National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for air-volume system economizer

  1. Promising Technology: Variable-Air-Volume Ventilation System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Variable-air-volume (VAV) ventilation saves energy compared to a constant-air-volume (CAV) ventilation system, mainly by reducing energy consumption associated with fans.

  2. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  3. Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September ...

  4. Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE and the Potential advantages...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE and the Potential advantages of Fast Ignition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE ...

  5. NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL's Economic Analysis and power system modeling integrates data from device deployment and programmatic research into deployment and scenario models to quantify the economic and societal benefits of developing cost-competitive marine and hydrokinetic systems. It also identifies policy mechanisms, market designs, and supply chain needs to support various deployment scenarios, provide information and training to potential members of

  6. Economic benefits of an economizer system: Energy savings and reduced sick leave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2004-02-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, D.C. with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The annual financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modeling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  7. Heat recovery and the economizer for HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anantapantula, V.S. . Alco Controls Div.); Sauer, H.J. Jr. )

    1994-11-01

    This articles examines why a combined heat reclaim/economizer system with priority to heat reclaim operation is most likely to result in the least annual total HVAC energy. PC-based, hour-by-hour simulation programs evaluate annual HVAC energy requirements when using combined operation of heat reclaim and economizer cycle, while giving priority to operation of either one. These simulation programs also enable the design engineer to select the most viable heat reclaim and/or economizer system for any given type of HVAC system serving the building internal load level, building geographical location and other building/system variables.

  8. NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL has a long history of successful research to understand and improve the cost of renewable energy technologies, their possible deployment scenarios, and the economic impacts of this deployment. As a research laboratory, NREL is a neutral third party and can provide an unbiased perspective of methodologies and approaches used to estimate direct and indirect economic impacts of offshore renewable energy projects. Deployment and

  9. Solar central receiver systems comparative economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eicker, P J

    1980-04-01

    Several major conceptual design studies of solar central receiver systems and components have been completed in the last year. The results of these studies are used to compare the projected cost of electric power generation using central receiver systems with that of more conventional power generation. The cost estimate for a molten salt central receiver system is given. Levelized busbar energy cost is shown as a function of annual capacity factor indicating the fraction of the cost due to each of the subsystems. The estimated levelized busbar energy cost for a central receiver (70 to 90 mills per kilowatt hour) is compared with the levelized busbar energy cost for a new coal fired Rankine cycle plant. Sensitivities to the initial cost of coal and the delta fuel escalation are shown. (WHK)

  10. Economic penalties of problems and errors in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, K.; Sparkes, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experience with a large number of installed solar energy systems in the HUD Solar Program has shown that a variety of problems and design/installation errors have occurred in many solar systems, sometimes resulting in substantial additional costs for repair and/or replacement. In this paper, the effect of problems and errors on the economics of solar energy systems is examined. A method is outlined for doing this in terms of selected economic indicators. The method is illustrated by a simple example of a residential solar DHW system. An example of an installed, instrumented solar energy system in the HUD Solar Program is then discussed. Detailed results are given for the effects of the problems and errors on the cash flow, cost of delivered heat, discounted payback period, and life-cycle cost of the solar energy system. Conclusions are drawn regarding the most suitable economic indicators for showing the effects of problems and errors in solar energy systems. A method is outlined for deciding on the maximum justifiable expenditure for maintenance on a solar energy system with problems or errors.

  11. Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-01-24

    This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

  12. Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

  13. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  14. Effect of Component Failures on Economics of Distributed Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, Barry T.

    2012-02-02

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for both. Some societal benefits associated with financial benefits to the utility of having a distributed generation capacity that is not fossil-fuel based have been included into the economic models. Also included and quantified in the models are several benefits to society more generally: job creation and some estimates of benefits from avoiding greenhouse emissions. PV system failures result in a lowering of the economic values of a grid-connected system, but this turned out to be a surprisingly small effect on the overall economics. The most significant benefit noted resulted from including the societal benefits accrued to the utility. This provided a marked increase in the valuations of the array and made the overall value proposition a financially attractive one, in that net present values exceeded installation costs. These results indicate that the Department of Energy and state regulatory bodies should consider focusing on societal benefits that create economic value for the utility, confirm these quantitative values, and work to have them accepted by the utilities and reflected in the rate structures for power obtained from grid-connected arrays. Understanding and applying the economic benefits evident in this work can significantly improve the business case for grid-connected PV installations. This work also indicates that the societal benefits to the population are real and defensible, but not nearly as easy to justify in a business case as are the benefits that accrue directly to the utility.

  15. Actionable Capability for Social and Economic Systems (ACSES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Steven J; Brecke, Peter K; Carmichael, Theodore D; Eichelberger, Christopher N; Ganguly, Auroop R; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Jiao, Yu; Khouja, Moutaz J; McLean, Angus L; Middleton, Erin J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Saric, Amar; Sun, Min; Whitmeyer, Joseph M; Gilman, Paul; O'Maonaigh, Heather C

    2008-05-01

    The foundation of the Actionable Capability for Social and Economic Systems (ACSES) project is a useful regional-scale social-simulation system. This report is organized into five chapters that describe insights that were gained concerning the five key feasibility questions pertaining to such a system: (1) Should such a simulation system exist, would the current state of data sets or collectible data sets be adequate to support such a system? (2) By comparing different agent-based simulation systems, is it feasible to compare simulation systems and select one appropriate for a given application with agents behaving according to modern social theory rather than ad hoc rule sets? (3) Provided that a selected simulation system for a region of interest could be constructed, can the simulation system be updated with new and changing conditions so that the universe of potential outcomes are constrained by events on the ground as they evolve? (4) As these results are constrained by evolving events on the ground, is it feasible to still generate surprise and emerging behavior to suggest outcomes from novel courses of action? (5) As these systems may for the first time require large numbers (hundreds of millions) of agents operating with complexities demanded of modern social theories, can results still be generated within actionable decision cycles?

  16. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipment investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.

  17. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipment investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.

  18. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipmentmore » investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.« less

  19. Interconnection economics of small power systems -- A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloethe, W.G.; Thakar, H.C. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Kim, L.C. [Sarawak Electricity Supply Corp., Kuching (Malaysia); Samin, S. [PT PLN Persero, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1996-11-01

    The advantages of interconnecting large electric power systems has been almost universally accepted in those parts of North America that are not geographically isolated. However, interconnecting power systems can result in significant economic advantages, even in those parts of the world where power systems are small and widely separated. This paper examines two small, isolated power systems on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. The Malaysian State of Srawak lies on the north coast of Borneo. With an area of 123,156 square km (47,555 square mi.) and population of 1.7 million, it is the largest, but most sparsely populated, state in the Federation of Malaysia. Its neighbor to the south is the Indonesian Province of West Kalimantan. A study examining the feasibility of interconnecting these two power systems was undertaken in 1994 as a part of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) initiative to interconnect the power systems in the region. The ASEAN region is characterized by rapidly growing economies and rapid load growth.

  20. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Peretz, Fred J; Qualls, A L

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience with advanced supercritical-water power cycles. The current design activities build upon a series of small-scale efforts over the past decade to evaluate and describe the features and technology variants of FHRs. Key prior concept evaluation reports include the SmAHTR preconceptual design report,1 the PB-AHTR preconceptual design, and the series of early phase AHTR evaluations performed from 2004 to 2006. This report provides a power plant-focused description of the current state of the AHTR. The report includes descriptions and sizes of the major heat transport and power generation components. Component configuration and sizing are based upon early phase AHTR plant thermal hydraulic models. The report also provides a top-down AHTR comparative economic analysis. A commercially available advanced supercritical water-based power cycle was selected as the baseline AHTR power generation cycle both due to its superior performance and to enable more realistic economic analysis. The AHTR system design, however, has several remaining gaps, and the plant cost estimates consequently have substantial remaining uncertainty. For example, the enriched lithium required for the primary coolant cannot currently be produced on the required scale at reasonable cost, and the necessary core structural ceramics do not currently exist in a nuclear power qualified form. The report begins with an overview of the current, early phase, design of the AHTR plant. Only a limited amount of information is included about the core and vessel as the core design and refueling options are the subject of a companion report. The general layout of an AHTR system and site showing the relationship of the major facilities is then provided. Next is a comparative evaluation of the AHTR anticipated performance and costs. Finally, the major system design efforts necessary to bring the AHTR design to a pre-conceptual level are then presented.

  1. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.

    2009-11-16

    Presentation about Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model used to analyze the economics and performance of combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) systems.

  2. Combined solar and internal load effects on selection of heat reclaim-economizer HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, H.J. Jr.; Howell, R.H.; Wang, Z. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The concern for energy conservation has led to the development and use of heat recovery systems which reclaim the building internal heat before it is discarded in the exhaust air. On the other hand, economizer cycles have been widely used for many years in a variety of types of HVAC systems. Economizer cycles are widely accepted as a means to reduce operating time for chilling equipment when cool outside air is available. It has been suggested that heat reclaim systems should not be used in conjunction with an HVAC system which incorporates an economizer cycle because the economizer operation would result in heat being exhausted which might have been recovered. Others suggest that the economizer cycle can be used economically in a heat recovery system if properly controlled to maintain an overall building heat balance. This study looks at potential energy savings of such combined systems with particular emphasis on the effects of the solar load (amount of glass) and the internal load level (lights, people, appliances, etc.). For systems without thermal storage, annual energy savings of up to 60 percent are predicted with the use of heat reclaim systems in conjunction with economizers when the heat reclaim has priority. These results demonstrate the necessity of complete engineering evaluations if proper selection and operation of combined heat recovery and economizer cycles are to be obtained. This paper includes the basic methodology for making such evaluations.

  3. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  4. Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, D.M.

    1983-03-22

    This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle. 18 figs.

  5. Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jardine, Douglas M.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle.

  6. Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE and the Potential advantages of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fast Ignition (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE and the Potential advantages of Fast Ignition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE and the Potential advantages of Fast Ignition An updated systems code for a laser-driven IFE power plant has been developed as part of the U.S. High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program. The cost of electricity (COE) is calculated using standardized methods for fusion

  7. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis Presented at the Renewable Hydrogen Workshop, Nov. 16, 2009, in Palm Springs, CA PDF icon renewable_hydrogen_workshop_nov16_steward.pdf More Documents & Publications Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model Project Reports for Tulalip Tribes - 2003

  8. Economic Systems Modeling for Laser IFE and the Potential advantages...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The cost of electricity (COE) is calculated using standardized methods for fusion reactor studies. In this paper, we describe the systems code and present results for capital cost ...

  9. Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2003-06-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, DC with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modelling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  10. Choosing among alternative recycling systems: An economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stedge, G.D. . Dept. of Agricultural and Applied Economics); Halstead, J.M. . Dept. of Resource Economics and Development)

    1994-03-01

    Due to the increasing concern over the disposal of municipal solid waste, municipalities have begun searching for ways to recycle a larger percentage to their waste stream at a reasonable cost. This report examines bag-based recycling. This system, due to its efficient collection and separation method, and its convenience, should be able to capture a larger share of the waste stream at a lower cost per metric ton than conventional recycling programs. Using a case study approach, a bag-based program is compared with a curbside-sort program and a drop-off program. Using time/motion analysis, a garbage composition study, a household survey, and the recording of set-out rates of a sample of dwelling units, the efficiency of the three programs was defined and estimated. The efficiency of the bag-based system was also estimated for three areas with distinct household densities. Although the curbside-sort program was found to divert a larger percentage of the residential waste stream than the bag-based system, the cost per metric ton of the bag-based system is so much lower that it clearly is the most efficient of the three programs. The drop-off program had a very low cost per metric ton; however, if failed to divert the minimum acceptable level of the waste stream. The bag-based system proved to be more efficient in areas with higher household densities.

  11. Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.; Gregurech, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

  12. An advanced economizer controller for dual-duct air-handling systems -- with a case application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M.; Claridge, D.E.; Park, B.Y.

    1997-12-31

    A heating penalty is expected when economizers are applied to dual-duct air-handling systems. The heating penalty can be even higher than the cooling savings when the hot airflow is higher than the cold airflow. To avoid the excessive heating penalty, advanced economizers are developed in this paper. The application of the advanced economizer has resulted in savings of $7,000/yr in one 95,000-ft{sup 2} (8,800-m{sup 2}) school building since 1993. The impacts of cold and hot deck settings on the energy consumption are also discussed.

  13. Renewable Energy Positioning System: Energy Positioning: Control and Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    GENI Project: The University of Washington and the University of Michigan are developing an integrated system to match well-positioned energy storage facilities with precise control technologies so the electric grid can more easily include energy from renewable power sources like wind and solar. Because renewable energy sources provide intermittent power, it is difficult for the grid to efficiently allocate those resources without developing solutions to store their energy for later use. The two universities are working with utilities, regulators, and the private sector to position renewable energy storage facilities in locations that optimize their ability to provide and transmit electricity where and when it is needed most. Expanding the network of transmission lines is prohibitively expensive, so combining well-placed storage facilities with robust control systems to efficiently route their power will save consumers money and enable the widespread use of safe, renewable sources of power.

  14. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

  15. Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

    2012-12-01

    To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

  16. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  17. Performance and economics of a spray-dryer FGD system used with high-sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D.; Farber, P.S.

    1986-04-01

    Flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems based on spray drying to offer advantages over wet lime/limestone systems in a number of areas: low energy consumption, low capital cost, high reliability, and production of a dry waste that is easily handled and disposed of. Uncertainties regarding the performance and economics of such systems for control of high-sulfur-coal emissions have slowed adoption of the technology in the Midwest and East. This paper summarizes 4 years, operating and research experience with that system and describes the current research program, which includes an indepth characterization of an industrial scale dry scrubber with 3.5% sulfur coal.

  18. The Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California Ryan Wiser, Andrew Mills, Galen Barbose & William Golove State Energy Advisory Board Meeting Berkeley, CA August 14, 2007 The Electricity Markets and Policy Group Conducts research and provides assistance to policy makers on issues related to: Ÿ Energy Efficiency and Demand Response (Chuck Goldman) - Tracking industry trends - Program administration, planning, implementation, and evaluation -

  19. Economic Analysis of a Brackish Water Photovoltaic-Operated (BWRO-PV) Desalination System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Karaghouli, A.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    2010-10-01

    The photovoltaic (PV)-powered reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination system is considered one of the most promising technologies in producing fresh water from both brackish and sea water, especially for small systems located in remote areas. We analyze the economic viability of a small PV-operated RO system with a capacity of 5 m3/day used to desalinate brackish water of 4000 ppm total dissolve solids, which is proposed to be installed in a remote area of the Babylon governorate in the middle of Iraq; this area possesses excellent insolation throughout the year. Our analysis predicts very good economic and environmental benefits of using this system. The lowest cost of fresh water achieved from using this system is US $3.98/ m3, which is very reasonable compared with the water cost reported by small-sized desalination plants installed in rural areas in other parts of the world. Our analysis shows that using this small system will prevent the release annually of 8,170 kg of CO2, 20.2 kg of CO, 2.23 kg of CH, 1.52 kg of particulate matter, 16.41 kg of SO2, and 180 kg of NOx.

  20. Use of Time-Aggregated Data in Economic Screening Analyses of Combined Heat and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson II, Carl Randy

    2004-09-01

    Combined heat and power (CHP) projects (also known as cogeneration projects) usually undergo a series of assessments and viability checks before any commitment is made. A screening analysis, with electrical and thermal loads characterized on an annual basis, may be performed initially to quickly determine the economic viability of the proposed project. Screening analyses using time-aggregated data do not reflect several critical cost influences, however. Seasonal and diurnal variations in electrical and thermal loads, as well as time-of-use utility pricing structures, can have a dramatic impact on the economics. A more accurate economic assessment requires additional detailed data on electrical and thermal demand (e.g., hourly load data), which may not be readily available for the specific facility under study. Recent developments in CHP evaluation tools, however, can generate the needed hourly data through the use of historical data libraries and building simulation. This article utilizes model-generated hourly load data for four potential CHP applications and compares the calculated cost savings of a CHP system when evaluated on a time-aggregated (i.e., annual) basis to the savings when evaluated on an hour-by-hour basis. It is observed that the simple, aggregated analysis forecasts much greater savings (i.e., greater economic viability) than the more detailed hourly analysis. The findings confirm that the simpler tool produces results with a much more optimistic outlook, which, if taken by itself, might lead to erroneous project decisions. The more rigorous approach, being more reflective of actual requirements and conditions, presents a more accurate economic comparison of the alternatives, which, in turn, leads to better decision risk management.

  1. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  2. Performance and Economic Analysis of Distributed Power Electronics in Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Granata, J.; Gonzalez, S.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed electronics like micro-inverters and DC-DC converters can help recover mismatch and shading losses in photovoltaic (PV) systems. Under partially shaded conditions, the use of distributed electronics can recover between 15-40% of annual performance loss or more, depending on the system configuration and type of device used. Additional value-added features may also increase the benefit of using per-panel distributed electronics, including increased safety, reduced system design constraints and added monitoring and diagnostics. The economics of these devices will also become more favorable as production volume increases, and integration within the solar panel?s junction box reduces part count and installation time. Some potential liabilities of per-panel devices include increased PV system cost, additional points of failure, and an insertion loss that may or may not offset performance gains under particular mismatch conditions.

  3. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

    2003-02-01

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

  4. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  5. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  6. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  7. The effects of refueling system operating pressure on LNG and CNG economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corless, A.J.; Barclay, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Natural gas (NG) liquefaction and compression are energy intensive processes which make up a significant portion of the overall delivered price of liquefied NG (LNG) and compressed NG (CNG). Increases in system efficiency and/or process changes which reduce the required amount of work will improve the overall economics of NG as a vehicle fuel. This paper describes a method of reducing the delivered cost of LNG by liquefying the gas above ambient pressures. Higher pressure LNG is desirable because OEM NG engine manufacturers would like NG delivered to the engine intake manifold at elevated pressures to avoid compromising engine performance. Producing LNG at higher pressures reduces the amount of work required for liquefaction but it is only practical when the LNG is liquefied on-site. Using a thermo-economic approach, it is shown that NG fuel costs can be reduced by as much as 10% when producing LNG at higher pressures. A reduction in the delivered cost is also demonstrated for CNG produced on-site from high pressure LNG.

  8. Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M.

    2010-09-15

    Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

  9. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt

    2001-11-01

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuels at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consists of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal at up to 30% on a Btu basis, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing prior art with respect to high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. Activities and results thus far include the following. Several potential alternative fuels have been obtained for evaluation and testing as potential feedstocks, including sewage sludge, used railroad ties, urban wood waste, municipal solid waste, and used waste tires/tire-derived fuel. Only fuels with potential tipping fees were considered; potential energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge has been selected as one of the primary feedstocks for consideration at the Wabash plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary. High-temperature drop-tube furnace tests were conducted to determine if explosive fragmentation of high-moisture sludge droplets could be expected, but showed that these droplets underwent a shrinking and densification process that implies that the sludge will have to be well dispersed when injected into the gasifier. Fuel dispersion nozzles have been obtained for measuring how well the sludge can be dispersed in the second stage of the gasifier. Future work will include leasing a Schwing America pump to test pumping sewage sludge against 400 psig. In addition, sludge dispersion testing will be completed using two different dispersion nozzles to determine their ability to generate sludge particles small enough to be entrained out of the E-Gas entrained-flow gasifier.

  10. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

    2010-10-01

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  11. Economic analysis of solar industrial process heat systems: a methodology to determine annual required revenue and internal rate of return

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, W.C.; Brown, K.C.

    1981-08-11

    To permit an economic evaluation of solar industrial process heat systems, a methodology was developed to determine the annual required revenue and the internal rate of return. First, a format is provided to estimate the solar system's installed cost, annual operating and maintenance expenses, and net annual solar energy delivered to the industrial process. Then an expression is presented that gives the annual required revenue and the price of solar energy. The economic attractiveness of the potential solar investment can be determined by comparing the price of solar energy with the price of fossil fuel, both expressed in levelized terms. This requires calculation of the internal rate of return on the solar investment or, in certain cases, the growth rate of return.

  12. Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

  13. ECONOMIC IMPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECONOMIC IMPACT 2015 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES National Security Sandia's primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable, and can fully support our nation's deterrence policy. NUCLEAR WEAPONS DEFENSE SYSTEMS & ASSESSMENTS We provide technical solutions for global security by engineering and integrating advanced science and technology to help defend and protect the United States. Jill Hruby President and Laboratories Director "Qualified, diverse

  14. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  15. The impact of demand-controlled and economizer ventilation strategies on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandemuehl, M.J.; Braun, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies for constant-air-volume (CAV) systems in commercial buildings. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation, and energy analyses were performed for four typical building types, eight alternative ventilation systems, and twenty US climates. Only single-zone buildings were considered so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates and for buildings that have relatively low internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 20% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger but were strongly dependent upon the building type and occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules and large internal gains (i.e., restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was virtually eliminated by demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates. For both heating and cooling, the savings associated with demand-controlled ventilation are dependent on the fixed minimum ventilation rate of the base case at design conditions.

  16. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  17. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  18. Ecological economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, E.M.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes an engine economizer system adapted to supply an internal combustion engine with a heated air and water vapor mixture. It comprises a containment vessel, the vessel having: water level control means, an engine coolant fluid circuit, an engine lubricant circuit, an elongated air passage, air disbursement means, a water reservoir, air filter means, a vacuum aspiration port, and engine induction means associated with one of the carburetor and intake manifold and adapted to draw in the heated air and water vapor mixture by means of a hose connection to the aspiration port.

  19. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-08-15

    The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

  20. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen-Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2010-06-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  1. Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benemann, J.R.; Oswald, W.J.

    1994-01-15

    This report provides an economic analysis and feasibility study for the utilization by microalgal systems of carbon dioxide generated from coal-fired power plants. The resulting biomass could be a fuel substitute for fossil fuels.

  2. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

    2007-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

  3. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  4. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The emergence of technologies that efficiently convert heat into cooling, such as absorption chillers, has opened up many new opportunities and markets for combined heat and power systems. These...

  5. Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Doris, E.

    2010-06-01

    This analysis uses simulated building data, simulated solar photovoltaic (PV) data, and actual electric utility tariff data from 25 cities to understand better the impacts of different commercial rate structures on the value of solar PV systems. By analyzing and comparing 55 unique rate structures across the United States, this study seeks to identify the rate components that have the greatest effect on the value of PV systems. Understanding the beneficial components of utility tariffs can both assist decision makers in choosing appropriate rate structures and influence the development of rates that favor the deployment of PV systems. Results from this analysis show that a PV system's value decreases with increasing demand charges. Findings also indicate that time-of-use rate structures with peaks coincident with PV production and wide ranges between on- and off-peak prices most benefit the types of buildings and PV systems simulated. By analyzing a broad set of rate structures from across the United States, this analysis provides an insight into the range of impacts that current U.S. rate structures have on PV systems.

  6. Status on the Development of a Modeling and Simulation Framework for the Economic Assessment of Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle; Rabiti, Cristian; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Kim, Jong Suk; Deason, Wesley Ray; Boardman, Richard Doin; Garcia, Humberto E.

    2015-09-01

    An effort to design and build a modeling and simulation framework to assess the economic viability of Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems (NHES) was undertaken in fiscal year 2015 (FY15). The purpose of this report is to document the various tasks associated with the development of such a framework and to provide a status on its progress. Several tasks have been accomplished. First, starting from a simulation strategy, a rigorous mathematical formulation has been achieved in which the economic optimization of a Nuclear Hybrid Energy System is presented as a constrained robust (under uncertainty) optimization problem. Some possible algorithms for the solution of the optimization problem are presented. A variation of the Simultaneous Perturbation Stochastic Approximation algorithm has been implemented in RAVEN and preliminary tests have been performed. The development of the software infrastructure to support the simulation of the whole NHES has also moved forward. The coupling between RAVEN and an implementation of the Modelica language (OpenModelica) has been implemented, migrated under several operating systems and tested using an adapted model of a desalination plant. In particular, this exercise was focused on testing the coupling of the different code systems; testing parallel, computationally expensive simulations on the INL cluster; and providing a proof of concept for the possibility of using surrogate models to represent the different NHES subsystems. Another important step was the porting of the RAVEN code under the Windowsℱ operating system. This accomplishment makes RAVEN compatible with the development environment that is being used for dynamic simulation of NHES components. A very simplified model of a NHES on the electric market has been built in RAVEN to confirm expectations on the analysis capability of RAVEN to provide insight into system economics and to test the capability of RAVEN to identify limit surfaces even for stochastic constraints. This capability will be needed in the future to enforce the stochastic constraints on the electric demand coverage from the NHES. The development team gained experience with many of the tools that are currently envisioned for use in the economic analysis of NHES and completed several important steps. Given the complexity of the project, preference has been given to a structural approach in which several independent efforts have been used to build the cornerstone of the simulation framework. While this is good approach in establishing such a complex framework, it may delay reaching more complete results on the performance of analyzed system configurations. The integration of the previously reported exergy analysis approach was initially proposed as part of this milestone. However, in reality, the exergy-based apportioning of cost will take place only in a second stage of the implementation since it will be used to properly allocate cost among the different NHES subsystems. Therefore, exergy does not appear at the level of the main drivers in the analysis framework; the latter development of the base framework is the focus of this report.

  7. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

  8. Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Development Economic Development Los Alamos is committed to investing and partnering in economic development initiatives and programs that have a positive impact to stimulate business growth that creates jobs and strengthens communities in Northern New Mexico. September 20, 2013 LANS Venture Acceleration Fund (VAF) award enabled Ideum to develop motion recognition software for international release. Jim Spadaccini (R) has tapped into the Lab's economic development programs: VAF, NMSBA,

  9. The technical and economic feasibility of establishing a building system integration laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Drost, M.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1989-09-01

    On December 22, 1987, the US Congress provided funding to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility and conceptual design of a whole building system integration laboratory'' (Title II of Pub. L. 100--202). A whole-building system integration laboratory would be a full-scale experimental facility in which the energy performance interactions of two or more building components, e.g., walls, windows, lighting, could be tested under actual operating conditions. At DOE's request, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted the study with the assistance of a technical review and representing other federal agencies and the academic and private sectors, including professional societies, building component manufacturers, and building research organizations. The results of the feasibility study are presented in this report.

  10. Framework for the Economic Analysis of Hybrid Systems Based on Exergy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cristian Rabiti; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Piyush Sabharwall; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman

    2014-08-01

    Starting from an overview of the dynamic behavior of the electricity market the need of the introduction of energy users that will provide a damping capability to the system is derived as also a qualitative analysis of the impact of uncertainty, both in the demand and supply side, is performed. Then it follows an introduction to the investment analysis methodologies based on the discounting of the cash flow, and then work concludes with the illustration and application of the exergonomic principles to provide a sound methodology for the cost accounting of the plant components to be used in the cash flow analysis.

  11. WASTES-II: Waste System Transportation and Economic Simulation--Release 24: User's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    WASTES models each reactor pool and an at-reactor, out-of-pool (ex-pool) storage facility for each reactor site. Spent fuel transfers between pools can be simulated under various constraints controlled by user input. In addition to simulating each pool and ex-pool facility, WASTES can accommodate up to ten other storage facilities of four different types: federal interim storage (FIS), monitored retrievable storage (MRS), auxiliary plants, and repositories. Considerable flexibility is allowed for the user to specify system configuration and priorities for fuel receipts. In addition, the WASTES computer code simulates very detailed (assembly-specific) movements of spent fuel throughout the waste management system. Spent fuel characteristics that are tracked by WASTES for each movement are: discharge year and month, number of assemblies, weight of uranium (MTU), exposure, original enrichment, and heat generation rate (calculated from the preceding characteristics). Data for the WASTES model is based upon the DOE reactor-specific spent fuel data base, which is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to the spent fuel characteristics, this data includes reactor location, type, transportation access, and historical and projected discharge data on the number of fuel assemblies. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Economic Performance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance ... of greenhouse gas emissions a priority for Federal agencies, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. ...

  13. Economic Competitiveness of U.S. Utility-Scale Photovoltaics Systems in 2015: Regional Cost Modeling of Installed Cost ($/W) and LCOE ($/kWh)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Ran; James, Ted L.; Chung, Donald; Gagne, Douglas; Lopez, Anthony; Dobos, Aron

    2015-06-14

    Utility-scale photovoltaics (PV) system growth is largely driven by the economic metrics of total installed costs and levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), which differ by region. This study details regional cost factors, including environment (wind speed and snow loads), labor costs, material costs, sales taxes, and permitting costs using a new system-level bottom-up cost modeling approach. We use this model to identify regional all-in PV installed costs for fixed-tilt and one-axis tracker systems in the United States with consideration of union and non-union labor costs in 2015. LCOEs using those regional installed costs are then modeled and spatially presented. Finally, we assess the cost reduction opportunities of increasing module conversion efficiencies on PV system costs in order to indicate the possible economic impacts of module technology advancements and help future research and development (R&D) effects in the context of U.S. SunShot targets.

  14. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  15. ECONOMIC DISPATCH

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ECONOMIC DISPATCH OF ELECTRIC GENERATION CAPACITY A REPORT TO CONGRESS AND THE STATES PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 1234 AND 1832 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 United States Department of Energy February 2007 ECONOMIC DISPATCH OF ELECTRIC GENERATION CAPACITY A REPORT TO CONGRESS AND THE STATES PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 1234 AND 1832 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Sections 1234 and 1832 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) 1 direct the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department, or DOE) to: 1) Study

  16. Economics | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACEconomics content top NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics (N-ABLE(tm)) Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics (N-ABLE(tm)) NISAC has developed N-ABLE(tm) to assist federal decision makers in improving the security and resilience of the U.S. economy. N-ABLE(tm) is a large-scale microeconomic simulation tool that models the complex supply-chain, spatial market dynamics, and critical-infrastructure interdependencies of

  17. KINETIC UNDERSTANDING OF THE SYNGAS-TO-DME REACTION SYSTEM AND ITS IMPLICATIONS TO PROCESS AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-12-01

    In a single-step synthesis gas-to-dimethyl ether process, synthesis gas (or syngas, a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO) is converted into dimethyl ether (DME) in a single reactor. The three reactions involved in this process, methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration and water gas shift, form an interesting reaction network. The interplay among these three reactions results in excellent syngas conversion or reactor productivity. A fundamental understanding of this interplay helps to explain many experimental and simulation observations, to identify optimal reaction conditions, and to provide guidelines for process development. The higher syngas conversion or reactor productivity in the syngas-to-DME reaction system, compared to that in the syngas-to-methanol reaction system, is referred to as chemical synergy. This synergy exhibits a strong dependence on the composition of the reactor feed. To demonstrate the extent of this dependence, simulations with adjusted activity for each reaction were performed to reveal the relative rate of each reaction. The results show that the water gas shift reaction is the most rapid, being practically controlled by the equilibrium. Both methanol synthesis and methanol dehydration reactions are kinetically controlled. The kinetics of the dehydration reactions is greater than that of the methanol synthesis reaction in the CO-rich regime. However, the rates of these two reactions come closer as the H{sub 2} concentration in the reactor feed increases. The role of the dehydration reaction is to remove the equilibrium barrier for the methanol synthesis reaction. The role of the water gas shift reaction is more complex; it helps the kinetics of methanol dehydration by keeping the water concentration low, which in turn enhances methanol synthesis. It also readjusts the H{sub 2}:CO ratio in the reactor as the reactions proceed. In the CO-rich regime, the water gas shift reaction supplements the limiting reactant, H{sub 2}, by reacting water with CO. This enhances both the kinetics and thermodynamic driving force of the methanol synthesis reaction. In the H{sub 2}-rich regime, water gas shift consumes the limiting reactant, CO, which harms both the kinetics and thermodynamics of methanol synthesis. An understanding of these complex roles of the methanol dehydration and water gas shift reactions and of their dependence on the syngas composition explains why the synergy is high in the CO-rich regime, but decreases with increasing H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} content in the reactor feed. The methanol equivalent productivity of the syngas-to-DME reactor is also a strong function of the reactor feed. A mathematical approach was developed to understand this dependence. The approach divides a power law type of rate equation into two terms, the kinetic term (the rate of the forward reaction) and the thermodynamics or driving force term (1- approach to equilibrium). The equations for the best feed composition for each term were derived. The approach was developed for the single reaction system, and then extended to the syngas-to-DME reaction system. The equations provide insights into why and how the methanol synthesis in the syngasto-DME system depends on the other two reactions. They can also be used to calculate the best feed composition for a given conversion. The analysis shows that for typical commercial syngas conversion, the optimal H{sub 2}:CO ratio for the LPDME{trademark} reactor is around 1-to-1, in good agreement with the results from the simulation. While the 1-to-1 feed provides a good foundation for some process configurations, it does not match the composition of natural gas-derived syngas, which typically has a H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 2:1 or greater. The process would also produce one CO{sub 2} molecule for every DME product, both a materials utilization and an environmental problem. However, recycling CO{sub 2} to the syngas generation unit can solve all of these problems. Integration schemes with different syngas generation technologies (dry reforming, steam methane reforming and partial oxidation) were developed. The feasibility of these schemes was illustrated by simulations using realistic kinetics, thermodynamics, and commercial conditions. Finally, this report discusses the implications of the kinetic understanding and the resulting process schemes to the process economics. It was recognized that, for the overall process, the cost saving in the synthesis loop due to the reaction synergy is counteracted by the cost addition due to CO{sub 2} formation and the resulting costly separation.

  18. Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of primary energy saving than conventional systems fed by vapour compression chillers and coupled with PV cells. All SAC systems present good figures for primary energy consumption. The best performances are seen in systems with integrated heat pumps and small solar collector areas. The economics of these SAC systems at current equipment costs and energy prices are acceptable. They become more interesting in the case of public incentives of up to 30% of the investment cost (Simple Payback Time from 5 to 10 years) and doubled energy prices. (author)

  19. Fuel economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwierzelewski, V.F.

    1984-06-26

    A fuel economizer device for use with an internal combustion engine fitted with a carburetor is disclosed. The fuel economizer includes a plate member which is mounted between the carburetor and the intake portion of the intake manifold. The plate member further has at least one aperture formed therein. One tube is inserted through the at least one aperture in the plate member. The one tube extends longitudinally in the passage of the intake manifold from the intake portion toward the exit portion thereof. The one tube concentrates the mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor and conveys the mixture of fuel and air to a point adjacent but spaced away from the inlet port of the internal combustion engine.

  20. Establishing Economic Competitiveness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Establishing Economic Competitiveness Energy storage technologies can transform electric systems operation by providing flexibility. This can improve the efficiency of electric system operation. For example, energy storage systems can smooth the otherwise variable production of renewable energy technologies and help shift the peak demand to reduce peak electric prices. Though energy storage technologies can be game-changing grid technology, they must inevitably compete with alternative

  1. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-03-01

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  2. Assessment and economic analysis of the MOD III Stirling-engine driven chiller system. Final report, October 1989-July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moryl, J.

    1990-07-01

    The Stirling engine is an inherently clean and efficient engine. With the requirements for environmentally benign emissions and high energy efficiency, the Stirling engine is an attractive alternative to both internal combustion (IC) engines and electric motors. The study evaluated a Stirling-engine-driven chiller package. Technically, the Stirling engine is a good selection as a compressor drive, with inherently low vibrations, quiet operation, long life, and low maintenance. Exhaust emissions are below the projected 1995 stringent California standards. Economically, the Stirling-engine-driven chiller is a viable alternative to both IV-engine and electric-driven chillers, trading off slightly higher installed cost against lower total operating expenses. The penetration of a small portion of the projected near-term stationary engine market opportunity will provide the volume production basis to achieve competitively priced engines.

  3. Solar Trough Organic Rankine Electricity System (STORES) Stage 1: Power Plant Optimization and Economics; November 2000 -- May 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhu, E.

    2006-03-01

    Report regarding a Stage 1 Study to further develop the concept of the Solar Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Electricity Systems (STORES).

  4. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  5. A resilience assessment framework for infrastructure and economic systems : quantitative and qualitative resilience analysis of petrochemical supply chains to a hurricane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vugrin, Eric D.; Warren, Drake E.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the nation has recognized that critical infrastructure protection should consider not only the prevention of disruptive events, but also the processes that infrastructure systems undergo to maintain functionality following disruptions. This more comprehensive approach has been termed critical infrastructure resilience (CIR). Given the occurrence of a particular disruptive event, the resilience of a system to that event is the system's ability to efficiently reduce both the magnitude and duration of the deviation from targeted system performance levels. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed a comprehensive resilience assessment framework for evaluating the resilience of infrastructure and economic systems. The framework includes a quantitative methodology that measures resilience costs that result from a disruption to infrastructure function. The framework also includes a qualitative analysis methodology that assesses system characteristics that affect resilience in order to provide insight and direction for potential improvements to resilience. This paper describes the resilience assessment framework. This paper further demonstrates the utility of the assessment framework through application to a hypothetical scenario involving the disruption of a petrochemical supply chain by a hurricane.

  6. Development of a Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly Modern Power System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Development of a Secure, Economic and...

  7. Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benemann, J.R.; Oswald, W.J.

    1996-03-21

    There is growing evidence that global warming could become a major global environmental threat during the 21st century. The precautionary principle commands preventive action, at both national and international levels, to minimize this potential threat. Many near-term, relatively inexpensive, mitigation options are available. In addition, long-term research is required to evaluate and develop advanced, possibly more expensive, countermeasures, in the eventuality that they may be required. The utilization of power plant CO{sub 2} and its recycling into fossil fuel substitutes by microalgae cultures could be one such long-term technology. Microalgae production is an expanding industry in the U.S., with three commercial systems (of approximately 10 hectare each) producing nutriceuticals, specifically beta-carotene, extracted from Dunaliella, and Spirulina biomass. Microalgae are also used in wastewater treatment. Currently production costs are high, about $10,000/ton of algal biomass, almost two orders of magnitude higher than acceptable for greenhouse gas mitigation. This report reviews the current state-of-the-art, including algal cultivation and harvesting-processing, and outlines a technique for achieving very high productivities. Costs of CO{sub 2} mitigation with microalgae production of oils ({open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes}) are estimated and future R&D needs outlined.

  8. Final Project Report: Self-Correcting Controls for VAV System Faults Filter/Fan/Coil and VAV Box Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Cort, Katherine A.; Cho, Heejin; Ngo, Hung; Goddard, James K.

    2011-05-01

    This report addresses original research by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the California Institute for Energy and Environment on self-correcting controls for variable-air-volume (VAV) heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems and focuses specifically on air handling and VAV box components of the air side of the system. A complete set of faults for these components was compiled and a fault mode analysis performed to understand the detectable symptoms of the faults and the chain of causation. A set of 26 algorithms was developed to facilitate the automatic correction of these faults in typical commercial VAV systems. These algorithms include training tests that are used during commissioning to develop models of normal system operation, passive diagnostics used to detect the symptoms of faults, proactive diagnostics used to diagnose the cause of a fault, and finally fault correction algorithms. Ten of the twenty six algorithms were implemented in a prototype software package that interfaces with a test bed facility at PNNL's Richland, WA, laboratory. Measurement bias faults were instigated in the supply-air temperature sensor and the supply-air flow meter to test the algorithms developed. The algorithms as implemented in the laboratory software correctly detected, diagnosed and corrected these faults. Finally, an economic and impact assessment was performed for the State of California for deployment of self-correcting controls. Assuming 15% HVAC energy savings and a modeled deployment profile, 3.1-5.8 TBu of energy savings are possible by year 15.

  9. Geothermal District Heating Economics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-12

    GEOCITY is a large-scale simulation model which combines both engineering and economic submodels to systematically calculate the cost of geothermal district heating systems for space heating, hot-water heating, and process heating based upon hydrothermal geothermal resources. The GEOCITY program simulates the entire production, distribution, and waste disposal process for geothermal district heating systems, but does not include the cost of radiators, convectors, or other in-house heating systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating basedmore » on the climate, population, and heat demand of the district; characteristics of the geothermal resource and distance from the distribution center; well-drilling costs; design of the distribution system; tax rates; and financial conditions.« less

  10. Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) Focus Area: Solar Topics: System & Application...

  11. Considerations When Selecting a Condensing Economizer | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Considerations When Selecting a Condensing Economizer Considerations When Selecting a Condensing Economizer This tip sheet lays out considerations when selecting condensing economizers as part of optimized steam systems. STEAM TIP SHEET #26B PDF icon Considerations When Selecting a Condensing Economizer (January 2012) More Documents & Publications Consider Installing a Condensing Economizer Steam System Survey Guide Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry,

  12. RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

    2003-11-01

    In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

  13. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Conversion Pathway: Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons The 2017 Design Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL conducted a campaign to quantify the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from standing in the field or stand to the throat of the biomass conversion process. The goal of this program was to establish the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes, design improvements to the current system, and to mark annual improvements based on higher efficiencies or better designs. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $35/dry ton. This goal was successfully achieved in 2012 by implementing field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. Looking forward to 2017, the programmatic target is to supply biomass to the conversion facilities at a total cost of $80/dry ton and on specification with in-feed requirements. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, abundant, low-cost feedstock. If this goal is not achieved, biofuel plants are destined to be small and/or clustered in select regions of the country that have a lock on low-cost feedstock. To put the 2017 cost target into perspective of past accomplishments of the cellulosic ethanol pathway, the $80 target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all conversion in-feed quality targets. The 2012 $35 programmatic target included only logistics costs with a limited focus on biomass quality

  14. Economic Impact | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Impact Jefferson Lab generates many economic benefits. For the nation, Jefferson Lab generates $679.1 million in economic output and 4,422 jobs. The economic output and related jobs represent the potential loss of gross output and employment that would be felt by the country if the lab suddenly were to vanish. For the Commonwealth of Virginia, Jefferson Lab generates $271.1 million in economic output and 2,200 jobs. For the Hampton Roads area, the lab creates an economic benefit in the

  15. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  16. MTBE Production Economics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production ... End Notes 1. For an analysis of MTBE economics through 1999 refer to: U.S. ...

  17. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  18. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  19. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  20. Conflict Between Economic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The confict between economic growth and environmental protection may not be reconciled via ... Physicists and other scholars from the physical sciences are urgently needed for helping ...

  1. SWAMC Economic Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 27th Annual Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting is a three-day conference covering energy efficiency planning, information on Alaska programs, and more.

  2. Economic Values | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economic Values Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEconomicValues&oldid612356...

  3. Techno-economic Modeling - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techno-economic Modeling October 22, 2015, Accomplishments Building New Battery Systems on the Computer JCESR is applying techno-economic models to project the performance and cost of a wide array of promising new battery systems before they are prototyped. The results from techno-economic modeling establish performance "floors" for discovery science teams looking for new anodes, cathodes, and electrolytes for a ... Read More Techno-economic Modeling October 1, 2015, News Articles

  4. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  5. A Technical and Economic Analysis of an Innovative Two-Step Absorption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Analysis of an Innovative Two-Step Absorption System for Utilizing Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources to Condition Commercial Buildings A Technical and Economic Analysis ...

  6. Economic Development Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Development Office Is your technology business looking for a door to the Laboratory? The Economic Development Office at PNNL is here to help you start, grow, or relocate your business. We help you tap into technology experts, facilities, and other resources available at the Laboratory...some at no cost to you. We've helped more than 400 companies in our region and 100 more nationwide. Our goals: to expand the economy's technology sector and create high-value jobs. Economic Development

  7. Tribal Economic Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by Northern Arizona University, the Tribal Economic Outlook Conference will preview the conditions that will impact business and economy in the year ahead. Hear what the experts are predicting for 2016 at the tribal, state, and local level.

  8. SWAMC Economic Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Southwest Alaska Municipal Conference (SWAMC), the 27th Annual Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting is a three-day conference covering energy efficiency planning,...

  9. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  10. Regional Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Economic Development Regional Economic Development Supporting companies in every stage of development through access to technology, technical assistance or investment Questions Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Regional Programs (505) 665-9090 New Mexico Small Business Assistance Email Venture Acceleration Fund Email DisrupTECH Email SBIR/STTR Email FCI facilitates commercialization in New Mexico to accelerate and enhance our efforts to convert federal and state research

  11. An economic and technical assessment of black-dross and salt-cake-recycling systems for application in the secondary aluminum industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karvelas, D.; Daniels, E.; Jody, B.; Bonsignore, P.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry annually disposes of large amounts of dross residues and salt cake, which are by-products from the processing of scrap aluminum for reuse. These wastes contain as much as 50% salts and are presently disposed of in conventional landfills. As the costs of landfill space increase and the availability of landfill space decreases, disposal of the residues will increasingly compromise the economics of recycling aluminum. Alternative processes exist by which the major constituents of the various drosses and salt cakes can be recovered for recycling. In this study, we review available recycling technologies and processes relevant to the recycling of black dross and salt cake and discuss new concepts that have the potential to improve the cost-effectiveness of recycling technologies.

  12. Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems. This digital appendix contains supplement material for the NREL technical...

  13. Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Financial Analysis1 Background Economic Analysis of Solar Home Systems: A Case Study for the Philippines, Peter Meier, Prepared for The World Bank, Washington, D.C....

  14. Economical wind protection - underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesling, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    Earth-sheltered buildings inherently posess near-absolute occupant protection from severe winds. They should sustain no structural damage and only minimal facial damage. Assuming that the lower-hazard risk attendant to this type of construction results in reduced insurance-premium rates, the owner accrues economic benefits from the time of construction. Improvements to aboveground buildings, in contrast, may not yield early economic benefits in spite of a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. This, in addition to sensitivity to initial costs, traditionalism in residential construction, and lack of professional input to design, impede the widespread use of underground improvements and the subsequent economic losses from severe winds. Going underground could reverse the trend. 7 references.

  15. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  16. WINDExchange: Wind Economic Development

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Development WINDExchange provides software applications and publications to help individuals, developers, local governments, and utilities make decisions about wind power. Projecting costs and benefits of new installations, including the economic development impacts created, is a key element in looking at potential wind applications. Communities, states, regions, job markets (i.e., construction, operations and maintenance), the tax base, tax revenues, and others can be positively affected. These

  17. Cogeneration: Economics and politics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, R.G.H.; Poole, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Cogeneration is a well established process for supplying heat and electricity from a single fuel source. Its feasibility and implementation in any particular case depend on technical, economic and internal and external {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors, including government policies. This paper describes the current status of small scale industrial cogeneration in Australia. A model has been developed to analyse the technical and economic aspects of retrofitting gas turbine cogeneration in the size range 3 to 30MW to industrial sites. The model demonstrates that for typical Australian energy cost data, the payback and the size of the optimized cogeneration plant depend strongly on electricity buyback prices. Also reviewed are some of the {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors which often militate against an otherwise economic installation, and government policies which may retard cogeneration by concern about local air emissions or favor it as increasing efficiency of energy use and reducing greenhouse emissions. A case study of a small gas turbine plant in Australia is outlined. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  19. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellinger, A.

    1995-11-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters-type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates-define the investment and operating costs of anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters in somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 11/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  20. Arctic Economics Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    AEM (Arctic Economics Model) for oil and gas was developed to provide an analytic framework for understanding the arctic area resources. It provides the capacity for integrating the resource and technology information gathered by the arctic research and development (R&D) program, measuring the benefits of alternaive R&D programs, and providing updated estimates of the future oil and gas potential from arctic areas. AEM enables the user to examine field or basin-level oil and gas recovery,more » costs, and economics. It provides a standard set of selected basin-specified input values or allows the user to input their own values. AEM consists of five integrated submodels: geologic/resource submodel, which distributes the arctic resource into 15 master regions, consisting of nine arctic offshore regions, three arctic onshore regions, and three souhtern Alaska (non-arctic) regions; technology submodel, which selects the most appropriate exploration and production structure (platform) for each arctic basin and water depth; oil and gas production submodel, which contains the relationship of per well recovery as a function of field size, production decline curves, and production decline curves by product; engineering costing and field development submodel, which develops the capital and operating costs associated with arctic oil and gas development; and the economics submodel, which captures the engineering costs and development timing and links these to oil and gas prices, corporate taxes and tax credits, depreciation, and timing of investment. AEM provides measures of producible oil and gas, costs, and ecomonic viability under alternative technology or financial conditions.« less

  1. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  2. NISAC Agent Based Laboratory for Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-10-11

    The software provides large-scale microeconomic simulation of complex economic and social systems (such as supply chain and market dynamics of businesses in the US economy) and their dependence on physical infrastructure systems. The system is based on Agent simulation, where each entity of inteest in the system to be modeled (for example, a Bank, individual firms, Consumer households, etc.) is specified in a data-driven sense to be individually repreented by an Agent. The Agents interact using rules of interaction appropriate to their roles, and through those interactions complex economic and social dynamics emerge. The software is implemented in three tiers, a Java-based visualization client, a C++ control mid-tier, and a C++ computational tier.

  3. NISAC Agent Based Laboratory for Economics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-11

    The software provides large-scale microeconomic simulation of complex economic and social systems (such as supply chain and market dynamics of businesses in the US economy) and their dependence on physical infrastructure systems. The system is based on Agent simulation, where each entity of inteest in the system to be modeled (for example, a Bank, individual firms, Consumer households, etc.) is specified in a data-driven sense to be individually repreented by an Agent. The Agents interactmore » using rules of interaction appropriate to their roles, and through those interactions complex economic and social dynamics emerge. The software is implemented in three tiers, a Java-based visualization client, a C++ control mid-tier, and a C++ computational tier.« less

  4. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-02-01

    Report on the specific factors driving wind-power-related economic development and on the impact of specific economic development variables on new wind project economic benefits.

  5. Economic evolutions and their resilience: a model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitenecker, M.; Gruemm, H.

    1981-04-01

    The report designs a highly aggregated macroeconomic model that can be formulated in terms of a system of ordinary differential equations. The report consists of two parts supplementing each other in a sort of symbiosis. One part is the abstract structure of the equations - that is, the individual dependence of the time variations of the state variables (which span the state space) on the variables themselves (which in this model are E, K, and L). The other part is the parameter space, each point of which is a set of parameter values that have a well-defined economic meaning and thereby endow the system with economic content. (Copyright (c) 1981, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.)

  6. SRS Economic Impact Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SRS Economic Impact Study The operations at Savannah River Site (SRS) create jobs, generate income, and contribute to the tax revenues across both South Carolina and Georgia. When economic multipliers are factored in, the economic ripple effect is enormous. Despite its significance in recent years, there has been little understanding beyond qualitative observations about the value of SRS's contributions to the region and what that impact means in quantifiable terms. Consequently, the SRSCRO

  7. economic hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    economic hydrogen fuel cell vehicles - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future ...

  8. The Economics of Micro Grids

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blink-less UPS Go Electric Energy Arbitrage Energy Optimization Peak shaving Demand Response & Aggregation FACILITIES UTILITIES 4 Micro Grid Economics: 2 Examples Go Electric ...

  9. Competitive economics of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellman, R.

    1981-03-02

    Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics.

  10. DC Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (March 2015) | Department of Energy Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits (March 2015) DC Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits (March 2015) Microgrid demonstrations and deployments have shown the ability of microgrids to provide higher reliability and higher power quality than utility power systems and improved energy utilization. The vast majority of these microgrids are based on AC power, but some manufacturers, power system

  11. Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 | Department of Energy Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 Novel Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems - Fact Sheet, 2015 University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with Siemens Corporate Research, developed and demonstrated novel algorithms and dynamic control technology for optimal economic use of CHP systems under 5 MW. The control

  12. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  13. Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct). A software tool for rapidly approximating economic impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Loose, Verne William; Starks, Shirley J.; Ellebracht, Lory A.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct) analysis tool that has been in use for the last 5 years to rapidly estimate approximate economic impacts for disruptions due to natural or manmade events. It is based on and derived from the well-known and extensively documented input-output modeling technique initially presented by Leontief and more recently further developed by numerous contributors. REAcct provides county-level economic impact estimates in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and employment for any area in the United States. The process for using REAcct incorporates geospatial computational tools and site-specific economic data, permitting the identification of geographic impact zones that allow differential magnitude and duration estimates to be specified for regions affected by a simulated or actual event. Using these data as input to REAcct, the number of employees for 39 directly affected economic sectors (including 37 industry production sectors and 2 government sectors) are calculated and aggregated to provide direct impact estimates. Indirect estimates are then calculated using Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) multipliers. The interdependent relationships between critical infrastructures, industries, and markets are captured by the relationships embedded in the inputoutput modeling structure.

  14. Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes -- Update to Include Analyses of an Economizer Option and Alternative Winter Water Heating Control Option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D

    2006-12-01

    The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment, ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. In 2006, the two top-ranked options from the 2005 study, air-source and ground-source versions of an integrated heat pump (IHP) system, were subjected to an initial business case study. The IHPs were subjected to a more rigorous hourly-based assessment of their performance potential compared to a baseline suite of equipment of legally minimum efficiency that provided the same heating, cooling, water heating, demand dehumidification, and ventilation services as the IHPs. Results were summarized in a project report, Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes, ORNL/TM-2006/130 (Baxter 2006). The present report is an update to that document. Its primary purpose is to summarize results of an analysis of the potential of adding an outdoor air economizer operating mode to the IHPs to take advantage of free cooling (using outdoor air to cool the house) whenever possible. In addition it provides some additional detail for an alternative winter water heating/space heating (WH/SH) control strategy briefly described in the original report and corrects some minor errors.

  15. A Technical and Economic Analysis of an Innovative Two-Step Absorption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System for Utilizing Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources to Condition Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy A Technical and Economic Analysis of an Innovative Two-Step Absorption System for Utilizing Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources to Condition Commercial Buildings A Technical and Economic Analysis of an Innovative Two-Step Absorption System for Utilizing Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources to Condition Commercial Buildings PDF icon A Technical and Economic Analysis of an

  16. Gas engine driven chiller development and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koplow, M.D.; Searight, E.F.; Panora, R.

    1986-03-01

    The TECOGEN Division of Thermo Electron Corporation has developed a nominal 150 ton engine driven chiller system under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute. The system incorporates an engine directly driving a screw compressor to produce about 130 tons of cooling capacity and a single effect absorption chiller driven by hot water recovered from engine heat to produce another 30 tons of cooling capacity. An economic analysis shows that it will be possible to recover the cost premium of engine driven chiller systems in most US cities in 3 years or less with the O and M savings of these systems when this cost premium is $30 per ton. 4 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  17. WINDExchange: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet PDF The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on

  18. Transcript of Tribal Energy and Economic Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript for the Tribal Energy and Economic Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development held on Jan. 27, 2016.

  19. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. ...

  20. PERI Green Economics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PERI Green Economics Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: PERI Green Economics AgencyCompany Organization: Political Economy Research Institute Sector:...

  1. Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California L. ... NRELSR-550-39291 April 2006 Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of ...

  2. Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference April 4, 2016 8:00AM CDT to ...

  3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction ... A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth Comparing Emissions Benefits from ...

  4. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. You are accessing a ...

  5. Workforce and Economic Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce and Economic Development Workforce and Economic Development Slides presented in the "What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Conference - ...

  6. Renewable Energy: science, politics, and economics (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Renewable Energy: science, politics, and economics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Renewable Energy: science, politics, and economics You are ...

  7. OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SNe Ia AND ESTIMATING THEIR REDSHIFTS (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING SNe Ia AND ESTIMATING THEIR REDSHIFTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: OPTICAL CROSS-CORRELATION FILTERS: AN ECONOMICAL APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING SNe Ia AND ESTIMATING THEIR REDSHIFTS Large photometric surveys of transient phenomena, such as Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, will

  8. Adrian Cooper CEO, Oxford Economics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    macroeconomic impact of lower oil prices June 2015 Adrian Cooper CEO, Oxford Economics acooper@oxfordeconomics.com Lower oil prices big boost for the global economy... 2 ...but global economic news has been disappointing 3 Who should be the winners? 4 ...and losers? 5 Fall in oil prices give US households extra $1,000 6 But investment down sharply... 7 ...and further falls likely 8 Extraction sector employment also hit hard 9 But not all countries have seen lower gas prices 10 Contrasting

  9. BEST (Battery Economics for more Sustainable Transportation)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-31

    Computer software for the simulation of battery economics based on various transportation business models.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    feasibility, and the preliminary economic viability of a COsub 2-sequestering ... A preliminary economic analysis showed the costs of an integrated system based on ...

  11. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the technical and fuel cycle aspects of advanced (non-light water reactor [LWR]) reactors with the market and production aspects of SMRs. This requires the collection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple unrelated and potentially high-uncertainty data sets from a wide range of data sources. Further, the nature of both economic and nuclear technology analysis requires at least a minor attempt at prediction and prognostication, and the far-term horizon for deployment of advanced nuclear systems introduces more uncertainty. Energy market uncertainty, especially the electricity market, is the result of the integration of commodity prices, demand fluctuation, and generation competition, as easily seen in deregulated markets. Depending on current or projected values for any of these factors, the economic attractiveness of any power plant construction project can change yearly or quarterly. For long-lead construction projects such as nuclear power plants, this uncertainty generates an implied and inherent risk for potential nuclear power plant owners and operators. The uncertainty in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle costs is in some respects better understood and quantified than the energy market uncertainty. The LWR-based fuel cycle has a long commercial history to use as its basis for cost estimation, and the current activities in LWR construction provide a reliable baseline for estimates for similar efforts. However, for advanced systems, the estimates and their associated uncertainties are based on forward-looking assumptions for performance after the system has been built and has achieved commercial operation. Advanced fuel materials and fabrication costs have large uncertainties based on complexities of operation, such as contact-handled fuel fabrication versus remote handling, or commodity availability. Thus, this analytical work makes a good faith effort to quantify uncertainties and provide qualifiers, caveats, and explanations for the sources of these uncertainties. The overall result is that this work assembles the necessary information and establishes the foundation for future analyses using more precise data as nuclear technology advances.

  12. Economic Rebalancing and Electricity Demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Gang; Lin, Jiang; Yuan, Alexandria

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the relationship between economic growth and electricity use is essential for power systems planning. This need is particularly acute now in China, as the Chinese economy is going through a transition to a more consumption and service oriented economy. This study uses 20 years of provincial data on gross domestic product (GDP) and electricity consumption to examine the relationship between these two factors. We observe a plateauing effect of electricity consumption in the richest provinces, as the electricity demand saturates and the economy develops and moves to a more service-based economy. There is a wide range of forecasts for electricity use in 2030, ranging from 5,308 to 8,292 kWh per capita, using different estimating functions, as well as in existing studies. It is therefore critical to examine more carefully the relationship between electricity use and economic development, as China transitions to a new growth phase that is likely to be less energy and resource intensive. The results of this study suggest that policymakers and power system planners in China should seriously re-evaluate power demand projections and the need for new generation capacity to avoid over-investment that could lead to stranded generation assets.

  13. Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic Solutions for Air Handling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unit-Variable Air Volume and Air Handling Unit-Constant Air Volume Systems - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic Solutions for Air Handling Unit-Variable Air Volume and Air Handling Unit-Constant Air Volume Systems - 2014 BTO Peer Review Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic Solutions for Air Handling Unit-Variable Air Volume and Air Handling Unit-Constant Air Volume Systems - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jin Wen, Drexel

  14. Economics of a multimedia approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.B.; Hindawi, M.A.

    1996-02-01

    One of the major driving forces in the decision of a facility operator to implement a multimedia approach to examining pollution is the economics of the situation. A multimedia approach has gained favor with many facility operators because it has been shown to be more cost-effective than dealing with a number of phases, or media, separately. To a great extent, this is due to elimination of inefficiencies involved with cross-media transfer of pollutants. Even more basic to the problem of industrial pollution is the generation of waste. All industrial processes yield some percentage of waste products, but frequently during the design phase the costs associated with producing wastes are underestimated. As part of this series on multimedia issues, the costs related to manufacturing waste products are examined in detail. An obvious inefficiency associated with waste generation is the loss of material that potentially could be converted to salable products. The value of commodity raw materials frequently is ignored when considering the total costs of pollution generation at an industrial facility. Although the economics of pollution generation are affected by a number of factors, including regulatory costs, disposal costs and impacts on health and safety, this article focuses on the economics of lost production in industrial facilities.

  15. Economic analysis of a passive solar multiple-family dwelling for upstate New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laquatra, J. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the economic feasibility of passive solar energy as applied to a multiple-family dwelling in three upstate New York cities: Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse. Specifically, two passive solar applications - a Trombe wall and a direct-gain system - for a nine-unit structure designed by Total Environmental Action, Inc. were analyzed through the use of a solar economic performance code. City-specific data, including climatological information, building construction costs, utility rates, and property taxes were used, as were various economic parameters to reflect economic conditions in general and specifically those of the solar systems' owners.

  16. System Analysis Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Analysis Success Stories System Analysis Success Stories Program Links System Analysis Projects System Analysis Success Stories Economic Impact Tools National Geothermal ...

  17. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  18. Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the Energy Polict Act of 2005. PDF icon Economic ...

  19. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds This Environmental Protection Agency report contains recommendations for a series of...

  20. Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support - Sandia ... Transportation Energy Co-Evolution of Biofuels ... Biological and Environmental Research Collaborations ...

  1. Economic Impact Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impact Tools Economic Impact Tools Photo of a well drilling rig. A man stands on the platform while another is climbing the rig. Technology Feasibility and Cost Analysis is performed to determine the potential economic viability of geothermal energy production and helps to identify which technologies have the greatest likelihood of economic success. Results from technology feasibility analysis efforts provide input to the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) research, development, and

  2. Economics of coal fines utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathi, V.; McHale, E.; Ramezan, M.; Winslow, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the twentieth century, coal has become the major fuel for electric power generation in the U.S. and most of the nonpetroleum-producing countries of the world. In 1998, the world coal-fired capacity for electric power generation was about 815 GW, consuming large quantities of coals of all ranks. Today, coal provides a third of the world`s energy requirements. In fact, coal use for power generation has grown steadily since the oil embargo in 1973 and has seen an even faster rate of growth in recent years. It has been reported that the global demand for new coal will increase by more than 1500 million tons by the year 2000. However, this increased production of coal has its drawbacks, including the concomitant production of coal waste. Reported estimates indicate that billions of tons of coal waste have already been disposed of in waste impoundments throughout the U.S. Further, in the U.S. today, about 20-25 % of each ton of mined coal is discarded by preparation plants as gob and plant tailings. It appears that the most economical near-term approach to coal waste recovery is to utilize the waste coal fines currently discarded with the refuse stream, rather than attempt to recover coal from waste impoundments that require careful prior evaluation and site preparation. A hypothetical circuit was designed to examine the economics of recovery and utilization of waste coal fines. The circuit recovers products from 100 tons per hour (tph) of coal waste feed recovering 70 tph of fine coal that can be used in coal-fired boilers. The present analysis indicates that the coal waste recovery is feasible and economical. In addition, significant environmental benefits can be expected.

  3. Economic evaluation of a swine farm covered anaerobic lagoon digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is helpful to evaluate anaerobic digestion technologies using objective economic criteria. Options can then be ranked in terms of their relative cost effectiveness, leading to rational deployment decisions. This study presents the results of a hypothetical pro forma economic evaluation of one type of digestion system that could commonly be found on many swine farms; a covered anaerobic lagoon. The digester was assumed to be located in North Carolina, a major swine-producing state. Electricity generation with waste heat recovery was assumed to be the major end-use application of biogas manufactured from this process.

  4. Engineering and Techno-Economic Assessment | Concentrating Solar Power |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Engineering and Techno-Economic Assessment The concentrating solar power (CSP) program at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) measures and models the solar resource, develops and uses computer models for engineering design and modeling of system performance and technology deployment, and investigates the environmental benefits and impacts of utility-scale solar power. Learn more about the capabilities discussed below by contacting the CSP Research Staff. System Advisor Model

  5. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  6. Condensing economizers for thermal efficiency improvements and emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaphy, J.P.; Carbonara, J.; Litzke, W.; Butcher, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Flue gas condensing economizers improve the thermal efficiency of boilers by recovering sensible heat and water vapor latent heat from flue gas exhaust. In addition to improving thermal efficiency, condensing economizers also have the potential to act as control devices for emissions of particulates, SO{sub x}, and air toxics. Both Consolidated Edison of New York and Brookhaven National LaborAtory are currently working on condensing economizer technology with an emphasis on developing their potential for emissions control. Con Edison is currently conducting a condensing economizer demonstration at their oil-fired 74th Street Station in New York. Since installing this equipment in February of 1992 a heat rate improvement of 800 Btu/kWh has been seen. At another location, Ravenswood Station, a two stage condensing economizer has been installed in a pilot test. In this advanced configuration -the ``Integrated Flue Gas Treatment or IFGT system- two heat exchanger sections are installed and sprays of water with and without SO{sub 2} sorbents are included. Detailed studies of the removal of particulates, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and selected air toxics have been done for a variety of operating conditions. Removal efficiencies for SO{sub 2} have been over 98% and for SO{sub 3} over 65%. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s studies involve predicting and enhancing particulate capture in condensing economizers with an emphasis on small, coal-fired applications. This work is funded by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the Department of Energy. Flyash capture efficiencies as high as 97% have been achieved to date with a single stage economizer.

  7. Boston solar retrofits: studies of solar access and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, M.

    1980-11-01

    Studies of solar access and solar retrofit economics are described for residential applications in the City of Boston. The study of solar access was based upon a random sample of 94 buildings; the sample was stratified to ensure a broad geographic representation from the city's various sections. Using available data on the heights and orientations of the sampled structures and surrounding buildings, each building's hourly access to sunlight was computed separately for the roof and south facing walls. These data were then aggregated by broad structural classifications in order to provide general measures of solar access. The second study was a comparative analysis of the economics of several solar heating and hot water systems. An active hot water system, installed using pre-assembled, commercially purchased equipment, was selected as a reference technology. A variety of measures of economic performance were computed for this system, with and without existing tax credits and under various financing arrangements. Next, a number of alternative approaches for solar space and water heating were identified from interviews with individuals and groups involved in solar retrofit projects in the Boston area. The objective was to identify approaches that many of those interviewed believe to be low-cost means of applying solar energy in residential settings. The approaches selected include thermal window covers, wall collectors, bread box water heaters, and sun spaces. Preliminary estimates of the performance of several representative designs were developed and the economics of these designs evaluated.

  8. Experimental study on the floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Takebayashi, Yoshihisa

    1995-12-31

    These results are presented from a research project to investigate the effects of a floor-supply displacement ventilation system with practical indoor heat loads. The experiments were performed in an experimental chamber (35.2 m{sup 2}) located in a controlled environment chamber. Temperature distributions were measured at seven heights throughout the experimental chamber for each test condition. Data were analyzed to observe thermal stratification as affected by lighting, occupants, and heat loads (personal computers), and its disruption caused by walking and change of air volume. In addition, airflow characteristics and ventilation efficiencies were investigated using a smoke machine, tobacco smoke, dust for industrial testing, and a tracer gas (CO{sub 2}) step-up procedure.

  9. Iowa Department of Economic Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department of Economic Development Jump to: navigation, search Name: Iowa Department of Economic Development Place: Des Moines, Iowa Zip: 50309 Product: Iowa economic development...

  10. CMI Course Inventory: Mineral Economics and Business | Critical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Economics and Business Mineral Economics and Business Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, two offer courses in Mineral Economics and Business. ...

  11. Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies PDF icon 27079.pdf More Documents ...

  12. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery This tip sheet on feedwater economizers ... STEAM TIP SHEET 3 PDF icon Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery (January ...

  13. AVLIS: a technical and economic forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.I.; Spaeth, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    The AVLIS process has intrinsically large isotopic selectivity and hence high separative capacity per module. The critical components essential to achieving the high production rates represent a small fraction (approx.10%) of the total capital cost of a production facility, and the reference production designs are based on frequent replacement of these components. The specifications for replacement frequencies in a plant are conservative with respect to our expectations; it is reasonable to expect that, as the plant is operated, the specifications will be exceeded and production costs will continue to fall. Major improvements in separator production rates and laser system efficiencies (approx.power) are expected to occur as a natural evolution in component improvements. With respect to the reference design, such improvements have only marginal economic value, but given the exigencies of moving from engineering demonstration to production operations, we continue to pursue these improvements in order to offset any unforeseen cost increases. Thus, our technical and economic forecasts for the AVLIS process remain very positive. The near-term challenge is to obtain stable funding and a commitment to bring the process to full production conditions within the next five years. If the funding and commitment are not maintained, the team will disperse and the know-how will be lost before it can be translated into production operations. The motivation to preserve the option for low-cost AVLIS SWU production is integrally tied to the motivation to maintain a competitive nuclear option. The US industry can certainly survive without AVLIS, but our tradition as technology leader in the industry will certainly be lost.

  14. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Shropshire

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Systems Analysis supports engineering economic analyses and trade-studies, and requires a requisite reference cost basis to support adequate analysis rigor. In this regard, the AFCI program has created a reference set of economic documentation. The documentation consists of the “Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) Cost Basis” report (Shropshire, et al. 2007), “AFCI Economic Analysis” report, and the “AFCI Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies Report.” Together, these documents provide the reference cost basis, cost modeling basis, and methodologies needed to support AFCI economic analysis. The application of the reference cost data in the cost and econometric systems analysis models will be supported by this report. These methodologies include: the energy/environment/economic evaluation of nuclear technology penetration in the energy market—domestic and internationally—and impacts on AFCI facility deployment, uranium resource modeling to inform the front-end fuel cycle costs, facility first-of-a-kind to nth-of-a-kind learning with application to deployment of AFCI facilities, cost tradeoffs to meet nuclear non-proliferation requirements, and international nuclear facility supply/demand analysis. The economic analysis will be performed using two cost models. VISION.ECON will be used to evaluate and compare costs under dynamic conditions, consistent with the cases and analysis performed by the AFCI Systems Analysis team. Generation IV Excel Calculations of Nuclear Systems (G4-ECONS) will provide static (snapshot-in-time) cost analysis and will provide a check on the dynamic results. In future analysis, additional AFCI measures may be developed to show the value of AFCI in closing the fuel cycle. Comparisons can show AFCI in terms of reduced global proliferation (e.g., reduction in enrichment), greater sustainability through preservation of a natural resource (e.g., reduction in uranium ore depletion), value from weaning the U.S. from energy imports (e.g., measures of energy self-sufficiency), and minimization of future high level waste (HLW) repositories world-wide.

  15. Recent Developments of the Modelica"Buildings" Library for Building Energy and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael; Zuo, Wangda; Nouidui, Thierry Stephane

    2011-04-01

    At the Modelica 2009 conference, we introduced the Buildings library, a freely available Modelica library for building energy and control systems. This paper reports the updates of the library and presents example applications for a range of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Over the past two years, the library has been further developed. The number of HVAC components models has been doubled and various components have been revised to increase numerical robustness.The paper starts with an overview of the library architecture and a description of the main packages. To demonstrate the features of the Buildings library, applications that include multizone airflow simulation as well as supervisory and local loop control of a variable air volume (VAV) system are briefly described. The paper closes with a discussion of the current development.

  16. Workforce and Economic Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce and Economic Development Workforce and Economic Development Slides presented in the "What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Conference - Promising Approaches and Lessons Learned" on May 20, 2011 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon Workforce and Economic Development for BPI Auditing More Documents & Publications What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs - Promising Approaches and Lessons Learned Efficiency First - Contractor

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Economic Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Impact Sandia National Laboratories has a robust and widespread economic impact. Spending by the Labs exceeds $2 billion a year. Nearly $1 billion goes to the procurement of goods and services nationally. Much of the remainder is spent on salaries. Explore the links below to learn more about the specific ways Sandia is making a difference at our headquarters in New Mexico and our second principal laboratory in California. New Mexico Economic Impact 2015 Download (PDF 10 MB) 2014

  18. CAIED Tribal Economic Development Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How will the tribal economy do this year? What will impact your bottom line? What does the tribal economic future look like?

  19. Economic Impacts and Business Opportunities | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Impacts and Business Opportunities NREL contributes to the local and national economy in various ways. We are one of the largest employers in Jefferson County, Colorado,...

  20. Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OilGas Wells in Texas Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing OilGas Wells in Texas Technical ...

  1. "Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection", Dr. Bryan Czech, resident, Center for the Advancement of the Steady State...

  2. Reservation Economic Summit: Nevada | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    over the phases of the project. Download the RES 2012 presentation. Addthis Related Articles Reservation Economic Summit: Nevada Indian Energy & Energy Infrastructure to be...

  3. CAIED Tribal Economic Development Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Center for American Indian Economic Development (CAIED) is hosting a conference on the impact that business and the economy will have on the next year for Tribes.

  4. Community Economic Analysis Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economic Analysis How-to manual AgencyCompany Organization: R. Hustedde, R. Shaffer, G. Pulver Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline User Interface: Website Website:...

  5. Algal Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis Algae Platform Review March 24, 2015 Alexandria, VA Ryan Davis National Renewable Energy Laboratory This presentation does not contain any ...

  6. International Economic Platform for Renewable Energies IWR |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Platform for Renewable Energies IWR Jump to: navigation, search Name: International Economic Platform for Renewable Energies (IWR) Place: Mnster, Germany Zip: 48159 Sector:...

  7. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  8. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-26

    Brochure on the Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for calculating the economic impacts of wind development.

  9. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery - Steam Tip Sheet #3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  10. Economic analysis of model validation for a challenge problem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paez, Paul J.; Paez, Thomas L.; Hasselman, Timothy K.

    2016-02-19

    It is now commonplace for engineers to build mathematical models of the systems they are designing, building, or testing. And, it is nearly universally accepted that phenomenological models of physical systems must be validated prior to use for prediction in consequential scenarios. Yet, there are certain situations in which testing only or no testing and no modeling may be economically viable alternatives to modeling and its associated testing. This paper develops an economic framework within which benefit–cost can be evaluated for modeling and model validation relative to other options. The development is presented in terms of a challenge problem. Asmore » a result, we provide a numerical example that quantifies when modeling, calibration, and validation yield higher benefit–cost than a testing only or no modeling and no testing option.« less

  11. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

  12. Oil and economic performance in industrial countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordhaus, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries have experienced slower economic growth and periods of discontinuity in the energy market since the 1973-74 oil embargo. A review of this phenomenon examines changes in the market during the 1960s and 70s, linkages between oil prices and economic performance, and appropriate policy responses. When price elasticities are calculated over time, recent US economic behavior appears to have both historical and cross-sountry consistency. Little flexibility is seen in the available energy-using technologies for producing goods and services, while energy-using capital has been sluggish. Dr. Nordhaus advocates high oil price and high tax policies as the best way to limit demand without slowing economic growth. (DCK)

  13. Techno-economic Modeling - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techno-economic Modeling JCESR has developed computer models that combine scientific and technical parameters with cost. These models are being used to evaluate the best pathways for beyond-lithium-ion systems to reach $100 per kilowatt-hour, a key parameter for batteries used in electric vehicles and on the grid. One of the most difficult challenges in developing transformative battery technologies is predicting what combinations of materials will produce the highest performance and cost. To

  14. Economic performance of the SCE Stirling dish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, K.W.; Lopez, C.W.; McAlister, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    In 1982 McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and United Stirling AB (USAB) of Sweden formed a joint venture to develop and market a solar Stirling dish system. Eight modules were built and extensively tested from 1984 to 1988. Power production and daily energy-conversion efficiency as determined by field testing were characterized and modeled into a computer program. Included in this simulation are models of mirror soiling rate, wind spillage loss, mirror washing, and other maintenance outage time, operation and maintenance (O and M) costs, and equipment purchase cost. An economic model of a hybrid (combustion) receiver has been included in the simulation for illustrating the value of using solar energy when available and other fuels such as methane, natural gas, hydrogen, etc. when solar energy is not available or adequate. This paper describes the simulation and presents comparisons of the simulation to test data. The simulation also estimates both the O and M expenses and levelized energy costs for different production volumes.

  15. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  16. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

  18. Environmental management during economic transition: Ukraine--A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempen van, T.H.; Demydenko, A.O.

    1995-12-01

    After dissolution of Soviet Union, each new States had to confront the legacy of an unsustainable, and ultimately failed, economic and political system. Enormous environmental problems resulted from centrally planned economics, which promoted rapid growth through exploitation of the former Soviet Union`s (FSU) vast natural resources. Unconstrained by scarcity-based pricing, extractive and heavy industry ministries created huge, inefficient, and heavily polluting enterprises. The region also experienced extensive forest-cutting, steady deterioration of soils, and contaminated runoff and infiltration from over-excessive application of agrichemicals. The fate of the environment will depend largely on successful transition to a market-based economy. Funds for environmental protection will remain scarce, and poor technology combined with a degraded and overworked infrastructure will slow cleanup of contaminated regions. With failed economies, policy-makers and legislators will be forced to overlook sustainable development as they exploit natural resources in an effort to produce food and obtain hard currency. Ukraine, the second-most populous republic of the FSU, experienced possibly the world`s greatest single environment disaster--the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe. Today, heavy industry, with its resource-intensive and highly polluting technologies, contributes 61% of Ukraine`s GNP, in comparison with 34% in the European Union. Energy production is grossly inefficient. Environmental agencies in Ukraine are new, with limited legal or economic tools, financial resources, or technical skills. Yet the country has commenced environmental management initiatives that, when combined with economic reforms, will start to improve environmental conditions. This paper presents an overview of Ukraine`s environmental and economic conditions, steps already undertaken to manage the environment, and additional measures needed to improve the situation.

  19. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

    2007-03-06

    Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

  20. Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The potential for SMR deployment will be largely determined by the economic value that these power plants would provide to interested power producers who would evaluate their prospects in relation...

  1. An Economic Engine for Washington State

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pnnl.gov An Economic Engine for Washington State When Washington State leaders share their visions for a vibrant future, certain priorities rise to the top: jobs, education, and an...

  2. Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

  3. COLLOQUIUM: Sustainability Economics | Princeton Plasma Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 24, 2015, 4:15pm to 5:30pm MBG AUDITORIUM COLLOQUIUM: Sustainability Economics James Morris Rutgers University It's easy to agree that managing resources in a sustainable ...

  4. Life assessments of a boiler economizer unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichti, K.A.; Thomas, C.W.; Wilson, P.T.; Julian, W.

    1997-09-01

    An economizer which experienced pitting corrosion during a cleaning accident was subject to recurring corrosion fatigue failures. A condition assessment was undertaken to assess the risk of further failures through metallurgical assessment, extreme value pitting assessments, and on-site NDT condition assessment with on-site extreme value pitting analysis. This was followed by a fatigue life assessment in accordance with PD6493. Condition assessment work and lifetime prediction progressed from initial failure investigation through to final recommendations in a stepwise process. Each stage of the work was followed by a review of the findings and an economic assessment of the alternative options i.e. continue with assessment, full economizer replacement or partial replacement. Selective replacement of a portion of the economizer was recommended.

  5. Puerto Rico- Economic Development Incentives for Renewables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2008 Economic Incentives for the Development of Puerto Rico Act (EIA) provides a wide array of tax credits and incentives that enable local and foreign companies dedicated to certain business...

  6. Tribal Energy and Economic Development Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, in partnership with Western Area Power Administration (Western), is pleased to continue its sponsorship of the DOE Tribal Energy and Economic Development Webinar Series for 2016.

  7. Wind Energy and Economic Development in Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2009-06-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a recent report by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Economic Development Benefits from Wind Power in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office, which focuses on the estimated economic development impacts in Nebraska from development and operation of wind power in the state as envisioned in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030.

  8. National Institute of Economic and Industry Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    scale export of East Coast Australia natural gas: Unintended consequences National Institute of Economic and Industry Research 1 This note summarizes the major conclusions of the NIEIR study referenced here. Many major projects to export Liquefied Natural Gas from Eastern Australia have been approved and will start to operate over the next several years. This will significantly impact the domestic supply of natural gas. The National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) has done an

  9. Lab scientists recognized for economic development efforts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists recognized for economic development efforts Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab scientists recognized for economic development efforts Program provides regional businesses with expert assistance December 1, 2013 Winner of the 2013 Principal Investigator Award is Andy McCown Winner of a 2013 Principal Investigator Award is Andy McCown (at right, with pie), of Energy

  10. China`s macro economic trends and power industry structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binsheng Li; Johnson, C.J.; Hagen, R.

    1994-09-01

    Since China adopted an open door policy in 1978, its economy has grown rapidly. Between 1980 and 1993, China`s real GNP growth averaged 9.4 percent per year. Economists at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences forecast that GNP will increase by 11.5 percent in 1994. During the rest of the decade, the Chinese government plans to reduce its annual GNP growth rate to 8-9 percent. During the 2001-2010 period, the economic growth rate is projected to decline to 6.5 percent per year. Table 1 compares China`s economic growth to other Asia-Pacific Economies, and includes projections to 2010. During the 1980s, China`s GDP growth rate was only second to that of South Korea. In the 1990`s, China is projected to have the highest economic growth in the Asia-Pacific region. China`s rapid economic growth is due to dramatic increases in the effective labor supply and effective capital stock. For the remainder of the 1990s, the effective labor supply should continue to increase rapidly because: (1) Chinese state enterprises are over-staffed and labor system reforms will move millions of these workers into more productive activities; (2) reforms in the wage system will provide increased incentives to work harder; (3) relaxation of migration controls from rural to urban areas will cause nominal labor in the industrial sector to accelerate; (4) differentials in personal income will increase and develop peer pressure on workers to work harder and earn more money; and (5) at China`s low personal income level, Chinese people are willing to trade leisure for more income as wages increase.

  11. National Reservation Economic Summit 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Reservation Economic Summit 2016 National Reservation Economic Summit 2016 March 21, 2016 9:00AM PDT to March 24, 2016 5:00PM PDT National Reservation Economic Summit (RES

  12. Part_3_Minority_Economic_Impact.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part3MinorityEconomicImpact.pdf Part3MinorityEconomicImpact.pdf PDF icon Part3MinorityEconomicImpact.pdf More Documents & Publications RFA-14-0002 - In the Matter of ...

  13. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicolas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the economic benefit of thermal energy storage (TES) for cooling, across a range of economic and climate conditions. Chilled water TES systems are simulated for a large office building in four distinct locations, Miami in the U.S.; Lisbon, Portugal; Shanghai, China; and Mumbai, India. Optimal system size and operating schedules are determined using the optimization model DER-CAM, such that total cost, including electricity and amortized capital costs are minimized. The economic impacts of each optimized TES system is then compared to systems sized using a simple heuristic method, which bases system size as fraction (50percent and 100percent) of total on-peak summer cooling loads. Results indicate that TES systems of all sizes can be effective in reducing annual electricity costs (5percent-15percent) and peak electricity consumption (13percent-33percent). The investigation also indentifies a number of criteria which drive TES investment, including low capital costs, electricity tariffs with high power demand charges and prolonged cooling seasons. In locations where these drivers clearly exist, the heuristically sized systems capture much of the value of optimally sized systems; between 60percent and 100percent in terms of net present value. However, in instances where these drivers are less pronounced, the heuristic tends to oversize systems, and optimization becomes crucial to ensure economically beneficial deployment of TES, increasing the net present value of heuristically sized systems by as much as 10 times in some instances.

  14. Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for Backup Power under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Title Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in...

  15. Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide AgencyCompany Organization: Ronald J. Hustedde Partner: Ron Shaffer Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase:...

  16. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Energy and Economic Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Economic Success Studies Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Energy and Economic ... feasibility of energy efficiency and renewable energy installations, and demonstrated ...

  17. Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc. Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc. Topics Discussed: Real GDP ...

  18. Tribal Energy and Economic Development Webinar Series | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training Tribal Energy and Economic Development Webinar Series Tribal Energy and Economic Development Webinar Series The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, in...

  19. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios ...

  20. Biofuels Techno-Economic Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techno-Economic Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biofuels Techno-Economic Models AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  1. Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Business, Economic Development, and Tourism Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism Address: P.O. Box 2359 Place:...

  2. Energy Economic Environmental Consultants e3c | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Energy Economic & Environmental Consultants (e3c) Place: Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip: 87111 Sector: Services Product: E3c, Inc. has provided economic consulting...

  3. Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County (CEDA) Place: Chicago, IL...

  4. Economic Community of West African States | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economic Community of West African States Jump to: navigation, search Name: Economic Community of West African States Address: 101, Yakubu Gowon Crescent, Asokoro District Place:...

  5. Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Place: Albany, New York Zip: NY 12207-1 Sector:...

  6. The Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance CEMEP Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance (CEMEP) Place: United...

  7. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery, Energy Tips...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the fue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler ...

  8. U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives of Energy Efficiency at the Pittsburgh Energy Summit 2006 U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic ...

  9. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional ...

  10. A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Jump to: navigation, search Name A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland AgencyCompany Organization Government of Scotland Sector...

  11. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field ...

  12. Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November ...

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the ... * www.nrel.gov Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power ...

  14. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current ... Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current ...

  15. JBEI Updates Techno-Economic Modeling Tools for Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... improved versions of a techno-economic model created in 2010 to accelerate development of next generation biofuels that are economically competitive with petroleum-based fuels. ...

  16. 2014/2015 Economic Dispatch and Technological Change Report to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Economic Dispatch and Technological Change Report to Congress Now Available 20142015 Economic Dispatch and Technological Change Report to Congress Now Available September 3, ...

  17. The STEM Promise: Opportunities for Economic Empowerment. Join...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The STEM Promise: Opportunities for Economic Empowerment. Join the Conversation on April 8. The STEM Promise: Opportunities for Economic Empowerment. Join the Conversation on April ...

  18. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) ...

  19. Our Impending Energy, Climate, and Economic-Development Crisis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Our Impending Energy, Climate, and Economic-Development Crisis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Our Impending Energy, Climate, and Economic-Development Crisis You are ...

  20. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003 Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, ...

  1. White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers ...

  2. Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility managers and Designers; Second Edition Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource ...

  3. Economic Impacts Associated With Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Road Map Using the JOBS H2 Model Economic Impacts Associated With Commercializing ... This report by Argonne National Laboratory summarizes an analysis of the economic impacts ...

  4. Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel Materials in Thermal Reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of ...

  5. Economic Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Economic Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based PC Boiler Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical ...

  6. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power ...

  7. Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for Backup Power under the ... This report by Argonne National Laboratory presents estimates of economic impacts ...

  8. Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 2 Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, ...

  9. DOE Announces Webinars on Energy Planning for Tribal Economic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning for Tribal Economic Development and Water Efficiency and Energy Savings DOE Announces Webinars on Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development and Water Efficiency and ...

  10. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: ...

  11. Taiwan Institute of Economic Research | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economic Research Jump to: navigation, search Name: Taiwan Institute of Economic Research Place: Taipei, Taiwan Product: Idependent research institute engaged in research on...

  12. Consider Installing a Condensing Economizer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery Considerations When Selecting a Condensing Economizer Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam

  13. Comments of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Comments of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies The Media and Technology Institute and the Climate Change Initiative ...

  14. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment (Redirected from Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate...

  15. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment AgencyCompany Organization Climate and...

  16. Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Generation Projects

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    LCOE/LACE Workshop July 25, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional"

  17. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are discussed. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power and steam generation, dual-purpose and fuel cell power plants, and on-site power generation. Tower focus power plants, solar cogeneration, biomass conversion, coal liquefaction and gasification, and refuse derived fuels are examined. References cite feasibility studies, performance and economic evaluation, environmental impacts, and institutional factors. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Subject: 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS; PRODUCTION; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; METABOLISM; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; ALGAE; CULTIVATION; COAL; ...

  3. Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    W.J. 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS; PRODUCTION; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; METABOLISM; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; ALGAE; CULTIVATION; COAL;...

  4. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presented at the Renewable Hydrogen Workshop, Nov. 16, 2009, in Palm Springs, CA PDF icon renewablehydrogenworkshopnov16steward.pdf More Documents & Publications Biogas ...

  5. Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  6. Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Percin, D.; Werner, J.F. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.

  7. Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Percin, D.; Werner, J.F. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.

  8. Standardized wellheads proven economical for subsea operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreira, C.C.; Silva Paulo, C.A. )

    1994-05-02

    A standardization program for subsea wellheads and completion equipment has made development of Brazil's offshore fields more economical and efficient. The resulting operational flexibility associated with the use of field-proven equipment and procedures saves rig time and can reduce production loss during workovers. Additionally, investments can be rationalized economically by installing part of the completion equipment at the end of the drilling job and then delaying purchase and installation of the christmas tree and the flow lines until installation of the production platform. Savings are also realized from the reduction in the number of spare parts and tools. Moreover, the savings related to improved operations exceed considerably those from equipment acquisition and storage. Thus, the greatest benefit is the operational flexibility. The paper discusses initial standards, the subsea programs, philosophy, implementation, diver-assisted trees, diverless trees, and economics.

  9. Lessons from the new institutional economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, W.P.

    1997-06-01

    Policy makers should seek to get the structure right ex ante as antitrust may not be effective ex post. It will be important to deal effectively with information asymmetries and to minimize transaction costs. The electric services industry is experiencing a period of rapid change, entrepreneurship, innovation and increased competition. The introduction of direct-access retail competition, for example, is becoming increasingly feasible because of the path-breaking activities of England, Norway, Chile and California. While the basic model of a reformed electric services industry has begun to come into a sharper focus, the techniques and methods that policy makers and regulators will need to use in evaluating electric restructuring plans are less well understood. If regulators and their staffs only use the traditional analytical tools, they could fail to analyze fully the transaction cost implications of alternative market, industry and corporate structures. An appreciation of the implications of the new institutional economics (NIE), of which transaction cost economics (TCE) is an important subset, can provide valuable insights. The new institutional economics: (1) holds that institutions matter and are susceptible to analysis..., (2) is different from but not hostile to orthodoxy, and (3) is an interdisciplinary combination of law, economics, and organization in which economics is the first among equals. This paper surveys several of the analytical tools of the new institutional economics, with an emphasis on the tools that are most relevant to the design of the market, industry and corporate structure of a restructured electric services industry. This article applies ME and TCE tools but does not attempt to provide a comprehensive survey of the issues involved in electric restructuring. Rather, it illustrates how regulators can use the tools of NIE/TCE to evaluate and solve the difficult practical problems that electric restructuring presents.

  10. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O.; Williams, I.D.; Dietrich, J.; Carroll, C.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We analyse ICT equipment reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. • Most common ICT products dealt with are computers and related equipment. • In the UK in 2010, ?143,750 appliances were reused. • Marketing and legislative difficulties are the common hurdles to reuse activities. • Socio-economic enterprises can significantly contribute to resource efficiency. - Abstract: In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the UK from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the UK market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into “reuse parks” would enhance both their profile and their products. Reuse parks would also improve consumer confidence in and subsequently sales of the products. Further, it is advocated that industrial networking opportunities for the exchange of by-products resulting from the organisations’ activities should be investigated. The findings make two significant contributions to the current literature. One, they provide a detailed insight into the reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. Previously unavailable data has been presented and analysed. Secondly, new evidence about the by-products/materials resulting from socio-economic enterprises’ reuse activities has been obtained. These contributions add substantially to our understanding of the important role of reuse organisations.

  11. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

    2006-12-01

    A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

  12. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: to create an interactive, physics based, systems analysis tool for geothermal energy development that will: Identify points of attack to maximize efforts and investment dollars; Identify the parameter space where geothermal energy production is physically and economically viable; Provide a platform for public education and interaction.

  13. spurring_local_economic_development_clean_energy_programs.doc...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    spurringlocaleconomicdevelopmentcleanenergyprograms.doc spurringlocaleconomicdevelopmentcleanenergyprograms.doc More Documents & Publications Spurring Local Economic...

  14. Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting (SWAMC) highlights the need for Alaska communities to pull together and make a way through challenging fiscal times. Panels and discussion will focus on providing conference attendees with the knowledge they need to pursue new opportunities.

  15. Economic Analysis of Alternative Fuel School Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, M.

    2004-04-01

    This Clean Cities final report provides a general idea of the potential economic impacts of choosing alternative fuels for school bus fleets. It provides information on different school bus types, as well as analysis of the three main types of alternative fuel used in school bus fleets today (natural gas, propane, and biodiesel).

  16. Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B.

    2006-08-15

    The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

  17. Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) - additional modifications to final report as per GTP's request.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowda, Varun; Hogue, Michael

    2015-07-17

    This report will discuss the methods and the results from economic impact analysis applied to the development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. As part of this work, the Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) has developed a web-based Geothermal Economics Calculator (Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC)) tool that is aimed at helping the industry perform geothermal systems analysis and study the associated impacts of specific geothermal investments or technological improvements on employment, energy and environment. It is well-known in the industry that geothermal power projects will generate positive economic impacts for their host regions. Our aim in the assessment of these impacts includes quantification of the increase in overall economic output due to geothermal projects and of the job creation associated with this increase. Such an estimate of economic impacts of geothermal investments on employment, energy and the environment will also help us understand the contributions that the geothermal industry will have in achieving a sustainable path towards energy production.

  18. Energy scarcity and economic growth reconsidered

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uri, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    This analysis is concerned with the effect of energy scarcity on economic growth in the US. After defining the notion of scarcity and introducing two measures of scarcity, namely unit costs and relative energy price, changes in the trend in resource scarcity are investigated for natural gas, bituminous coal, anthracite coal, and crude oil over the most recent three decades. Each of the energy resources became significantly more scarce during the decade of the 1970s in the Malthusian stock scarcity and Malthusian flow scarcity sense. Unit costs exhibit a similar change for natural gas and crude oil but not for bituminous coal and anthracite coal. The situation reversed itself during the 1980s. Natural gas, bituminous coal, anthracite coal, and crude oil all became significantly less scarce during the 1980s than the 1970s. That is, the increase in scarcity as measured by relative energy prices observed during the 1970s was not reversed completely during the 1980s for natural gas and crude oil. Unit costs for natural gas and crude oil demonstrate analogous patterns and test results. Given that change has take place, it has implications for future economic growth to the extent that resource scarcity and economic growth are interrelated. To see whether this is a relevant concern, subsequent to the examination of changing trends in resource scarcity, an objective effort is made to identify a long-run equilibrium relationship between energy scarcity and economic growth. Relying on cointegration techniques, only for crude oil is there a suggestion that resource scarcity has affected economic growth in the US over the period 1889--1992. 56 refs.

  19. Economic Incentives for Cybersecurity: Using Economics to Design Technologies Ready for Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishik, Claire; Sheldon, Frederick T; Ott, David

    2013-01-01

    Cybersecurity practice lags behind cyber technology achievements. Solutions designed to address many problems may and do exist but frequently cannot be broadly deployed due to economic constraints. Whereas security economics focuses on the cost/benefit analysis and supply/demand, we believe that more sophisticated theoretical approaches, such as economic modeling, rarely utilized, would derive greater societal benefits. Unfortunately, today technologists pursuing interesting and elegant solutions have little knowledge of the feasibility for broad deployment of their results and cannot anticipate the influences of other technologies, existing infrastructure, and technology evolution, nor bring the solutions lifecycle into the equation. Additionally, potentially viable solutions are not adopted because the risk perceptions by potential providers and users far outweighs the economic incentives to support introduction/adoption of new best practices and technologies that are not well enough defined. In some cases, there is no alignment with redominant and future business models as well as regulatory and policy requirements. This paper provides an overview of the economics of security, reviewing work that helped to define economic models for the Internet economy from the 1990s. We bring forward examples of potential use of theoretical economics in defining metrics for emerging technology areas, positioning infrastructure investment, and building real-time response capability as part of software development. These diverse examples help us understand the gaps in current research. Filling these gaps will be instrumental for defining viable economic incentives, economic policies, regulations as well as early-stage technology development approaches, that can speed up commercialization and deployment of new technologies in cybersecurity.

  20. Jobs and Economic Impacts Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Technical Publications » Jobs and Economic Impacts Reports Jobs and Economic Impacts Reports Find analysis reports about jobs and other economic impacts resulting from fuel cell deployment in transportation and early market applications. Economic Impacts Associated with Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles in California: An Analysis of the California Road Map Using the JOBS H2 Model (Argonne National Laboratory, December 2014) Economic Impact of Fuel Cell

  1. Studies Conclude Significant Economic Impact of OREM | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies Conclude Significant Economic Impact of OREM Studies Conclude Significant Economic Impact of OREM February 12, 2016 - 11:00am Addthis Cover of the summary document exploring OREM's economic impact. Cover of the summary document exploring OREM's economic impact. OAK RIDGE, Tenn., February 12, 2016 - The Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy has published two reports highlighting the economic impacts of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management

  2. 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development January Webinar: Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning for Tribal Economic Development | Department of Energy January Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development January Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development The Office of Indian Energy, in partnership with Western Area Power Administration, hosted a webinar on Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, about tools and resources available to establish a clean, diverse, and

  3. 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development March Webinar: Transmission and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Basics for Tribal Economic and Energy Development | Department of Energy March Webinar: Transmission and Grid Basics for Tribal Economic and Energy Development 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development March Webinar: Transmission and Grid Basics for Tribal Economic and Energy Development The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, in partnership with Western Area Power Administration (Western), hosted a webinar on "Transmission and Grid Basics for Tribal Economic

  4. Founding Legislation - Office of Minority Economic Impact | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Founding Legislation - Office of Minority Economic Impact Founding Legislation - Office of Minority Economic Impact The Office of Minority Economic Impact, now titled the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641, Title VI, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978. The following document is a copy of the legislative mandate of the Office of Minority Economic Impact. It includes: Establishing a Director

  5. Racial Geography, Economic Growth and Natural Disaster Resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huiping; Fernandez, Steven J.; Ganguly, Auroop

    2014-03-01

    Recent development of National Response Plans and National Incident Management Plans has emphasized the need for interoperability of plans, systems, technology, and command structures. However, much less emphasis has been placed on equally important elements such as the at-risk populations’ response to those plans, systems, and directions. The community-wide consequences of Hurricane Katrina demonstrated that the protection of communities should no longer be considered only a function of public organizations. Private organizations, nonprofit organizations and individual households have significant roles to play in these plans (Comfort 2006, Salamon 2002). This study is a first attempt to characterize the effect on the resilience (recovery) of metropolitan areas by the presence (or absence) of separate small communities within a larger jurisdiction. These communities can be based on many different social cleavages (ethnic, racial, economic, social, geographic, linguistic, etc.).

  6. System Advisor Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a performance and economic model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry, ranging from project managers and engineers to incentive program designers, technology developers, and researchers.

  7. Economics of ethanol fuel for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontana, C.; Rotz, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate conventional and ethanol fuel consumption for crop production. The model was validated by obtaining a close comparison between simulated and actual diesel requirements for farms in Michigan. Parameters for ethanol consumption were obtained from laboratory tests using total fueling of spark-ignition engines and dual-fueling of diesel engines with ethanol. Ethanol fuel will always be more economically used in spark-ignition engines than in dual-fueled diesel engines. The price of gasoline must inflate at least 14 percent/year greater than that of ethanol and diesel must inflate at least 23 percent/year more than ethanol to allow economic use of ethanol as tractor fuel within the next 5 years. (Refs. 13).

  8. Native American companies receive economic development grants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Native American VAF Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Native American companies receive economic development grants Awards total $60,000 March 1, 2015 Phoebe Suina of High Water Mark, one of this year's Native American VAF recipients. Phoebe Suina of High Water Mark, one of this year's Native American VAF recipients. Contact Community Programs Director Kurt Steinhaus Email Editor

  9. Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact Final Rule, 10 CFR 810 February 3, 2015 1 Executive Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for part 810 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) on Sept 7, 2011 and a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNOPR) on August 2, 2013. This regulation governs the process of export control review and approval for nuclear technology exports from the United States. After careful consideration of all

  10. WINDExchange: Wind Economic Development Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Development Resources and Tools This page lists wind-related economic development resources and tools such as publications, Web resources, and news. Search the WINDExchange Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Start Search Clear Search Date State Type of Information Program Area Title 5/1/2016 News Econ. Dev. Energy and Commerce Departments Announce Lab Partnership Opportunities for U.S. Small Businesses and Manufacturers 4/18/2016 VA Publication Econ.

  11. Alan Farquharson, SVP Reservoir Engineering Economics! Upstream

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 16, 2015 Alan Farquharson, SVP - Reservoir Engineering & Economics! Upstream Developments Generate Growing Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids Supply! 2 Forward-Looking Statements Certain statements and information in this presentation may constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The words "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "forecast," "plan,"

  12. Assessing the Economic Potential of Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Economic Potential of Advanced Biofuels - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  13. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include cogeneration power plants, design and operation of heat supply systems, waste heat and waste product utilization, and fossil fuel cogenerated power. Fuel cell cogeneration perspectives, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, protective relay and control systems, and market potential are discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Economic feasibility analysis of water-harvesting techniques for mined-land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Marti, M.H.

    1981-07-01

    A water harvesting, agricultural production system, field tested as a means of reclaiming strip-mined land is described. Though the technical feasibility of the system is becoming increasingly apparent, economic feasibility and legal issues may determine its potential application. The purpose of this study is to explore the economic feasibility of the system and to provide information for use in assessing whether further investigation of water harvesting reclamation techniques is warranted. The economic feasibility of the PNL reclamation system hinges on whether its net benefits exceed those of conventional reclamation. This preliminary feasibility study assesses the net private benefits of each system using data for the Peabody Coal Company's Kayenta mine on the Black Mesa in Arizona. To compare the alternative reclamation systems, the present value of direct net benefits (income minus production and reclamation costs) is calculated for grazing (conventional reclamation) or for cropping (PNL reclamation). Three of the PNL system slope treatments have lower estimated total costs than conventional reclamation. The difference is $3895/acre for compacted slope, $3025/acre for salt-compacted slope and $2310/acre for crop-on-slope. These differences constitute a substantial cost advantage for the system on the basis of the present value of land reclamation and maintenance costs. The system also has advantages based on the estimated value of agricultural production capacity. Even the lowest yield levels considered for alfalfa, corn, and pinto beans had higher net present values than grazing.

  15. Economic Analysis Case Studies of Battery Energy Storage with SAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Interest in energy storage has continued to increase as states like California have introduced mandates and subsidies to spur adoption. This energy storage includes customer sited behind-the-meter storage coupled with photovoltaics (PV). This paper presents case study results from California and Tennessee, which were performed to assess the economic benefit of customer-installed systems. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued.

  16. Economizer recirculation for low-load stability in heat recovery steam generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuscino, R.T.; Shade, R.L. Jr.

    1986-04-15

    An economizer system is described for heating feedwater in a heat recovery steam generator which consists of: at least first and second economizer tube planes; each of the economizer tube planes including a plurality of generally parallel tubes; the tubes being generally vertically disposed; each of the economizer tube planes including a top header and a bottom header; all of the plurality of tubes in each economizer tube plane being connected in parallel to their top and bottom headers whereby parallel feedwater flow through the plurality of tubes between the top and bottom headers is enabled; one of the top and bottom headers being an inlet header; a second of the top and bottom headers being an outlet header; a boiler feed pump; the boiler feed pump being effective for applying a flow of feedwater to the inlet header; means for serially interconnecting the economizer tube planes; the means for serially interconnecting including means for flowing the feedwater upward and downward in tubes of alternating ones of the economizer tube planes between the inlet header and the outlet header; means for conveying heated feedwater from the outlet header to a using process; means for recirculating at least a portion of the heated feedwater from the outlet header to an inlet of the boiler feed pump; and the means for recirculating including means for relating the portion to a steam load in the using process whereby an increased flow is produced through all of the economizer tube planes at values of the steam load below a predetermined value and a condition permitting initiation of reverse flow in any of the tubes is substantially reduced.

  17. Energy Economics of Farm Biogas in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillay, Pragasen; Grimberg, Stefan; Powers, Susan E

    2012-10-24

    Anaerobic digestion of farm and dairy waste has been shown to be capital intensive. One way to improve digester economics is to co-digest high-energy substrates together with the dairy manure. Cheese whey for example represents a high-energy substrate that is generated during cheese manufacture. There are currently no quantitative tools available that predict performance of co-digestion farm systems. The goal of this project was to develop a mathematical tool that would (1) predict the impact of co-digestion and (2) determine the best use of the generated biogas for a cheese manufacturing plant. Two models were developed that separately could be used to meet both goals of the project. Given current pricing structures of the most economical use of the generated biogas at the cheese manufacturing plant was as a replacement of fuel oil to generate heat. The developed digester model accurately predicted the performance of 26 farm digesters operating in the North Eastern U.S.

  18. Webinar: DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model Above is the video recording for the webinar, "DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells ...

  19. File:Wind-turbine-economics-student.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind-turbine-economics-student.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind-turbine-economics-student.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  20. File:Wind-turbine-economics-teacher.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind-turbine-economics-teacher.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind-turbine-economics-teacher.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  1. File:Wind-turbine-economics-lp.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind-turbine-economics-lp.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind-turbine-economics-lp.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other...

  2. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning for Tribal Economic Development Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development January 27, 2016 11:00AM to 12:30PM MST Tribal governments ...

  3. Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now Available Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now Available April 25, 2013 ...

  4. THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1234 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO ...

  5. 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development March Webinar: Transmissio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Tribal Economic and Energy Development 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development ... Energy Development" Wednesday, March 30, 2016, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain Time. ...

  6. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid ...aspen-plus.cfm. 4. Tao, L.; Aden, A. "The Economics of Current and Future Biofuels." ...

  7. London School of Economics and Political Science | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economics and Political Science Jump to: navigation, search Name: London School of Economics and Political Science Place: United Kingdom Zip: WC2A 2AE Product: Centre for research...

  8. Economics in Criticality and Restoration of Energy Infrastructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Gale A.; Flaim, Silvio J.; Folga, Stephen M.; Gotham, Douglas J.; McLamore, Michael R.; Novak, Mary H.; Roop, Joe M.; Rossmann, Charles G.; Shamsuddin, Shabbir A.; Zeichner, Lee M.; Stamber, Kevin L.

    2005-03-01

    Economists, systems analysts, engineers, regulatory specialists, and other experts were assembled from academia, the national laboratories, and the energy industry to discuss present restoration practices (many have already been defined to the level of operational protocols) in the sectors of the energy infrastructure as well as other infrastructures, to identify whether economics, a discipline concerned with the allocation of scarce resources, is explicitly or implicitly a part of restoration strategies, and if there are novel economic techniques and solution methods that could be used help encourage the restoration of energy services more quickly than present practices or to restore service more efficiently from an economic perspective. AcknowledgementsDevelopment of this work into a coherent product with a useful message has occurred thanks to the thoughtful support of several individuals:Kenneth Friedman, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance, provided the impetus for the work, as well as several suggestions and reminders of direction along the way. Funding from DOE/OEA was critical to the completion of this effort.Arnold Baker, Chief Economist, Sandia National Laboratories, and James Peerenboom, Director, Infrastructure Assurance Center, Argonne National Laboratory, provided valuable contacts that helped to populate the authoring team with the proper mix of economists, engineers, and systems and regulatory specialists to meet the objectives of the work.Several individuals provided valuable review of the document at various stages of completion, and provided suggestions that were valuable to the editing process. This list of reviewers includes Jeffrey Roark, Economist, Tennessee Valley Authority; James R. Dalrymple, Manager of Transmission System Services and Transmission/Power Supply, Tennessee Valley Authority; William Mampre, Vice President, EN Engineering; Kevin Degenstein, EN Engineering; and Patrick Wilgang, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance.With many authors, creating a document with a single voice is a difficult task. Louise Maffitt, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Engineering Research and Applications at New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology (on contract to Sandia National Laboratories) served a vital role in the development of this document by taking the unedited material (in structured format) and refining the basic language so as to make the flow of the document as close to a single voice as one could hope for. Louise's work made the job of reducing the content to a readable length an easier process. Additional editorial suggestions from the authors themselves, particularly from Sam Flaim, Steve Folga, and Doug Gotham, expedited this process.

  9. Fan System Assessment Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fan System Assessment Tool Fan System Assessment Tool April 10, 2014 - 3:08pm Addthis Fan System Assessment Tool The Fan System Assessment Tool (FSAT) is a free online software tool that helps industrial users quantify energy use and savings opportunities in industrial fan systems. Use FSAT to understand how well your fan systems are operating, determine the economic benefit of system modifications, and establish which options are most economically viable when multiple opportunities exist for

  10. Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development Renewable Energy Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASSISTANT SECRETARY INDIAN AFFAIRS OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (OIEED) Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) seeks to spur job growth and sustainable economies on American Indian reservations. OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (OIEED) OIEED BUSINESS MODEL INDIAN TRUST LANDS RENEWABLE ENERGY POTENTIAL Resource Number of Reservations Wind 60 Woody Biomass 179 Waste to

  11. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  12. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  13. Biomass and Biofuels: Technology and Economic Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, A

    2007-05-23

    Presentation on biomass and biofuels technology and economics presented at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, May 23, 2007.

  14. Minority Business and Economic Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business and Economic Development Minority Business and Economic Development The Office of Minority Business and Economic Development is responsible for contract assistance, energy research, development, outreach and technical assistance for minority businesses. The Office was established in November 2013. Karen Atkinson serves as Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Minority Business and Economic Development. Get in touch: Email us at diversity@hq.doe.gov or call (202) 586-8383. Stay in

  15. Techno-Economic, Sustainability, and Market Analysis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techno-Economic, Sustainability, and Market Analysis NREL conducts techno-economic analyses (TEAs) for algal biofuels, thermochemical conversion, and biochemical conversion. Photo of two algae raceway ponds that show large-scale algae biomass production in the form of two oval-shaped pools filled with dark green liquid and a paddle-wheel in each pool that is agitating the liquid as it flows around. Algal Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis NREL's Algae Techno-Economic Analysis group employs

  16. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Construction- and Operations-related Economic Activity from 1,800 MW of New Natural Gas Generation ......

  17. Governor Haslam touts Oak Ridge's economic possibilities | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Governor Haslam touts Oak Ridge's economic possibilities Governor Haslam touts Oak Ridge's economic possibilities March 24, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam, at ETTP's fire station, discusses economic opportunities in Oak Ridge. Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam, at ETTP's fire station, discusses economic opportunities in Oak Ridge. On March 21, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam visited the Energy Department's East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge. During his

  18. 10th Annual Native American Economic Development Conference | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 10th Annual Native American Economic Development Conference 10th Annual Native American Economic Development Conference June 6, 2016 7:30AM PDT to June 7, 2016 4:00PM PDT Anaheim, California Disney's Grand Californian Hotel & Spa 1600 Disneyland Dr. Anaheim, CA 92802 The 10th Annual Native American Economic Development Conference is hosting renewable energy sessions, including Tribal Renewable Energy Projects Roundtable: Creating Sovereignty, Energy Independence, Economic

  19. Re-thinking incentives and penalties: Economic aspects of waste management in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossu, R.; Masi, S.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ‱ We focused on the dynamics the formation of operational costs of waste management. ‱ We provide the basic elements to compose a picture of economic management. ‱ We present a reflection on the last hidden costs associated with the consumption of goods and packaging. ‱ Reduction of waste production. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the dynamics the formation of operational costs of waste management in Italy and the effect of economic measures. Currently incentives and penalties have been internalized by the system no differently from other cost items and revenues. This has greatly influenced the system directing it towards solutions that are often distant from the real environmental objectives. Based on an analysis of disaggregated costs of collection treatment and recovery, we provide the basic elements to compose a picture of economic management in various technical–organizational scenarios. In the light of the considerations contained in the paper it is proposed, e.g. for controlled landfills, that the ecotax, currently based on weight, could be replaced by one based on the volume consumption. Likewise, for tax reduction on disposal system, instead a pre-treatment might ask an environmental balance of the overall system. The article presents a reflection on the last hidden costs associated with the consumption of goods and packaging, and how to reduce waste production is the necessary path to be followed in ecological and economic perspectives.

  20. Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management | Department of Energy Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management By: Drury Crawley, Office of Energy

  1. Path to Economic Sovereignty: Arctic Opportunities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Path to Economic Sovereignty: Arctic Opportunities Presented by Kip Knudson Office of Alaska Governor Bill Walker Slide Deck prepared by Sean Skaling, Director, Alaska Energy Authority Photo by Chuck Berray 200 remote microgrids spread over large area  Population: 735,000  Area: 660,000 sq. miles  1.2 people/sq. mile  New Jersey has 1,000 times the density  About 200 stand-alone microgrid communities 3 Alaska Electrical Generation Railbelt 72% of Pop 76% of Energy Natural Gas*

  2. Evaluating Behind-the-Meter Energy Storage Systems with NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluating Behind-the- Meter Energy Storage Systems with NREL's System Advisor Model A new model helps companies assess the performance and economic effects of integrating battery ...

  3. Real-time hydro coordination and economic hydro optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dasigenis, A.T.; Garcia-San Pedro, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper addresses the real-time aspects of the Hydro-Thermal Coordination problem. It describes the real-time modeling and monitoring of hydro resources, and the use of the resulting real-time hydraulic data in the on-line Economic Dispatch algorithm. A variable head, hydro loss model is incorporated that allows for on-line changes to the hydro topology. The method presented provides the operator with a current view of the available water resources, enables the validation of the real-time hydro data received from the field, and enables real-time optimization of the Hydro-Thermal Unit Commitment plan. The implementation of this approach on the Iberdrola system in Spain is described.

  4. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Power Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Systems Engineering Power systems engineering at NREL means working with the electricity industry to optimize strategies for effectively interconnecting renewable resources and emerging energy efficiency technologies with the electric power system. Power systems engineering focuses on resolving grid integration barriers to sustainable, economic, secure, and reliable electricity based on a paradigm of high penetration of renewable energy, coordinated and intelligent cyber-control, and

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-03-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on brownfield sites in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All of the assessed sites are landfills. The sites were assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.119/kWh and incentives offered by Puerto Rico and by the serving utility, PREPA. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  6. Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-11-01

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

  7. Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-07-31

    On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

  8. Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

  9. Economic Evaluation of Short-Term Wind Power Forecasts in ERCOT: Preliminary Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwig, K.; Hodge, B. M.; Brinkman, G.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Banunarayanan, V.; Nasir, S.; Freedman, J.

    2012-09-01

    Historically, a number of wind energy integration studies have investigated the value of using day-ahead wind power forecasts for grid operational decisions. These studies have shown that there could be large cost savings gained by grid operators implementing the forecasts in their system operations. To date, none of these studies have investigated the value of shorter-term (0 to 6-hour-ahead) wind power forecasts. In 2010, the Department of Energy and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration partnered to fund improvements in short-term wind forecasts and to determine the economic value of these improvements to grid operators, hereafter referred to as the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP). In this work, we discuss the preliminary results of the economic benefit analysis portion of the WFIP for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. The improvements seen in the wind forecasts are examined, then the economic results of a production cost model simulation are analyzed.

  10. Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2011-10-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

  11. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

    2008-11-28

    Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

  12. U.S. and EU Unite to Strengthen Economic Integration and Boost Jobs, Growth and Competitiveness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Bush Administration hosted the second informal U.S.-EU economic ministerial meeting to discuss transatlantic economic integration and shared economic challenges. ...

  13. Energy efficiency, human behavior, and economic growth: Challenges to cutting energy demand to sustainable levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, Tilman

    2015-03-30

    Increasing energy efficiency in households, transportation, industries, and services is an important strategy to reduce energy service demand to levels that allow the steep reduction of greenhouse gases, and a full fledged switch of energy systems to a renewable basis. Yet, technological efficiency improvements may generate so-called rebound effects, which may ‘eat up’ parts of the technical savings potential. This article provides a comprehensive review of existing research on these effects, raises critiques, and points out open questions. It introduces micro-economic rebound effect and suggests extending consumer-side analysis to incorporate potential ‘psychological rebound effects.’ It then discusses meso-economic rebound effects, i.e. producer-side and market-level rebounds, which so far have achieved little attention in the literature. Finally, the article critically reviews evidence for macro-economic rebound effects as energy efficiency-induced economic growth impacts. For all three categories, the article summarizes assessments of their potential quantitative scope, while pointing out remaining methodological weaknesses and open questions. As a rough “rule of thumb”, in the long term and on gross average, only half the technical savings potential of across-the-board efficiency improvements may actually be achieved in the real world. Policies that aim at cutting energy service demand to sustainable levels are well advised to take due note of detrimental behavioral and economic growth impacts, and should foster policies and measures that can contain them.

  14. Economic impacts of irrigation load management controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, D.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Irrigators subject to load management controls experience electric power interruptions during periods of peak power demand. The resulting interruptions in irrigation pumping may result in moisture stress-induced crop yield reductions. The results of analysis show a great sensitivity of irrigator incomes to such yield losses. The sensitivity is of such a magnitude that rural electric cooperatives (RECs) would have to offer load management incentives of at least five times their monthly demand charges for irrigators under typical conditions (not oversized irrigation pumps) to remain under load control when irrigated crops are experiencing yield-reducing moisture stress. Incentives of this magnitude cannot be economically justified by most RECs. Thus, provision for the voluntary withdrawal of irrigators from load control is an essential feature of most workable and effective irrigation laod management programs.

  15. Laser-isotope-separation technology. [Review; economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.J.; Blair, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Molecular Laser Isotope Separation (MLIS) process currently under development is discussed as an operative example of the use of lasers for material processing. The MLIS process, which uses infrared and ultraviolet lasers to process uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) resulting in enriched uranium fuel to be used in electrical-power-producing nuclear reactor, is reviewed. The economics of the MLIS enrichment process is compared with conventional enrichment technique, and the projected availability of MLIS enrichment capability is related to estimated demands for U.S. enrichment service. The lasers required in the Los Alamos MLIS program are discussed in detail, and their performance and operational characteristics are summarized. Finally, the timely development of low-cost, highly efficient ultraviolet and infrared lasers is shownd to be the critical element controlling the ultimate deployment of MLIS uranium enrichment. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  16. Financial and economic determinants of collective action: The case of wastewater management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Norbert; Starkl, Markus

    2012-01-15

    Where public environmental funds support development of wastewater infrastructure, funding institutions ensure the economic use of funds, while the beneficiaries minimize their own costs. In rural areas, there is often a choice between decentralized or centralized (multi-village) systems: if the centralized system is most economic, then only this system is eligible for public funding. However, its implementation requires a voluntary cooperation of the concerned communities, who need to organize themselves to develop and run the infrastructure. The paper analyzes the social determinants of collaboration in a generic case study, using the following variables: method of (economic) assessment, modeled by the social discount rate, funding policy, modeled by the funding rate, and users' self-organization, modeled by cost sharing. In a borderline situation, where the centralized system turns out to be most economic, but this assessment is contingent on the assessment method, collective action may fail: the advantages of collective action from funding are too small to outweigh organizational deficiencies. Considering in this situation sanitation as a human right, authors recommend using innovative forms of organization and, if these fail, reassessing either the amount of funding or the eligibility for funding of more acceptable alternatives. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A generic case study models collective action and funding in wastewater management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determinants of success: economic assessment, funding policy and self-organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success indicators: conflict rate, funds needed to make cost shares fair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for analyzing centralized vs. decentralized disputes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer If collective action has less benefits, innovative cost sharing may ensure success.

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Van Geet, O.

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California. The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.13/kWh and incentives offered by Southern California Edison under the California Solar Initiative. According to the assessment, a government-owned, ground-mounted PV system represents a technically and economically feasible option. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  18. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  19. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichman, Joshua

    2015-07-30

    This presentation summarizes opportunities for hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas and presents the results of a market analysis performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to quantify the value of energy storage. Hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas systems have the ability to integrate multiple energy sectors including electricity, transportation, and industrial. On account of the flexibility of hydrogen systems, there are a variety of potential system configurations. Each configuration will provide different value to the owner, customers and grid system operator. This presentation provides an economic comparison of hydrogen storage, power-to-gas and conventional storage systems. The total cost is compared to the revenue with participation in a variety of markets to assess the economic competitiveness. It is found that the sale of hydrogen for transportation or industrial use greatly increases competitiveness. Electrolyzers operating as demand response devices (i.e., selling hydrogen and grid services) are economically competitive, while hydrogen storage that inputs electricity and outputs only electricity have an unfavorable business case. Additionally, tighter integration with the grid provides greater revenue (e.g., energy, ancillary service and capacity markets are explored). Lastly, additional hours of storage capacity is not necessarily more competitive in current energy and ancillary service markets and electricity markets will require new mechanisms to appropriately compensate long duration storage devices.

  20. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: The Economics of The Kyoto Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JA Edmonds; CN MacCracken; RD Sands; SH Kim

    2000-07-06

    The Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) was completed on the morning of December 11, 1997, following over two years of negotiations. The product of these deliberations is a complex and incomplete document knitting together the diversity of interests and perspectives represented by the more than 150 delegations. Because the document is complex, its implications are not immediately obvious. If it enters into force, the Kyoto Protocol will have far-reaching implications for all nations--both nations with obligations under the Protocol and those without obligations. National energy systems, and the world's energy system, could be forever changed. In this paper the authors develop an assessment of the energy and economic implications of achieving the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. They find that many of the details of the Protocol that remain to be worked out introduce critical uncertainties affecting the cost of compliance. There are also a variety of uncertainties that further complicate the analysis. These include future non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas emissions and the cost of their mitigation. Other uncertainties include the resolution of negotiations to establish rules for determining and allocating land-use emissions rights, mechanisms for Annex 1 trading, and participation by non-Annex 1 members in the Clean Development Mechanism. In addition, there are economic uncertainties, such as the behavior of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union in supplying emissions credits under Annex 1 trading. These uncertainties in turn could affect private sector investments in anticipation of the Protocol's entrance into force. The longer the nature of future obligations remains unclear, the less able decision makers will be to incorporate these rules into their investment decisions. They find that the cost of implementing the Protocol in the US can vary by more than an order of magnitude. The marginal cost could be as low as $26 per tonne of carbon if a global system of emissions mitigation could be quickly and effectively implemented. But it could also exceed $250 per tonne of carbon if the US must meet its emissions limitations entirely through domestic actions, and if mitigation obligations are not adequately anticipated by decision-makers.

  1. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from

  2. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conventional Hydro Model Conventional Hydro Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Conventional Hydro model was developed to demonstrate the economic benefits associated with conventional hydro power plants in the United States. The primary goal in developing the state level model was to provide a tool for developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, decision makers and other potential users, to easily identify the local economic impacts associated with

  3. NREL Estimates Economically Viable U.S. Renewable Generation - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Estimates Economically Viable U.S. Renewable Generation November 19, 2015 Analysts at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are providing, for the first time, a method for measuring the economic potential of renewable energy across the United States. A study applying this new method found that renewable energy generation is economically viable in many parts of the United States largely due to rapidly declining technology costs. The report,

  4. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover | Department of Energy Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover This report is an update of NREL's ongoing process design and economic analyses of

  5. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Environmental Benefits with Propane Buses Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic and Environmental Benefits with Propane Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic and Environmental Benefits with Propane Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic and Environmental Benefits with Propane Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mesa Unified

  7. Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Evaluation Volume 2 | Department of Energy Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 2 Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 2 Final Report: Savings and Economic Impacts of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 2, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, June 2015. Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and

  8. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

  9. Before the Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation and Regulatory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affairs - House Committee on Oversight and Governmant Reform | Department of Energy Economic Growth, Job Creation and Regulatory Affairs - House Committee on Oversight and Governmant Reform Before the Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation and Regulatory Affairs - House Committee on Oversight and Governmant Reform Written statement of Nicholas Whitcombe, Former Acting Director, Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Submitted to the Subcommittee on Economic Growth,

  10. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 | Department of Energy CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 This presentation, "Industrial/Commercial/Institutional Boiler MACT - Combined Heat and Power: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy," by John Cuttica, Midwest Clean Energy Application Center, and Bruce Hedman, ICF International, is from the January 17, 2012, SEE

  11. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Printable Version JEDI Fact Sheet The cover of JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model factsheet. PDF 563 KB The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's WINDExchange program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze biofuels, coal, concentrating solar power,

  12. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model Analysis JEDI Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models Printable Version About JEDI Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from MHK power generation projects. The basic user interface for the MHK model is the same as for all other JEDI models. Results are provided in the same format as other JEDI models allowing for

  13. Office of Economic Impact and Diversity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Minorities in Energy Initiative: Our Ambassadors Minorities in Energy Initiative: Our Ambassadors The Minorities in Energy Initiative, guided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, seeks to create a substantive, sustainable model that connects diverse stakeholders together to address challenges and opportunities for minority engagement in energy economic participation, STEM education, and climate change. Read more

  14. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Status Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the

  15. 2013 Economic Dispatch and Technological Change - Report to Congress (March

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014) | Department of Energy Economic Dispatch and Technological Change - Report to Congress (March 2014) 2013 Economic Dispatch and Technological Change - Report to Congress (March 2014) In this report, the Department of Energy is responding to Sections 1234 and 1832 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, which directed the Secretary of Energy to conduct an annual study of economic dispatch and potential ways to improve such dispatch to benefit American electricity consumers. In this 2013

  16. Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis: A Foundation -

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information Administration Appendix A Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis: A Foundation Release date: October 15, 2014 Neoclassical economics has shaped our understanding of human behavior for several decades. While still an important starting point for economic studies, neoclassical frameworks have generally imposed strong assumptions, for example regarding utility maximization, information, and foresight, while treating consumer preferences as given or external to

  17. Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2009-05-29

    This analysis explores economic impacts that might result from a wide-area release of anthrax. The intent is not to provide a quantitative analysis of such a disaster, but to: 1. Define the general categories of economic impacts that the region should be concerned about; and, 2. Explore what types of private sector businesses or industries, if any, may have the greatest impact on speeding the economic recovery of the region.

  18. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project objective: To conduct an economic impact study for EGS and to develop a Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) tool to quantify (in economic terms) the potential job, energy and environmental impacts associated with electric power production from geothermal resources. PDF icon analysis_low_t_resources_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Canby Cascaded Geothermal Project Phase 1 Feasibility Novel Energy Conversion

  19. Algal Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Techno-Economic Analysis To promote an understanding of the challenges and opportunities unique to microalgae, NREL's Algae Techno-Economic Analysis group focuses on techno-economic analysis (TEA) for the production and conversion of algal biomass into biofuels and coproducts. We help research technologies that will enable the production of cost-competitive hydrocarbon fuels and products from algal biomass in support of the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy

  20. Evaluation of Variable Refrigerant Flow Systems Performance and the Enhanced Control Algorithm on Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Flexible Research Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Piljae; Munk, Jeffrey D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2015-06-01

    A research project “Evaluation of Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Systems Performance and the Enhanced Control Algorithm on Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Flexible Research Platform” was performed to (1) install and validate the performance of Samsung VRF systems compared with the baseline rooftop unit (RTU) variable-air-volume (VAV) system and (2) evaluate the enhanced control algorithm for the VRF system on the two-story flexible research platform (FRP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Based on the VRF system designed by Samsung and ORNL, the system was installed from February 18 through April 15, 2014. The final commissioning and system optimization were completed on June 2, 2014, and the initial test for system operation was started the following day, June 3, 2014. In addition, the enhanced control algorithm was implemented and updated on June 18. After a series of additional commissioning actions, the energy performance data from the RTU and the VRF system were monitored from July 7, 2014, through February 28, 2015. Data monitoring and analysis were performed for the cooling season and heating season separately, and the calibrated simulation model was developed and used to estimate the energy performance of the RTU and VRF systems. This final report includes discussion of the design and installation of the VRF system, the data monitoring and analysis plan, the cooling season and heating season data analysis, and the building energy modeling study

  1. Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Report 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Economic Analysis Page 16 Document Number DE-EE0005360 by combining an excellent wind source and efficient large capacity turbines with the design, fabrication, and...

  2. Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TOOL Name: REMI AgencyCompany Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User Interface:...

  3. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and ...

  4. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to ... The process design converts biomass to a hydrocarbon intermediate, a free fatty acid, ...

  5. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to ... research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by ...

  6. Grid-Interactive Renewable Water Heating Economic and Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Grid-Interactive Renewable Water Heating Economic and Environmental Value Grid-interactive renewable water heaters have smart controls that quickly change their charge rate and ...

  7. Campo 's Remewble Energy: Security, Independance, and Economic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... availability Focused on economic development 9 November 2008 executed MOU & NDA 160MW wind farm to serve San Diego County Produce energy to power 54,000 homes ...

  8. The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change in Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Name The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico AgencyCompany Organization Government of Mexico Sector Energy Topics Policies...

  9. Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Economic Evaluation...

  10. NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603 Renewable ... From both perspectives, the program has been a huge success. NREL's analysis estimates ...

  11. TAP Webinar - Partnering For Success: How to Work with Economic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Topics include examples of successful partnerships with public finance institutions or economic development authorities for clean energy financing, how to lay the groundwork for a ...

  12. Community Wind Handbook/Research Project Economics & Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    * Submit Permit Applications * Find an Installer * Purchase Equipment * Plan for Maintenance Research Project Economics & Financing Generally defined as the amount of time it...

  13. Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios Effects Of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment ...

  14. 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development February Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February Webinar: Exploring Your Energy Markets 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic ... Your Energy Markets on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016, about exploring energy markets, wholesale ...

  15. 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development January Webinar:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January Webinar: Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development 2016 Tribal Energy and ... Development on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, about tools and resources available to ...

  16. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  17. Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in New Automotive Painting Technologies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting Technologies Painting is ...

  18. Webinar: Lessons From Iowa: The Economic, Market, and Organizational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Lessons From Iowa: The Economic, Market, and Organizational Issues in Making Bulk Energy Storage Work - February 9, 2012 (new date) Webinar: Lessons From Iowa: The ...

  19. NREL's Economic Impact Tops $872 Million | Awards and Honors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The economic impact of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was 872.3 million nationwide in fiscal year 2014, according to a study by the...

  20. Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Financial Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank...

  1. Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference AgencyCompany...

  2. Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development funds Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:...

  3. Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this property. Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 Screenshot References: African Economy1 "The key questions addressed in the report are as follows: What are the...

  4. Center for Chinese Energy Economics Research | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Economics Research Place: Xiamen, Fujian Province, PRC Website: ice.xmu.edu.cnenglishshowlet References: http:ice.xmu.edu.cnenglishshowletter.aspx?newsid2637 This...

  5. Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meetup | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting (SWAMC) highlights the need for ... providing conference attendees with the knowledge they need to pursue new opportunities.

  6. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Fletcher, Jerald 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT The project currently is composed of six specific tasks - three...

  7. Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP AgencyCompany Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy...

  8. Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * NRELSR-550-35037 The Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada R. K. Schwer and M. Riddel Center for Business and ...

  9. Indonesia-GTZ Mini-Hydropower Schemes for Sustainable Economic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "Energy supplies generated by mini-hydropower to selected rural areas in Sulawesi, Java and Sumatra are improved. Local economic cycles triggered by this are able to generate...

  10. Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Report 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Analysis of the U.S. wind market, including analysis of developments in wind technology, changes in policy, and effect on economic impact, regional development, and job creation.

  11. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... economic impacts in the North Atlantic region (Navigant Consulting 2013; Hamilton 2013). ... which is in line with the estimates that the Navigant Consortium reports (Hamilton 2013). ...

  12. Our impending energy, climate-change, and economic-development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    crisis : Options for Change - Part 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Our impending energy, climate-change, and economic-development crisis : Options for ...

  13. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    project owners, and others interested in the economic impacts from new electricity generation projects. JEDI's user-friendly design allows novices to explore the statewide...

  14. United Nations Economic Commission for Africa | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Ministerial Consultation known as "The Big Table" . Started in 2000, a small group of African Ministers of Finance gather with...

  15. Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a particular utility-scale wind configuration project that has been referred to as the "Big Wind" project. Lantz, E.; Tegen, S. (April 2009). Economic Development Impacts of...

  16. KEP LLC Economic and Management Consulting PRESENTED TO:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New tracks, yard expansions 9 KEP LLC Economic and Management Consulting Effective rail transportation management matters Unit train operations will generally have preference ...

  17. Microsoft Word - REPORT Jefferson Lab Economic Impact FY2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these contractors and visitors also spend money in the immediate area for accommodations, food and transportation. The estimation of economic impact is an analytic process that...

  18. NPR's Science Friday discussed lighting economics with Sandia...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    September 20, 2010 :: Jerry Simmons, director of the EFRC for Solid-State Lighting Science at Sandia National Laboratory, discussed the economics of LED lighting on the September ...

  19. OSIRIS and the Collaborative Modeling Initiative on REDD Economics...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RelatedTo: Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet (OSIRIS) Cost: Free Language: English OSIRIS and the Collaborative Modeling Initiative on REDD Economics...

  20. Spurring Local Economic Development with Clean Energy Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), provides information on Spurring Local Economic Development with Clean Energy Investments.

  1. Socio-economic impact analysis in the NEPA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnovitz, A.; McQueen, S.

    1997-08-01

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations require environmental impact statements to assess direct and indirect effects on a number of different environmental resource categories, including economic and social effects. However, NEPA regulations do not dictate the scope of the socio-economic analyses or specify which analytical procedures must be employed. As a result, socio-economic impact analyses vary considerably across NEPA documents in both the methodology of analysis and in the models used to quantify impacts. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of socio-economic analyses in NEPA documents and present strategies for ensuring that the socio-economic analyses are focused on the most relevant socio-economic indicators, while still conforming to the full intent of NEPA. This paper will provide guidance on what factors should be considered when identifying the economic indicators to be assessed. The paper will also describe and discuss various types of models currently used to quantify economic impacts in NEPA documents, and the comparative advantages and disadvantages of these models. In addition, the definition of the appropriate Return On Investment in relation to the model used and the analysis performed will be discussed. The offices of the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the Food and Drug Administration present real world examples of innovative approaches to socio-economic impact analysis.

  2. Before the Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Written statement of Nicholas Whitcombe, Former Acting Director, Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Submitted to the Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job ...

  3. Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap AgencyCompany Organization:...

  4. UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations1 Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country...

  5. Planning cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limaye, D.

    1984-01-01

    Major factors and considerations in the planning and evaluation of cogeneration systems are explained here. Coverage is provided of prefeasibility assessment, technical and economic feasibility evaluation, computerized systems design, cogeneration technologies and applications, and non-conventional technologies. Also discussed are fuel availability and price trends, financing and risk management in cogeneration projects, and practical considerations in cogeneration implementation.

  6. Economic Feasibility of Recycling Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.K.; Fthenakis, V.

    2010-12-01

    The market for photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has boomed over the last decade, and its expansion is expected to continue with the development of new technologies. Taking into consideration the usage of valuable resources and the generation of emissions in the life cycle of photovoltaic technologies dictates proactive planning for a sound PV recycling infrastructure to ensure its sustainability. PV is expected to be a 'green' technology, and properly planning for recycling will offer the opportunity to make it a 'double-green' technology - that is, enhancing life cycle environmental quality. In addition, economic feasibility and a sufficient level of value-added opportunity must be ensured, to stimulate a recycling industry. In this article, we survey mathematical models of the infrastructure of recycling processes of other products and identify the challenges for setting up an efficient one for PV. Then we present an operational model for an actual recycling process of a thin-film PV technology. We found that for the case examined with our model, some of the scenarios indicate profitable recycling, whereas in other scenarios it is unprofitable. Scenario SC4, which represents the most favorable scenario by considering the lower bounds of all costs and the upper bound of all revenues, produces a monthly profit of $107,000, whereas the least favorable scenario incurs a monthly loss of $151,000. Our intent is to extend the model as a foundation for developing a framework for building a generalized model for current-PV and future-PV technologies.

  7. Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis Lau

    2002-12-01

    Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more general term, and includes heating as well as the injection of other ''ingredients'' such as oxygen and water. Pyrolysis alone is a useful first step in creating vapors from coal or biomass that can then be processed in subsequent steps to make liquid fuels. Such products are not the objective of this project. Therefore pyrolysis was not included in the process design or in the economic analysis. High-pressure, fluidized bed gasification is best known to GTI through 30 years of experience. Entrained flow, in contrast to fluidized bed, is a gasification technology applied at much larger unit sizes than employed here. Coal gasification and residual oil gasifiers in refineries are the places where such designs have found application, at sizes on the order of 5 to 10 times larger than what has been determined for this study. Atmospheric pressure gasification is also not discussed. Atmospheric gasification has been the choice of all power system pilot plants built for biomass to date, except for the Varnamo plant in Sweden, which used the Ahlstrom (now Foster Wheeler) pressurized gasifier. However, for fuel production, the disadvantage of the large volumetric flows at low pressure leads to the pressurized gasifier being more economical.

  8. A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

    2002-05-17

    An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

  9. Planning a Small Wind Electric System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Wind Electric System Planning a Small Wind Electric System Small wind electric systems require planning to determine if there is enough wind, the location is appropriate, if wind systems are allowed, and if the system will be economical. | Photo courtesy of Bergey WindPower. Small wind electric systems require planning to determine if there is enough wind, the location is appropriate, if wind systems are allowed, and if the system will be economical. | Photo courtesy of Bergey WindPower.

  10. An operational subsea wireline system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dines, C.; Cowan, P.; Headworth, C.

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes an operational subsea wireline system that is self-contained and flexible and offers a safe, economical, and proven method for riserless re-entry into any subsea well.

  11. Green Data Center Cooling: Achieving 90% Reduction: Airside Economization and Unique Indirect Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weerts, B. A.; Gallaher, D.; Weaver, R.; Van Geet, O.

    2012-01-01

    The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center's constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant change is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling system. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. This project's geographic location allowed maximizing the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling, but these strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the U.S.

  12. Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing and Economic Development Conference is a three-day event that will cover new and rehabilitated homes of tribal members and economic development projects that have provided jobs and services in Indian Country. Attendees will hear from veteran developers and learn from industry leaders.

  13. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Optimizing your options: Extracting the full economic value of transmission when planning under uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Munoz, Francisco D.; Watson, Jean -Paul; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2015-06-04

    In this study, the anticipated magnitude of needed investments in new transmission infrastructure in the U.S. requires that these be allocated in a way that maximizes the likelihood of achieving society's goals for power system operation. The use of state-of-the-art optimization tools can identify cost-effective investment alternatives, extract more benefits out of transmission expansion portfolios, and account for the huge economic, technology, and policy uncertainties that the power sector faces over the next several decades.

  16. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  17. Impacts of Time Delays on Distributed Algorithms for Economic Dispatch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di; Sun, Yannan; Lian, Jianming

    2015-07-26

    Economic dispatch problem (EDP) is an important problem in power systems. It can be formulated as an optimization problem with the objective to minimize the total generation cost subject to the power balance constraint and generator capacity limits. Recently, several consensus-based algorithms have been proposed to solve EDP in a distributed manner. However, impacts of communication time delays on these distributed algorithms are not fully understood, especially for the case where the communication network is directed, i.e., the information exchange is unidirectional. This paper investigates communication time delay effects on a distributed algorithm for directed communication networks. The algorithm has been tested by applying time delays to different types of information exchange. Several case studies are carried out to evaluate the effectiveness and performance of the algorithm in the presence of time delays in communication networks. It is found that time delay effects have negative effects on the convergence rate, and can even result in an incorrect converge value or fail the algorithm to converge.

  18. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume I. Economic impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-12-22

    This analysis identifies the economic impacts associated with OTEC development and quantifies them at the national, regional, and industry levels. It focuses on the effects on the United States' economy of the domestic development and utilization of twenty-five and fifty 400 MWe OTEC power plants by the year 2000. The methodology employed was characteristic of economic impact analysis. After conducting a literature review, a likely future OTEC scenario was developed on the basis of technological, siting, and materials requirements parameters. These parameters were used to identify the industries affected by OTEC development; an economic profile was constructed for each of these industries. These profiles established an industrial baseline from which the direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts of OTEC implementation could be estimated. Each stage of this analysis is summarized; and the economic impacts are addressed. The methodology employed in estimating the impacts is described.

  19. The economic value of wind energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlak, Alex

    2008-10-15

    Today's wholesale electricity market passes intermittency costs to the ratepayer in the form of increased overall system cost, a hidden subsidy. Market managers need a competition that correctly allocates cost and provides consumers with the lowest price. One solution is for buyers to contract wind farms to provide energy on demand. (author)

  20. An approach for assessing the economics of sorption chillers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summerer, F.; Ziegler, F.F.

    1998-10-01

    Two methods are presented to optimize sorption chillers with respect to economics. To this end, the investment that is necessary for the heat exchangers is balanced with the achievable COP. The numerical tools available today allow for an exact calculation of thermodynamic processes. However, the thermophysical property data these calculations are based on are often not reliable. Moreover, the economic data that have to be taken into account are very rough guesses in most cases. Consequently, a detailed thermodynamic calculation often is too much effort if quick economic decisions have to be made. This paper shows how, based on the main irreversibilities of the process, quite strong economic statements can be made with limited effort. For detailed engineering and optimization, however, a sound cycle calculation is required. In this respect, an economic optimization can only be performed when all relevant parameters determining the process (e.g., pump flow rates and heat exchanger areas) are varied simultaneously while keeping constant the external temperatures of heat sources and sinks. The result of this parameter variation is the chiller COP, which is dependent on the overall heat exchanger area invested in the chiller. This result can be translated into running cost vs. first cost. Consequently, an economic optimum can be found. In most cases, only chillers that perform near the optimum are economically competitive.

  1. Evaluating the economic effectiveness of a cogeneration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korik, L.; Yeaple, D.: Hajosy, M.

    1996-08-01

    Economic considerations constitute the major factor in the decision to build a cogeneration plant and to its eventual design - topics which have been the focus of many studies and papers. These economic concerns continue when the plant is built and on-line, thus plant operation must be geared to provide the customers` demand in the most economically effective manner possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of and high degree of interaction between the disparate components of a cogeneration plant oftentimes, make it difficult to conceptualize the plant configuration required to maximize plant economic performance for a given demand, Indeed, actions taken to increase the thermal performance of individual plant components can actually decrease the overall economic effectiveness of the plant as a whole in the context of converting fuels to sendouts. What is needed, then, is a way to meld the performance of individual plant components into a total plant performance index that accurately measures the economic effectiveness of the plant. This paper details such a method developed by the Cogeneration Management Company to accomplish the performance evaluation of its Medical Area Total Energy Plant which supplies electricity, steam, and chilled water to the Longwood. Medical Area in Boston, This method - which is easily adapted to a variety of cogeneration designs - addresses the aforementioned complexities in the assessing of a cogeneration plant`s effectiveness and results in simple-to-understand plant performance quantifications which have proved to be of great utility in ensuring the economically sound operation of MATEP.

  2. NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACNISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics content top NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics (N-ABLE(tm)) Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics (N-ABLE(tm)) NISAC has developed N-ABLE(tm) to assist federal decision makers in improving the security and resilience of the U.S. economy. N-ABLE(tm) is a large-scale microeconomic simulation tool that models the complex supply-chain, spatial market dynamics, and

  3. Economic Viability of Brewery Spent Grain as a Biofuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes an investigation into the technical feasibility and economic viability of use grain wastes from the beer brewing process as fuel to generate the heat needed in subsequent brewing process. The study finds that while use of spent grain as a biofuel is technically feasible, the economics are not attractive. Economic viability is limited by the underuse of capital equipment. The investment in heating equipment requires a higher utilization that the client brewer currently anticipates. It may be possible in the future that changing factors may swing the decision to a more positive one.

  4. Chaotic time series analysis in economics: Balance and perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faggini, Marisa

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the paper is not to review the large body of work concerning nonlinear time series analysis in economics, about which much has been written, but rather to focus on the new techniques developed to detect chaotic behaviours in economic data. More specifically, our attention will be devoted to reviewing some of these techniques and their application to economic and financial data in order to understand why chaos theory, after a period of growing interest, appears now not to be such an interesting and promising research area.

  5. Economic assessment model architecture for AGC/AVLIS selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoglund, R.L.

    1984-05-24

    The economic assessment model architecture described provides the flexibility and completeness in economic analysis that the selection between AGC and AVLIS demands. Process models which are technology-specific will provide the first-order responses of process performance and cost to variations in process parameters. The economics models can be used to test the impacts of alternative deployment scenarios for a technology. Enterprise models provide global figures of merit for evaluating the DOE perspective on the uranium enrichment enterprise, and business analysis models compute the financial parameters from the private investor's viewpoint.

  6. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin. The site currently has a PV system in place and was assessed for further PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.1333/kWh and incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and by the serving utility, Madison Gas and Electric. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  7. National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling System (NEMS) AgencyCompany Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Develop Goals Topics: Policies...

  8. Resource Planning for Power Systems: Integrating Renewables and New Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Become Kinetic is hosting a course to review resource planning issues and how they are being addressed to provide reliable and economic operation of the bulk power system.

  9. Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STEAM TIP SHEET 18 PDF icon Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems (January 2012) More ... Second Edition Consider Installing a Condensing Economizer CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook

  10. Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the preliminary economic viability of a COsub 2-sequestering system integrated with a coal-fired power plant based on microalgae biofixation. A review of relevant literature was...

  11. Summary of the report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdren, J.P.; Berwald, D.H.; Budnitz, R.J.; Crocker, J.G.; Delene, J.G.; Endicott, R.D.; Kazimi, M.S.; Krakowski, R.A.; Logan, B.G.; Schultz, K.R.

    1987-09-10

    The Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) has assessed magnetic fusion energy's prospects for providing energy with economic, environmental, and safety characteristics that would be attractive compared with other energy sources (mainly fission) available in the year 2015 and beyond. ESECOM gives particular attention to the interaction of environmental, safety, and economic characteristics of a variety of magnetic fusion reactors, and compares them with a variety of fission cases. Eight fusion cases, two fusion-fission hybrid cases, and four fission cases are examined, using consistent economic and safety models. These models permit exploration of the environmental, safety, and economic potential of fusion concepts using a wide range of possible materials choices, power densities, power conversion schemes, and fuel cycles. The ESECOM analysis indicates that magnetic fusion energy systems have the potential to achieve costs-of-electricity comparable to those of present and future fission systems, coupled with significant safety and environmental advantages. 75 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. The Future of Food Demand: Understanding Differences in Global Economic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Nelson, Gerald; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Bodirsky, Benjamin; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Paltsev, S.; Rolinski, Susanne; Tabeau, Andrzej; van Meijl, Hans; von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the capacity of agricultural systems to feed the world population under climate change requires a good prospective vision on the future development of food demand. This paper reviews modeling approaches from ten global economic models participating to the AgMIP project, in particular the demand function chosen and the set of parameters used. We compare food demand projections at the horizon 2050 for various regions and agricultural products under harmonized scenarios. Depending on models, we find for a business as usual scenario (SSP2) an increase in food demand of 59-98% by 2050, slightly higher than FAO projection (54%). The prospective for animal calories is particularly uncertain with a range of 61-144%, whereas FAO anticipates an increase by 76%. The projections reveal more sensitive to socio-economic assumptions than to climate change conditions or bioenergy development. When considering a higher population lower economic growth world (SSP3), consumption per capita drops by 9% for crops and 18% for livestock. Various assumptions on climate change in this exercise do not lead to world calorie losses greater than 6%. Divergences across models are however notable, due to differences in demand system, income elasticities specification, and response to price change in the baseline.

  13. ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT ON VITRIFICATION FACILITY OF LOW-AND INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN KOREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Kun Jai; Ji, Pyung Kook; Park, Jong Kil; Ha, Jong Hyun; Song, Myung Jae

    2003-02-27

    The usefulness of vitrification technology for low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was demonstrated with high volume reduction capability and good mechanical and chemical stability of final waste forms, and commercial vitrification facility is expected to be constructed at Ulchin site of Korean Nuclear Power Plant Ulchin Unit 5 and 6. Hence, overall economic assessment was necessary to find out the economic advantage of the vitrification facility and to predict the construction and operation costs of the facility on the preliminary bases. Additionally, the generation characteristics of radioactive wastes were investigated. The results of the cost analysis showed that the disposal cost of radioactive wastes treated by vitrification facility reduced to 85 percent compared with that by current waste treatment system. And the present worth analysis was performed through the cost-benefit analysis method for the commercial vitrification facility. The results showed that the vitrification facility combining cold crucible melter (CCM) for treatment of combustible DAW, spent resin, and borated liquid waste concentrate and plasma torch melter (PTM) for non-combustible DAW and spent filter is more economical than current waste treatment system when the escalation rate of disposal cost of more than 10 percent per year was applied.

  14. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Esmang R enewable E nergy Economic Potenal in the United States: M ethodology a nd I nial Results Ausn B rown, P hilipp B eiter, D onna H eimiller, C arolyn Davidson, P aul D...

  15. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  16. How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials; Gail Mosey and Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Wind Model.

  17. Ninth Annual Native American Economic Development, Diversification & Energy Projects Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 9th Annual Native American Economic Development, Diversification & Energy Projects Conference featuring the Inaugural Leaders of Tomorrow Workshop  will be held June 15th and 16th, 2015 at...

  18. Economic and environmental implications of a U. S. nuclear moratorium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    implications of a U. S. nuclear moratorium, 1985--2010 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic and environmental implications of a U. S. nuclear moratorium, 1985--2010 ...

  19. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    benefits of offshore wind plants, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently released a new version of the Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) input-output modeling tool. ...

  20. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Protection Agency report contains recommendations for a series of environmental actions, including those to increase environmental and economically beneficial landscaping practices at Federal facilities and federally funded projects.

  1. IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Treasury and the IRS published new guidance today allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs) for Tribes that have projects that are in the final stages of going to the market to receive financing.

  2. Economic analysis of utility-coal company relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, M.

    1987-01-01

    An examination of the economic and legal issues of electric utility relationships with coal suppliers begins with a description of the coal industry and coal's use of power generation. The author analyzes the major economic problems and two legal institutions that are used or could be used to regulate the economic problems. He concludes that neither legal institution is adequate because public utility solutions focus almost exclusively on the cost inflation problem and antitrust solutions have too many common law loopholes. Of the approaches available in the public utility solution, the cost of service approach alone addresses all of the economic problems. However, cost of service also creates a new and more complex set of rate hearings for coal. 1 figure.

  3. Economic Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and compares their economics to that of a comparable, air-based PC plant. Rather than combust their coal with air, the oxygen-based plants use oxygen to facilitate capture...

  4. EERE Webinar: The Economic Potential of Renewable Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Please join the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for a webinar discussing their recent report analyzing the economic potential of renewable power in the United States. Estimating...

  5. JLab's economic footprint expands (Daily Press) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab's economic footprint expands (Daily Press) External Link: http://articles.dailypress.com/2011-01-20/news/dp-nws-jlab-economy-20110120_1_je... By jlab_admin on Thu, 2011-01-2

  6. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development...

  7. Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 16th Annual Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference is a free three-day conference to learn about housing programs, hear stories of successful projects from tribal members, and meet developers.

  8. 2016 Navajo Nation Economic Summit & Business Opportunity Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2016 Navajo Nation Economic Summit and Business Opportunity Day will include contract opportunities, matchmaking, one-on-one with buyers and purchasing agencies, network and evening banquet, and over 24 session topics. Conference registration ends April 5.

  9. Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Wind and solar made up the balance of approximately 0.1% of Utah's electricity generation (Economic Report to the Governor 2010). Over-reliance on fossil-fuel-based...

  10. Take a Closer Look:Biofuels Can Support Environmental, Economic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Take a Closer Look:Biofuels Can Support Environmental, Economic and Social Goals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Take a Closer Look:Biofuels Can Support ...

  11. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Field Results from Application of the Outdoor-Air/Economizer Diagnostician for Commissioning and O&M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Blanc, Steven L.

    2000-05-31

    This paper presents results of field testing an automated diagnostician for outdoor-air-supply and economizer systems that can be used for commissioning purposes. The fundamental capabilities of the tool are described and key results of its application on six air handlers in a large hotel building are discussed. Ancillary issues pertinent to the development and application of such tools are also presented.

  18. Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Report 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 17, 2013 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Page ii Document Number DE-EE0005360 U.S. Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Annual Market Assessment Document Number DE-EE0005360 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Michael Hahn Patrick Gilman Prepared by: Navigant Consulting, Inc. Bruce Hamilton, Principal Investigator Lindsay Battenberg Mark Bielecki Charlie Bloch Terese Decker Lisa Frantzis Jay Paidipati Andy Wickless Feng Zhao Navigant Consortium Member Organizations

  19. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power Model CSP Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from CSP projects. JEDI CSP has default information that can be utilized to run a generic impacts analysis assuming industry averages. Model users are encouraged to enter as much project-specific data as possible. Download the JEDI CSP Model Printable Version JEDI Home About JEDI Biofuels Models Coal Model

  20. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Model Natural Gas Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Natural Gas model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from natural gas power generation projects. The basic user interface for the natural gas model is the same as the wind and coal models. Results are provided in the same format as the coal and wind models allowing for straightforward comparison with other generation types. JEDI Natural Gas relies on a similar set of standard user inputs

  1. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaics Model Photovoltaics Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Photovoltaics (PV) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from PV projects. JEDI PV has default information that can be utilized to run a generic impacts analysis assuming industry averages. Model users are encouraged to enter as much project-specific data as possible. The PV JEDI model is designed for use on a PC and has very limited functionality on a Mac. However, this model is

  2. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Line Model Transmission Line Model The Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts associated with transmission line projects. Applying a similar user interface as other JEDI models, Transmission Line JEDI requires a few additional user inputs such as: Transmission Line Type Line Length Terrain Type Right-of-Way Characteristics. Results are presented in the same manner as those in other JEDI

  3. NPR's Science Friday discussed lighting economics with Sandia National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory's EFRC | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) NPR's Science Friday discussed lighting economics with Sandia National Laboratory's EFRC Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE Announcements Publications History Contact BES Home 09.20.10 NPR's Science Friday discussed lighting economics with Sandia National Laboratory's EFRC Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page September 20, 2010 ::

  4. Renewable Energy: science, politics, and economics (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Renewable Energy: science, politics, and economics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Renewable Energy: science, politics, and economics Authors: Migliori, Albert [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory [Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-03-03 OSTI Identifier: 1122038 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-21366 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  5. Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting Technologies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting Technologies Painting is the most expensive unit operation in automobile manufacturing and the source of over 90 percent of the air, water and solid waste emissions at the assembly plant. While innovative paint technologies such as waterborne or powder

  6. Secretary Bodman Highlights Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives in Kansas City | Department of Energy Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy Initiatives in Kansas City Secretary Bodman Highlights Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy Initiatives in Kansas City March 10, 2006 - 11:46am Addthis KANSAS CITY, MO - Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today highlighted America's robust economy and the role the energy sector plays to ensure its continued growth, while speaking to the Greater Kansas City Chamber of

  7. Secretary Chu Announces Changes to Expedite Economic Recovery Funding |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Changes to Expedite Economic Recovery Funding Secretary Chu Announces Changes to Expedite Economic Recovery Funding February 19, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON D.C. --- Two days after President Obama signed the historic American Recovery and Reinvestment Act into law, Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced a sweeping reorganization of the Department of Energy's dispersal of direct loans, loan guarantees and funding contained in the new recovery legislation. The goal of

  8. Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers | Department of Energy Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers March 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - In recent discussions with a broad range of world energy ministers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has stressed the need for global cooperation

  9. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Arnold Barry

    2006-04-01

    What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

  10. Material to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganism and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microalgae - Energy Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Material to Efficiently and Economically Obtain Microorganism and Microalgae Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryTechnology provides an economical and efficient process to harvest microorganisms like microalgae from its growth media.Description The interest in using algae as feedstock for biofuel

  11. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Hendrickson; S.Tegen

    2009-12-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local(usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels,concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants.

  12. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    edition (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Home economics: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

  13. Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages In June 2011, President Obama released A Policy Framework for the 21st Century Grid which set out a four-pillared strategy for modernizing the electric grid. The initiative directed billions of dollars toward investments in 21st century smart grid technologies focused at increasing the grid's efficiency, reliability,

  14. NREL's Economic Impact Tops $872 Million - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's Economic Impact Tops $872 Million University of Colorado researchers quantify benefits of national laboratory dedicated to clean energy June 4, 2015 The economic impact of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was $872.3 million nationwide in fiscal year 2014, according to a study by the University of Colorado Boulder's Leeds School of Business. The study estimates NREL's impact to Colorado's economy totaled $701 million, a decline of 1.6 percent from the

  15. Condensing economizers for small coal-fired boilers and furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.A.; Litzke, W.

    1994-01-01

    Condensing economizers increase the thermal efficiency of boilers by recovering sensible and latent heat from exhaust gas. These economizers are currently being used commercially for this purpose in a wide range of applications. Performance is dependent upon application-specific factors affecting the utility of recovered heat. With the addition of a condensing economizer boiler efficiency improvements up to 10% are possible. Condensing economizers can also capture flue gas particulates. In this work, the potential use of condensing economizers for both efficiency improvement and control of particulate emissions from small, coal water slurry-fired boilers was evaluated. Analysis was done to predict heat transfer and particulate capture by mechanisms including: inertial impaction, interception, diffusion, thermophoretic forces, and condensation growth. Shell-and-tube geometries were considered with flue gas on the outside of Teflon-covered tubes. Experimental studies were done with both air- and water-cooled economizers refit to a small boiler. Two experimental arrangements were used including oil-firing with injection of flyash upstream of the economizer and direct coal water slurry firing. Firing rates ranged from 27 to 82 kW (92,000 to 280,000 Btu/hr). Inertial impaction was found to be the most important particulate capture mechanism and removal efficiencies to 95% were achieved. With the addition of water sprays directly on the first row of tubes, removal efficiencies increased to 98%. Use of these sprays adversely affects heat recovery. Primary benefits of the sprays are seen to be the addition of small impaction sites and future design improvements are suggested in which such small impactors are permanently added to the highest velocity regions of the economizer. Predicted effects of these added impactors on particulate removal and pressure drop are presented.

  16. Thermochemical Conversion Techno-Economic Analysis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion Techno-Economic Analysis NREL's Thermochemical Conversion Analysis team focuses on the conceptual process design and techno-economic analysis (TEA) for the thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and products via direct liquefaction pathways, using pyrolysis or bio-oil intermediates, and indirect liquefaction pathways, using gasification or gaseous intermediates, from lignocellulosic biomass. Illustration of a simplified process flow diagram of NREL's catalytic fast pyrolysis

  17. Biochemical Conversion Techno-Economic Analysis | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion Techno-Economic Analysis NREL's biochemical conversion analysis team focuses on techno-economic analysis (TEA) for the biochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and products via sugars and other components derived from lignocellulosic biomass. Process flow diagram with simple icon illustrations of the biochemical conversion process and facility. Biomass is pictured in the upper left as a simple black-and-white truck illustration that begins this process in the conversion facility:

  18. Text Transcript of the Tribal Energy and Economic Development February

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: Exploring Your Energy Markets | Department of Energy Text Transcript of the Tribal Energy and Economic Development February Webinar: Exploring Your Energy Markets Text Transcript of the Tribal Energy and Economic Development February Webinar: Exploring Your Energy Markets Randy Manion: Good morning or good afternoon wherever you may be and welcome to the second webinar of the 2016 DOE Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series: Exploring Your Energy Markets. I'm Randy Manion, today's

  19. DOE Announces Webinars on Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Water Efficiency and Energy Savings | Department of Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development and Water Efficiency and Energy Savings DOE Announces Webinars on Energy Planning for Tribal Economic Development and Water Efficiency and Energy Savings January 25, 2016 - 8:30am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free;

  20. Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis: A Foundation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis: A Foundation October 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

  1. 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive annual assessment of the U.S. offshore wind market.This 3rd annual report focuses on new developments that have occurred in 2014. The report provides stakeholders with a reliable and consistent data source addressing entry barriers and U.S. competitiveness in the offshore wind market. Available for download are both the full report and the

  2. Green Economic Development Partnership to Boost Clean Energy Startups in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado - News Releases | NREL Green Economic Development Partnership to Boost Clean Energy Startups in Colorado June 17, 2011 Through a collaborative partnership to expand cleantech entrepreneurship in Colorado, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the State of Colorado have formed the Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED) in Golden, Colo. CREED is designed to bring together stakeholders and service providers that

  3. Thorium: Crustal abundance, joint production, and economic availability

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Thorium: Crustal abundance, joint production, and economic availability Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thorium: Crustal abundance, joint production, and economic availability Recently, interest in thorium's potential use in a nuclear fuel cycle has been renewed. Thorium is more abundant, at least on average, than uranium in the earth's crust and, therefore, could theoretically extend the use of

  4. Economical development of small isolated fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, W.G.

    1995-11-01

    U.K. offshore oil supplies could be in decline in 10 years unless new methods and technology are developed to open fields that are uncommercial by conventional methods. Such technology is being developed, and much of it is aimed at pressure boosting subsea stepout fields to improve production rate and recovery over increasing distances to a host platform. This paper is concerned with the development of small isolated fields for which a new platform facility is not justified or where no suitable existing host platform is available. The isolated-field production system described here comprises a two-stage subsea separator near the subsea well(s) from which production is tied in by flexible flowlines. Oil/water/gas separation is achieved at near atmosphere pressure, allowing safe loading of the ``dead`` crude into a tanker. The gas is flared at a surface buoy (directly above the separator unit) that also contains power generation and chemical injection facilities. Liquids are pumped to an offshore tanker-loading catenary anchor leg mooring (CALM) buoy, and then to the connected shuttle tanker. Control of the separator system is autonomous based on a programmable logic controller in the subsea control module, with commands and monitoring by an umbilical from a production center on the tanker.

  5. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  6. Oil exports, structural change, and economic development in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emami-Khoi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Within the broad Chenery-Kuznets framework, using structural change as a major indicator of economic development, this study investigates the direction and magnitude and broad features of structural change in Iran, and the role of oil production and exports in that change. Although the study covers a larger horizon, the analysis is focused on the period 1955 through 1977. A similar but less-detailed investigation is conducted for Algeria, Indonesia, and Venezuela also, and a cross-country, comparative perspective is generated. The study shows that, in general, the structural changes in Iran have either been weak (for example, in production and employment), or they are contrary to what the model would predict (for instance in trade). The pattern of structural change observed in Iran, therefore, does not indicate any significant economic development even though per capita income increased five-fold over the period 1955 through 1977. In short, oil does not appear to have been an engine of economic development in Iran. The situation appears broadly similar for the other three countries. Based on these findings, the study offers some suggestions concerning the future economic strategies that should enhance very considerably the contribution that oil industry can make toward Iran's economic development, and should thus accelerate the pace of economic development. These suggestions may be useful to other oil-exporting countries as well.

  7. Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Geothermal Technologies Office » Systems Analysis Systems Analysis What is the Systems Analysis program? The Systems Analysis program in the Geothermal Technologies Office focuses primarily on: Environmental issues Policy, regulatory, and financing Economic Analysis and validation Data and Tools that support geothermal exploration and development As a key part of the Systems Analysis portfolio, a two-year, comprehensive Vision Study for geothermal energy development is underway to

  8. Economic Development Benefits of the Mars Hill Wind Farm, Wind Powering America Rural Economic Development, Case Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    This case study summarizes the economic development benefits of the Mars Hill Wind Farm to the community of Mars Hill, Maine. The Mars Hill Wind Farm is New England's first utility-scale wind farm.

  9. Biogas systems in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtman, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to an analysis of household energy consumption, three scenarios are presented for the economic analysis of energy systems used for cooking, lighting, irrigation, and rice husk-cement manufacture. Digester design and feedstock variations are discussed. Problems such as gas pricing, sociological problems of distribution to diverse ethnic groups, and the complexity of technology transfer are mentioned. (CKK)

  10. Applications of subsea systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss their experience in offshore engineering, worldwide subsea technology, civil design and construction. This book is a guide to subsea systems and components. The authors assess options for field developments - technically and economically and an evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of various available options.

  11. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former St. Marks Refinery in St. Marks, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2010-09-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site in St. Marks, Florida. The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.08/kWh and incentives offered in the State of Florida and from the two accessible utilities, Progress Energy and the City of Tallahassee. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the fixed-tilt thin film technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  12. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

  13. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2004-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

  14. Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Ganguly, Srirupa; Traber, Kim; Price, Hillary; Horvath, Arpad; Nazaroff, William W.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-08-01

    In the US, data center operations currently account for about 61 billion kWh/y of electricity consumption, which is more than 1.5percent of total demand. Data center energy consumption is rising rapidly, having doubled in the last five years. A substantial portion of data-center energy use is dedicated to removing the heat generated by the computer equipment. Data-center cooling load might be met with substantially reduced energy consumption with the use of air-side economizers. This energy saving measure, however, has been shown to expose servers to an order-of-magnitude increase in indoor particle concentrations with an unquantified increase in the risk of equipment failure. An alternative energy saving option is the use of water-side economizers, which do not affect the indoor particle concentration but require additional mechanical equipment and tend to be less beneficial in high humidity areas. Published research has only presented qualitative benefits of economizer use, providing industry with inadequate information on which to base their design decisions. Energy savings depend on local climate and the specific building-design characteristics. In this paper, based on building energy models, we report energy savings for air-side and water-side economizer use in data centers in several climate zones in California. Results show that in terms of energy savings, air-side economizers consistently outperform water-side economizers, though the performance difference varies by location. Model results also show that conventional humidity restrictions must by relaxed or removed to gain the energy benefits of air-side economizers.

  15. Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

  16. NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from...

  17. NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar (Redirected from How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy) Jump to: navigation, search...

  18. Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technical and Economic Assessment of...

  19. Gasification Systems Portfolio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasification is a clean way to efficiently produce electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels, and chemicals from coal and other solid feedstocks. By first converting the solid feedstock to a gaseous form (syngas), potential pollutants can be captured and reduced to any desired level and then converted to useful by-products or safely disposed. The Gasification Systems Program is developing advanced technologies to improve the economics and

  20. Comparison of LNG, CNG, and diesel transit bus economics. Topical report, July 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powars, C.A.; Moyer, C.B.; Luscher, D.R.; Lowell, D.D.; Pera, C.J.

    1993-10-20

    The purpose of the report is to compare the expected costs of operating a transit bus fleet on liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG), and diesel fuel. The special report is being published prior to the overall project final report in response to the current high level of interest in LNG transit buses. It focuses exclusively on the economics of LNG buses as compared with CNG and diesel buses. The reader is referred to the anticipated final report, or to a previously published 'White Paper' report (Reference 1), for information regarding LNG vehicle and refueling system technology and/or the economics of other LNG vehicles. The LNG/CNG/diesel transit bus economics comparison is based on total life-cycle costs considering all applicable capital and operating costs. The costs considered are those normally borne by the transit property, i.e., the entity facing the bus purchase decision. These costs account for the portion normally paid by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Transit property net costs also recognize the sale of emissions reduction credits generated by using natural gas (NG) engines which are certified to levels below standards (particularly for NOX).