Retamosa, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Faleiro, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E.U.I.T. Industrial, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28012 Madrid (Spain); Molina, R.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik Komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    It is widely accepted that the statistical properties of energy level spectra provide an essential characterization of quantum chaos. Indeed, the spectral fluctuations of many different systems like quantum billiards, atoms, or atomic nuclei have been studied. However, noninteracting many-body systems have received little attention, since it is assumed that they must exhibit Poisson-like fluctuations. Apart from a heuristic argument of Bloch, there are neither systematic numerical calculations nor a rigorous derivation of this fact. Here we present a rigorous study of the spectral fluctuations of noninteracting identical particles moving freely in a mean field emphasizing the evolution with the number of particles N as well as with the energy. Our results are conclusive. For N{>=}2 the spectra of these systems exhibit Poisson fluctuations provided that we consider sufficiently high excitation energies. Nevertheless, when the mean field is chaotic there exists a critical energy scale L{sub c}; beyond this scale, the fluctuations deviate from the Poisson statistics as a reminiscence of the statistical properties of the mean field.

  19. Spectral method for a kinetic swarming model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.; Motsch, Sebastien

    2015-04-28

    Here we present the first numerical method for a kinetic description of the Vicsek swarming model. The kinetic model poses a unique challenge, as there is a distribution dependent collision invariant to satisfy when computing the interaction term. We use a spectral representation linked with a discrete constrained optimization to compute these interactions. To test the numerical scheme we investigate the kinetic model at different scales and compare the solution with the microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of the Vicsek model. Lastly, we observe that the kinetic model captures key features such as vortex formation and traveling waves.

  20. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    total downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, at specrally-resolved wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, is being emitted upwards and downwards into a radiation field and transferred across a surface area (real or imaginary) in a hemisphere of directions. Categories Radiometric Instruments

  1. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  2. Spectral geometry of {kappa}-Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrea, Francesco

    2006-06-15

    After recalling Snyder's idea [Phys. Rev. 71, 38 (1947)] of using vector fields over a smooth manifold as 'coordinates on a noncommutative space', we discuss a two-dimensional toy-model whose 'dual' noncommutative coordinates form a Lie algebra: this is the well-known {kappa}-Minkowski space [Phys. Lett. B 334, 348 (1994)]. We show how to improve Snyder's idea using the tools of quantum groups and noncommutative geometry. We find a natural representation of the coordinate algebra of {kappa}-Minkowski as linear operators on an Hilbert space (a major problem in the construction of a physical theory), study its 'spectral properties', and discuss how to obtain a Dirac operator for this space. We describe two Dirac operators. The first is associated with a spectral triple. We prove that the cyclic integral of Dimitrijevic et al. [Eur. Phys. J. C 31, 129 (2003)] can be obtained as Dixmier trace associated to this triple. The second Dirac operator is equivariant for the action of the quantum Euclidean group, but it has unbounded commutators with the algebra.

  3. Hyper-spectral scanner design and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.; Moses, J.; Smith, R.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An earlier project produced rough designs for key components of a compact hyper-spectral sensor for environmental and ecological measurements. Such sensors could be deployed on unmanned vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for measurements important to agriculture, the environment, and ecologies. This represents an important advance in remote sensing. Motorola invited us to propose an add-on, proof-of-principle sensor for their Comet satellite, whose primary mission is to demonstrate a channel of the IRIDIUM satellite communications system. Our project converted the preliminary designs from the previous effort into final designs for the telescope, camera, computer and interfaces that constitute the hyper-spectral scanning sensor. The work concentrated on design, fabrication, preliminary integration, and testing of the electronic circuit boards for the computer, data compression board, and interface board for the camera-computer and computer-modulator (transmitter) interfaces.

  4. PICK-UP ION DISTRIBUTIONS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRAL CURVATURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Randol, B. M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Moebius, E. S.; Zank, G. P.; Frisch, P. C.

    2012-05-20

    This paper focuses on the analysis and significance of the spectral curvature of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) detected by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer. The flux versus energy spectrum is analytically expressed in terms of the source proton distributions, namely: (1) the solar wind kappa distribution of protons and (2) the coexisting filled spherical shell distribution of pick-up ions (PUIs). The influence of PUIs on the spectral index and curvature is modeled and investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that (1) the PUI speed upper limit is restricted by the Earthward PUI velocity vector, (2) the PUI distribution causes a positive spectral curvature, and (3) the exact expressions of the spectral index and curvature can be used to extract information about the governing parameters of the parent proton distributions. The sky maps of the spectral curvature reveal a possible band-like configuration of positive spectral curvature that is missing in the original flux sky maps. This band can be roughly separated into the north/south polar regions and two ecliptic meridional 'columns' located around the ecliptic longitudes {approx}5 Degree-Sign and {approx}150 Degree-Sign . The geometric locus between the two cones with noseward axis, and apertures {approx}60 Degree-Sign and {approx}120 Degree-Sign , configures the band-like region of (1) the positive curvature and (2) the maximum values of PUI distribution. Indeed, the observed curvature band is highly correlated with PUI distributions, and is possibly caused by the influence of PUIs on bending the spectrum from linear (log-log scale) to concave upward, thus increasing its spectral curvature.

  5. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RF Kristensen; JF Beausang; DM DePoy

    2004-06-28

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1 mm to 100 mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  6. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan T. Kristensen; John F. Beausang; David M. DePoy

    2003-12-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1mm to 100mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  7. Spectral structures and their generation mechanisms for solar radio type-I bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwai, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Masuda, S.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2014-07-01

    The fine spectral structures of solar radio type-I bursts were observed by the solar radio telescope AMATERAS. The spectral characteristics, such as the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth, of the individual burst elements were satisfactorily detected by the highly resolved spectral data of AMATERAS with the burst detection algorithm that is improved in this study. The peak flux of the type-I bursts followed a power-law distribution with a spectral index of 2.9-3.3, whereas their duration and bandwidth were distributed more exponentially. There were almost no correlations between the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth. That means there was no similarity in the shapes of the burst spectral structures. We defined the growth rate of a burst as the ratio between its peak flux and duration. There was a strong correlation between the growth rate and peak flux. These results suggest that the free energy of type-I bursts that is originally generated by nonthermal electrons is modulated in the subsequent stages of the generation of nonthermal electrons, such as plasma wave generation, radio wave emissions, and propagation. The variation of the timescale of the growth rate is significantly larger than that of the coronal environments. These results can be explained by the situation wherein the source region may have the inhomogeneity of an ambient plasma environment, such as the boundary of open and closed field lines, and the superposition of entire emitted bursts was observed by the spectrometer.

  8. Airborne Open Polar/Imaging Nephelometer for Ice Particles in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... light because of the choice of a high-power, ... the non-sphericity andor shape of the scattering particles. ... These data illustrate the future potential of the ...

  9. REGULATION OF THE SPECTRAL PEAK IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-02-20

    Observations indicate that the peak of a gamma-ray burst spectrum forms in the opaque region of an ultrarelativistic jet. Recent radiative transfer calculations support this picture and show that the spectral peak is inherited from initially thermal radiation, which is changed by heating into a broad photon distribution with a high-energy tail. We discuss the processes that regulate the observed position of the spectral peak E {sub pk}. The opaque jet has three radial zones: (1) the Planck zone r < R {sub P} where a blackbody spectrum is enforced; this zone ends where the Thomson optical depth decreases to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5}, (2) the Wien zone R {sub P} < r < R {sub W} with a Kompaneets parameter y >> 1 where radiation has a Bose-Einstein spectrum, and (3) the Comptonization zone r > R {sub W} where the radiation spectrum develops a high-energy tail. Besides the initial jet temperature, an important factor regulating E {sub pk} is internal dissipation (of bulk motions and magnetic energy) at large distances from the central engine. Dissipation in the Planck zone reduces E {sub pk}, and dissipation in the Wien zone can increase E {sub pk}. In jets with subdominant magnetic fields, the predicted E {sub pk} varies around 1 MeV up to a maximum value of about 10 MeV. If the jet carries an energetically important magnetic field, E {sub pk} can be additionally increased by dissipation of magnetic energy. This increase is suggested by observations, which show E {sub pk} up to about 20 MeV. We also consider magnetically dominated jets; then a simple model of magnetic dissipation gives E {sub pk} Almost-Equal-To 30 {Gamma}{sub W} keV where {Gamma}{sub W} is the jet Lorentz factor at the Wien radius R {sub W}.

  10. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  11. Spectral line broadening in magnetized black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Shoom, Andrey A.; Tzounis, Christos E-mail: ashoom@ualberta.ca

    2014-07-01

    We consider weakly magnetized non-rotating black holes. In the presence of a regular magnetic field the motion of charged particles in the vicinity of a black hole is modified. As a result, the position of the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) becomes closer to the horizon. When the Lorentz force is repulsive (directed from the black hole) the ISCO radius can reach the gravitational radius. In the process of accretion charged particles (ions) of the accreting matter can be accumulated near their ISCO, while neutral particles fall down to the black hole after they reach 6M radius. The sharp spectral line Fe α, emitted by iron ions at such orbits, is broadened when the emission is registered by a distant observer. In this paper we study this broadening effect and discuss how one can extract information concerning the strength of the magnetic field from the observed spectrum.

  12. Spatially resolved spectral-imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloom, Joshua Simon; Tyson, John Anthony

    2016-02-09

    A spatially resolved spectral device comprising a dispersive array to receive an incident light comprising a principal ray. The dispersive array comprising a plurality of dichroic layers, each of the plurality of dichroic layers disposed in a path of a direction of the principal ray. Each of the plurality of dichroic layers configured to at least one of reflect or transmit a different wavelength range of the incident light. The device further comprising a detection array operatively coupled with the dispersive array. The detection array comprising a photosensitive component including a plurality of detection pixels, each of the plurality of detection pixels having a light-receiving surface disposed parallel to the direction of the principal ray to detect a respective one of the different wavelength ranges of incident light reflected from a corresponding one of the plurality of dichroic layers.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise: Missions Missions Change Detection Change Detection Facilities and Border Protection Facilities and Border Protection Crevasse Detection Crevasse Detection Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Space Missions Space Missions High-Resolution Terrain Elevation Mapping High-Resolution Terrain Elevation Mapping Maritime/Littoral Maritime/Littoral Vehicle and Dismount Tracking Vehicle and Dismount Tracking Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Targeting Reconnaissance,

  14. MOJAVE: Monitoring of jets in active galactic nuclei with VLBA experiments. XI. Spectral distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Pushkarev, Alexander B.; Savolainen, Tuomas; Homan, Daniel C.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2014-06-01

    with distance can be explained with radiative losses if the jets are collimating or with the evolution of the high-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum if the jets are conical. This interpretation is supported by a significant correlation with the age of the component and the spectral index, with older components having steeper spectra.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  16. Ground-based retrievals of optical depth, effective radius, and composition of airborne mineral dust above the Sahel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retrievals of optical depth, effective radius, and composition of airborne mineral dust above the Sahel Dave Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin - Madison Aerosol Working Group Breakout Session 10 March 2008 ARM STM, Norfolk, VA Background and Objectives * Many airborne minerals have absorption features in the thermal infrared (8-13 µm) * These absorption features can be used to determine the "radiatively relevant" mineral composition of atmospheric

  17. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  18. Apparatus for real-time airborne particulate radionuclide collection and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smart, John E.; Perkins, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus for collecting and analyzing an airborne particulate radionuclide having a filter mounted in a housing, the housing having an air inlet upstream of the filter and an air outlet downstream of the filter, wherein an air stream flows therethrough. The air inlet receives the air stream, the filter collects the airborne particulate radionuclide and permits a filtered air stream to pass through the air outlet. The improvement which permits real time counting is a gamma detecting germanium diode mounted downstream of the filter in the filtered air stream. The gamma detecting germanium diode is spaced apart from a downstream side of the filter a minimum distance for a substantially maximum counting detection while permitting substantially free air flow through the filter and uniform particulate radionuclide deposition on the filter.

  19. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24 (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24 We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow ...

  20. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. ...

  1. Solar spectral optical properties of pigments--Part I: model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar spectral optical properties of ... Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Solar Energy Materials and ...

  2. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a geophysical sensor system based on a remotely operated model helicopter (ROH) and to evaluate the efficacy of the system for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is a geophysical survey system that uses a ROH as the survey vehicle. We have selected the ROH because of its advantages over fixed wing and ground based vehicles. Lower air speed and superior maneuverability of the ROH make it better suited for geophysical surveys than a fixed wing model aircraft. The ROH can fly close to the ground, allowing detection of weak or subtle anomalies. Unlike ground based vehicles, the ROH can traverse difficult terrain while providing a stable sensor platform. ROH does not touch the ground during the course of a survey and is capable of functioning over water and surf zones. The ROH has been successfully used in the motion picture industry and by geology companies for payload bearing applications. The only constraint to use of the airborne system is that the ROH must remain visible to the pilot. Obstructed areas within a site can be characterized by relocating the base station to alternate positions. GAUSS consists of a ROH with radio controller, a data acquisition and processing (DAP) system, and lightweight digital sensor systems. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a DAP and sensors suitable for ROH operation. We have constructed these subsystems and integrated them to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system, referred to as the ``pre-prototype``. We have performed test surveys with the pre-prototype to determine the functionality of the and DAP and sensor subsystems and their suitability for airborne application. The objective of the Phase II effort will be to modify the existing subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. Efficacy of the prototype for geophysical survey of hazardous sites will then be determined.

  3. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  4. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  5. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIsaac, Charles V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idaho Falls, ID); Grafwallner, Ervin G. (Arco, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Pocatello, ID); Randolph, Peter D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  6. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  7. Airborne reconnaissance VIII; Proceedings of the meeting, San Diego, CA, August 21, 22, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkel, P.; Lagesse, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    Various papers on sensors and ancillary equipment, technological advances, development and testing, and intelligence extraction and exploitation in airborne reconnaissance are presented. The topics discussed include: the CA-810 modern trilens camera, PC-183B standoff imaging system, ruggedized MMW radiometer sensor for surveillance applications, application of biocular viewers to airborne reconnaissance, KA-102 film/EO standoff system, KS-146A camera development and flight test results, electrooptical imaging for film cameras, and new generation advanced IR linescan sensor system. Also addressed are: evolution of real time airborne reconnaissance, computer-controlled operation of reconnaissance cameras, miniature focus sensor, microprocessor-controller autofocus system, camera flight tests and image evaluation, LM-230A cost-effective test system, information management for tactical reconnaissance, performance modeling of infrared linescanners and FLIRs, USAF tactical reconnaissance - Grenada, sensor control and film annotation for long-range standoff reconnaissance, laser beam recording on film, meteorological effects on image quality, and optimization of photographic information transfer by CRT.

  8. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammack, R. W.

    2006-12-28

    subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  9. Investigation into Spectral Parameters as they Impact CPV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-03-01

    The CPV industry is well aware that performance of triple junction cells depends on spectral conditions but there is a lack of data quantifying this spectral dependence at the module level. This paper explores the impact of precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and optical air mass on multiple CPV module technologies on-sun in Golden, CO.

  10. Propagation of spectral functions and dilepton production at SIS energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Gy.; Kaempfer, B.; Zetenyi, M.

    2012-06-15

    The time evolution of vector meson spectral functions is studied within a BUU-type transport model. Applications focus on {rho} and {omega} mesons being important pieces for the interpretation of the dielectron invariant mass spectrum. Since the evolution of the spectral functions is driven by the local density, the inmedium modifications turn out to compete, in this approach, with the known vacuum contributions.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: What is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar? What is Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)? What is Synthetic Aperture Radar? Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Often, this imagery must be acquired at night or during inclement weather. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides such a capability. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  14. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Nagendra; Glenn, Nancy F

    2009-07-01

    Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

  15. Spectral ellipsometry of a nanodiamond composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yastrebov, S. G. Gordeev, S. K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I. A.; Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2006-07-15

    Optical properties of a nanodiamond composite were analyzed by methods of spectral ellipsometry in the range of photon energies 1.4-5 eV, which are characteristic of {pi}-{pi}* transitions in amorphous carbon. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding nanodiamond powder with subsequent binding of diamond nanoparticles by pyrocarbon formed as a result of the heterogeneous chemical reaction of methane decomposition. The dispersion curves of the imaginary and real parts of the dielectric function were reconstructed. It is shown that the imaginary part of the dielectric function can be represented as the sum of two components generated by the two types of {pi}-{pi}* optical transitions. The maximum contribution of the transitions of the first and second types manifests itself at energies of 2.6 and 5.6 eV, respectively, which correspond to peaks in optical density at 2.9 and 6.11 eV. It was established that the main specific features of the normalized optical density of the nanodiamond composite almost coincide with those for poly(para-phenylenevinylene). It was found that the energy of a {sigma} + {pi} plasmon of the pyrocarbon component of the nanodiamond composite is 24.2 eV. On the basis on this value, the pyrocarbon density matrix was estimated to be 2 g/cm{sup 3}. Within the concepts of optimum filling of an elementary volume by carbon atoms in an amorphous material with such a density, the allotropic composition of the pyrocarbon matrix was restored.

  16. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A.; Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D.

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  17. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: FOUR YEARS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruber, David; Von Ahlefeld, Victoria Weller; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, Dave; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cleveland, William H. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2014-03-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 triggered GRBs. Four different spectral models were fitted to the data, resulting in a compendium of more than 7500 spectra. The analysis was performed similarly but not identically to Goldstein et al. All 487 GRBs from the first two years have been re-fitted using the same methodology as that of the 456 GRBs in years three and four. We describe, in detail, our procedure and criteria for the analysis and present the results in the form of parameter distributions both for the observer-frame and rest-frame quantities. The data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  18. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or 0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or 0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  19. AMIP Simulation with the CAM4 Spectral Element Dynamical Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Katherine J; Lauritzen, Peter; Mishra, Saroj; Neale, Rich; Taylor, Mark; Tribbia, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the climate produced by the Community Earth System Model, version 1, running with the new spectral-element atmospheric dynamical core option. The spectral-element method is congured to use a cubed-sphere grid, providing quasi-uniform resolution over the sphere, increased parallel scalability and removing the need for polar filters. It uses a fourth order accurate spatial discretization which locally conserves mass and moist total energy. Using the Atmosphere Model Intercomparison Project protocol, we compare the results from the spectral-element dy- namical core with those produced by the default nite-volume dynamical core and with observations.

  20. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  1. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  2. COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adjoint Methods | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 6, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and Adjoint Methods Professor Jeroen Tromp Princeton University Presentation: Office presentation icon WC06FEB2013_JTromp.ppt Harnessing high-performance computers and accurate numerical methods to better constrain physical properties of Earth's interior is rapidly becoming one of the most important research topics in

  3. Sampling airborne microorganisms. Summary report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatigny, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    In response to a rapidly increasing awarness of problems in air pollution and air hygiene, considerable emphasis has been placed on sampling of gaseous and particulate contaminants. Although included in the latter category, airborne microbes have not been considered major air pollutants as have chemical aerosols. They have been of some concern in extramural environments (plant diseases) and of considerable interest in intramural (hospital surgical theaters) environments. The intrinsic characteristics of microbes make them difficult to collect and assay quantitatively. The collection instrumentation available tends to be less sophisticated, though no less diverse, than that for other particulates and to require more processing after collection.

  4. Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vapor Radiometer Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based

  5. INTERPRETATION OF AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETIC DATA IN THE 600 AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CUMMINS GD

    2010-11-11

    As part of the 200-PO-1 Phase I geophysical surveys, Fugro Airborne Surveys was contracted to collect airborne electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic surveys of the Hanford Site 600 Area. Two helicopter survey systems were used with the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} time domain portion flown between June 19th and June 20th, 2008, and the RESOLVE{reg_sign} frequency domain portion was flown from June 29th to July 1st, 2008. Magnetic data were acquired contemporaneously with the electromagnetic surveys using a total-field cesium vapor magnetometer. Approximately 925 line kilometers (km) were flown using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} II system and 412 line kilometers were flown using the RESOLVE{reg_sign} system. The HeliGEOTEM system has an effective penetration of roughly 250 meters into the ground and the RESOLVE system has an effective penetration of roughly 60 meters. Acquisition parameters and preliminary results are provided in SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site. Airborne data are interpreted in this report in an attempt to identify areas of likely preferential groundwater flow within the aquifer system based on the presence of paleochannels or fault zones. The premise for the interpretation is that coarser-grained intervals have filled in scour channels created by episodic catastrophic flood events during the late Pleistocene. The interpretation strategy used the magnetic field anomaly data and existing bedrock maps to identify likely fault or lineament zones. Combined analysis of the magnetic, 60-Hz noise monitor, and flight-altitude (radar) data were used to identify zones where EM response is more likely due to cultural interference and or bedrock structures. Cross-sectional and map view presentations of the EM data were used to identify more electrically resistive zones that likely correlate with coarser-grained intervals. The resulting interpretation identifies one major northwest-southeast trending

  6. Computerized Mathematical Models of Spray Washout of Airborne Contaminants (Radioactivity) in Containment Vessels.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-23

    Version 01 Distribution is restricted to the United States Only. SPIRT predicts the washout of airborne contaminants in containment vessels under postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. SPIRT calculates iodine removal constants (lambdas) for post-LOCA containment spray systems. It evaluates the effect of the spectrum of drop sizes emitted by the spray nozzles, the effect of drop coalescence, and the precise solution of the time-dependent diffusion equation. STEAM-67 routines are included for calculating the properties ofmore » steam and water according to the 1967 ASME Steam Tables.« less

  7. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal

  8. Gravitational collapse of scalar fields via spectral methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, H. P. de; Rodrigues, E. L.; Skea, J. E. F.

    2010-11-15

    In this paper we present a new numerical code based on the Galerkin method to integrate the field equations for the spherical collapse of massive and massless scalar fields. By using a spectral decomposition in terms of the radial coordinate, the field equations were reduced to a finite set of ordinary differential equations in the space of modes associated with the Galerkin expansion of the scalar field, together with algebraic sets of equations connecting modes associated with the metric functions. The set of ordinary differential equations with respect to the null coordinate is then integrated using an eighth-order Runge-Kutta method. The numerical tests have confirmed the high accuracy and fast convergence of the code. As an application we have evaluated the whole spectrum of black hole masses which ranges from infinitesimal to large values obtained after varying the amplitude of the initial scalar field distribution. We have found strong numerical evidence that this spectrum is described by a nonextensive distribution law.

  9. Spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emission from stratified jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Matsumoto, Jin; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Tolstov, Alexey; Mao, Jirong; Dainotti, Maria; Mizuta, Akira

    2014-07-10

    We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral directions. Propagation of thermal photons injected at a high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that the presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to the nonthermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra, as well as the polarization degree, tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multicomponent jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts irrespective of the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral (θ) positions. The degree of polarization associated with the emission is significant (>few percent) at a wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.

  10. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachn, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring film spectral properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Burrows, Paul E.; Garbuzov, Dmitri Z.; Bulovic, Vladimir

    1999-12-21

    Film spectral properties are measured by projecting chopped monochromatic light onto a luminescent film sample deposited on a substrate, and coupling through use of immersion oil the reflection of light therefrom to a light detector.

  12. Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the future, will be taken from 915-MHz and 55-MHz radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). ... Spectral Resolution (cm -1 ): 0.5 (wavenumber to first zero) Noise (670-1400 cm -1 ) (Wm ...

  13. Development of stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Bo; Tong, Xin; Jiang, Chenyang; Brown, Daniel R.; Robertson, Lee

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we developed a stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping. An optimized external cavity equipped with an off-the-shelf volume holographic grating narrowed the spectral line-width of a 100 W high-power diode laser and stabilized the laser spectrum. The laser spectrum showed a high side mode suppression ratio of >30 dB and good long-term stability (center wavelength drifting within ±0.002 nm during 220 h of operation). Finally, our laser is delivered by a multimode fiber with power ~70 W, center wavelength of 794.77 nm, and spectral bandwidth of ~0.12 nm.

  14. Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: University of Minnesota, Cambustion UK 2004_deer_collings.pdf (417.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Diesel Aerosol Measurement of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic

  15. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal Metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystals have been grown

  16. Precision spectral manipulation: A demonstration using a coherent optical memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparkes, B. M.; Cairns, C.; Hosseini, M.; Higginbottom, D.; Campbell, G. T.; Lam, P. K.; Buchler, B. C.

    2014-12-04

    The ability to coherently spectrally manipulate quantum information has the potential to improve qubit rates across quantum channels and find applications in optical quantum computing. Here we present experiments that use a multi-element solenoid combined with the three-level gradient echo memory scheme to perform precision spectral manipulation of optical pulses. If applied in a quantum information network, these operations would enable frequency-based multiplexing of qubits.

  17. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  18. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 1, Analysis of experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This handbook contains (1) a systematic compilation of airborne release and respirable fraction experimental data for nonreactor nuclear facilities, (2) assessments of the data, and (3) values derived from assessing the data that may be used in safety analyses when the data are applicable. To assist in consistent and effective use of this information, the handbook provides: identification of a consequence determination methodology in which the information can be used; discussion of the applicability of the information and its general technical limits; identification of specific accident phenomena of interest for which the information is applicable; and examples of use of the consequence determination methodology and airborne release and respirable fraction information.

  19. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  20. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  1. Mutagenic activity and chemical analysis of airborne particulates collected in Pisa (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vellosi, R.; Fiorio, R.; Rosellini, D.; Bronzetti, G. ); Vannucchi, C.; Ciacchini, G.; Giaconi, V. ); Bianchi, F. )

    1994-03-01

    In the last few years there has been much concern about the problem connected to the exposure to mutagens present in the environment of industrialized countries. Particularly, the mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter has been studied by many investigators and correlated with elevated lung cancer mortality rates. In most cases the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome test has been used for these studies. This short-term test, which is the most validated among the short-term genotoxicity tests, provides an important indication on the carcinogenic potential of environmental pollutants. That are complex mixtures containing a wide variety of compounds potentially capable of causing additive, antagonistic or synergistic genotoxic response in living organisms. Several studies have suggested that diverse factors, such as traffic and meteorological conditions, could affect the levels of pollutants in the air. In our work, we have investigated three different areas in Pisa, where the intensity and the kind of the road traffic were different. Airborne particles have been collected during a year and the genotoxic activity has been studied using TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors previous work [K. Taguchi et al., Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects, Med. Phys. 38(2), 10891102 (2011)]. The

  3. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  4. Analysis of hyper-spectral data derived from an imaging Fourier transform: A statistical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, S.K.; Clark, G.A.; Fields, D.J.

    1996-01-10

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) using optical sensors are increasingly being used in various branches of science. Typically, a FTS generates a three-dimensional data cube with two spatial dimensions and one frequency/wavelength dimension. The number of frequency dimensions in such data cubes is generally very large, often in the hundreds, making data analytical procedures extremely complex. In the present report, the problem is viewed from a statistical perspective. A set of procedures based on the high degree of inter-channel correlation structure often present in such hyper-spectral data, has been identified and applied to an example data set of dimension 100 x 128 x 128 comprising 128 spectral bands. It is shown that in this case, the special eigen-structure of the correlation matrix has allowed the authors to extract just a few linear combinations of the channels (the significant principal vectors) that effectively contain almost all of the spectral information contained in the data set analyzed. This in turn, enables them to segment the objects in the given spatial frame using, in a parsimonious yet highly effective way, most of the information contained in the data set.

  5. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spitler, Mark T.; Ehret, Anne; Stuhl, Louis S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  6. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letcia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Baslio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; Gonzlez Hernndez, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji; and others

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T {sub eff}, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ? 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T {sub eff}, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An

  7. Discrete spectral incoherent solitons in nonlinear media with noninstantaneous response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Claire; Kibler, Bertrand; Picozzi, Antonio

    2011-02-15

    We show theoretically that nonlinear optical media characterized by a finite response time may support the existence of discrete spectral incoherent solitons. The structure of the soliton consists of three incoherent spectral bands that propagate in frequency space toward the low-frequency components in a discrete fashion and with a constant velocity. Discrete spectral incoherent solitons do not exhibit a confinement in the space-time domain, but exclusively in the frequency domain. The kinetic theory describes in detail all the essential properties of discrete spectral incoherent solitons: A quantitative agreement has been obtained between simulations of the kinetic equation and the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Discrete spectral incoherent solitons may be supported in both the normal dispersion regime or the anomalous dispersion regime. These incoherent structures find their origin in the causality condition inherent to the nonlinear response function of the material. Considering the concrete example of the Raman effect, we show that discrete incoherent solitons may be spontaneously generated through the process of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers.

  8. Spectral Structure of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S. L.; Kelley, J. H.; Lenske, H.; Tsoneva, N.

    2010-02-19

    High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions observed in the reaction {sup 138}Ba(gamma-vector,gamma{sup '}) at energies below the one-neutron separation energy have been performed using the nearly monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams of the HIgamma-vectorS facility. The electric dipole character of the so-called 'pygmy' dipole resonance was experimentally verified for excitations from 4.0 to 8.6 MeV. The fine structure of the M1'spin-flip' mode was observed for the first time in N=82 nuclei.

  9. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Short, Robert W.; Craxton, Stephen; Letzring, Samuel A.; Soures, John

    1991-01-01

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  10. Profiled spectral lines generated in the field of Kerr superspinars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schee, Jan; Stuchlk, Zdenek E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz

    2013-04-01

    String Theory suggests existence of primordial Kerr superspinars, extremely compact objects with external spacetime described by the Kerr naked singularity geometry. The primordial Kerr superspinars have to be converted to a near-extreme black hole due to accretion, but they could survive to the era of highly redshifted quasars. We study the shape of the profiled spectral lines generated by radiating rings or the innermost parts of Keplerian discs orbiting the Kerr superspinars. Influence of the superspinar surface location on the profiled lines is also considered. We demonstrate strong difference of the character of the profiled lines generated by radiating rings for all values of the superspinar spin and all values of the inclination angles of the observer when compared to those generated in the field of Kerr black holes. For small and mediate inclination angles there are large quantitative differences in the extension and position of the lines. For large inclination angles even strong qualitative difference appears as the profiled lines have a clear doubled character. The smaller, redshifted region of the profiled line is related to the photons reaching the regions near the superspinar surface. Strong differences are obtained also for profiled lines generated by the innermost parts of Keplerian discs especially in the shape of the line. The influence of the superspinar surface location is reflected in the intermediate parts of the the profiled lines. The line profiles can give a clear signature of the presence of a Kerr superspinar and in principle enable estimates of its surface location since the signatures of the superspinar surface location are of different character as those corresponding to the presence of the black hole horizon.

  11. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q.

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  12. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  13. X-RAY SPECTRAL COMPONENTS OBSERVED IN THE AFTERGLOW OF GRB130925A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Forster, Karl; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Barrire, Nicolas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bhalerao, Varun; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Stern, Daniel; and others

    2014-04-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at >4? significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6}s after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several keV width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10{sup 8}cm), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  14. Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

    1994-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

  15. Quantifying sources and sinks of reactive gases in the lower atmosphere using airborne flux observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, Glenn; Hanisco, T. F.; Atkinson, H. L.; Bui, Thaopaul; Crounse, J. D.; Dean-Day, J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Jacob, D.; Karl, T.; Kim, P. S.; Liu, X.; Marvin, M. R.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Misztal, Pawel K.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Peischl, Jeff; Pollack, Ilana; Ryerson, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Travis, Katherine; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-10-16

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concentrations, aerosol uptake coefficients, and other key parameters. Evaluation of results against state-of-the-science models and parameterizations provides insight into our current understanding of this system and frames future observational priorities. As a near-direct measurement of fundamental process rates, airborne fluxes offer a new tool to improve biogenic and anthropogenic emissions inventories, photochemical mechanisms, and deposition parameterizations.

  16. Airborne Multisensor Pod System, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M

    1995-01-01

    This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.

  17. Spatial and spectral effects in subcritical system pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dulla, S.; Nervo, M.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate neutronic models are needed for the interpretation of pulsed experiments in subcritical systems. In this work, the extent of spatial and spectral effects in the pulse propagation phenomena is investigated and the analysis is applied to the GUINEVERE experiment. The multigroup cross section data is generated by the Monte Carlo SERPENT code and the neutronic evolution following the source pulse is simulated by a kinetic diffusion code. The results presented show that important spatial and spectral aspects need to be properly accounted for and that a detailed energy approach may be needed to adequately capture the physical features of the system to the pulse injection. (authors)

  18. Synthesis, spectral characterization, and single crystal structure studies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of (2-nitro-ethene-1,1-diyl)-bis-((4-isopropyl-benzyl)sulfane) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Synthesis, spectral characterization, and single crystal structure studies of (2-nitro-ethene-1,1-diyl)-bis-((4-isopropyl-benzyl)sulfane) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis, spectral characterization, and single crystal structure studies of (2-nitro-ethene-1,1-diyl)-bis-((4-isopropyl-benzyl)sulfane) The title compound (2-nitro-ethene-1,1-diyl)-bis-(4-isopropylbenzyl)sulfane)

  19. Asymmetric spectral broadening of modulated electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koepke, M.E.; Alport, M.J.; Sheridan, T.E.; Amatucci, W.E.; Carroll, J.J. III

    1994-06-01

    Modulated, current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron (CDEIC) waves are shown to exhibit amplitude and frequency modulation, spectral broadening, and time-averaged frequency pulling. The observed spectral broadening is asymmetric and sensitively dependent on the driving frequency. Qualitative features of the experimental data are reproduced by the forced van der Pol equation and are explainable using processes associated with driven self oscillations. These results may be relevant to ionospheric modification experiments involving the controlled modulation of the natural electrojet. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  20. SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE AND PHASE EVOLUTION IN PETAWATT LASER PULSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filip, C V

    2010-11-22

    The influence of the active gain medium on the spectral amplitude and phase of amplified pulses in a CPA system is studied. Results from a 10-PW example based on Nd-doped mixed glasses are presented. In conclusion, this study shows that, by using spectral shaping and gain saturation in a mixed-glass amplifier, it is possible to produce 124 fs, 1.4 kJ laser pulses. One detrimental effect, the pulse distortion due to resonant amplification medium, has been investigated and its magnitude as well as its compensation calculated.

  1. Spectral hole burning studies of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.C.

    1995-11-01

    Low temperature absorption and hole burning spectroscopies were applied to the D1-D2-cyt b{sub 559} and the CP47 and CP43 antenna protein complexes of Photosystem H from higher plants. Low temperature transient and persistent hole-burning data and theoretical calculations on the kinetics and temperature dependence of the P680 hole profile are presented and provide convincing support for the linker model. Implicit in the linker model is that the 684-nm-absorbing Chl a serve to shuttle energy from the proximal antenna complex to reaction center. The stoichiometry of isolated Photosystem H Reaction Center (PSII RC) in several different preparations is also discussed. The additional Chl a are due to 684-nm-absorbing Chl a, some contamination by the CP47 complex, and non-native Chl a absorbing near 670 nm. In the CP47 protein complex, attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q{sub y}-states. High pressure hole-burning studies of PSII RC revealed for the first time a strong pressure effect on the primary electron transfer dynamics. The 4.2 K lifetime of P680*, the primary donor state, increases from 2.0 ps to 7.0 ps as pressure increases from 0.1 to 267 MPa. Importantly, this effect is irreversible (plastic) while the pressure induced effect on the low temperature absorption and non-line narrowed P680 hole spectra are reversible (elastic). Nonadiabatic rate expressions, which take into account the distribution of energy gap values, are used to estimate the linear pressure shift of the acceptor state energy for both the superexchange and two-step mechanisms for primary charge separation. It was found that the pressure dependence could be explained with a linear pressure shift of {approximately} 1 cm{sup -1}/MPa in magnitude for the acceptor state. The results point to the marriage of hole burning and high pressures as having considerable potential for the study of primary transport dynamics in reaction centers and antenna complexes.

  2. THE 2011 JUNE 23 STELLAR OCCULTATION BY PLUTO: AIRBORNE AND GROUND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S. E.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Sallum, S.; Dunham, E. W.; Collins, P.; Bida, T.; Bright, L.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Pandey, S.; Amrhein, D.; Tholen, D. J.; Taylor, B.; Wolf, J.; Pfueller, E.; Meyer, A.; and others

    2013-10-01

    On 2011 June 23, stellar occultations by both Pluto (this work) and Charon (future analysis) were observed from numerous ground stations as well as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This first airborne occultation observation since 1995 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory resulted in the best occultation chords recorded for the event, in three visible wavelength bands. The data obtained from SOFIA are combined with chords obtained from the ground at the IRTF, the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, and Leeward Community College to give the detailed state of the Pluto-Charon system at the time of the event with a focus on Pluto's atmosphere. The data show a return to the distinct upper and lower atmospheric regions with a knee or kink in the light curve separating them as was observed in 1988, rather than the smoothly transitioning bowl-shaped light curves of recent years. The upper atmosphere is analyzed by fitting a model to all of the light curves, resulting in a half-light radius of 1288 {+-} 1 km. The lower atmosphere is analyzed using two different methods to provide results under the differing assumptions of particulate haze and a strong thermal gradient as causes for the lower atmospheric diminution of flux. These results are compared with those from past occultations to provide a picture of Pluto's evolving atmosphere. Regardless of which lower atmospheric structure is assumed, results indicate that this part of the atmosphere evolves on short timescales with results changing the light curve structures between 1988 and 2006, and then reverting these changes in 2011 though at significantly higher pressures. Throughout these changes, the upper atmosphere remains remarkably stable in structure, again except for the overall pressure changes. No evidence of onset of atmospheric collapse predicted by frost migration models is seen, and the atmosphere appears to be remaining at a stable pressure level, suggesting it should

  3. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This document is a Final Technical Report that describes the results of the Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) research project. The objectives were to construct a geophysical data acquisition system that uses a remotely operated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and to evaluate its effectiveness for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. The GAUSS is a data acquisition system that mitigates the potential risk to personnel during geophysical characterization of hazardous or radioactive sites. The fundamental basis of the GAUSS is as follows: (1) an unmanned survey vehicle carries geophysical sensors into a hazardous location, (2) the pilot remains outside the hazardous site and operates the vehicle using radio control, (3) geophysical measurements and their spatial locations are processed by an automated data-acquisition system which displays data on an off-site monitor in real-time, and (4) the pilot uses the display to direct the survey vehicle for complete site coverage. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a data acquisition and processing (DAP) subsystem and geophysical sensors suitable for UAV deployment. We integrated these two subsystems to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system. The objective of the Phase II effort was to modify the subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. The completed GAUSS DAP system consists of a UAV platform, a laser tracking and ranging subsystem, a telemetry subsystem, light-weight geophysical sensors, a base-station computer (BC), and custom-written survey control software (SCS). We have utilized off-the-shelf commercial products, where possible, to reduce cost and design time.

  4. Nonlinear Legendre Spectral Finite Elements for Wind Turbine Blade Dynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical implementation and examination of new wind turbine blade finite element model based on Geometrically Exact Beam Theory (GEBT) and a high-order spectral finite element method. The displacement-based GEBT is presented, which includes the coupling effects that exist in composite structures and geometric nonlinearity. Legendre spectral finite elements (LSFEs) are high-order finite elements with nodes located at the Gauss-Legendre-Lobatto points. LSFEs can be an order of magnitude more efficient that low-order finite elements for a given accuracy level. Interpolation of the three-dimensional rotation, a major technical barrier in large-deformation simulation, is discussed in the context of LSFEs. It is shown, by numerical example, that the high-order LSFEs, where weak forms are evaluated with nodal quadrature, do not suffer from a drawback that exists in low-order finite elements where the tangent-stiffness matrix is calculated at the Gauss points. Finally, the new LSFE code is implemented in the new FAST Modularization Framework for dynamic simulation of highly flexible composite-material wind turbine blades. The framework allows for fully interactive simulations of turbine blades in operating conditions. Numerical examples showing validation and LSFE performance will be provided in the final paper.

  5. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-02-01

    Gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identifications typically involves locating spectral peaks and matching the spectral peaks with known nuclides in the knowledge base or database. Wavelet analysis, due to its ability for fitting localized features, offers the potential for automatic detection of spectral peaks. Past studies of wavelet technologies for gamma spectra analysis essentially focused on direct fitting of raw gamma spectra. Although most of those studies demonstrated the potentials of peak detection using wavelets, they often failed to produce new benefits to operational adaptations for radiological surveys. This work presents a different approach with the operational objective being to detect only the nuclides that do not exist in the environment (anomalous nuclides). With this operational objective, the raw-count spectrum collected by a detector is first converted to a count-rate spectrum and is then followed by background subtraction prior to wavelet analysis. The experimental results suggest that this preprocess is independent of detector type and background radiation, and is capable of improving the peak detection rates using wavelets. This process broadens the doors for a practical adaptation of wavelet technologies for gamma spectral surveying devices.

  6. Demodulation circuit for AC motor current spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrix, Donald E.; Smith, Stephen F.

    1990-12-18

    A motor current analysis method for the remote, noninvasive inspection of electric motor-operated systems. Synchronous amplitude demodulation and phase demodulation circuits are used singly and in combination along with a frequency analyzer to produce improved spectral analysis of load-induced frequencies present in the electric current flowing in a motor-driven system.

  7. THE INFRARED TELESCOPE FACILITY (IRTF) SPECTRAL LIBRARY: COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D. E-mail: michael.cushing@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 {mu}m spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R {identical_to} {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.

  8. Atlas of Atomic Spectral Lines of Neptunium Emitted by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeKalb, E.L. and Edelson, M. C.

    1987-08-01

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Np-237 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 230-700 nm wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on the methodology used in collecting the data. The Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program has been charged with the task of developing optical spectroscopic methods to analyze the composition of spent nuclear fuels. Such materials are highly radioactive even after prolonged 'cooling' and are chemically complex. Neptunium (Np) is a highly toxic by-product of nuclear power generation and is found, in low abundance, in spent nuclear fuels. This atlas of the optical emission spectrum of Np, as produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopic source, is part of a general survey of the ICP emission spectra of the actinide elements. The ICP emission spectrum of the actinides originates almost exclusively from the electronic relaxation of excited, singly ionized species. Spectral data on the Np ion emission spectrum (i.e., the Np II spectrum) have been reported by Tomkins and Fred [1] and Haaland [2]. Tomkins and Fred excited the Np II spectrum with a Cu spark discharge and identified 114 Np lines in the 265.5 - 436.3 nm spectral range. Haaland, who corrected some spectral line misidentifications in the work of Tomkins and Fred, utilized an enclosed Au spark discharge to excite the Np II spectrum and reported 203 Np lines within the 265.4 - 461.0 nm wavelength range.

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  10. ARM - Campaign Instrument - hsrl-air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-AIR) Instrument...

  11. ENERGY-DEPENDENT POWER SPECTRAL STATES AND ORIGIN OF APERIODIC VARIABILITY IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Wenfei; Zhang Wenda, E-mail: wenfei@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2013-06-20

    We found that the black hole candidate MAXI J1659-152 showed distinct power spectra, i.e., power-law noise (PLN) versus band-limited noise (BLN) plus quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) below and above about 2 keV, respectively, in observations with Swift and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2010 outburst, indicating a high energy cutoff of the PLN and a low energy cutoff of the BLN and QPOs around 2 keV. The emergence of the PLN and the fading of the BLN and QPOs initially took place below 2 keV when the source entered the hard intermediate state and settled in the soft state three weeks later. The evolution was accompanied by the emergence of the disk spectral component and decreases in the amplitudes of variability in the soft and hard X-ray bands. Our results indicate that the PLN is associated with an optically thick disk in both hard and intermediate states, and the power spectral state is independent of the X-ray energy spectral state in a broadband view. We suggest that in the hard or intermediate state, the BLN and QPOs emerge from the innermost hot flow subjected to Comptonization, while the PLN originates from the optically thick disk farther out. The energy cutoffs of the PLN and the BLN or QPOs then follow the temperature of the seed photons from the inner edge of the optically thick disk, while the high frequency cutoff of the PLN follows the orbital frequency of the inner edge of the optically thick disk as well.

  12. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Gaensler, Bryan M. [Australian Research Council, Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia); Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Center, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Manchester, Richard N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Kamenetzky, Julia R. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Laki?evi?, Maa [Institute for the Environment, Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Marcaide, Jon M. [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Mart-Vidal, Ivan [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Park, Sangwook, E-mail: giovanna.zanardo@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, 108 Science Hall, Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (? 3.2 mm to 450 ?m), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ?}??{sup 0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ? 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields 0.4 ? ? ? 0.1 across the western regions, with ? ? 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  13. ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska Science and Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than predicted by climate models. The impact of this warming on permafrost degradation is not well understood, but it is projected to increase carbon decomposition and greenhouse gas production (CO₂ and/or CH₄) by arctic ecosystems. Airborne observations of atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, and cloud properties at the North Slope of Alaska are improving our understanding of global climate, with the goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections.

  14. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    26 ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports SC Biraud MS Torn January 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

  15. Optimized Field Sampling and Monitoring of Airborne Hazardous Transport Plumes; A Geostatistical Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, DI-WEN

    2001-11-21

    Airborne hazardous plumes inadvertently released during nuclear/chemical/biological incidents are mostly of unknown composition and concentration until measurements are taken of post-accident ground concentrations from plume-ground deposition of constituents. Unfortunately, measurements often are days post-incident and rely on hazardous manned air-vehicle measurements. Before this happens, computational plume migration models are the only source of information on the plume characteristics, constituents, concentrations, directions of travel, ground deposition, etc. A mobile ''lighter than air'' (LTA) system is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will be part of the first response in emergency conditions. These interactive and remote unmanned air vehicles will carry light-weight detectors and weather instrumentation to measure the conditions during and after plume release. This requires a cooperative computationally organized, GPS-controlled set of LTA's that self-coordinate around the objectives in an emergency situation in restricted time frames. A critical step before an optimum and cost-effective field sampling and monitoring program proceeds is the collection of data that provides statistically significant information, collected in a reliable and expeditious manner. Efficient aerial arrangements of the detectors taking the data (for active airborne release conditions) are necessary for plume identification, computational 3-dimensional reconstruction, and source distribution functions. This report describes the application of stochastic or geostatistical simulations to delineate the plume for guiding subsequent sampling and monitoring designs. A case study is presented of building digital plume images, based on existing ''hard'' experimental data and ''soft'' preliminary transport modeling results of Prairie Grass Trials Site. Markov Bayes Simulation, a coupled Bayesian/geostatistical methodology, quantitatively combines soft information

  16. Information-Efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor With Tdi

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rienstra, Jeffrey L.; Gentry, Stephen M.; Sweatt, William C.

    2004-01-13

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging employing variable gain time delay and integrate arrays. A telescope focuses an image of a scene onto at least one TDI array that is covered by a multispectral filter that passes separate bandwidths of light onto the rows in the TDI array. The variable gain feature of the TDI array allows individual rows of pixels to be attenuated individually. The attenuations are functions of the magnitudes of the positive and negative components of a spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. This system provides for a very efficient determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  17. Soliton communication lines based on spectrally efficient modulation formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushko, O V; Redyuk, A A

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of mathematical modelling of optical-signal propagation in soliton fibre-optic communication lines (FOCLs) based on spectrally efficient signal modulation formats. We have studied the influence of spontaneous emission noise, nonlinear distortions and FOCL length on the data transmission quality. We have compared the characteristics of a received optical signal for soliton and conventional dispersion compensating FOCLs. It is shown that in the presence of strong nonlinearity long-haul soliton FOCLs provide a higher data transmission performance, as well as allow higher order modulation formats to be used as compared to conventional communication lines. In the context of a coherent data transmission, soliton FOCLs allow the use of phase modulation with many levels, thereby increasing the spectral efficiency of the communication line. (optical communication lines)

  18. SPECTRAL LAGS AND THE LAG-LUMINOSITY RELATION: AN INVESTIGATION WITH SWIFT BAT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Eskandarian, A.; Maximon, L. C.; Parke, W. C.; Stamatikos, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Norris, J. P.

    2010-03-10

    Spectral lag, the time difference between the arrival of high-energy and low-energy photons, is a common feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Norris et al. reported a correlation between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity of GRBs based on a limited sample. More recently, a number of authors have provided further support for this correlation using arbitrary energy bands of various instruments. In this paper, we report on a systematic extraction of spectral lags based on the largest Swift sample to date of 31 GRBs with measured redshifts. We extracted the spectral lags for all combinations of the standard Swift hard X-ray energy bands: 15-25 keV, 25-50 keV, 50-100 keV, and 100-200 keV and plotted the time dilation corrected lag as a function of isotropic peak luminosity. The mean value of the correlation coefficient for various channel combinations is -0.68 with a chance probability of {approx}0.7 x 10{sup -3}. In addition, the mean value of the power-law index is 1.4 +- 0.3. Hence, our study lends support to the existence of a lag-luminosity correlation, albeit with large scatter.

  19. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Handbook C Flynn March 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use

  20. Spectral Slope of MHD Turbulence | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectral Slope of MHD Turbulence PI Name: Andrey Beresnyak PI Email: andrey.at.astro@gmail.com Institution: Los Alamos National Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 35 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Physics MHD turbulence has attracted attention of astronomers since mid 1960s. As most astrophysical media are ionized, plasmas are coupled to the magnetic fields. A simple one-fluid description known as magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is broadly applicable to most

  1. Scalar spectral measures associated with an operator-fractal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Palle E. T.; Kornelson, Keri A.; Shuman, Karen L.

    2014-02-15

    We study a spectral-theoretic model on a Hilbert space L{sup 2}(μ) where μ is a fixed Cantor measure. In addition to μ, we also consider an independent scaling operator U acting in L{sup 2}(μ). To make our model concrete, we focus on explicit formulas: We take μ to be the Bernoulli infinite-convolution measure corresponding to scale number 1/4 . We then define the unitary operator U in L{sup 2}(μ) from a scale-by-5 operation. The spectral-theoretic and geometric properties we have previously established for U are as follows: (i) U acts as an ergodic operator; (ii) the action of U is not spatial; and finally, (iii) U is fractal in the sense that it is unitarily equivalent to a countable infinite direct sum of (twisted) copies of itself. In this paper, we prove new results about the projection-valued measures and scalar spectral measures associated to U and its constituent parts. Our techniques make use of the representations of the Cuntz algebra O{sub 2} on L{sup 2}(μ)

  2. Quality assurance project plan for the radionuclide airborne emissions for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofzski, J.G.; Alison, D.

    1992-04-01

    The information provided in this document meets the quality assurance (QA) requirements for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants'' (NESHAP) (EPA 1989a) radionuclide airborne emissions control program in accordance with the regulation's referenced stack monitoring method (i.e. Method 114) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). At the Hanford Site, the operations personnel have primary responsibility for implementing the continuous radionuclide emission measurements in conformance with NESHAP. Continuous measurement is used to describe continuous sampling of the effluent stream withdrawn and subjected to radiochemical analysis, and monitoring of radionuclide particulate emissions for administrative control. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) fully describes these PFP- implemented activities and the associated QA program as required by the NESHAP. The information is provided in the format specified in QAMS/005, Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA 1983a). This QAPjP describes the QA program for only those activities that are the responsibility of the PFP: operation, calibration, and maintenance of the sampling systems. The QA requirements for laboratory services, data compilation, and data reporting are beyond the scope of this QAPjP.

  3. Quality assurance project plan for the radionuclide airborne emissions for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofzski, J.G.; Alison, D.

    1992-04-01

    The information provided in this document meets the quality assurance (QA) requirements for the ``National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants`` (NESHAP) (EPA 1989a) radionuclide airborne emissions control program in accordance with the regulation`s referenced stack monitoring method (i.e. Method 114) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). At the Hanford Site, the operations personnel have primary responsibility for implementing the continuous radionuclide emission measurements in conformance with NESHAP. Continuous measurement is used to describe continuous sampling of the effluent stream withdrawn and subjected to radiochemical analysis, and monitoring of radionuclide particulate emissions for administrative control. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) fully describes these PFP- implemented activities and the associated QA program as required by the NESHAP. The information is provided in the format specified in QAMS/005, Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA 1983a). This QAPjP describes the QA program for only those activities that are the responsibility of the PFP: operation, calibration, and maintenance of the sampling systems. The QA requirements for laboratory services, data compilation, and data reporting are beyond the scope of this QAPjP.

  4. THE SECOND STAGE OF FERMI@ELETTRA: A SEEDED FEL IN THE SOFT X-RAY SPECTRAL RANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allaria, E.; DeNinno, G.; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14

    The second stage of the FERMI FEL, named FEL-2, is based on the principle of high-gain harmonic generation and relies on a double-seeded cascade. Recent developments stimulated a revision of the original setup, which was designed to cover the spectral range between 40 and 10 nm. The numerical simulations we present here show that the nominal (expected) electron-beam performance allows extension of the FEL spectral range down to 4 nm. A significant amount of third harmonic power can be also expected. We also show that the proposed setup is flexible enough for exploiting future developments of new seed sources, e.g., high harmonic generation in gases.

  5. ARM: Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Title: ARM: Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Marine W-band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud ...

  6. Energy efficient residential new construction: market transformation. Spectral selective glass. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammon, Robert

    2000-12-18

    This final report describes the following tasks associated with this project: cost and availability of spectrally selective glass (SSG); window labeling problem and field verification of glass; availability of SSG replacement glass and tempered glass; HVAC load reduction due to spectrally selective glass; and comsumer appreciation of spectrally selective glass. Also included in the report are four attachments: builder and HVAC subcontractor presentation, sample advertisements, spectrally selective glass demonstration model, and invitation to SCE Glass mini trade-show.

  7. A spectral transform dynamical core option within the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Katherine J; Mahajan, Salil; Branstetter, Marcia L; McClean, Julie L.; Caron, Julie M.; Maltrud, Matthew E.; Hack, James J; Bader, David C; Neale, Rich

    2014-01-01

    A spectral transform dynamical core with an 85 spectral truncation resolution (T85) within the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), version 4, is evaluated within the recently released Community Earth System Model, version 1.0 (CESM) global climate model. The spectral dynamical core option provides a well-known base within the climate model community from which to assess climate behavior and statistics, and its relative computational efficiency for smaller computing platforms allows it to be extended to perform climate length simulations using high-resolution configurations in the near term. To establish the characteristics of the CAM4 T85, an ensemble of simulations covering the present day observational period using forced sea surface temperatures and prescribed sea-ice extent are evaluated. Overall, the T85 ensemble attributes and biases are similar to a companion ensemble of simulations using the one degree finite volume (FV1) dynamical core, relative to observed and model derived datasets. Notable improvements with T85 compared to FV1 include the representation of wintertime Arctic sea level pressure and summer precipitation over the Western Indian subcontinent. The mean and spatial patterns of the land surface temperature trends over the AMIP period are generally well simulated with the T85 ensemble relative to observations, however the model is not able to capture the extent nor magnitude of changes in temperature extremes over the boreal summer, where the changes are most dramatic. Biases in the wintertime Arctic surface temperature and annual mean surface stress fields persist with T85 as with the CAM3 version of T85.

  8. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  9. TIMING AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF Be/X-RAY PULSAR EXO 2030+375 DURING A TYPE I OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, Sachindra; Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Maitra, Chandreyee; Paul, Biswajit

    2013-02-20

    We present results from a study of broadband timing and spectral properties of EXO 2030+375 using a Suzaku observation. Pulsations with a period of 41.41 s and strong energy-dependent pulse profiles were clearly detected up to 100 keV. Narrow dips are seen in the profiles up to {approx}70 keV. The presence of prominent dips at several phases in the profiles up to such high energy ranges was not seen before. At higher energies, these dips gradually disappeared and the profile appeared to be single-peaked. The 1.0-200.0 keV broadband spectrum is found to be well described by a partial covering high-energy cutoff power-law model. Several low-energy emission lines are also detected in the pulsar spectrum. We fitted the spectrum using neutral as well as partially ionized absorbers along with the above continuum model yielding similar parameter values. The partial covering with a partially ionized absorber resulted in a marginally better fit. The spectral fitting did not require any cyclotron feature in the best-fit model. To investigate the changes in spectral parameters at dips, we carried out pulse-phase-resolved spectroscopy. During the dips, the value of the additional column density was estimated to be high compared to other pulse phases. While using a partially ionized absorber, the value of the ionization parameter is also higher at the dips. This may be the reason for the presence of dips up to higher energies. No other spectral parameters show any systematic variation with pulse phases of the pulsar.

  10. Spectral calibration in the mid-infrared: Challenges and solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, G. C. [Cornell University, Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Herter, T. L.; Houck, J. R. [Cornell University, Astronomy Department, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and ITCP, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece); Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Burgdorf, M., E-mail: sloan@isc.astro.cornell.edu [HE Space Operations, Flughafenallee 24, D-28199 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    We present spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope of 33 K giants and 20 A dwarfs to assess their suitability as spectrophotometric standard stars. The K giants confirm previous findings that the strength of the SiO absorption band at 8 ?m increases for both later optical spectral classes and redder (BV){sub 0} colors, but with considerable scatter. For K giants, the synthetic spectra underpredict the strengths of the molecular bands from SiO and OH. For these reasons, the assumed true spectra for K giants should be based on the assumption that molecular band strengths in the infrared can be predicted accurately from neither optical spectral class or color nor synthetric spectra. The OH bands in K giants grow stronger with cooler stellar temperatures, and they are stronger than predicted by synthetic spectra. As a group, A dwarfs are better behaved and more predictable than the K giants, but they are more likely to show red excesses from debris disks. No suitable A dwarfs were located in parts of the sky continuously observable from Spitzer, and with previous means of estimating the true spectra of K giants ruled out, it was necessary to use models of A dwarfs to calibrate spectra of K giants from observed spectral ratios of the two groups and then use the calibrated K giants as standards for the full database of infrared spectra from Spitzer. We also describe a lingering artifact that affects the spectra of faint blue sources at 24 ?m.

  11. New positron spectral features from supersymmetric dark matter: A way to explain the PAMELA data?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2008-11-15

    The space-borne antimatter experiment PAMELA has recently reported a surprising rise in the positron to electron ratio at high energies. It has also recently been found that electromagnetic radiative corrections in some cases may boost the gamma-ray yield from supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations in the galactic halo by up to 3 or 4 orders of magnitude, providing distinct spectral signatures for indirect dark matter searches to look for. Here, we investigate whether the same type of corrections can also lead to sizeable enhancements in the positron yield. We find that this is indeed the case, albeit for a smaller region of parameter space than for gamma rays; selecting models with a small mass difference between the neutralino and sleptons, like in the stau-coannihilation region in mSUGRA, the effect becomes more pronounced. The resulting, rather hard positron spectrum with a relatively sharp cutoff may potentially fit the rising positron ratio measured by the PAMELA satellite. To do so, however, very large 'boost factors' have to be invoked that are not expected in current models of halo structure. If the predicted cutoff would also be confirmed by later PAMELA data or upcoming experiments, one could either assume nonthermal production in the early universe or nonstandard halo formation to explain such a spectral feature as an effect of dark-matter annihilation. At the end of the paper, we briefly comment on the impact of radiative corrections on other annihilation channels, in particular, antiprotons and neutrinos.

  12. Spectral regularisation: induced gravity and the onset of inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurkov, Max A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2014-01-01

    Using spectral regularisation, we compute the Weyl anomaly and express the anomaly generating functional of the quantum effective action through a collective scalar degree of freedom of all quantum vacuum fluctuations. Such a formulation allows us to describe induced gravity on an equal footing with the anomaly-induced effective action, in a self-consistent way. We then show that requiring stability of the cosmological constant under loop quantum corrections, Sakharov's induced gravity and Starobinsky's anomaly-induced inflation are either both present or both absent, depending on the particle content of the theory.

  13. Spectral sum rules for the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romatschke, P.; Son, D. T.

    2009-09-15

    We derive sum rules involving the spectral density of the stress-energy tensor in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory and pure Yang-Mills theory. The sum rules come from the hydrodynamic behavior at small momenta and the conformal (in the case of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory) or asymptotically free (as for the pure Yang-Mills theory) behavior at large momenta. These sum rules may help constrain quark-gluon plasma transport coefficients obtained from lattice QCD.

  14. Real-Time Airborne Gamma-Ray Background Estimation Using NASVD with MLE and Radiation Transport for Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Jordan, David V.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kernan, Warnick J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements. This method is built upon on the noise-adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD) technique that was previously developed for estimating the potassium (K), uranium (U), and thorium (T) concentrations in soil post-flight. The method can be calibrated using K, U, and T spectra determined from radiation transport simulations along with basis functions, which may be determined empirically by applying maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to previously measured airborne gamma-ray spectra. The method was applied to both measured and simulated airborne gamma-ray spectra, with and without man-made radiological source injections. Compared to schemes based on simple averaging, this technique was less sensitive to background contamination from the injected man-made sources and may be particularly useful when the gamma-ray background frequently changes during the course of the flight.

  15. Suppressing spectral diffusion of emitted photons with optical pulses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fotso, H. F.; Feiguin, A. E.; Awschalom, D. D.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2016-01-22

    In many quantum architectures the solid-state qubits, such as quantum dots or color centers, are interfaced via emitted photons. However, the frequency of photons emitted by solid-state systems exhibits slow uncontrollable fluctuations over time (spectral diffusion), creating a serious problem for implementation of the photon-mediated protocols. Here we show that a sequence of optical pulses applied to the solid-state emitter can stabilize the emission line at the desired frequency. We demonstrate efficiency, robustness, and feasibility of the method analytically and numerically. Taking nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond as an example, we show that only several pulses, with the width of 1more » ns, separated by few ns (which is not difficult to achieve) can suppress spectral diffusion. As a result, our method provides a simple and robust way to greatly improve the efficiency of photon-mediated entanglement and/or coupling to photonic cavities for solid-state qubits.« less

  16. Multi-Spectral Detection of Microfluidic Separation Products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, Carl C.; Meagher, Robert

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop a new scientific tool for studies of chemical processes at the single molecule level, and to provide enhanced capabilities for multiplexed, ultrasensitive separations and immunoassays. We have combined microfluidic separation techniques with our newly developed technology for spectrally and temporally resolved detection of single molecules. The detection of individual molecules can reveal fluctuations in molecular conformations, which are obscured in ensemble measurements, and allows detailed studies of reaction kinetics such as ligand or antibody binding. Detection near the single molecule level also enables the use of correlation techniques to extract information, such as diffusion rates, from the fluorescence signal. The micro-fluidic technology offers unprecedented control of the chemical environment and flow conditions, and affords the unique opportunity to study biomolecules without immobilization. For analytical separations, the fluorescence lifetime and spectral resolution of the detection makes it possible to use multiple parameters for identification of separation products to improve the certainty of identification. We have successfully developed a system that can measure fluorescence spectra, lifetimes and diffusion constants of the components of mixtures separated in a microfluidic electrophoresis chip.

  17. Numeric spectral radiation hydrodynamic calculations of supernova shock breakouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapir, Nir; Halbertal, Dorri

    2014-12-01

    We present here an efficient numerical scheme for solving the non-relativistic one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics equations including inelastic Compton scattering, which is not included in most codes and is crucial for solving problems such as shock breakout. The devised code is applied to the problems of a steady-state planar radiation mediated shock (RMS) and RMS breakout from a stellar envelope. The results are in agreement with those of a previous work on shock breakout, in which Compton equilibrium between matter and radiation was assumed and the 'effective photon' approximation was used to describe the radiation spectrum. In particular, we show that the luminosity and its temporal dependence, the peak temperature at breakout, and the universal shape of the spectral fluence derived in this earlier work are all accurate. Although there is a discrepancy between the spectral calculations and the effective photon approximation due to the inaccuracy of the effective photon approximation estimate of the effective photon production rate, which grows with lower densities and higher velocities, the difference in peak temperature reaches only 30% for the most discrepant cases of fast shocks in blue supergiants. The presented model is exemplified by calculations for supernova 1987A, showing the detailed evolution of the burst spectrum. The incompatibility of the stellar envelope shock breakout model results with observed properties of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and the discrepancy between the predicted and observed rates of XRFs remain unexplained.

  18. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  19. Final Report DE-EE0005380 Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Final Report DE-EE0005380 Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Hao Ling (UT) Mark F. Hamilton (ARL:UT) Rajan Bhalla (SAIC) Walter E. Brown (ARL:UT) Todd A. Hay (ARL:UT) Nicholas J. Whitelonis (UT) Shang-Te Yang (UT) Aale R. Naqvi (UT) 9/30/2013 DE-EE0005380 The University of Texas at Austin ii Notice and Disclaimer This report is being disseminated by

  20. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  1. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  2. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  3. Spectral Barcoding of Quantum Dots: Deciphering Structural Motifs from the Excitonic Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlinar, V.; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) show in high-resolution single-dot spectra a multitude of sharp lines, resembling a barcode, due to various neutral and charged exciton complexes. Here we propose the 'spectral barcoding' method that deciphers structural motifs of dots by using such barcode as input to an artificial-intelligence learning system. Thus, we invert the common practice of deducing spectra from structure by deducing structure from spectra. This approach (i) lays the foundation for building a much needed structure-spectra understanding for large nanostructures and (ii) can guide future design of desired optical features of QDs by controlling during growth only those structural motifs that decide given optical features.

  4. The Northwest Infrared (NWIR) gas-phase spectral database of industrial and environmental chemicals: Recent updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    2014-05-22

    With continuing improvements in both standoff- and point-sensing techniques, there is an ongoing need for high-quality infrared spectral databases. The Northwest Infrared Database (NWIR) contains quantitative, gas-phase infrared spectra of nearly 500 pure chemical species that can be used for a variety of applications such as atmospheric monitoring, biomass burning studies, etc. The data, recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, are pressure broadened to one atmosphere (N2) in order to mimic atmospheric conditions. Each spectrum is a composite composed of multiple individual measurements. Recent updates to the database include over 60 molecules that are known or suspected biomass-burning effluents. Examples from this set of measurements will be presented and experimental details will be discussed in the context of the utility of NWIR for environmental applications.

  5. SULFUR IX TO XIII SPECTRAL MEASURMENTS BETWEEN 170 AND 500 A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z. H.; Zhang, B. L.; Wang, W.; Yu, D.Y.; Cai, X. H.; Du, S. B.; Zeng, X. T.; Chang, H. W.

    2009-04-15

    This paper reports laboratory measurements of the spectrum of highly ionized sulfur. The spectrum of S IX-S XIII has been observed in the wavelength range 170-500 A. A total of 54 lines have been measured. Forty-two of them have been classified as 2s {sup 2}2p{sup k} -2s2p{sup k} {sup +1} and 2s2p{sup k} -2p{sup k} {sup +1} transitions. Twelve other lines have been ascribed to 2s-2p, 4p-5s, 5p-6s, 5d-6p, and 6p-8d transitions. These spectral lines have been identified, among which 22 are new and accurately measured. The analysis of the spectra was based on a comparison with other experimental results and calculated values.

  6. Spectral weight changes at the superconducting transition of Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8+. delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.X.; Wells, B.O.; Spicer, W.E. . Stanford Electronics Labs.); Arko, A.J. )

    1991-01-01

    An overview of our gap studies in high-{Tc} superconductors is presented for the workshop on Fermiology of high-{Tc}'s. The work is centered on the study of single crystal Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}. In a conventional BCS superconductor, a superconducting gap {Delta} is formed when the near Fermi edge electrons condense to form Cooper pairs at low temperatures. As the material goes superconducting the density of states is modified such that the spectral intensity in the region from the Fermi energy down to an energy {Delta} is transferred to a regions just below {Delta}. While this spectral weight transfer has in the past been studied with tunneling spectroscopy, the size of the gap as well as improvements in our instrument resolution allow us now to study it with photoelectron spectroscopy. We have found that as the sample goes superconducting, not only is there spectral weight transfer from the gap region as in BCS theory, but along the {Gamma}-M direction there is also some spectral weight transfer from higher binding energies resulting in a dspectral dip at about {minus}90 meV relative E{sub F}. The total spectral weight decreases along the {Gamma}-M direction, but actually increases along the {Gamma}-X direction. This temperature dependent spectral transfer is discussed in terms of (1) a two to three dimensional phase transition from RVB theory; (2) a manifestation of the electron-boson interaction in the form of {alpha}{sup 2}F oscillations; and (3) conformity with the theory of Van Hove singularities. The latter are particularly attractive in that there are several other observations possibly explained by them: (1) the observation that the magnitude of the gap is anisotropic in the a-b plane; (2) the observation that for overdoped samples the magnitude of D appears to fall off faster then {Tc}. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andriyash, I.A.; Lehe, R.; Malka, V.

    2015-02-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  8. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  9. Spectral and temperature correction of silicon photovoltaic solar radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, J.J.; Perez, R.; Harrison, L. ); LeBaron, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Silicon photovoltaic sensors are an inexpensive alternative to standard thermopile sensors for the measurement of solar radiation. However, their temperature and spectral response render them less accurate for global horizontal irradiance and unsuitable for direct beam and diffuse horizontal irradiance unless they can be reliably corrected. A correction procedure for the rotating shadowband radiometer, which measures all three components, based on a three-way parameterization of the solar position and sky conditions is proposed. After correction, root-mean-square errors for the global and diffuse horizontal irradiance and the direct normal irradiance are about 10, 12, and 13 W/m{sup 2} in comparison with coincident, 5-minute thermopile measurements. While the numerical results are specific to the rotating shadowband instrument, the correction algorithm should apply universally.

  10. Method for detection and imaging over a broad spectral range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yefremenko, Volodymyr (Westmont, IL); Gordiyenko, Eduard (Westmont, IL); Pishko, legal representative, Olga (Kharkov, UA); Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Pishko, deceased; Vitalii (Westmont, IL)

    2007-09-25

    A method of controlling the coordinate sensitivity in a superconducting microbolometer employs localized light, heating or magnetic field effects to form normal or mixed state regions on a superconducting film and to control the spatial location. Electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching were applied as pattern transfer processes in epitaxial Y--Ba--Cu--O films. Two different sensor designs were tested: (i) a 3 millimeter long and 40 micrometer wide stripe and (ii) a 1.25 millimeters long, and 50 micron wide meandering-like structure. Scanning the laser beam along the stripe leads to physical displacement of the sensitive area, and, therefore, may be used as a basis for imaging over a broad spectral range. Forming the superconducting film as a meandering structure provides the equivalent of a two-dimensional detector array. Advantages of this approach are simplicity of detector fabrication, and simplicity of the read-out process requiring only two electrical terminals.

  11. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, S.; Letzring, S.A.; Soures, J.

    1991-09-10

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies (''colors'') cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers. 8 figures.

  12. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. hawaii_geophysics_planetology_peer2013.pdf (439.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and

  13. Star formation relations and CO spectral line energy distributions across the J-ladder and redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greve, T. R.; Leonidaki, I.; Xilouris, E. M.; Wei, A.; Henkel, C.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Van der Werf, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Daz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E.; Harris, A.; Naylor, D. A.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present FIR [50-300 ?m]CO luminosity relations (i.e., log L{sub FIR}=?log L{sub CO}{sup ?}+?) for the full CO rotational ladder from J = 1-0 up to J = 13-12 for a sample of 62 local (z ? 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; L {sub IR[8-1000} {sub ?m]} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 submillimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations, and sufficiently well-sampled FIR/submillimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs), so that accurate FIR luminosities can be determined. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIRCO luminosity relations toward the high-IR-luminosity end, while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-J/high-J CO line data (J = 5-4 and higher) that was available prior to Herschel. This new data set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIRCO luminosity relations (i.e., ? ? 1) for J = 1-0 up to J = 5-4, with a nearly constant normalization (? ? 2). In the simplest physical scenario, this is expected from the (also) linear FIR(molecular line) relations recently found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However, from J = 6-5 and up to the J = 13-12 transition, we find an increasingly sublinear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (?100 K) and dense (>10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star-formation-powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova-driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for this component. The global CO

  14. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; Iosif 1 ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin Bharadwaj + Show ...

  15. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, filtered spectral data, co-polarized mode Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; Iosif 1 ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin Bharadwaj + Show ...

  16. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith ... situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. ...

  17. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon hawaiigeophysicsplane...

  18. Fine tuning the spectral response of metal insulator composites for specific solar applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.B.; Ng, M.W.; Reuben, A.J.; Radchik, A.V.; Dligatch, S.

    1993-12-31

    Solar selective absorbers based on thin films of metal insulator composites or cermets such as black chrome and pigmented aluminum oxide on metals such as nickel and copper have proved to be the most attractive for applications. They give high solar absorptance {alpha} (>0.93), low thermal emittance {var_epsilon} ({approximately}0.1) and are readily deposited on large areas. Attempts to control the optical properties of these systems have usually involved variations in composition including metal-insulator ratio and grading in refractive index to minimize the light reflected at the front surface. Cermets have also recently been found suitable for window applications because they can be deposited to give excellent angular selectivity. These systems thus require special attention to the spectral response of the cermet as a function of angle of incidence. Furthermore the need to retain the vision and lighting functions of the window for forward and downward angles puts restraints on the amount of metal that can be included in the insulator matrix. Again the best approach appears to be tied up with utilizing a low density of metal which is distributed in such a way as to give strongly enhanced absorption only for particular directions. This paper deals with physical insights into these phenomena from both a theoretical and experimental viewpoint. Theories developed to understand angular selective films, recent new deposition procedures and the structural information on the resulting films, and new advances in effective medium theories have together provided the insights into controlling the spectral optical response of cermets to a degree not previously realized. The key is understanding the resonance characteristics of cermets. Several factors play a role, but three have a prime influence. They are the spatial distribution of the metal particles (even more important than total content), the dielectric constant of the host material and the metal itself.

  19. Detection of embedded radiation sources using temporal variation of gamma spectral data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-09-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the isotopes present in a measurement. For low energy resolution detectors, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the isotopes present in the measurement. When many isotopes are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many trial solutions by highly skilled spectroscopists. This report investigates the potential of a new analysis method which uses spatial/temporal information from multiple low energy resolution measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other isotopes present. This method is referred to as targeted principal component analysis (TPCA). For radiation portal monitor applications, multiple measurements of gamma spectra are taken at equally spaced time increments as a vehicle passes through the portal and the TPCA method is directly applicable to this type of measurement. In this report we describe the method and investigate its application to the problem of detection of a radioactive localized source that is embedded in a distributed source in the presence of an ambient background. Examples using simulated spectral measurements indicate that this method works very well and has the potential for automated analysis for RPM applications. This method is also expected to work well for isotopic detection in the presence of spectrally and spatially varying backgrounds as a result of vehicle-induced background suppression. Further work is needed to include effects of shielding, to understand detection limits, setting of thresholds, and to estimate false positive probability.

  20. The probability of laser caused ocular injury to the aircrew of undetected aircraft violating the exclusion zone about the airborne aura LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-12-01

    The probability of a laser caused ocular injury, to the aircrew of an undetected aircraft entering the exclusion zone about the AURA LIDAR airborne platform with the possible violation of the Laser Hazard Zone boundary, was investigated and quantified for risk analysis and management.

  1. Airborne studies of submicron aerosol in the troposphere over West Siberia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchenko, M.V.; Zuev, V.E.; Belan, B.D.; Terpugova, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    Submicron fraction particles that have the longest lifespan and are included in almost all atmospheric processes are of special importance among the great variety of sizes of particles present in the atmosphere. Submicron particles mainly determine the opticle state of the atmosphere in the visible spectral range, essentially cause the absorption of infrared radiation and, since they are the products and participants in all aerosol-to-gas transformations, accumulate of a lot of various chemical compounds and transfer them to large distances. Investigation of the processes of the spatial-temporal variability of aerosol particles for different climatic zones of the earth is the experimental base for studying their effect on climatically and ecologically significant factors and estimating their unfavorable tendencies. The increasing anthropogenic loading of the earth`s atmosphere is creating an urgency for aerosol research. Regardless of how perfect the analytical and numerical methods of solving radiation problems may be, success in forecasting climatic change is mainly determined by the reliability of the experimental data on optical parameters of the atmosphere and of the description of their variability under the effect of external factors.

  2. Design and Testing of a 10B4C Capsule for Spectral-Tailoring in Mixed-Spectrum Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Metz, Lori A.; Finn, Erin C.; Friese, Judah I.

    2014-04-11

    A boron carbide capsule highly enriched in 10B has been designed and used for spectral-tailoring experiments at the TRIGA reactor at Washington State University. New experiments show that enriching the boron to 96% B-10 results in additional absorption of neutrons in the resonance region thereby producing a neutron spectrum that is much closer to a pure 235U fission spectrum. A cadmium outer cover was used to reduce thermal heating. The neutron spectrum calculated with MCNP was found to be in very good agreement with measured activation rates from neutron fluence monitors.

  3. Polarization of photons scattered by electrons in any spectral distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the quantum electrodynamics, we present a generic formalism of the polarization for beamed monochromatic photons scattered by electrons in any spectral distribution. The formulae reduce to the components of the Fano matrix when electrons are at rest. We mainly investigate the polarization in three scenarios, i.e., electrons at rest, isotropic electrons with a power-law spectrum, and thermal electrons. If the incident beam is polarized, the polarization is reduced significantly by isotropic electrons at large viewing angles; the degree of polarization caused by thermal electrons is about half of that caused by power-law electrons. If the incident bean is unpolarized, soft ?-rays can lead to about 15% polarization at viewing angles around ?/4. For isotropic electrons, one remarkable feature is that the polarization as a function of the incident photon energy always peaks roughly at 1 MeV; this is valid for both the thermal and power-law cases. This feature can be used to distinguish the model of the inverse Compton scattering from that of the synchrotron radiation.

  4. Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.

  5. Spectral Energy Distributions for Disk and Halo M Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, S. K.; Allard, F.; Dahn, Conard; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kerr, T. H.; Rayner, J.

    2000-06-01

    We have obtained infrared (1-2.5 {mu}m) spectroscopy for 42 halo and disk dwarfs with spectral types M1-M6.5. These data are compared to synthetic spectra generated by the latest model atmospheres of Allard and Hauschildt. Photospheric parameters metallicity, effective temperature, and radius are determined for the sample.We find good agreement between observation and theory except for known problems due to incomplete molecular data for metal hydrides and H2O. The metal-poor M subdwarfs are well matched by the models, as oxide opacity sources are less important in this case. The derived effective temperatures for the sample range from 3600 to 2600 K; at these temperatures grain formation and extinction are not significant in the photosphere. The derived metallicities range from solar to 1/10 solar. The radii and effective temperatures derived agree well with recent models of low-mass stars. The spectra are available in electronic form upon request. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  6. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  7. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Los Alamos National Lab.; Smith, Darryl L.; Los Alamos National Lab.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solutionmore » using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.« less

  8. Spectral monodromy of non-self-adjoint operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phan, Quang Sang

    2014-01-15

    In the present paper, we build a combinatorial invariant, called the “spectral monodromy” from the spectrum of a single (non-self-adjoint) h-pseudodifferential operator with two degrees of freedom in the semi-classical limit. Our inspiration comes from the quantum monodromy defined for the joint spectrum of an integrable system of n commuting self-adjoint h-pseudodifferential operators, given by S. Vu Ngoc [“Quantum monodromy in integrable systems,” Commun. Math. Phys. 203(2), 465–479 (1999)]. The first simple case that we treat in this work is a normal operator. In this case, the discrete spectrum can be identified with the joint spectrum of an integrable quantum system. The second more complex case we propose is a small perturbation of a self-adjoint operator with a classical integrability property. We show that the discrete spectrum (in a small band around the real axis) also has a combinatorial monodromy. The main difficulty in this case is that we do not know the description of the spectrum everywhere, but only in a Cantor type set. In addition, we also show that the corresponding monodromy can be identified with the classical monodromy, defined by J. Duistermaat [“On global action-angle coordinates,” Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 33(6), 687–706 (1980)].

  9. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S. C.; Tom, M. S.; Sweeney, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 5-year multi-institution and multi-agency airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, with scientific objectives that are central to the carbon-cycle and radiative-forcing goals of the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) SGP region; 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative-forcing, convective processes, and CO2 concentrations over the ARM SGP region, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  10. Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

  11. Spectral network based on component cells under the SOPHIA European project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Núñez, Rubén Antón, Ignacio; Askins, Steve; Sala, Gabriel; Domínguez, César; Voarino, Philippe; Steiner, Marc; Siefer, Gerald; Fucci, Rafaelle; Roca, Franco; Minuto, Alessandro; Morabito, Paolo

    2015-09-28

    In the frame of the European project SOPHIA, a spectral network based on component (also called isotypes) cells has been created. Among the members of this project, several spectral sensors based on component cells and collimating tubes, so-called spectroheliometers, were installed in the last years, allowing the collection of minute-resolution spectral data useful for CPV systems characterization across Europe. The use of spectroheliometers has been proved useful to establish the necessary spectral conditions to perform power rating of CPV modules and systems. If enough data in a given period of time is collected, ideally a year, it is possible to characterize spectrally the place where measurements are taken, in the same way that hours of annual irradiation can be estimated using a pyrheliometer.

  12. Prior-knowledge-based spectral mixture analysis for impervious...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    First, an urban area was categorized into high- and low-density urban areas, using a multi-step classification method. Next, in high-density urban areas that were assumed to have ...

  13. Vegetation classification in southern pine mixed hardwood forests using airborne scanning laser point data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, Robert J.; Reutebuch, Stephen E.

    2012-09-01

    Forests of the southeastern United States are dominated by a relatively small number of conifer species. However, many of these forests also have a hardwood component composed of a wide variety of species that are found in all canopy positions. The presence or absence of hardwood species and their position in the canopy often dictates management activities such as thinning or prescribed burning. In addition, the characteristics of the under- and mid-story layers, often dominated by hardwood species, are key factors when assessing suitable habitat for threatened and endangered species such as the Red Cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) (RCW), making information describing the hardwood component important to forest managers. General classification of cover types using LIDAR data has been reported (Song et al. 2002, Brennan and Webster 2006) but most efforts focusing on the identification of individual species or species groups rely on some type of imagery to provide more complete spectral information for the study area. Brandtberg (2007) found that use of intensity data significantly improved LIDAR detection and classification of three leaf-off deciduous eastern species: oaks (Quercus spp.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.). Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of hardwood species present in the canopy using only the LIDAR point data and derived products. However, the presence of several hardwood species that retain their foliage through the winter months complicated our analyses. We present two classification approaches. The first identifies areas containing hardwood and softwood (conifer) species (H/S) and the second identifies vegetation with foliage absent or present (FA/FP) at the time of the LIDAR data acquisition. The classification results were used to develop predictor variables for forest inventory models. The ability to incorporate the proportion of hardwood and softwood was important to the

  14. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  15. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikoloch, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  16. Effects of Spectral Error in Efficiency Measurements of GaInAs-Based Concentrator Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Moriarty, T.; Steiner, M. A.; Emery, K. A.

    2014-03-01

    This technical report documents a particular error in efficiency measurements of triple-absorber concentrator solar cells caused by incorrect spectral irradiance -- specifically, one that occurs when the irradiance from unfiltered, pulsed xenon solar simulators into the GaInAs bottom subcell is too high. For cells designed so that the light-generated photocurrents in the three subcells are nearly equal, this condition can cause a large increase in the measured fill factor, which, in turn, causes a significant artificial increase in the efficiency. The error is readily apparent when the data under concentration are compared to measurements with correctly balanced photocurrents, and manifests itself as discontinuities in plots of fill factor and efficiency versus concentration ratio. In this work, we simulate the magnitudes and effects of this error with a device-level model of two concentrator cell designs, and demonstrate how a new Spectrolab, Inc., Model 460 Tunable-High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (T-HIPSS) can mitigate the error.

  17. SPATIALLY AND SPECTRALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF A ZEBRA PATTERN IN A SOLAR DECIMETRIC RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; Gary, D. E.; Jing Ju

    2011-07-20

    We present the first interferometric observation of a zebra-pattern radio burst with simultaneous high spectral ({approx}1 MHz) and high time (20 ms) resolution. The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope Subsystem Testbed (FST) and the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) were used in parallel to observe the X1.5 flare on 2006 December 14. By using OVSA to calibrate the FST, the source position of the zebra pattern can be located on the solar disk. With the help of multi-wavelength observations and a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, the zebra source is explored in relation to the magnetic field configuration. New constraints are placed on the source size and position as a function of frequency and time. We conclude that the zebra burst is consistent with a double-plasma resonance model in which the radio emission occurs in resonance layers where the upper-hybrid frequency is harmonically related to the electron cyclotron frequency in a coronal magnetic loop.

  18. Spectral Emissions and Dosimetry of Metal Tritide Particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.; Stewart, Robert D.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2002-01-01

    Inference of intakes and doses from inhalation of metal tritide particles has come under scrutiny because of decommissioning and decontamination of U.S. Department of Energy facilities. Since self-absorption of radiation is very significant for larger particles, interpretation of counting results of metal tritide particles by liquid scintillation requires information about emission spectra. Similarly, inference of dose requires knowledge of charged particle and photon spectra. Using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code, we calculated various dosimetric, microdosimetric and spectral emissions from tritides of Sc, Ti, Zr, Er, and Hf. For metal tritide particles with physical diameters in the range from about 0.01 mm to 25 mm, we present energy emission fractions, distributions of microdosimetric quantities, and the emitted spectra of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons. Results characterizing the effects of uncertainties associated with the composition and density of the tritides are also presented. Emission spectra are used to illustrate trends in the relationship between "apparent" and "observed" activity as a function of particle type and size. Emissions from metal tritide particles are weakly penetrating, and the emission spectra tend to "harden" as the particle size increases. Microdosimetric considerations suggest that the radiation emitted by metal tritides can be classified as a low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation source. For cells less than about 7 mm away from the surface of a metal tritide, the primary dose component is due to electrons. However, bremsstrahlung radiation may deposit some energy tens, hundreds or even thousands of micrometers away from the surface of a tritide particle.

  19. Spectral singularity in confined PT symmetric optical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, R.

    2013-11-15

    We present an analytical study for the scattering amplitudes (Reflection ?R? and Transmission ?T?), of the periodic PT symmetric optical potential V(x)=W{sub 0}cos{sup 2}x+iV{sub 0}sin2x confined within the region 0 ?x?L, embedded in a homogeneous medium having uniform potential W{sub 0}. The confining length L is considered to be some integral multiple of the period ?. We give some new and interesting results. Scattering is observed to be normal (?T?{sup 2}? 1, ?R?{sup 2}? 1) for V{sub 0}? 0.5, when the above potential can be mapped to a Hermitian potential by a similarity transformation. Beyond this point (V{sub 0} > 0.5) scattering is found to be anomalous (?T?{sup 2}, ?R?{sup 2} not necessarily ?1). Additionally, in this parameter regime of V{sub 0}, one observes infinite number of spectral singularities E{sub SS} at different values of V{sub 0}. Furthermore, for L= 2n?, the transition point V{sub 0}= 0.5 shows unidirectional invisibility with zero reflection when the beam is incident from the absorptive side (Im[V(x)] < 0) but with finite reflection when the beam is incident from the emissive side (Im[V(x)] > 0), transmission being identically unity in both cases. Finally, the scattering coefficients ?R?{sup 2} and ?T?{sup 2} always obey the generalized unitarity relation : ?T|{sup 2}?1|=?(|R{sub R}|{sup 2}|R{sub L}|{sup 2}), where subscripts R and L stand for right and left incidence, respectively.

  20. Resonances and spectral shift function for a magnetic Schroedinger operator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khochman, Abdallah

    2009-04-15

    We consider the three-dimensional Schroedinger operator H{sub 0} with a constant magnetic field and subject to an electric potential v{sub 0} depending only on the variable along the magnetic field x{sub 3}. The operator H{sub 0} has infinitely many eigenvalues of infinite multiplicity embedded in its continuous spectrum. We perturb H{sub 0} by smooth scalar potentials V=O(<(x{sub 1},x{sub 2})>{sup -{delta}{sub perpendicular}}{sup -{delta}{sub ||}}), {delta}{sub perpendicular}>2, {delta}{sub ||}>1. We assume also that V and v{sub 0} have an analytic continuation, in the magnetic field direction, in a complex sector outside a compact set. We define the resonances of H=H{sub 0}+V as the eigenvalues of the nonself-adjoint operator obtained from H by analytic distortions of R{sub x{sub 3}}. We study their distribution near any fixed real eigenvalue of H{sub 0}, 2bq+{lambda} for q is an element of N. In a ring centered at 2bq+{lambda} with radii (r,2r), we establish an upper bound, as r tends to 0, of the number of resonances. This upper bound depends on the decay of V at infinity only in the directions (x{sub 1},x{sub 2}). Finally, we deduce a representation of the derivative of the spectral shift function for the operator pair (H{sub 0},H) in terms of resonances. This representation justifies the Breit-Wigner approximation and implies a local trace formula.

  1. Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M; Veilleux, John M; Lucero, Randy P; Seamans, Jr., James V; Clapham, Martin J

    2010-11-09

    An analytical technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC), utilizing spectral summing of spectra from groups of drums of similar waste type, is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposal (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no place to go unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs two High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confinned TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radio nuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have too high a MDA to be classified as LLW enter a radioactive waste characterization indetenninate status that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced ganuna spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discernable in the individual spectra can become quantifiable in the

  2. Characteristics of degenerately doped silicon for spectral control in thermophotovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehsani, H.; Bhat, I.; Borrego, J.; Gutmann, R.; Brown, E.; Dzeindziel, R.; Freeman, M.; Choudhury, N.

    1995-07-01

    Heavily doped Si was investigated for use as spectral control filter in thermal photovoltaic (TPV) system. These filters should reflect radiation at 4 {micro}m and above and transmit radiation at 2 {micro}m and below. Two approaches have been used for introducing impurities into Si to achieve high doping concentration. One was the diffusion technique, using spin-on dopants. The plasma wavelength ({lambda}{sub p}) of these filters could be adjusted by controlling the diffusion conditions. The minimum plasma wavelength achieved was 4.8 {micro}m. In addition, a significant amount of absorption was observed for the wavelength 2 {micro}m and below. The second approach was doping by ion implantation followed by thermal annealing with a capped layer of doped glass. Implantation with high dosage of B and As followed by high temperature annealing (> 1,000 C) resulted in a plasma wavelength that could be controlled between 3.5 and 6 {micro}m. The high temperature annealing (> 1,000 C) that was necessary to activate the dopant atoms and to heal the implantation damage, also caused significant absorption at 2 {micro}m. For phosphorus implanted Si, a moderate temperature (800--900 C) was sufficient to activate most of the phosphorus and to heal the implantation damage. The position of the plasma turn-on wavelength for an implantation dose of 2 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2} of P was at 2.9 {micro}m. The absorption at 2 {micro}m was less than 20% and the reflection at 5 {micro}m was about 70%.

  3. The spectral element method (SEM) on variable-resolution grids: evaluating grid sensitivity and resolution-aware numerical viscosity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guba, O.; Taylor, M. A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Overfelt, J. R.; Levy, M. N.

    2014-11-27

    We evaluate the performance of the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) spectral element method on variable-resolution grids using the shallow-water equations in spherical geometry. We configure the method as it is used in CAM, with dissipation of grid scale variance, implemented using hyperviscosity. Hyperviscosity is highly scale selective and grid independent, but does require a resolution-dependent coefficient. For the spectral element method with variable-resolution grids and highly distorted elements, we obtain the best results if we introduce a tensor-based hyperviscosity with tensor coefficients tied to the eigenvalues of the local element metric tensor. The tensor hyperviscosity is constructed so that, formore » regions of uniform resolution, it matches the traditional constant-coefficient hyperviscosity. With the tensor hyperviscosity, the large-scale solution is almost completely unaffected by the presence of grid refinement. This later point is important for climate applications in which long term climatological averages can be imprinted by stationary inhomogeneities in the truncation error. We also evaluate the robustness of the approach with respect to grid quality by considering unstructured conforming quadrilateral grids generated with a well-known grid-generating toolkit and grids generated by SQuadGen, a new open source alternative which produces lower valence nodes.« less

  4. The spectral element method on variable resolution grids: evaluating grid sensitivity and resolution-aware numerical viscosity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guba, O.; Taylor, M. A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Overfelt, J. R.; Levy, M. N.

    2014-06-25

    We evaluate the performance of the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) spectral element method on variable resolution grids using the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. We configure the method as it is used in CAM, with dissipation of grid scale variance implemented using hyperviscosity. Hyperviscosity is highly scale selective and grid independent, but does require a resolution dependent coefficient. For the spectral element method with variable resolution grids and highly distorted elements, we obtain the best results if we introduce a tensor-based hyperviscosity with tensor coefficients tied to the eigenvalues of the local element metric tensor. The tensor hyperviscosity ismore » constructed so that for regions of uniform resolution it matches the traditional constant coefficient hyperviscsosity. With the tensor hyperviscosity the large scale solution is almost completely unaffected by the presence of grid refinement. This later point is important for climate applications where long term climatological averages can be imprinted by stationary inhomogeneities in the truncation error. We also evaluate the robustness of the approach with respect to grid quality by considering unstructured conforming quadrilateral grids generated with a well-known grid-generating toolkit and grids generated by SQuadGen, a new open source alternative which produces lower valence nodes.« less

  5. COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    icon WC06FEB2013JTromp.ppt Harnessing high-performance computers and accurate numerical methods to better constrain physical properties of Earth's interior is rapidly...

  6. Spectral compression algorithms for the analysis of very large multivariate images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2007-10-16

    A method for spectrally compressing data sets enables the efficient analysis of very large multivariate images. The spectral compression algorithm uses a factored representation of the data that can be obtained from Principal Components Analysis or other factorization technique. Furthermore, a block algorithm can be used for performing common operations more efficiently. An image analysis can be performed on the factored representation of the data, using only the most significant factors. The spectral compression algorithm can be combined with a spatial compression algorithm to provide further computational efficiencies.

  7. High level white noise generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  8. Nuclear Transparency and Single Particle Spectral Functions from Quasielastic A(e,e'p) Reactions up to Q2=8.1 GeV2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David McKee

    2003-05-01

    High statistics elastic and quasielastic scattering measurements were performed on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and iron at squared momentum transfers up to 8.1 GeV2. Both the nuclear transparency and the single particle spectral functions were extracted by means of comparison with a Plane- Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. Our data provide no evidence of the onset of color transparency within our kinematic range.

  9. SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION OF GALAXIES AT 0.5 {<=} z {<=} 1 IN THE CDFS: THE ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teimoorinia, H.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to combine spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with artificial neural network techniques to assign spectral characteristics to a sample of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 1. The sample is selected from the spectroscopic campaign of the ESO/GOODS-South field, with 142 sources having photometric data from the GOODS-MUSIC catalog covering bands between {approx}0.4 and 24 {mu}m in 10-13 filters. We use the CIGALE code to fit photometric data to Maraston's synthesis spectra to derive mass, specific star formation rate, and age, as well as the best SED of the galaxies. We use the spectral models presented by Kinney et al. as targets in the wavelength interval {approx}1200-7500 A. Then a series of neural networks are trained, with average performance {approx}90%, to classify the best SED in a supervised manner. We consider the effects of the prominent features of the best SED on the performance of the trained networks and also test networks on the galaxy spectra of Coleman et al., which have a lower resolution than the target models. In this way, we conclude that the trained networks take into account all the features of the spectra simultaneously. Using the method, 105 out of 142 galaxies of the sample are classified with high significance. The locus of the classified galaxies in the three graphs of the physical parameters of mass, age, and specific star formation rate appears consistent with the morphological characteristics of the galaxies.

  10. Enhanced sensitivity to dark matter self-annihilations in the Sun using neutrino spectral information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rott, C.; Tanaka, T.; Itow, Y. E-mail: ttanaka@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2011-09-01

    Self-annihilating dark matter gravitationally captured by the Sun could yield observable neutrino signals at current and next generation neutrino detectors. By exploiting such signals, neutrino detectors can probe the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons in the Sun. We describe a method how to convert constraints on neutrino fluxes to a limit on the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. In this method all neutrino flavors can be treated in a very similar way. We study the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes for Solar WIMP signals using vertex contained events and find that this detection channel is of particular importance in the search for low mass WIMPs. We obtain highly competitive sensitivities with all neutrino flavor channels for a Megaton sized detector through the application of basic spectral selection criteria. Best results are obtained with the electron neutrino channel. We discuss associated uncertainties and provide a procedure how to treat them for analyses in a consistent way.

  11. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, Karol; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Shelton, William A.

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Greens function that renders a highly scalable computational accurate method for producing an analytic coupled-cluster Greens function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N?1 and N +1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N ?1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the cor- responding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Greens function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Greens function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating prop- erties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but it also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. As a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Greens function defined by the CCSD (CC with singles and doubles) representation of the ground-state wave function.

  12. Viscosity of strongly interacting quantum fluids: Spectral functions and sum rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2010-05-15

    The viscosity of strongly interacting systems is a topic of great interest in diverse fields. We focus here on the bulk and shear viscosities of nonrelativistic quantum fluids, with particular emphasis on strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases. We use Kubo formulas for the bulk and shear viscosity spectral functions, {zeta}({omega}) and {eta}({omega}), respectively, to derive exact, nonperturbative results. Our results include a microscopic connection between the shear viscosity {eta} and the normal-fluid density {rho}{sub n}; sum rules for {zeta}({omega}) and {eta}({omega}) and their evolution through the BCS-BEC crossover (where BEC denotes Bose-Einstein condensate); and universal high-frequency tails for {eta}({omega}) and the dynamic structure factor S(q,{omega}). We use our sum rules to show that, at unitarity, {zeta}({omega}) is identically zero and thus relate {eta}({omega}) to density-density correlations. We predict that frequency-dependent shear viscosity {eta}({omega}) of the unitary Fermi gas can be experimentally measured using Bragg spectroscopy.

  13. A panoply of insertion devices at SOLEIL for a wide spectral range and flexible polarisation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couprie, M. E.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Berteaud, P.; Briquez, F.; Chapuis, L.; Elajjouri, T.; Marteau, F.; Filhol, J. M.; Kitegi, C.; Marcouille, O.; Massal, M.; Valleau, M.; Veteran, J.; Chubar, O.

    2010-06-23

    The SOLEIL storage ring presents a very high fraction of its circumference dedicated to accommodate Insertion Devices (ID). Over the 25 presently planned insertion devices presenting a large variety of systems, 16 have been already installed and commissioned in September 2009. The UV-VUV region is covered with electromagnetic devices, offering tuneable polarisations. An electromagnet/permanent magnet undulator using copper sheets coils for fast switching of the helicity is under construction. 13 APPLE-II type undulators, with period ranging from 80 down to 36 mm, provide photons in the 0.1-10 keV region, some of them featuring tapering or quasi-periodicity. Five U20 in vacuum undulators cover typically the 3-30 keV range whereas an in vacuum wiggler, with compensation of the magnetic forces via adequate springs will cover the 10-50 keV spectral domain. R and D on cryogenic in-vacuum undulator is also under progress. A magnetic chicane using permanent magnet dipoles has also been designed in order to accommodate two canted undulators on the same straight section. A wiggler dedicated to slicing (production of femto second long pulses) is also being designed, its radiation will also serve for an X-ray beamline.

  14. HOW COMPLETE ARE ASTROPHYSICAL CATALOGS FOR THE MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRAL REGION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2010-12-10

    With the growth in sensitivity and angular resolution of millimeter and submillimeter telescopes, the number of unidentified molecular spectral lines in surveys of the interstellar medium has grown rapidly. While some of these unidentified lines are due to as yet unidentified astrophysical species, it is the general consensus that most are due to lines from a limited number of well-known interstellar species, the interstellar weeds. These unidentified lines do not appear in astrophysical line catalogs, which are based on quantum mechanical models and are incomplete primarily because of the difficulty of performing the usual bootstrap assignment and analysis process in their often highly perturbed low-lying vibrational states. To address this problem, we have proposed and demonstrated an alternative catalog approach that is based on the analysis of intensity-calibrated spectra taken over a range of temperatures in the laboratory. These analyses also make it possible to quantitatively address the astrophysical completeness of existing catalogs. In this Letter, we use extensive new experimental data in the 210-270 GHz window to address this question for eight molecules that are considered to be the leading candidates for astronomical weeds-methyl formate, methanol, dimethyl ether, acetaldehyde, sulfur dioxide, methyl cyanide, vinyl cyanide, and ethyl cyanide. Additionally, for each of the eight molecules, we use these results and knowledge of the molecular vibrational/torsional energy levels to predict completeness as a function of astronomical source temperature.

  15. SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION OF THE BRIGHTEST OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGION W40

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuping, R. Y.; Vacca, William D.; Kassis, Marc; Yu, Ka Chun

    2012-10-01

    We present high signal-to-noise, moderate resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 2000) near-infrared spectra, as well as 10 {mu}m imaging, for the brightest members of the central stellar cluster in the W40 H II region, obtained using the SpeX and MIRSI instruments at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility. Using these observations combined with archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we have determined the spectral classifications, extinction, distances, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the brightest members of the cluster. Of the eight objects observed, we identify four main-sequence (MS) OB stars (one late-O, three early-B), two Herbig Ae/Be stars, and two low-mass young stellar objects (Class II). Strong He I absorption at 1.083 {mu}m in the MS star spectra strongly suggests that at least some of these sources are in fact close binaries. Two out of the four MS stars also show significant infrared excesses typical of circumstellar disks. Extinctions and distances were determined for each MS star by fitting model stellar atmospheres to the SEDs. We estimate a distance to the cluster of between 455 and 535 pc, which agrees well with earlier (but far less precise) distance estimates. We conclude that the late-O star we identify is the dominant source of Lyman continuum luminosity needed to power the W40 H II region and is the likely source of the stellar wind that has blown a large ( Almost-Equal-To 4 pc) pinched-waist bubble observed in wide-field mid-IR images. We also suggest that 3.6 cm radio emission observed from some of the sources in the cluster is likely not due to emission from ultracompact H II regions, as suggested in other work, due to size constraints based on our derived distance to the cluster. Finally, we also present a discussion of the curious source IRS 3A, which has a very strong mid-IR excess (despite its B3 MS classification) and appears to be embedded in a dusty envelope roughly 2700 AU in size.

  16. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  17. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadić, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 ×more » 109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.« less

  18. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadić, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 × 109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be

  19. Detection of a Spectral Break in the Extra Hard Component of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Extra Hard Component of GRB 090926A Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection of a Spectral Break in the Extra Hard Component of GRB 090926A You are accessing a ...

  20. Enhanced Thermal Stability of W-Ni-Al2O3 Cermet-Based Spectrally...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solar Absorbers with Tungsten Infrared Reflectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Thermal Stability of W-Ni-Al2O3 Cermet-Based Spectrally Selective Solar ...

  1. Finite grid instability and spectral fidelity of the electrostatic Particle-In-Cell algorithm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, C. -K.; Zeng, Y.; Wang, Y.; Meyers, M. D.; Yi, S.; Albright, B. J.

    2016-06-07

    The origin of the Finite Grid Instability (FGI) is studied by resolving the dynamics in the 1D electrostatic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) model in the spectral domain at the single particle level and at the collective motion level. The spectral fidelity of the PIC model is contrasted with the underlying physical system or the gridless model. The systematic spectral phase and amplitude errors from the charge deposition and field interpolation are quantified for common particle shapes used in the PIC models. Lastly, it is shown through such analysis and in simulations that the lack of spectral fidelity relative to the physical systemmore » due to the existence of aliased spatial modes is the major cause of the FGI in the PIC model.« less

  2. Uncertainty Analysis of Spectral Irradiance Reference Standards Used for NREL Calibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Campanelli, M.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-05-01

    Spectral irradiance produced by lamp standards such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) FEL-type tungsten halogen lamps are used to calibrate spectroradiometers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Spectroradiometers are often used to characterize spectral irradiance of solar simulators, which in turn are used to characterize photovoltaic device performance, e.g., power output and spectral response. Therefore, quantifying the calibration uncertainty of spectroradiometers is critical to understanding photovoltaic system performance. In this study, we attempted to reproduce the NIST-reported input variables, including the calibration uncertainty in spectral irradiance for a standard NIST lamp, and quantify uncertainty for measurement setup at the Optical Metrology Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  3. Smoothed aggregation adaptive spectral element-based algebraic multigrid

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-20

    SAAMGE provides parallel methods for building multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for elliptic equations with highly heterogeneous coefficients. Additionally, hierarchy adaptation is implemented allowing solving multiple problems with close coefficients without rebuilding the hierarchy.

  4. Methodology for Calculating Spectral Surface Albedo Using ARM MFSR and MFR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Methodology for Calculating Spectral Surface Albedo Using ARM MFSR and MFR Data Gaustad, Krista Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Long, Chuck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Radiation This poster will describe a methodology for identifying the best estimate downwelling and upwelling irradiance measurements for use in calculating a global and spectral albedo for the area located near the SGP ARM's central facility 10m tower. The best estimate MFRSR downwelling global

  5. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE SPECTRAL BREAK IN THE AFTERGLOW OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2012-02-20

    The temporal evolution of the spectral break in the time-resolved spectral energy density of the broadband afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 091127 and 080319B was shown recently to be inconsistent with that expected for the cooling break in the standard fireball model of GRBs. Here we show that it is, however, in good agreement with the predicted temporal evolution of the smooth injection break/bend in the cannonball model of GRBs.

  6. Instrillment Development Multi-Spectral Automated Rotating Shadowt)and Radiometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrillment Development Multi-Spectral Automated Rotating Shadowt)and Radiometry L. Harrison Atmospheric: Sciences Research Center State University of New York at Albany Albany, NY 12205 I am developing two related instruments for use in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) p,rogram; both use an automated rotating shadowband technique to make spectrally resolved measurements of the direct-normal, total horizontal, and diffuse horizontal irradiances. These parameters of the sky-radiance

  7. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  8. An expert computer program for classifying stars on the MK spectral classification system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes an expert computer program (MKCLASS) designed to classify stellar spectra on the MK Spectral Classification system in a way similar to humans—by direct comparison with the MK classification standards. Like an expert human classifier, the program first comes up with a rough spectral type, and then refines that spectral type by direct comparison with MK standards drawn from a standards library. A number of spectral peculiarities, including barium stars, Ap and Am stars, λ Bootis stars, carbon-rich giants, etc., can be detected and classified by the program. The program also evaluates the quality of the delivered spectral type. The program currently is capable of classifying spectra in the violet-green region in either the rectified or flux-calibrated format, although the accuracy of the flux calibration is not important. We report on tests of MKCLASS on spectra classified by human classifiers; those tests suggest that over the entire HR diagram, MKCLASS will classify in the temperature dimension with a precision of 0.6 spectral subclass, and in the luminosity dimension with a precision of about one half of a luminosity class. These results compare well with human classifiers.

  9. Radical advancement in multi-spectral imaging for autonomous vehicles (UAVs, UGVs, and UUVs) using active compensation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Brian F.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to demonstrate a compact, multi-spectral, refractive imaging systems using active optical compensation. Compared to a comparable, conventional lens system, our system has an increased operational bandwidth, provides for spectral selectivity and, non-mechanically corrects aberrations induced by the wavelength dependent properties of a passive refractive optical element (i.e. lens). The compact nature and low power requirements of the system lends itself to small platforms such as autonomous vehicles. In addition, the broad spectral bandwidth of our system would allow optimized performance for both day/night use, and the multi-spectral capability allows for spectral discrimination and signature identification.

  10. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing, E-mail: liy@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)] [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.420?kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ?20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  11. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  12. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  13. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

  14. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  15. The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

    2010-07-15

    The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

  16. INVISIBLE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. SAMPLE SELECTION AND OPTICAL/NEAR-IR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Hearty, Fred

    2012-10-01

    In order to find more examples of the elusive high-redshift molecular absorbers, we have embarked on a systematic discovery program for highly obscured, radio-loud 'invisible active galactic nuclei' using the Very Large Array Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters radio survey in conjunction with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to identify 82 strong ({>=}300 mJy) radio sources positionally coincident with late-type, presumably gas-rich galaxies. In this first paper, the basic properties of this sample are described including the selection process and the analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) derived from the optical (SDSS) + near-IR (NIR) photometry obtained by us at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m. The NIR images confirm the late-type galaxy morphologies found by SDSS for these sources in all but a few (6 of 70) cases (12 previously well studied or misclassified sources were culled). Among 70 sources in the final sample, 33 show galaxy type SEDs, 17 have galaxy components to their SEDs, and 20 have quasar power-law continua. At least nine sources with galaxy SEDs have K-band flux densities too faint to be giant ellipticals if placed at their photometric redshifts. Photometric redshifts for this sample are analyzed and found to be too inaccurate for an efficient radio-frequency absorption line search; spectroscopic redshifts are required. A few new spectroscopic redshifts for these sources are presented here but more will be needed to make significant progress in this field. Subsequent papers will describe the radio continuum properties of the sample and the search for redshifted H I 21 cm absorption.

  17. High power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabu, Razvan

    2015-02-24

    Specifications of the high power laser system (HPLS) designed for nuclear physics experiments are presented. Configuration of the 2 × 10 PW femtosecond laser system is described. In order to reach the required laser beam parameters, advanced laser techniques are proposed for the HPLS: parametric amplification and cross-polarized wave generation for the intensity contrast improvement and spectral broadening, acousto-optic programmable filters to compensate for spectral phase dispersion, optical filters for spectrum management, combined methods for transversal laser suppression.

  18. Replacing 16 mm film cameras with high definition digital cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balch, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    For many years 16 mm film cameras have been used in severe environments. These film cameras are used on Hy-G automotive sleds, airborne gun cameras, range tracking and other hazardous environments. The companies and government agencies using these cameras are in need of replacing them with a more cost effective solution. Film-based cameras still produce the best resolving capability, however, film development time, chemical disposal, recurring media cost, and faster digital analysis are factors influencing the desire for a 16 mm film camera replacement. This paper will describe a new camera from Kodak that has been designed to replace 16 mm high speed film cameras.

  19. Subaru spectroscopy and spectral modeling of Cygnus A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, Matthew J.; Perlman, Eric S.; Nikutta, Robert; Packham, Christopher; Elitzur, Moshe; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, James T.

    2014-06-10

    We present high angular resolution (?0.''5) MIR spectra of the powerful radio galaxy, Cygnus A (Cyg A), obtained with the Subaru telescope. The overall shape of the spectra agree with previous high angular resolution MIR observations, as well as previous Spitzer spectra. Our spectra, both on and off nucleus, show a deep silicate absorption feature. The absorption feature can be modeled with a blackbody obscured by cold dust or a clumpy torus. The deep silicate feature is best fit by a simple model of a screened blackbody, suggesting that foreground absorption plays a significant, if not dominant, role in shaping the spectrum of Cyg A. This foreground absorption prevents a clear view of the central engine and surrounding torus, making it difficult to quantify the extent the torus attributes to the obscuration of the central engine, but does not eliminate the need for a torus in Cyg A.

  20. Ramsey-type spectroscopy in the XUV spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirri, A. [IFAC-CNR, Via Madonna del piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sali, E.; Cavalieri, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Corsi, C. [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bellini, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (CNR), Largo E. Fermi 6, I-50125 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Eramo, R. [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFM-CRS-Soft Matter (CNR), Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2010-02-02

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of Ramsey-type spectroscopy with high-order harmonic generation applied to autoionizing states of Krypton. The ionization yield, detected by an ion-mass spectrometer, shows the characteristic quantum interference pattern. The behaviour of the fringe contrast was interpreted on the basis of a simple analytic model, which reproduces the experimental data without any free parameter.

  1. Terahertz wave electro-optic measurements with optical spectral filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilyakov, I. E. Shishkin, B. V.; Kitaeva, G. Kh.; Akhmedzhanov, R. A.

    2015-03-23

    We propose electro-optic detection techniques based on variations of the laser pulse spectrum induced during pulse co-propagation with terahertz wave radiation in a nonlinear crystal. Quantitative comparison with two other detection methods is made. Substantial improvement of the sensitivity compared to the standard electro-optic detection technique (at high frequencies) and to the previously shown technique based on laser pulse energy changes is demonstrated in experiment.

  2. Accurate, practical simulation of satellite infrared radiometer spectral data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study's purpose is to determine whether a relatively simple random band model formulation of atmospheric radiation transfer in the infrared region can provide valid simulations of narrow interval satellite-borne infrared sounder system data. Detailed ozonesondes provide the pertinent atmospheric information and sets of calibrated satellite measurements provide the validation. High resolution line-by-line model calculations are included to complete the evaluation.

  3. Digital Intermediate Frequency Receiver Module For Use In Airborne Sar Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tise, Bertice L.; Dubbert, Dale F.

    2005-03-08

    A digital IF receiver (DRX) module directly compatible with advanced radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. The DRX can combine a 1 G-Sample/sec 8-bit ADC with high-speed digital signal processor, such as high gate-count FPGA technology or ASICs to realize a wideband IF receiver. DSP operations implemented in the DRX can include quadrature demodulation and multi-rate, variable-bandwidth IF filtering. Pulse-to-pulse (Doppler domain) filtering can also be implemented in the form of a presummer (accumulator) and an azimuth prefilter. An out of band noise source can be employed to provide a dither signal to the ADC, and later be removed by digital signal processing. Both the range and Doppler domain filtering operations can be implemented using a unique pane architecture which allows on-the-fly selection of the filter decimation factor, and hence, the filter bandwidth. The DRX module can include a standard VME-64 interface for control, status, and programming. An interface can provide phase history data to the real-time image formation processors. A third front-panel data port (FPDP) interface can send wide bandwidth, raw phase histories to a real-time phase history recorder for ground processing.

  4. Negative running of the spectral index, hemispherical asymmetry and the consistency of Planck with large r

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    Planck favours a negative running of the spectral index, with the likelihood being dominated by low multipoles l?<50 and no preference for running at higher l. A negative spectral index is also necessary for the 2- Planck upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be consistent with values significantly larger than 0.1. Planck has also observed a hemispherical asymmetry of the CMB power spectrum, again mostly at low multipoles. Here we consider whether the physics responsible for the hemispherical asymmetry could also account for the negative running of the spectral index and the consistency of Planck with a large value of r. A negative running of the spectral index can be generated if the hemispherical asymmetry is due to a scale- and space-dependent modulation which suppresses the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles. We show that the observed hemispherical asymmetry at low l can be generated while satisfying constraints on the asymmetry at higher l and generating a negative spectral index of the right magnitude to account for the Planck observation and to allow Planck to be consistent with a large value of r.

  5. A complex guided spectral transform Lanczos method for studying quantum resonance states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2014-12-28

    A complex guided spectral transform Lanczos (cGSTL) algorithm is proposed to compute both bound and resonance states including energies, widths and wavefunctions. The algorithm comprises of two layers of complex-symmetric Lanczos iterations. A short inner layer iteration produces a set of complex formally orthogonal Lanczos (cFOL) polynomials. They are used to span the guided spectral transform function determined by a retarded Green operator. An outer layer iteration is then carried out with the transform function to compute the eigen-pairs of the system. The guided spectral transform function is designed to have the same wavefunctions as the eigenstates of the originalmore » Hamiltonian in the spectral range of interest. Therefore the energies and/or widths of bound or resonance states can be easily computed with their wavefunctions or by using a root-searching method from the guided spectral transform surface. The new cGSTL algorithm is applied to bound and resonance states of HO₂, and compared to previous calculations.« less

  6. Ambiguity in running spectral index with an extra light field during inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: matsuda@sit.ac.jp

    2015-02-01

    At the beginning of inflation there could be extra dynamical scalar fields that will soon disappear (become static) before the end of inflation. In the light of multi-field inflation, those extra degrees of freedom may alter the time-dependence of the original spectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is possible to remove such fields introducing extra number of e-foldings prior to 0N{sub e}∼ 6, however such extra e-foldings may make the trans-Planckian problem worse due to the Lyth bound. We show that such extra scalar fields can change the running of the spectral index to give correction of ± 0.01 without adding significant contribution to the spectral index. The corrections to the spectral index (and the amplitude) could be important in considering global behavior of the corrected spectrum, although they can be neglected in the estimation of the spectrum and its spectral index at the pivot scale. The ambiguity in the running of the spectral index, which could be due to such fields, can be used to nullify tension between BICEP2 and Planck experiments.

  7. A complex guided spectral transform Lanczos method for studying quantum resonance states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2014-12-28

    A complex guided spectral transform Lanczos (cGSTL) algorithm is proposed to compute both bound and resonance states including energies, widths and wavefunctions. The algorithm comprises of two layers of complex-symmetric Lanczos iterations. A short inner layer iteration produces a set of complex formally orthogonal Lanczos (cFOL) polynomials. They are used to span the guided spectral transform function determined by a retarded Green operator. An outer layer iteration is then carried out with the transform function to compute the eigen-pairs of the system. The guided spectral transform function is designed to have the same wavefunctions as the eigenstates of the original Hamiltonian in the spectral range of interest. Therefore the energies and/or widths of bound or resonance states can be easily computed with their wavefunctions or by using a root-searching method from the guided spectral transform surface. The new cGSTL algorithm is applied to bound and resonance states of HO?, and compared to previous calculations.

  8. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-17

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

  9. Spectrally resolved hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light emitting diodes: Magneto-electroluminescence studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooker, S. A.; Kelley, M. R.; Martinez, N. J. D.; Nie, W.; Mohite, A.; Nayyar, I. H.; Tretiak, S.; Smith, D. L.; Liu, F.; Ruden, P. P.

    2014-10-13

    We use spectrally resolved magneto-electroluminescence (EL) measurements to study the energy dependence of hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light-emitting diodes. Using layered devices that generate bright exciplex emission, we show that the increase in EL emission intensity I due to small applied magnetic fields of order 100 mT is markedly larger at the high-energy blue end of the EL spectrum (ΔI/I ∼ 11%) than at the low-energy red end (∼4%). Concurrently, the widths of the magneto-EL curves increase monotonically from blue to red, revealing an increasing hyperfine coupling between polarons and nuclei and directly providing insight into the energy-dependent spatial extent and localization of polarons.

  10. S4: A spatial-spectral model for speckle suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fergus, Rob; Hogg, David W.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas; Pueyo, Laurent

    2014-10-20

    High dynamic range imagers aim to block or eliminate light from a very bright primary star in order to make it possible to detect and measure far fainter companions; in real systems, a small fraction of the primary light is scattered, diffracted, and unocculted. We introduce S4, a flexible data-driven model for the unocculted (and highly speckled) light in the P1640 spectroscopic coronagraph. The model uses principal components analysis (PCA) to capture the spatial structure and wavelength dependence of the speckles, but not the signal produced by any companion. Consequently, the residual typically includes the companion signal. The companion can thus be found by filtering this error signal with a fixed companion model. The approach is sensitive to companions that are of the order of a percent of the brightness of the speckles, or up to 10{sup 7} times the brightness of the primary star. This outperforms existing methods by a factor of two to three and is close to the shot-noise physical limit.

  11. Characterization and calibration of compact array spectrometers in the ultraviolet spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindo, Francois; Woolliams, Emma; Scott, Barry; Harris, Subrena

    2013-05-10

    Array-based spectrometers, with their compact size, low weight, low cost, and fast measurement time, are now frequently used in place of both conventional single-channel scanning monochromators, and broadband meters. Their rapid measurement capability makes them an attractive option for routine solar UV spectral measurements, where shortterm variability in signal is a challenge. However, compactness, portability, low cost and high speed are achieved at the expense of the spectrometer's optical and electronic performance. Thus such spectrometers are more prone to measurement error from environmental changes, and more prone to other intrinsic sources of error such as stray light and detector non-linearity, which significantly affect solar UV measurements, than a scanning monochromator. The effects of stray light and non-linearity can be reduced either by improved optical and detector design or by a detailed spectrometer characterization. We present in this paper our investigation of the performance of three different commercial array spectrometers: two mini-spectrometers, and a more elaborate array spectrometer with an on-board image amplifier device. These were tested for a subset of performance parameters: their wavelength accuracy and stability, electronic linearity, responsivity linearity, stray light sensitivity, and mechanical stability and repeatability. With all three spectrometers we found that these parameters, particularly but not limited to stray light, had a significant impact on the measurement of the incoming optical radiation. This meant that, without characterization, the instruments would be unable to accurately measure the UV component of any source with significant visible radiation. We discuss various simple and low-cost solutions for improving the performance of these instruments, and providing a rigorous calibration using a straightforward set-up including optical filters and the quasi-monochromatic light from a double monochromator.

  12. OPTICAL SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF A FLICKERING WHITE-LIGHT KERNEL IN A C1 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-10

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 to 4550 acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, ?0.''5 (10{sup 15}cm{sup 2}) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a ''blue continuum bump'' in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  13. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burling, Ian; Yokelson, Robert J.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James; Weise, David

    2011-12-07

    We measured the emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5) from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous suggestions that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform at the same time the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions were measured with our ground-based platform after the flame front passed through. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including significant 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts of smoke that disperses at ground level, and we show that the normally-ignored unlofted emissions can also significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence of large emissions of monoterpenes was seen in the residual smoldering spectra, but we have not yet quantified these emissions. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar

  14. Allergy arising from exposure to airborne contaminants in an insect rearing facility: Health effects and exposure control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, D.

    1994-06-01

    In agricultural crop improvement, yield under various stress conditions and limiting factors is assessed experimentally. Of the stresses on plants which affect yield are those due to insects. Ostrinia nubilalis, the European corn borer (corn borer) is a major pest in sweet and field corn in the U.S. There are many ways to fight crop pests such as the corn borer, including (1) application of chemical insecticides, (2) application of natural predators and, (3) improving crop resistance through plant genetics programs. Randomized field trials are used to determine the effectiveness of pest management programs. These trials frequently consist of randomly selected crop plots to which well-defined input regimes are instituted. For example, corn borers might be released onto crop plots in several densities at various stages of crop development, then sprayed with different levels of pesticide. These experiments are duplicated across regions and, in some cases across the country, to determine, in this instance for example, the best pesticide application rate for a given pest density and crop development stage. In order to release these pests onto crop plots, one must have an adequate supply of the insect pest. In winter months studies are carried out in the laboratory to examine chemical and natural pesticide effectiveness, as well as such things as the role of pheromones in moth behavior. The advantage in field trials is that yield data can be garnered directly. In this country, insects are raised for crop research primarily through the US Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with public Land Grant Universities and, by the private sector agricultural concerns - seed companies and others. This study quantifies the airborne allergen exposure of persons working in a Land Grant University entomology lab were allergy to European corn borer was suspected.

  15. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  16. Uncertainty quantification of a radionuclide release model using an adaptive spectral technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilli, L.; Hoogwerf, C.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we present the application of a non-intrusive spectral techniques we recently developed for the evaluation of the uncertainties associated with a radionuclide migration problem. Spectral techniques can be used to reconstruct stochastic quantities of interest by means of a Fourier-like expansion. Their application to uncertainty propagation problems can be performed by evaluating a set of realizations which are chosen adaptively, in this work the main details about how this is done are presented. The uncertainty quantification problem we are going to deal with was first solved in a recent work where the authors used a spectral technique based on an intrusive approach. In this paper we are going to reproduce the results of this reference work, compare them and discuss the main numerical aspects. (authors)

  17. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Shiyang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Xu, Tao; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang

    2014-07-15

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, is the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.

  18. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  19. Nonlinear-optical spectral interferometry of nanostructures using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Mitrokhin, V P; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Smirnova, I V; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A

    2005-01-31

    The spectrum of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from Raman-active vibrations of gas-phase nitrogen molecules in a mesoporous silica aerogel host is experimentally studied. The CARS spectral profile under these conditions is a result of interference of the resonant part of nonlinear susceptibility, originating from nitrogen molecules in aerogel pores, and the nonresonant contribution, related to the mesoporous host. Raman-active modes of gas-phase molecular nitrogen give rise to intense resonances in the CARS spectrum, serving as reference spectral profiles for probing local parameters of a nanocomposite material (nanoCARS). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Pump Spectral Bandwidth, Birefringence, and Entanglement in Type-II Parametric Down Conversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erenso, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The twin photons produced by a type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion are well know as a potential source of photons for quantum teleportation due to the strong entanglement in polarization. This strong entanglement in polarization, however, depends on the spectral composition of the pump photon and the nature of optical isotropy of the crystal. By exact numerical calculation of the concurrence, we have shown that how pump photons spectral width and the birefringence nature of the crystal directly affect the degree of polarization entanglement of the twin photons.

  1. Far-Infrared Spectral Observations of the Galaxy by COBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reach, W.T.; Dwek, E.; Fixsen, D.J.; Hewagama, T.; Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A.; Banday, A.J.; Bennett, C.L.; Cheng, E.S.; Eplee Jr., R.E.,; Leisawi tz, D.; Lubin, P.M.; Read, S.M.; Rosen, L.P.; Shuman, F.G.D.; Smoot, G.F.; Sodroski, T.J.; Wright, E.L.

    1994-10-27

    We derive Galactic continuum spectra from 5-96 cm(-1) fromCOBE/FIRAS observations. The spectra are dominated by warm dust emission,which may be fitted with a single temperature in the range 16-21 K (fornu(2) emissivity) along each line of sight. Dust heated by the attenuatedradiation field in molecular clouds gives rise tointermediate-temperature (10-14 K) emission in the inner Galaxy only. Awidespread, very cold component (4-7 K) with optical depth that isspatially correlated with the warm component is also detected. The coldcomponent is unlikely to be due to very cold dust shielded from starlightbecause it is present at high latitude. We consider hypotheses that thecold component is due to enhanced submillimeter emissivity of the dustthat gives rise to the warm component, or that it may be due to verysmall, large, or fractal particles. Lack of substantial power above theemission from warm dust places strong constraints on the amount of coldgas in the Galaxy. The microwave sky brightness due to interstellar dustis dominated by the cold component, and its angular variation could limitour ability to discern primordial fluctuations in the cosmic microwavebackground radiation.

  2. Spectral characteristics of background error covariance and multiscale data assimilation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Zhijin; Cheng, Xiaoping; Gustafson, Jr., William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.

    2016-05-17

    The steady increase of the spatial resolutions of numerical atmospheric and oceanic circulation models has occurred over the past decades. Horizontal grid spacing down to the order of 1 km is now often used to resolve cloud systems in the atmosphere and sub-mesoscale circulation systems in the ocean. These fine resolution models encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, across which dynamical and statistical properties vary. In particular, dynamic flow systems at small scales can be spatially localized and temporarily intermittent. Difficulties of current data assimilation algorithms for such fine resolution models are numerically and theoretically examined. Ourmore » analysis shows that the background error correlation length scale is larger than 75 km for streamfunctions and is larger than 25 km for water vapor mixing ratios, even for a 2-km resolution model. A theoretical analysis suggests that such correlation length scales prevent the currently used data assimilation schemes from constraining spatial scales smaller than 150 km for streamfunctions and 50 km for water vapor mixing ratios. Moreover, our results highlight the need to fundamentally modify currently used data assimilation algorithms for assimilating high-resolution observations into the aforementioned fine resolution models. Lastly, within the framework of four-dimensional variational data assimilation, a multiscale methodology based on scale decomposition is suggested and challenges are discussed.« less

  3. High Pressure Sensing and Dynamics Using High Speed Fiber Bragg Grating Interrogation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Lalone, B. M.; Marshall, B. R.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G. D.; Udd, E.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  4. City of Irving utilizes high resolution multispectral imagery for NPDES compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monday, H.M.; Urban, J.S.; Mulawa, D.; Benkelman, C.A.

    1994-04-01

    A case history of using high resolution multispectral imagery is described. A statistical clustering method was applied to identify the primary spectral signatures present within the image data. This was for the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).

  5. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST GALAXIES. II. SPECTRAL SIGNATURES OF LYMAN CONTINUUM LEAKAGE FROM GALAXIES IN THE REIONIZATION EPOCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zackrisson, Erik; Jensen, Hannes; Inoue, Akio K.

    2013-11-01

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape (f{sub esc}) from z ?> 6 galaxies is an important parameter for assessing the role of these objects in the reionization of the universe, but the opacity of the intergalactic medium precludes a direct measurement of f{sub esc} for individual galaxies at these epochs. We argue that since f{sub esc} regulates the impact of nebular emission on the spectra of galaxies, it should nonetheless be possible to indirectly probe f{sub esc} well into the reionization epoch. As a first step, we demonstrate that by combining measurements of the rest-frame UV slope ? with the equivalent width of the H? emission line, galaxies with very high Lyman continuum escape fractions (f{sub esc} ? 0.5) should be identifiable up to z ? 9 through spectroscopy with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). By targeting strongly lensed galaxies behind low-redshift galaxy clusters, JWST spectra of sufficiently good quality can be obtained for M{sub 1500} ?< 16.0 galaxies at z ? 7 and for M{sub 1500} ?< 17.5 galaxies at z ? 9. Dust-obscured star formation may complicate the analysis, but supporting observations with ALMA or the planned SPICA mission may provide useful constraints on this effect.

  6. Chromatic-aberration diagnostic based on a spectrally resolved lateral-shearing interferometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bahk, Seung -Whan; Dorrer, Christopher; Roides, Rick G.; Bromage, Jake

    2016-03-18

    Here, a simple diagnostic characterizing one-dimensional chromatic aberrations in a broadband beam is introduced. A Ronchi grating placed in front of a spectrometer entrance slit provides spectrally coupled spatial phase information. The radial-group delay of a refractive system and the pulse-front delay of a wedged glass plate have been characterized accurately in a demonstration experiment.

  7. Systems and methods for selective detection and imaging in coherent Raman microscopy by spectral excitation shaping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Freudiger, Christian; Min, Wei

    2016-03-15

    A microscopy imaging system is disclosed that includes a light source system, a spectral shaper, a modulator system, an optics system, an optical detector and a processor. The light source system is for providing a first train of pulses and a second train of pulses. The spectral shaper is for spectrally modifying an optical property of at least some frequency components of the broadband range of frequency components such that the broadband range of frequency components is shaped producing a shaped first train of pulses to specifically probe a spectral feature of interest from a sample, and to reduce information from features that are not of interest from the sample. The modulator system is for modulating a property of at least one of the shaped first train of pulses and the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of a train of pulses of interest transmitted or reflected through the common focal volume. The processor is for detecting a modulation at the modulation frequency of the integrated intensity of substantially all of the optical frequency components of the train of pulses of interest due to the non-linear interaction of the shaped first train of pulses with the second train of pulses as modulated in the common focal volume, and for providing an output signal for a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENCY ON THE SPECTRAL ANISOTROPY OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua; Marsch, Eckart

    2014-03-01

    The relation between the intermittency and the anisotropy of the power spectrum in the solar wind turbulence is studied by applying the wavelet technique to the magnetic field and flow velocity data measured by the WIND spacecraft. It is found that when the intermittency is removed from the turbulence, the spectral indices of the power spectra of the field and velocity turn out to be independent of the angle ?{sub RB} between the direction of the local scale-dependent background magnetic field and the heliocentric direction. The spectral index becomes 1.63 0.02 for magnetic field fluctuations and 1.56 0.02 for velocity fluctuations. These results may suggest that the recently found spectral anisotropy of solar wind power spectra in the inertial range could result from turbulence intermittency. As a consequence, a new concept is here proposed of an intermittency-associated sub-range of the inertial domain adjacent to the dissipation range. Since spectral anisotropy was previously explained as evidence for the presence of a ''critical balance'' type turbulent cascade, and also for the existence of kinetic Alfvn waves, this new finding may stimulate fresh thoughts on how to analyze and interpret solar wind turbulence and the associated heating.

  9. Deconvolving X-ray spectral variability components in the Seyfert 1.5 NGC 3227

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvalo, P.; Markowitz, A.

    2014-03-10

    We present the variability analysis of a 100 ks XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1.5 active galaxy, NGC 3227. The observation found NGC 3227 in a period where its hard power-law component displayed remarkably little long-term variability. This lucky event allows us to clearly observe a soft spectral component undergoing a large-amplitude but slow flux variation. Using combined spectral and timing analysis, we isolate two independent variable continuum components and characterize their behavior as a function of timescale. Rapid and coherent variations throughout the 0.2-10 keV band reveal a spectrally hard (photon index ? ? 1.7-1.8) power law, dominating the observed variability on timescales of 30 ks and shorter. Another component produces coherent fluctuations in the 0.2-2 keV range and is much softer (? ? 3); it dominates the observed variability on timescales greater than 30 ks. Both components are viewed through the same absorbers identified in the time-averaged spectrum. The combined spectral and timing analysis breaks the degeneracy between models for the soft excess: it is consistent with a power-law or thermal Comptonized component but not with a blackbody or an ionized reflection component. We demonstrate that the rapid variability in NGC 3227 is intrinsic to continuum-emitting components and is not an effect of variable absorption.

  10. Anisotropic determination and correction for ultrasonic flaw detection by spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Laszlo; Von Cook, K.; Simpson, Jr., William A.; Lewis, D. Kent

    1978-01-01

    The anisotropic nature of a material is determined by measuring the velocity of an ultrasonic longitudinal wave and a pair of perpendicular ultrasonic shear waves through a sample of the material each at a plurality of different angles in three planes orthogonal to each other. The determined anisotropic nature is used as a correction factor in a spectral analyzing system of flaw determination.

  11. SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE 2010 SEPTEMBER GAMMA-RAY FLARE FROM THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Trois, A.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Striani, E.; Caraveo, P.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Ferrari, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Pilia, M.

    2011-05-10

    Strong gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula have been recently discovered by AGILE and confirmed by Fermi-LAT. We study here the spectral evolution in the gamma-ray energy range above 50 MeV of the 2010 September flare that was simultaneously detected by AGILE and Fermi-LAT. We revisit the AGILE spectral data and present an emission model based on rapid (within 1 day) acceleration followed by synchrotron cooling. We show that this model successfully explains both the published AGILE and Fermi-LAT spectral data showing a rapid rise and a decay within 2 and 3 days. Our analysis constrains the acceleration timescale and mechanism, the properties of the particle distribution function, and the local magnetic field. The combination of very rapid acceleration, emission well above 100 MeV, and the spectral evolution consistent with synchrotron cooling contradicts the idealized scenario predicting an exponential cutoff at photon energies above 100 MeV. We also consider a variation of our model based on even shorter acceleration and decay timescales, which can be consistent with the published averaged properties.

  12. Documenting the Effectiveness of Cosorption of Airborne Contaminants by a Field-Installed Active Desiccant System: Final Report - Phase 2D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J

    2003-01-23

    The final report for Phase 1 of this research effort (ORNL/SUB/94-SV004/1) concluded that a significant market opportunity would exist for active desiccant systems if it could be demonstrated that they can remove a significant proportion of common airborne contaminants while simultaneously performing the primary function of dehumidifying a stream of outdoor air or recirculated building air. If the engineering community begins to follow the intent of ASHRAE Standard 62, now part of all major building codes, the outdoor air in many major cities may need to be pre-cleaned before it is introduced into occupied spaces. Common air contaminant cosorption capability would provide a solution to three important aspects of the ASHRAE 62-89 standard that have yet to be effectively addressed by heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment manufacturers: (1) The ASHRAE standard defines acceptable outdoor air quality. If the outdoor air contains unacceptable levels of certain common outdoor air contaminants (e.g., sulfur dioxide, ozone), then the standard requires that these contaminants be removed from the outdoor air stream to reach compliance with the acceptable outdoor air quality guidelines. (2) Some engineers prefer to apply a filtration or prescriptive approach rather than a ventilation approach to solving indoor air quality problems. The ASHRAE standard recognizes this approach provided that the filtration technology exists to remove the gaseous contaminants encountered. The performance of current gaseous filtration technologies is not well documented, and they can be costly to maintain because the life of the filter is limited and the cost is high. Moreover, it is not easy to determine when the filters need changing. In such applications, an additional advantage provided by the active desiccant system would be that the same piece of equipment could control space humidity and provide filtration, even during unoccupied periods, if the active desiccant system

  13. Herschel observations of extraordinary sources: Analysis of the HIFI 1.2 THz wide spectral survey toward orion KL. I. method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Neill, Justin L.; Favre, Ccile; Schilke, Peter; Lis, Dariusz C.; Emprechtinger, Martin; Phillips, Thomas G.; Bell, Tom A.; Cernicharo, Jos; Esplugues, Gisela B.; Blake, Geoffrey; Kleshcheva, Maria; Gupta, Harshal; Pearson, John; Lord, Steven; Marcelino, Nuria; McGuire, Brett A.; Plume, Rene; Van der Tak, Floris; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a broadband spectral line survey of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL), one of the most chemically rich regions in the Galaxy, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This survey spans a frequency range from 480 to 1907 GHz at a resolution of 1.1 MHz. These observations thus encompass the largest spectral coverage ever obtained toward this high-mass star-forming region in the submillimeter with high spectral resolution and include frequencies >1 THz, where the Earth's atmosphere prevents observations from the ground. In all, we detect emission from 39 molecules (79 isotopologues). Combining this data set with ground-based millimeter spectroscopy obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, we model the molecular emission from the millimeter to the far-IR using the XCLASS program, which assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Several molecules are also modeled with the MADEX non-LTE code. Because of the wide frequency coverage, our models are constrained by transitions over an unprecedented range in excitation energy. A reduced ?{sup 2} analysis indicates that models for most species reproduce the observed emission well. In particular, most complex organics are well fit by LTE implying gas densities are high (>10{sup 6} cm{sup 3}) and excitation temperatures and column densities are well constrained. Molecular abundances are computed using H{sub 2} column densities also derived from the HIFI survey. The distribution of rotation temperatures, T {sub rot}, for molecules detected toward the hot core is significantly wider than the compact ridge, plateau, and extended ridge T {sub rot} distributions, indicating the hot core has the most complex thermal structure.

  14. Lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, A. Yu. Babichev, A. V.; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Nikitina, E. V.; Tchernycheva, M.; Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-11-15

    The lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping are demonstrated. The quantum-cascade laser heterostructure is grown by molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Despite the relatively short laser cavity length and high level of external loss the laser shows the lasing in the temperature range of 80–220 K. The threshold current density below 4 kA/cm{sup 2} at 220 K with the characteristic temperature T{sub 0} = 123 K was demonstrated.

  15. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakama, M.; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.; Shikino, O.; Nakayama, S.

    2014-06-15

    Radioactive fission product {sup 131}I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m{sup -3} in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust and those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m{sup -3}) variation of stable cesium ({sup 133}Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.

  16. Simultaneous Observations of PKS 2155--304 with H.E.S.S., Fermi, RXTE and ATOM: Spectral Energy Distributions and Variability in a Low State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.G.; Anton, G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A.R.; Becherini, Y.; Behera, B.; Bernlohr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bochow, A.; Borrel, V.; Brion, E.; Brucker, J.; Brun, P.; Buhler, R.; Bulik, T.; Busching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Chadwick, P.M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R.C.G.; /more authors..

    2009-05-07

    We report on the first simultaneous observations that cover the optical, X-ray, and high-energy gamma-ray bands of the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304. The gamma-ray bands were observed for 11 days, between 2008 August 25 and 2008 September 6 (MJD 54704-54715), jointly with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov array, providing the first simultaneous MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution (SED) with the new generation of {gamma}-ray telescopes. The ATOM telescope and the RXTE and Swift observatories provided optical and X-ray coverage of the low-energy component over the same time period. The object was close to the lowest archival X-ray and very high energy (VHE; >100 GeV) state, whereas the optical flux was much higher. The light curves show relatively little ({approx}30%) variability overall when compared to past flaring episodes, but we find a clear optical/VHE correlation and evidence for a correlation of the X-rays with the high-energy spectral index. Contrary to previous observations in the flaring state, we do not find any correlation between the X-ray and VHE components. Although synchrotron self-Compton models are often invoked to explain the SEDs of BL Lac objects, the most common versions of these models are at odds with the correlated variability we find in the various bands for PKS 2155-304.

  17. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf

  18. Facile synthesis, spectral properties and formation mechanism of sulfur nanorods in PEG-200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Xin-yuan; Li, Li-yun; Zheng, Pu-sheng; Zheng, Wen-jie; Bai, Yan; Cheng, Tian-feng; Liu, Jie

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Homogeneous rod-like structure of sulfur with a typical diameter of about 80 nm and an average aspect ratio of about 68 was obtained. The sulfur nanoparticles could self-assemble from spherical particles to nanorods in PEG-200. During the self-assembling process, the absorption band showed a red shift which was due to the production of nanorods. Highlights: ? A novel, facile and greener method to synthesize sulfur nanorods by the solubilizing and templating effect of PEG-200 was reported. ? S{sup 0} nanoparticles could self assemble in PEG-200 and finally form monodisperse and homogeneous rod-like structure with an average diameter of about 80 nm, the length ca. 600 nm. ? The absorption band showed a red shift and the RRS intensity enhanced continuously during the self-assembling process. ? PEG-200 induced the oriented attachment of sulfur nanoparticles by the terminal hydroxyl groups. -- Abstract: The synthesis of nano-sulfur sol by dissolving sublimed sulfur in a green solvent-PEG-200 was studied. Homogeneous rod-like structure of sulfur with a typical diameter of about 80 nm and an average aspect ratio of 68 was obtained. The structure, morphology, size, and stability of the products were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The spectral properties of the products were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UVvis) absorption and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy (RRS). The results showed that the spherical sulfur nanoparticles could self-assemble into nanorods in PEG-200. During the self-assembling process, the absorption band showed a red shift and the RRS intensity enhanced continuously. There was physical cross-linking between PEG and sulfur nanoparticles. PEG-200 induced the oriented attachment of sulfur nanoparticles by the terminal

  19. Phase I characterization of the HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter media used in the airborne activity confinement system at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novick, V.J.; Higgins, P.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to characterize the HEPA filter media material. This work consisted of two major tasks. First, the pressure drop characteristics of the HEPA filter material were measured as a function of the aerosol mass loading. Particle size effects were studied by using three different particle size distributions to load the filter material. The second task was to determine the filtration efficiency spectrum for solid particles as a function of particle diameter. The filtration efficiency was measured at two different media velocities, one corresponding to the equivalent flow rate under normal operating conditions, the other corresponding to the minimum equivalent flow rate expected through the filter compartments. These tests were conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory between September 1988 and February 1989. 20 refs., 31 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Introduction Airborne Tritium Tritides

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 33rd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Aiken, South Carolina on April 22-24, 2014.

  1. Airborne particulate discriminator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creek, Kathryn Louise; Castro, Alonso; Gray, Perry Clayton

    2009-08-11

    A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

  2. Spectral Induced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... SIP response at frequencies between 0.11000 Hz using a NI-4461 dynamic signal analyzer. ... C. H. van Der Weijden, 2005, Surface chemistry of disordered mackinawite (FeS): ...

  3. Spectral Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-11-01

    SPEX enables the user to interactively create, display, compare, and analyze spectra (in particular gamma-ray spectra). It includes features from the INEEL GAUSS software series and the ORNL DAMM program. Input data is spectrum histograms, energy calibration, peakwidth calibrationb, and peak energy listgs. Output data includes new spectra created from projections, postscript for printing current view, summary log, gaussian fit log, exported energy calibratgion, exported peak lists and banana gates.

  4. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  5. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  6. Final Report - High-Order Spectral Volume Method for the Navier-Stokes Equations On Unstructured Tetrahedral Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z J

    2012-12-06

    The overriding objective for this project is to develop an efficient and accurate method for capturing strong discontinuities and fine smooth flow structures of disparate length scales with unstructured grids, and demonstrate its potentials for problems relevant to DOE. More specifically, we plan to achieve the following objectives: 1. Extend the SV method to three dimensions, and develop a fourth-order accurate SV scheme for tetrahedral grids. Optimize the SV partition by minimizing a form of the Lebesgue constant. Verify the order of accuracy using the scalar conservation laws with an analytical solution; 2. Extend the SV method to Navier-Stokes equations for the simulation of viscous flow problems. Two promising approaches to compute the viscous fluxes will be tested and analyzed; 3. Parallelize the 3D viscous SV flow solver using domain decomposition and message passing. Optimize the cache performance of the flow solver by designing data structures minimizing data access times; 4. Demonstrate the SV method with a wide range of flow problems including both discontinuities and complex smooth structures. The objectives remain the same as those outlines in the original proposal. We anticipate no technical obstacles in meeting these objectives.

  7. Structural, spectral-luminescent, and lasing properties of nanostructured Tm : CaF{sub 2} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryabochkina, P A; Lyapin, A A; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Fedorov, Pavel P; Ushakov, S N; Kruglova, M V; Sakharov, N V; Garibin, E A; Gusev, P E; Krutov, M A

    2012-09-30

    The structure and the spectral-luminescent properties of CaF{sub 2} - TmF{sub 3} fluoride ceramics and single crystals are studied. AFM investigations revealed a layered nanostructure of grains, which was not observed in reference samples of single crystals. It is found that the spectral-luminescent properties of CaF{sub 2} - TmF{sub 3} ceramics and single crystals are similar. Lasing at the {sup 3}F{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition of Tm{sup 3+} ions in CaF{sub 2} - TmF{sub 3} ceramics (wavelength 1898 nm) under diode pimping is obtained for the first time. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Spectral light separator based on deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bykalp, Yasin; Catrysse, Peter B. Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-07-07

    We propose to funnel, select, and collect light spectrally by exploiting the unique properties of deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film. In our approach, each aperture has an electromagnetic cross section that is much larger than its physical size while the frequency of the collected light is controlled by its height through the Fabry-Prot resonance mechanism. The electromagnetic crosstalk between apertures remains low despite physical separations in the deep-subwavelength range. The resulting device enables an extremely efficient, subwavelength way to decompose light into its spectral components without the loss of photons and spatial coregistration errors. As a specific example, we show a subwavelength-size structure with three deep-subwavelength slits in a metallic film designed to operate in the mid-wave infrared range between 3 and 5.5??m.

  9. Front Surface Spectral Control Development for TPV Energy Conversion (a Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TD Rahmlow, Jr; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; PM Fourspring; DM DePoy

    2004-12-09

    This paper discusses the introduction to the potential of alternative materials that provide higher temperature stability than current materials. The outline of this report is: (1) Review briefly the importance of spectral control; (2) Provide current results; (3) Introduce the temperature stability issue; (4) Describe the requirements for alternate materials and (5) Present alternative materials. The conclusions of this report are: (1) Antimony selenide has achieved the highest spectral efficiency to date; (2) Several materials expected to have higher temperature stability have been shown to be viable; (3) So far, with limited development, the performance of the these materials is lower than Antimony selenide; and (4) Additional development will be required to achieve similar or higher performance.

  10. Spectral selective radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of target materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2014-08-11

    The radio frequency emissions scanned over broad spectral range (30 MHz–1 GHz) from single shot nanosecond (7 ns) and picosecond (30 ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of different target materials (atmospheric air, aluminum, and copper) are presented. The dominant emissions from ns-LIB, compared to those from the ps-LIB, indicate the presence and importance of atomic and molecular clusters in the plasma. The dynamics of laser pulse-matter interaction and the properties of the target materials were found to play an important role in determining the plasma parameters which subsequently determine the emissions. Thus, with a particular laser and target material, the emissions were observed to be spectral selective. The radiation detection capability was observed to be relatively higher, when the polarization of the input laser and the antenna is same.

  11. Use of metal organic fluors for spectral discrimination of neutrons and gammas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Doty, F. Patrick; Feng, Patrick L.

    2010-09-01

    A new method for spectral shape discrimination (SSD) of fast neutrons and gamma rays has been investigated. Gammas interfere with neutron detection, making efficient discrimination necessary for practical applications. Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in liquid organic scintillators is currently the most effective means of gamma rejection. The hazardous liquids, restrictions on volume, and the need for fast timing are drawbacks to traditional PSD scintillators. In this project we investigated harvesting excited triplet states to increase scintillation yield and provide distinct spectral signatures for gammas and neutrons. Our novel approach relies on metal-organic phosphors to convert a portion of the energy normally lost to the scintillation process into useful luminescence with sub-microsecond lifetimes. The approach enables independent control over delayed luminescence wavelength, intensity, and timing for the first time. We demonstrated that organic scintillators, including plastics, nanoporous framework materials, and oil-based liquids can be engineered for both PSD and SSD.

  12. TEMPORAL SPECTRAL SHIFT AND POLARIZATION OF A BAND-SPLITTING SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Guohui; Chen, Yao; Lv, Maoshui; Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-10-01

    In many type II solar radio bursts, the fundamental and/or the harmonic branches of the bursts can split into two almost parallel bands with similar spectral shapes and frequency drifts. However, the mechanisms accounting for this intriguing phenomenon remain elusive. In this study, we report a special band-splitting type II event in which spectral features appear systematically earlier on the upper band (with higher frequencies) than on the lower band (with lower frequencies) by several seconds. Furthermore, the emissions carried by the splitting band are moderately polarized with the left-hand polarized signals stronger than the right-hand ones. The polarization degree varies in a range of 0.3 to 0.6. These novel observational findings provide important constraints on the underlying physical mechanisms of band-splitting of type II radio bursts.

  13. AFREET: HUMAN-INSPIRED SPATIO-SPECTRAL FEATURE CONSTRUCTION FOR IMAGE CLASSIFICATION WITH SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. PERKINS; N. HARVEY

    2001-02-01

    The authors examine the task of pixel-by-pixel classification of the multispectral and grayscale images typically found in remote-sensing and medical applications. Simple machine learning techniques have long been applied to remote-sensed image classification, but almost always using purely spectral information about each pixel. Humans can often outperform these systems, and make extensive use of spatial context to make classification decisions. They present AFREET: an SVM-based learning system which attempts to automatically construct and refine spatio-spectral features in a somewhat human-inspired fashion. Comparisons with traditionally used machine learning techniques show that AFREET achieves significantly higher performance. The use of spatial context is particularly useful for medical imagery, where multispectral images are still rare.

  14. Sandia uses a few spectral measurements to enhance PV performance models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uses a few spectral measurements to enhance PV performance models - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy

  15. Astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer for broadband spectral simultaneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue Qingsheng

    2011-04-01

    A low-cost, broadband, astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner arrangement with a fixed plane grating is proposed. A wedge cylindrical lens is used to correct astigmatism over a broadband spectral range. The principle and method of astigmatism correction are described in detail. We compare the performance of this modified Czerny-Turner arrangement with that of the traditional Czerny-Turner arrangement by using a practical Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer example.

  16. Aberration-corrected Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer with a wide spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue Qingsheng; Wang Shurong; Lu Fengqin

    2009-01-01

    A modified asymmetrical Czerny-Turner arrangement with a fixed plane grating is proposed to correct aberrations over a wide spectral region by analysis of the dependence of aberration correction for different wavelengths. The principle and method of aberration correction are described in detail. We compare the performance of this modified Czerny-Turner arrangement with that of the existing Czerny-Turner arrangement by using a practical Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer example.

  17. DISPERSION ANALYSIS OF RADIATION/THERMAL FRONTS WITH FULL RESOLVED SPECTRAL OPACITY VARIATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. AUER; R. LOWRIE

    2000-12-01

    The radiation transport and linearized thermal energy equations have been analyzed to find the temporal dependence of the component modes in a radiation/thermal front. The fully resolved spectral variation of the opacity as a function of energy, as well as the exact time and angular dependence, is treated in this work. As we are able to study arbitrarily complicated opacity spectra, we stress the importance of the new results as a check on the effect of using opacity averages.

  18. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Donald Thomas University of Hawaii Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology Research and Development/Geophysics Project Officer: Mark Ziegenbein Total Project Funding: $ $1,106,271 April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research Statement of the Problem * Surface exploration

  19. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

  20. Cloud Droplet Spectral Shape Sheds New Light on Aerosol- Cloud-Interaction Regimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Droplet Spectral Shape Sheds New Light on Aerosol- Cloud-Interaction Regimes For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Despite decades of research, aerosol indirect effects remain among the most uncertain climate forcings according to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. Furthermore, climate models tend to overestimate the cooling of aerosol indirect effects and are more susceptible than

  1. Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, C. M. Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B. A.

    2014-11-15

    Sources of 5–12 keV thermal Heα x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17–50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from “cold” Kα emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., “High-resolution 17–75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments,” Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., “Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV,” Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of Kα:Heα in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  2. High harmonic phase in molecular nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, Brian K.

    2009-10-17

    Electronic structure in atoms and molecules modulates the amplitude and phase of high harmonic generation (HHG). We report measurements of the high harmonic spectral amplitude and phase in N{sub 2}. The phase is measured interferometrically by beating the N{sub 2} harmonics with those of an Ar reference oscillator in a gas mixture. A rapid phase shift of 0.2{pi} is observed in the vicinity of the HHG spectral minimum, where a shift of {pi} had been presumed [J. Itatani et al., Nature 432, 867 (2004)]. We compare the phase measurements to a simulation of the HHG recombination step in N{sub 2} that is based on a simple interference model. The results of the simulation suggest that modifications beyond the simple interference model are needed to explain HHG spectra in molecules.

  3. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Letzring, S.A.

    1993-11-16

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse. 10 figures.

  4. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  5. DIAGNOSTICS ON THE SOURCE PROPERTIES OF A TYPE II RADIO BURST WITH SPECTRAL BUMPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Song, H. Q.; Feng, X. S.; Guo, Fan

    2013-04-10

    In recent studies, we proposed that source properties of type II radio bursts can be inferred through a causal relationship between the special shape of the type II dynamic spectrum (e.g., bump or break) and simultaneous extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white light imaging observations (e.g., CME-shock crossing streamer structures). As a further extension of these studies, in this paper we examine the coronal mass ejection (CME) event on 2007 December 31 associated with a multiple type II radio burst. We identify the presence of two spectral bump features on the observed dynamic spectrum. By combining observational analyses of the radio spectral observations and the EUV-white light imaging data, we conclude that the two spectral bumps result from a CME-shock propagating across dense streamers on the southern and northern sides of the CME. It is inferred that the corresponding two type II emissions originate separately from the two CME-shock flanks where the shock geometries are likely quasi-perpendicular or oblique. Since the emission lanes are bumped as a whole within a relatively short time, it suggests that the type II radio bursts with bumps of this study are emitted from spatially confined sources (with a projected lateral dimension smaller than 0.05-0.1 R{sub Sun} at a fundamental frequency level of 20-30 MHz).

  6. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse.

  7. DOE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V.

    2013-02-28

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR has been to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking. The primary application is to show improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Examples include scenarios where the target vehicle is obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or where the target is engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II resulted in the completion of a software tool suitable for evaluation and testing of advanced tracking concepts.

  8. Spectral calculation of thermal performance of solar pond and comparison of the results with the experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X.Y.; Kanayama, Kimio; Baba, Hiromu

    1999-07-01

    This paper deals with the method and the result of the spectroscopic calculation on the heat balance of a salt-gradient solar pond under the conditions of spectral solar radiation. Furthermore, the reflection of the rays incident upon the surface of the pond water, the refraction of the rays within the salt water layer and the diffusion of the salt in the pond water are considered. On the other hand, in order to make clear the mechanism of heat collection and heat storage of a solar pond, the authors conducted the indoor experiment and numerical analysis on a small scale model of salt-gradient solar pond with 2 m{sup 2} surface area and 1.6 m depth, under incident ray from a Xe-lamp solar simulator. According to above experimental analysis, the authors made a simulation model of thermal performance for a solar pond and calculated the heat balance in it. They found that the simulation calculations correspond well to the experimental result, so that their thermal simulation model might be correct. Furthermore, the authors also did the thermal calculation by changing the incident ray from Xe-lamp into natural ray, and found that the temperature distributions were notably different due to spectral characteristics of the incident ray. Therefore, the spectroscopic consideration for thermal performance of any solar pond is necessary to obtain a correct solution under the spectral incidence of special distributions.

  9. H{sub ?} SPECTRAL DIVERSITY OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: CORRELATIONS WITH PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutirrez, Claudia P.; Hamuy, Mario; Gonzlez-Gaitn, Santiago [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gastn [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia I.; Phillips, Mark M.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); McCarthy, Patrick [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Suntzeff, Nicholas B., E-mail: cgutierr@das.uchile.cl [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the H{sub ?} profiles of hydrogen-rich Type II supernovae. A total of 52 Type II supernovae having well-sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the H{sub ?} P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of the emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher H{sub ?} velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light, and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of Type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters that influence the morphologies of H{sub ?} profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction.

  10. CORRELATED SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF LATE-TIME AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2012-12-20

    The cannonball (CB) model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts that the asymptotic behavior of the spectral energy density of GRB afterglows is a power law in time and in frequency, and the difference between the temporal and spectral power-law indices, {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X}, is restricted to the values 0, 1/2, and 1. Here we report the distributions of the values {alpha}{sub X} and {beta}{sub X}, and their difference for a sample of 315 Swift GRBs. This sample includes all Swift GRBs that were detected before 2012 August 1, whose X-ray afterglow extended well beyond 1 day and the estimated error in {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} was {<=}0.25. The values of {alpha}{sub X} were extracted from the CB-model fits to the entire light curves of their X-ray afterglow while the spectral index was extracted by the Swift team from the time-integrated X-ray afterglow of these GRBs. We found that the distribution of the difference {alpha}{sub X} - {beta}{sub X} for these 315 Swift GRBs has three narrow peaks around 0, 1/2, and 1 whose widths are consistent with being due to the measurement errors, in agreement with the CB-model prediction.

  11. Comparison of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity measurement techniques using wavelength-tunable lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahtee, Ville; Brown, Steven W.; Larason, Thomas C.; Lykke, Keith R.; Ikonen, Erkki; Noorma, Mart

    2007-07-10

    Independent methods for measuring the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of detectors have been compared between the calibration facilities at two national metrology institutes, the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), Finland, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The emphasis is on the comparison of two different techniques for generating a uniform irradiance at a reference plane using wavelength-tunable lasers. At TKK's Laser Scanning Facility (LSF) the irradiance is generated by raster scanning a single collimated laser beam, while at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS), lasers are introduced into integrating spheres to generate a uniform irradiance at a reference plane. The laser-based irradiance responsivity results are compared to a traditional lamp-monochromator-based irradiance responsivity calibration obtained at the NIST Spectral Comparator Facility (SCF). A narrowband filter radiometer with a24 nm bandwidth and an effective band-center wavelength of 801 nm was used as the artifact. The results of the comparison between the different facilities, reported for the first time in the near-infrared wavelength range, demonstrate agreement at the uncertainty level of less than 0.1%. This result has significant implications in radiation thermometry and in photometry as well as in radiometry.

  12. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  13. Mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.; Roswell, R.L.; Stevens, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    A mathematical model was constructed for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included. 25 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. A Vorticity-Divergence Global Semi-Lagrangian Spectral Model for the Shallow Water Equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, JB

    2001-11-30

    The shallow water equations modeling flow on a sphere are useful for the development and testing of numerical algorithms for atmospheric climate and weather models. A new formulation of the shallow water equations is derived which exhibits an advective form for the vorticity and divergence. This form is particularly well suited for numerical computations using a semi-Lagrangian spectral discretization. A set of test problems, standard for the shallow water equations on a sphere, are solved and results compared with an Eulerian spectral model. The semi-Lagrangian transport method was introduced into atmospheric modeling by Robert, Henderson, and Turnbull. A formulation based on a three time level integration scheme in conjunction with a finite difference spatial discretization was studied by Ritchie. Two time level grid point schemes were derived by Bates et al. Staniforth and Cote survey developments of the application of semi-Lagrangian transport (SLT) methods for shallow water models and for numerical weather prediction. The spectral (or spherical harmonic transform) method when combined with a SLT method is particularly effective because it allows for long time steps avoiding the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction of Eulerian methods, while retaining accurate (spectral) treatment of the spatial derivatives. A semi-implicit, semi-Lagrangian formulation with spectral spatial discretization is very effective because the Helmholz problem arising from the semi-implicit time integration can be solved cheaply in the course of the spherical harmonic transform. The combination of spectral, semi-Lagrangian transport with a semi-implicit time integration schemes was first proposed by Ritchie. A advective formulation using vorticity and divergence was introduced by Williamson and Olson. They introduce the vorticity and divergence after the application of the semi-Lagrangian discretization. The semi-Lagrangian formulation of Williamson and Olson and Bates et al. has

  15. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  16. A spectral mimetic least-squares method for the Stokes equations with no-slip boundary condition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerritsma, Marc; Bochev, Pavel

    2016-03-22

    Formulation of locally conservative least-squares finite element methods (LSFEMs) for the Stokes equations with the no-slip boundary condition has been a long standing problem. Existing LSFEMs that yield exactly divergence free velocities require non-standard boundary conditions (Bochev and Gunzburger, 2009 [3]), while methods that admit the no-slip condition satisfy the incompressibility equation only approximately (Bochev and Gunzburger, 2009 [4, Chapter 7]). Here we address this problem by proving a new non-standard stability bound for the velocity–vorticity–pressure Stokes system augmented with a no-slip boundary condition. This bound gives rise to a norm-equivalent least-squares functional in which the velocity can be approximatedmore » by div-conforming finite element spaces, thereby enabling a locally-conservative approximations of this variable. Here, we also provide a practical realization of the new LSFEM using high-order spectral mimetic finite element spaces (Kreeft et al., 2011) and report several numerical tests, which confirm its mimetic properties.« less

  17. Raman spectral studies of aqueous zinc bromide solutions to 300/sup 0/C at pressures of 9 MPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.M.; Crerar, D.A.; Irish, D.E.

    1988-08-01

    A Raman spectral study of 14 solutions of varying bromide to zinc ratios was conducted up to 300/sup 0/C and 9 MPa. The tetra-, tri-, di- as well as the mono-bromozinc complexes were identified. The signal from the ZnBr/sup +/ complex increased in intensity as temperature increased, for solutions of low bromide- to-zinc ratios. The ZnBr/sub 4//sup 2 -/ species was favored at higher Br/Zn ratios, and higher temperatures favored the formation of the species ZnBr/sub 2/ and ZnBr/sup +/ at the expense of ZnBr/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and ZnBr/sub 3//sup -/. Although solvated water is probably present in these zinc-bromo complexes, they found no evidence of O-Zn vibrations other than for Zn(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/. However, spectra of successive dilutions of solutions with high bromide to zinc ratios show a relative change in species populations thereby suggesting that water activity plays a decisive role in complex formation. For the first time trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (HTFMS) has been used as an internal standard in Raman spectroscopy. This permitted quantitative measurement of stepwise stability constants.

  18. Bandwidth optimization of femtosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by pump/Stokes spectral focusing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2014-07-01

    A simple spectral focusing scheme for bandwidth optimization of gas-phase rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra is presented. The method is useful when femtosecond pump/Stokes preparation of the Raman coherence is utilized. The approach is of practical utility when working with laser pulses that are not strictly transform limited, or when windows or other sources of pulse chirp may be present in the experiment. A delay between the femtosecond preparation pulses is introduced to shift the maximum Raman preparation away from zero frequency and toward the Stokes or anti-Stokes side of the spectrum with no loss in total preparation bandwidth. Shifts of 100 cm-1 or more are attainable and allow for enhanced detection of high-energy (150-300 cm-1) rotational Raman transitions at near transform-limited optimum sensitivity. A simple theoretical treatment for the case of identical pump and Stokes pulses with linear frequency chirp is presented. The approach is then demonstrated experimentally for typical levels of transform-limited laser performance obtained our laboratory with nonresonant CARS in argon and Raman-resonant spectra from a lean H2/air flat flame.

  19. Bandwidth optimization of femtosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by pump/Stokes spectral focusing.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2014-07-01

    A simple spectral focusing scheme for bandwidth optimization of gas-phase rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra is presented. The method is useful when femtosecond pump/Stokes preparation of the Raman coherence is utilized. The approach is of practical utility when working with laser pulses that are not strictly transform limited, or when windows or other sources of pulse chirp may be present in the experiment. A delay between the femtosecond preparation pulses is introduced to shift the maximum Raman preparation away from zero frequency and toward the Stokes or anti-Stokes side of the spectrum with no loss in total preparationmore » bandwidth. Shifts of 100 cm-1 or more are attainable and allow for enhanced detection of high-energy (150-300 cm-1) rotational Raman transitions at near transform-limited optimum sensitivity. A simple theoretical treatment for the case of identical pump and Stokes pulses with linear frequency chirp is presented. The approach is then demonstrated experimentally for typical levels of transform-limited laser performance obtained our laboratory with nonresonant CARS in argon and Raman-resonant spectra from a lean H2/air flat flame.« less

  20. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, C. A.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.; Vyacheslavov, L.; Sanin, A.

    2015-09-15

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO{sub 2} laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1.

  1. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Belu, Radian; Koracin, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend with increasing elevation, while the turbulence intensity slowly decreased with an increase were the average wind speed. The wind speed and direction weremore » modeled using the Weibull and the von Mises distribution functions. The correlations show a strong coherence between the wind speed and direction with slowly decreasing amplitude of the multiday periodicity with increasing lag periods. The spectral analysis shows significant annual periodicity with similar characteristics at all locations. The relatively high correlations between the towers and small range of the computed turbulence intensity indicate that wind variability is dominated by the regional synoptic processes. Knowledge and information about daily, seasonal, and annual wind periodicities are very important for wind energy resource assessment, wind power plant operation, management, and grid integration.« less

  2. Ground-level spectral distribution of solar direct-normal irradiance and marine aerosol attenuation coefficients at Reunion Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaxelaire, P.; Leveau, J.; Baldy, S. ); Menguy, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The ground-level spectral distribution of direct solar irradiance at Reunion Island was measured for six bands covering the spectrum of solar radiation. The measurements, distributed over one year, were made under clear sky conditions with a pyrheliometer (Eppley, NIP) and six large pass-band flat filters. Good stability of spectral irradiances as a function of solar height allows us to propose approximate relationships which significantly characterize the irradiance into each spectral band. Measurements at Reunion vary significantly from data obtained with the same apparatus in a northern hemisphere continental area (Lyon). The determination of aerosol attenuation coefficients, for different spectral bands, allows the establish of a mean curve, for these coefficients as a function of wavelength, characteristic for marine aerosols.

  3. Features of the spectral dependences of transmittance of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted lutetium phthalocyanine molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Tikhonov, E. V.; Dronov, M. A.; Belogorokhova, L. I.; Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2011-11-15

    Vibronic properties of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted phthalocyanine lutetium diphthalocyanine molecules are studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that substitution of several carbon atoms in initial phthalocyanine (Pc) ligands with {sup 13}C isotope atoms causes a spectral shift in the main absorption lines attributed to benzene, isoindol, and peripheral C-H groups. A comparison of spectral characteristics showed that the shift can vary from 3 to 1 cm{sup -1}.

  4. Spectral and spatial characteristics of x-ray film detectors in the wavelength range 20--150 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedin, D.A.; Fedorchuk, R.V.; Koshevoi, M.O.; Lukjantsev, I.V.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.; Gullikson, E.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations of spectral sensitivity, contrast coefficient, and spatial resolution of widely used x-ray films have been undertaken at the P.N. Lebedev Institute. A description of experimental methodologies and results are presented. These studies were carried out using synchrotron radiation in the range of 20--150 {angstrom}. Spectral sensitivity and contrast coefficient dependencies on wavelength for Kodak 10106, DEF, RAR2490, and TPF films and spatial resolution for Kodak 10106 and RAR2490 films are presented and discussed.

  5. Surface Spectral Albedo Intensive Operational Period at the ARM SGP Site in august 2002: Results, Analysis, and Future Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectral Albedo Intensive Operational Period at the ARM SGP Site in August 2002: Results, Analysis, and Future Plans A. P. Trishchenko and Y. Luo Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada M. C. Cribb and Z. Li University of Maryland College Park, Maryland K. Hamm University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction A surface spectral albedo Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site was conducted during August

  6. On the construction of a new stellar classification template library for the LAMOST spectral analysis pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Peng; Luo, Ali; Li, Yinbi; Tu, Liangping; Wang, Fengfei; Zhang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Hou, Wen; Kong, Xiao; Wu, Yue; Zuo, Fang; Yi, Zhenping; Zhao, Yongheng; Chen, Jianjun; Du, Bing; Guo, Yanxin; Ren, Juanjuan; Pan, Jingchang; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Jie E-mail: weipeng@nao.cas.cn; and others

    2014-05-01

    The LAMOST spectral analysis pipeline, called the 1D pipeline, aims to classify and measure the spectra observed in the LAMOST survey. Through this pipeline, the observed stellar spectra are classified into different subclasses by matching with template spectra. Consequently, the performance of the stellar classification greatly depends on the quality of the template spectra. In this paper, we construct a new LAMOST stellar spectral classification template library, which is supposed to improve the precision and credibility of the present LAMOST stellar classification. About one million spectra are selected from LAMOST Data Release One to construct the new stellar templates, and they are gathered in 233 groups by two criteria: (1) pseudo g r colors obtained by convolving the LAMOST spectra with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz filter response curve, and (2) the stellar subclass given by the LAMOST pipeline. In each group, the template spectra are constructed using three steps. (1) Outliers are excluded using the Local Outlier Probabilities algorithm, and then the principal component analysis method is applied to the remaining spectra of each group. About 5% of the one million spectra are ruled out as outliers. (2) All remaining spectra are reconstructed using the first principal components of each group. (3) The weighted average spectrum is used as the template spectrum in each group. Using the previous 3 steps, we initially obtain 216 stellar template spectra. We visually inspect all template spectra, and 29 spectra are abandoned due to low spectral quality. Furthermore, the MK classification for the remaining 187 template spectra is manually determined by comparing with 3 template libraries. Meanwhile, 10 template spectra whose subclass is difficult to determine are abandoned. Finally, we obtain a new template library containing 183 LAMOST template spectra with 61 different MK classes by combining it with the current library.

  7. Synthesis and spectral study of new azo dye and its iron complexes derived from 2-naphthol and 2-amino-3-hydroxypyridine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G, Vidya V. Sadasivan, V.; Meena, S. S. Bhatt, Pramod

    2014-10-15

    An azodye C{sub 5}H{sub 12}N{sub 3}O{sub 2} [LH] is synthesised by coupling diazotised 2-amino-3-hydroxy pyridine with 2-naphthol in ice cold condition. The Fe(II)and Fe(III) complexes were prepared by mixing ethanol solution of metal salt and azodye in 1:2 molar ratio. The dye and metal complexes are structurally characterised by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements and spectral techniques like IR, UV-Vis, and Mössbauer analysis. Analytical data suggests the stoichiometry as [FeL{sub 2}Cl(H{sub 2}O)] for Fe(III) complex and [FeL{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] for Fe(II) complex. The IR spectral data suggests that [L{sup −}] is acting as a uninegative bidentate ligand. A high spin octahedral geometry is tentatively proposed for both the complexes with respect to the above studies.

  8. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 ?m diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 100 ?m pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy

  9. Spectral brilliance of parametric X-rays at the FAST facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Tanaji; Seiss, Todd

    2015-06-22

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays in the new photoinjector at the FAST (Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. These experiments will be conducted in addition to channeling X-ray radiation experiments. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays. We discuss the theoretical model and present detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance under different conditions. Furthermore, we report on expected results with parametric X-rays generated while under channeling conditions.

  10. Parameter assignments for spectral gamma-ray borehole calibration models. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heistand, B.E.; Novak, E.F.

    1984-04-01

    This report documents the work performed to determine the newly assigned concentrations for the spectral gamma-ray borehole calibration models. Thirty-two models, maintained by the US Department of Energy, are included in this study, and are grouped into eight sets of four models each. The eight sets are located at sites across the United States, and are used to calibrate logging instruments. The assignments are based on in-situ logging data to ensure self-consistency in the assigned concentrations, and on laboratory assays of concrete samples from each model to provide traceability to the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) standards. 13 references, 7 figures, 17 tables.

  11. Method and apparatus for simultaneously measuring a plurality of spectral wavelengths present in electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N.; Martin, John C.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method simultaneously measures a plurality of spectral wavelengths present in electromagnetic radiation. A modulatable birefringent optical element is employed to divide a polarized light beam into two components, thereby producing a phase difference in two resulting light beams such that the two beams can be made to interfere with one another when recombined, the interference pattern providing the wavelength information required for the analysis of the incident light. The interferometer thus created performs in a similar manner to a Michelson interferometer, but with no moving parts, and with a resolution dependent on the degree of phase shift introduced by the modulator.

  12. Spectral properties of laser-accelerated mid-Z MeV/u ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegelich, B.M.; Albright, B.; Cobble, J.; Gautier, C.; Johnson, R.; Letzring, S.; Fernandez, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Blazevic, A.; Brambrink, E.; Geissel, M.; Roth, M. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Cowan, T.; Kemp, A. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Gauthier, J.C. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), UMR 5107 CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, CEA, Universite Bordeaux 1, 33405 Talence (France); Habs, D.; Schramm, U.; Schreiber, J. [Ludwig-Maximilian Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Karsch, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, 85748 Garching (Germany)] (and others)

    2005-05-15

    Collimated jets of beryllium, carbon, oxygen, fluorine, and palladium ions with >1 MeV/nucleon energies are observed from the rear surface of thin foils irradiated with laser intensities of up to 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The normally dominant proton acceleration is suppressed when the target is subjected to Joule heating to remove hydrogen-bearing contaminant. This inhibits screening effects and permits effective energy transfer to and acceleration of heavier ion species. The influence of remnant protons on the spectral shape of the next highest charge-to-mass ratio species is shown. Particle-in-cell simulations confirming the experimental findings are presented.

  13. FESTR: Finite-Element Spectral Transfer of Radiation spectroscopic modeling and analysis code

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hakel, Peter

    2016-06-16

    Here we report on the development of a new spectral postprocessor of hydrodynamic simulations of hot, dense plasmas. Based on given time histories of one-, two-, and three-dimensional spatial distributions of materials, and their local temperature and density conditions, spectroscopically-resolved signals are computed. The effects of radiation emission and absorption by the plasma on the emergent spectra are simultaneously taken into account. This program can also be used independently of hydrodynamic calculations to analyze available experimental data with the goal of inferring plasma conditions.

  14. Diffraction spectral filter for use in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Bernardez, Luis J.

    2002-01-01

    A condenser system for generating a beam of radiation includes a source of radiation light that generates a continuous spectrum of radiation light; a condenser comprising one or more first optical elements for collecting radiation from the source of radiation light and for generating a beam of radiation; and a diffractive spectral filter for separating first radiation light having a particular wavelength from the continuous spectrum of radiation light. Cooling devices can be employed to remove heat generated. The condenser system can be used with a ringfield camera in projection lithography.

  15. G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H

    2005-06-20

    Redox state is one of the most important factors that affect color of glasses. Recently, optical properties and redox state of the glass melts have been studied at TNO by A.J. Faber [1]. Spectral measurements up to 4 {micro}m into the infrared region were taken. The focus of similar studies [2] was on the redox state of iron. In glassware production, the control of color is mainly dependent upon the experience of the operators. When the color varies due to changes in processing conditions, batching or furnace contamination, usually little can be done but to scrap the entire batch. This can result in significant down time and waste of energy to melt and refine the glass. For small glass companies, detecting out-of-specification color variation early in the melting process means savings on labor and energy costs. In larger color glass operations, early detection may provide means to correct or save the batch. Monitoring the redox state of the glass melt can be used to effectively control the quality of glass products. An in-line redox sensor has been tested in industrial environment [3]. Thermal emission spectroscopy is a non-contact, real-time sensing technique. The collection of a spectrum takes only a few seconds or less. This may allow on-line analysis of the glass melt or hot glass products. For a specific glass product, a series of spectra with different processing parameters could be collected and analyzed. The sensing system would be able to detect a deviation from the normal conditions and signal the operator a change has occurred. The primary goal of this GPLUS effort is to find a practical solution for color monitoring. In this project, we proposed to conduct initial experiments of spectral characterization of colored glasses from the designated glass industry members of the Society for Glass Science and Practices. The work plan contained three stages: (1) Obtain glass samples and use spectroscopy analysis at ORNL to measure basic spectral characteristics

  16. Method and system for calibrating acquired spectra for use in spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Blackwood, Larry G.

    2010-09-14

    A method for calibrating acquired spectra for use in spectral analysis includes performing Gaussian peak fitting to spectra acquired by a plurality of NaI detectors to define peak regions. A Na and annihilation doublet may be located among the peak regions. A predetermined energy level may be applied to one of the peaks in the doublet and a location of a hydrogen peak may be predicted based on the location of at least one of the peaks of the doublet. Control systems for calibrating spectra are also disclosed.

  17. N HIGH-EXPLOSIVE FIELD TESTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Nuclear Agency, 26 September 1979. 28. Green, W.E., Airborne Sampling and Analysis of ... Slade, D.H., Ed, Meteorology and Atomic Energy 1968, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Air ...

  18. Measuring the 3D clustering of undetected galaxies through cross correlation of their cumulative flux fluctuations from multiple spectral lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visbal, Eli; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2010-11-01

    We discuss a method for detecting the emission from high redshift galaxies by cross correlating flux fluctuations from multiple spectral lines. If one can fit and subtract away the continuum emission with a smooth function of frequency, the remaining signal contains fluctuations of flux with frequency and angle from line emitting galaxies. Over a particular small range of observed frequencies, these fluctuations will originate from sources corresponding to a series of different redshifts, one for each emission line. It is possible to statistically isolate the fluctuations at a particular redshift by cross correlating emission originating from the same redshift, but in different emission lines. This technique will allow detection of clustering fluctuations from the faintest galaxies which individually cannot be detected, but which contribute substantially to the total signal due to their large numbers. We describe these fluctuations quantitatively through the line cross power spectrum. As an example of a particular application of this technique, we calculate the signal-to-noise ratio for a measurement of the cross power spectrum of the OI(63 μm) and OIII(52 μm) fine structure lines with the proposed Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We find that the cross power spectrum can be measured beyond a redshift of z = 8. Such observations could constrain the evolution of the metallicity, bias, and duty cycle of faint galaxies at high redshifts and may also be sensitive to the reionization history through its effect on the minimum mass of galaxies. As another example of this technique, we calculate the signal-to-noise ratio for the cross power spectrum of CO line emission measured with a large ground based telescope like the Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT) and 21-cm radiation originating from hydrogen in galaxies after reionization with an interferometer similar in scale to the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), but optimized for post

  19. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  20. Generation of Stationary Non-Gaussian Time Histories with a Specified Cross-spectral Density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, David O.

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews several methods for the generation of stationary realizations of sampled time histories with non-Gaussian distributions and introduces a new method which can be used to control the cross-spectral density matrix and the probability density functions (pdfs) of the multiple input problem. Discussed first are two methods for the specialized case of matching the auto (power) spectrum, the skewness, and kurtosis using generalized shot noise and using polynomial functions. It is then shown that the skewness and kurtosis can also be controlled by the phase of a complex frequency domain description of the random process. The general casemore » of matching a target probability density function using a zero memory nonlinear (ZMNL) function is then covered. Next methods for generating vectors of random variables with a specified covariance matrix for a class of spherically invariant random vectors (SIRV) are discussed. Finally the general case of matching the cross-spectral density matrix of a vector of inputs with non-Gaussian marginal distributions is presented.« less