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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems Mukesh Khattar Michael J. Brandemuehl Manager, Space Conditioning and Refrigeration Associate Professor Customer Systems Group Joint Center for Energy Management Electric Power Research Institute Campus... costs, the small, modular nature of the system allows great flexibility for fitting into retrofit geometries and saves space in new construction. Moreover, a single chiller can serve multiple air-handling units-in stark contrast to packaged...

Khattar, M.; Brandemuehl, M. J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy...

3

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

5

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide and maintain a comfortable environment within a building for the occupants or for the process being conducted Many HVAC systems were not designed with energy efficiency as one of the design factors 3 Air Air is the major conductor of heat. Lack of heat = air conditioning OR 4 Btu - Amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 F = 0.252 KgCal 1 Pound of Water = About 1 Pint of Water ~ 1 Large Glass 1 Kitchen Match Basics of Air Conditioning = 1 Btu 5 = 6 Low Cost Cooling Unit 7 8 Typical Design Conditions 75 degrees F temperature 50% relative humidity 30 - 50 FPM air movement

6

Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:49pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for HVAC Renovations Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Solar Water Heating (SWH) Biomass Passive Solar Heating Biomass Heating Solar Ventilation Air Preheating Federal building renovations that encompass the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in a facility provide a range of renewable energy opportunities. The primary technology option for HVAC renovations is geothermal heat pumps (GHP). Other options include leveraging a solar water heating (SWH) system to offset heating load or using passive solar heating or a biomass-capable furnace or boiler. Some facilities may also take

8

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

9

Section 38 - HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term HVAC is an acronym for Heating, Ventilation (and) Air Conditioning, the industry term for any of various efforts to control conditions in a building or other enclosed area to improve comfort and efficiency. A closely related section is Refrigeration, which follows this one. Some contemporary HVAC techniques have ancient roots. Early forms of central heating and solar home heating were in use in Rome in the first century A.D. The earliest use of glass in windows (as opposed to a covering of wood, cloth, or hide, or simply an opening) is also attributed to the Romans at this same time. The first known use of solar-oriented building design in North America dates back to about the year 1050; i.e., the cliff dwellings built by the Anasazi (Ancient Pueblo) people of the Colorado Plateau area. Geothermal district heating was employed as early as the 1300s, in the Auvergne region of southern France. The foundation for modern central heating was established in the 1700s, first in England and then in France. The 1800s saw significant advances in the use of water heaters, especially the first automatic storage water heater (Edwin Ruud, 1889) and the first commercial solar water heater (Clarence Kemp, 1891). In comparison with heating, cooling technology was late in developing. The first successful method of producing ice occurred in 1851, and it was not until 1902 that Willis Haviland Carrier designed the first industrial air-conditioning system. His Carrier Air Conditioning Corporation would go on to develop air-conditioning systems for stores and theaters (1924) and for residential buildings (1928). Carrier remains the global leader in air conditioner production. The first air-conditioned automobile was produced by Packard in 1939. Recent entries in this section emphasize the use of alternative energy sources in heating and cooling, such as solar, photovoltaic, geothermal, and fuel cells. These advances include the ground-source heat pump, the Trombe wall, the heat pipe, and the PV/thermal hybrid system.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

11

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation-Air Methane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture and use of Coal Mine Capture and use of Coal Mine Ventilation - air Methane Background Methane emissions from coal mines represent about 10 percent of the U.S. anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Methane-the second most important non-water greenhouse gas-is 21 times as powerful as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in its global warming potential. Ventilation-air methane (VAM)-the exhaust air from underground coal mines-is the largest source of coal mine methane, accounting for about half of the methane emitted from coal mines in the United States. Unfortunately, because of the low methane concentration (0.3-1.5 percent) in ventilation air, its beneficial use is difficult. However, oxidizing the methane to CO 2 and water reduces its global warming potential by 87 percent. A thermal

12

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Speaker(s): James Axley Date: March 12, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Developments in mathematical models for building air quality and ventilation analysis have changed the way we idealize buildings for purposes of analysis, the way we form system equations to effect the analysis, and the way we solve these equations to realize the analysis. While much has been achieved more is possible. This presentation will review the current state of the art - the building idealizations used, the system equations formed, and the solution methods applied - critically evaluate the completeness, complexity and utility of the most advanced models, and present proposals for future development

13

Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom Sture Holmberg, Ph. For displacement ventilation systems, designers normally assume that all pollutants follow the buoyant air flow of the ventilation air flow are shown to play an important role in the control of air quality. Computer simulation

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

14

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared

16

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monoxide and nitrogen dioxide from gas appliances;health, indoor air quality, nitrogen dioxide, radon The workin residen- (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NOz), formaldehyde (

Hollowell, C.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air Temperature Speaker(s): Henry Willem Date: July 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Max Sherman (THIS SEMINAR TO BE RESCHEDULED.) Sustainability of the built-environment must be achieved in parallel with the sustenance of occupants' health and comfort. Actions to conserve energy and resources require much forethought and careful consideration due to possible consequences on the human aspects. Thus, many extensive works in the recent decades have focused on identifying the associations between indoor environment and human responses. Results have shown moderate to strong implications of thermal and indoor air quality factors on the prevalence and intensity of sick

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality ventilation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: air quality ventilation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Summary: control strategy impacts on indoor air...

19

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1 Philip Demokritou, and the operation strategy of the ventilation system are significant contributing factors to the indoor air quality contamination levels in the arenas. Keywords: Air distribution, health, skating rink, indoor air quality, space

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

20

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimal supply air temperature with respect to energy use in a variable air volume system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a variable air volume (VAV) system with 100% outdoor air, the cooling need in the building is satisfied with a certain air flow at a certain supply air temperature. To minimize the system energy use, an optimal supply air temperature can be set dependent on the load, specific fan power (SFP), chiller coefficient of performance, outdoor temperature and the outdoor relative humidity. The theory for an optimal supply air temperature is presented and the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) energy use is calculated depending on supply air temperature control strategy, average U-value of the building envelope and two outdoor climates. The analyses show that controlling the supply air temperature optimally results in a significantly lower HVAC energy use than with a constant supply air temperature. The optimal average U-value of the building envelope is in practise mostly zero.

Fredrik Engdahl; Dennis Johansson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation_Final2.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor

23

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR. FINAL REPORT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-10475 EEB-Hosp 79-6 HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS ANDCHH1ICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR na 1 Report DavidMinnesota 55455 TWIN CITIES HOSPITAL VEtHILATION STANDARDS

Rainer, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air conditioning  IAQ: Indoor air quality  LBNL: Lawrence Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms? HDEGRADING INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN CALIFORNIA CLASSROOMS?

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Heat balance for two commercial broiler barns with solar preheated ventilation air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In temperate climatic zones, solar air heaters can reduce heating loads, and increase winter ventilation rates thereby improving inside air quality and livestock performance without additional fuel input. A heat balance was carried out to measure bird heat production under field conditions on two commercial broiler barns to evaluate the impact of solar heated ventilation air on bird performance, and identify strategies to reduce winter heating load. Located 40 km east of Montreal, Canada, the experimental broiler barns were identically built with three floors housing 6500 birds per floor in an all-in all-out fashion. Equipped with solar air pre-heaters over their fresh air inlets, the barns were instrumented to monitor inlet, inside and outside air conditions, ventilation rate and heating system operating time. The effects on bird performance were observed from November 2007 to March 2009 by alternating their operation between the barns. The measured sensible and total heat productions of 4.5 W and 8.4 W, respectively, for 1 kg birds corresponded to laboratory measured values. Bird performance was not affected by the solar air pre-heaters which increased the ventilation rate above normal during only 20% of the daytime period. Room air temperature stratification resulted in 20–40 kW of heat losses during the winter, representing 25% of the total natural gas heat load. Because inside air moved directly to the fans, large and rapid increases in ventilation inlet air temperature, produced by the solar air pre-heaters, resulted in further heat losses equivalent to 15% of the solar energy recovered. Sustainable energy management in livestock barns requiring heating should incorporate an air mixing system to eliminate air temperature stratification and improve fan flows.

Sébastien Cordeau; Suzelle Barrington

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Radon Mitigation in Schools Utilising Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standard Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...Two case studies are presented where HVAC technology was implemented for controlling...system in a two-storey building. The HVAC system's controls were restored and modified......

G. Fisher; B. Ligman; T. Brennan; R. Shaughnessy; B.H. Turk; B. Snead

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014.

30

AUTOMATIC VARIABLE VENTILATION CONTROL SYSTEMS BASED ON AIR QUALITY DETECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Systems Based on Air Quality Detection Isaac Turiel,HVAC CONTROL SYSTEM BASED ON AIR QUALITY SENSING To Zl)(lecontrol systems based on air quality detection Isaac Turiel,

Turiel, Isaac

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning.control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air

Sidheswaran, Meera

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Consideration of air jet angle in open surface tank push-pull ventilation system design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSIDERATION OF AIR JET ANGLE IN OPEN SURFACE TANK PUSH-PULL VENTILATION SYSTEM DESIGN A Thesis by WAI-HUNG DAVID CHAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree o... MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subjeot: Industrial Hygiene CONSIDERATION OF AIR JET ANGLE IN OPEN SURFACE TANK PUSH-PULL VENTILATION STSTEM DESIGN A Thesis by WAI-HUNG DAVID CHAN Approved as to style and content by: (C an of mmittee) J. Suggs...

Chan, Wai-Hung David

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

H.N. Knudsen, P. Wargocki and J. Vondruskova (2006) "Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality of air polluted by building materials ­ a summary of reported data", Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Vol. 1, 57-62. #12;#12;Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted

36

Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the standard. To mitigate or nullify these additional weather loads, outdoor air preconditioning technologies are being promoted in combination with conventional HVAC operations downstream as a means to deliver the required fresh air and control humidity...

Kosar, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Outside Air Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

partner Davis Energy partner Davis Energy Group worked with Monley Cronin Construction to build 100 energy-efficient homes in Woodland, CA, with night- cooling ventilation systems. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Outside Air Ventilation Controller Building America researchers developed technologies to harness the natural day-night temperature swings in the U.S. Southwest to cut cooling energy peak demand with no compromise in comfort. Building America research has shown that, in dry climates, the use of ventilation cooling can significantly reduce, delay, or completely eliminate air conditioner operation resulting in both energy savings and reduction of peak demand

38

Outside Air Ventilation Controller - Building America Top Innovation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

demand up to 50% in California's central valley climates and can eliminate the need for air conditioning altogether in the coastal climate. Variations of these systems are being...

39

Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

Hun, Diana E [ORNL; Jackson, Mark C [University of Texas at Austin; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since terminal boxes do not have a modulation damper in constant volume (CV) air handling unit (AHU) systems, zone reheat coils have to be modulated to maintain the space temperature with constant supply airflow. This conventional control sequence...

Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality will be achieved. Our study aims to simulate airflow in the ventilated room with this new type of air conditioning. Radiation is taken into account by the energy conservation in the system. The following section presents algorithm, thermal..., the governing equations to be solved are the conservation equations for continuity, momentum, and energy as well as the equations for turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The buoyancy effect is accounted for by Boussinesq approximation...

Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning: Recent Advances in Diagnostics and Controls to Improve Air-Handling System Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of air-handling systems in buildings needs to be improved. Many of the deficiencies result from myths and lore and a lack of understanding about the non-linear physical principles embedded in the associated technologies. By incorporating these principles, a few important efforts related to diagnostics and controls have already begun to solve some of the problems. This paper illustrates three novel solutions: one rapidly assesses duct leakage, the second configures ad hoc duct-static-pressure reset strategies, and the third identifies useful intermittent ventilation strategies. By highlighting these efforts, this paper seeks to stimulate new research and technology developments that could further improve air-handling systems.

Wray, Craig; Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, I.S.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Federspiel, C.C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A genetic rule weighting and selection process for fuzzy control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the use of weighted linguistic fuzzy rules in combination with a rule selection process to develop accurate fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the intelligent control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems concerning ... Keywords: BEMS, building energy management system, FLC, fuzzy logic controller, Fuzzy logic controllers, GA, genetic algorithm, Genetic algorithms, HVAC systems, HVAC, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning, KB, knowledge base, PMV, predicted mean vote index for thermal comfort, Rule selection, Weighted fuzzy rules

Rafael Alcalá; Jorge Casillas; Oscar Cordón; Antonio González; Francisco Herrera

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Capability of air filters to retain airborne bacteria and molds in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capability of air filters (filterclass: F6, F7) to retain airborne outdoor microorganisms was examined in field experiments in two heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. At the beginning of the 15-month investigation period, the first filter stages of both HVAC systems were equipped with new unused air filters. The number of airborne bacteria and molds before and behind the filters were determined simultaneously in 14 days-intervals using 6-stage Andersen cascade impactors. Under relatively dry ( 12 °C) outdoor air conditions air filters led to a marked reduction of airborne microorganism concentrations (bacteria by approximately 70 % and molds by > 80 %). However, during long periods of high relative humidity (> 80 % R. H.) a proliferation of bacteria on air filters with subsequent release into the filtered air occured. These microorganisms were mainly smaller than 1.1 ?m therefore being part of the respirable fraction. The results showed furthermore that one possibility to avoid microbial proliferation is to limit the relative humidity in the area of the air filters to 80 % R. H. (mean of 3 days), e. g. by using preheaters in front of air filters in HVAC-systems.

Martin Möritz; Hans Peters; Bettina Nipko; Hennin Rüden

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hospital ventilation standards and energy conservation: chemical contamination of hospital air. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an era of increasing energy conservation consciousness, a critical reassessment of the validity of hospital ventilation and thermal standards is made. If current standards are found to be excessively conservative, major energy conservation measures could be undertaken by rebalancing and/or modification of current HVAC systems. To establish whether or not reducing ventilation rates would increase airborne chemical contamination to unacceptable levels, a field survey was conducted to develop an inventory and dosage estimates of hospital generated airborne chemical contaminants to which patients, staff, and visitors are exposed. The results of the study are presented. Emphasis is on patient exposure, but an examination of occupational exposure was also made. An in-depth assessment of the laboratory air environment is documented. Housekeeping products used in survey hospitals, hazardous properties of housekeeping chemicals and probable product composition are discussed in the appendices.

Rainer, D.; Michaelsen, G.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Performance of unglazed solar ventilation air pre-heaters for broiler barns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar radiation is an interesting heat source for applications requiring a limited amount of energy, such as pre-heating cold fresh air used in venting livestock barns. The objective of this study was to evaluate the energy recovery efficiency of a solar air pre-heater consisting of an unglazed perforated black corrugated siding where the incoming fresh ventilation air picks up heat from its face and back. Installed on the southeast wall of two broiler barns located 40 km east of Montreal, Canada, the performance of solar air pre-heaters was monitored over 2 years. Sensors inside the barns monitored the temperature of the ambient air, that pre-heated by the solar collector and that exhausted by one of the three operating fans. An on-site weather station measured ambient air temperature, wind direction and velocity and radiation energy absorbed on a vertical plane parallel to the unglazed solar air pre-heaters. The measured vertical solar radiation value was used to evaluate the heat recovery efficiency of the unglazed solar air pre-heaters. Using data from the Varennes Environment Canada weather station located 30 km northwest, the solar sensors were found to measure the absorbed solar radiation with a maximum error of 7%, including differences in exterior air moisture. Unglazed, the efficiency of the solar air pre-heaters reached 65% for wind velocities under 2 m/s, but dropped below 25% for wind velocities exceeding 7 m/s. Nevertheless, the unglazed solar air pre-heaters were able to reduce the heating load especially in March of both years. Over a period starting in November and ending in March, the solar air heaters recovered an energy value equivalent to an annual return on investment of 4.7%.

Sébastien Cordeau; Suzelle Barrington

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Air temperature effect on thermal models for ventilated dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temperature of the air surrounding the windings of ventilated dry-type transformers is an important factor in the cooling of the windings since they are cooled only by the air. In particular, inner windings are sensitive to the air temperature in vertical cooling ducts. This study presents air temperature effect on the temperatures in foil-type inner winding for the dry-type transformers. A transformer rated at 2000 kVA was selected for the research and temperature distribution was calculated under constant and varying air temperatures inside vertical ducts at three different loads. The 2-D transient heat diffusion equation was solved using the finite element method by coupling it with the vector potential equation due to non-uniformly generated heat caused by eddy currents in the foil winding. The calculated temperatures at constant and varying air temperatures are presented together with experimental values. The numerical and experimental results of this study showed that the air temperature affects the accuracy of temperatures in foil-type inner winding greatly.

Moonhee Lee; Hussein A. Abdullah; Jan C. Jofriet; Dhiru Patel; Murat Fahrioglu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system for Building 3862  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system for Building 3862

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. When creating an energy-efficient, airtight home through air sealing, it's very important to consider ventilation. Unless properly ventilated, an airtight home can seal in indoor air pollutants. Ventilation also helps control moisture-another important consideration for a healthy, energy-efficient home. Featured Whole-House Ventilation A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house --

53

An experimental system for advanced heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While having the potential to significantly improve heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system performance, advanced (e.g., optimal, robust and various forms of adaptive) controllers have yet to be incorporated into commercial systems. Controllers consisting of distributed proportional-integral (PI) control loops continue to dominate commercial HVAC systems. Investigation into advanced HVAC controllers has largely been limited to proposals and simulations, with few controllers being tested on physical systems. While simulation can be insightful, the only true means for verifying the performance provided by HVAC controllers is by actually using them to control an HVAC system. The construction and modeling of an experimental system for testing advanced HVAC controllers, is the focus of this article. A simple HVAC system, intended for controlling the temperature and flow rate of the discharge air, was built using standard components. While only a portion of an overall HVAC system, it is representative of a typical hot water to air heating system. In this article, a single integrated environment is created that is used for data acquisition, controller design, simulation, and closed loop controller implementation and testing. This environment provides the power and flexibility needed for rapid prototyping of various controllers and control design methodologies.

Michael Anderson; Michael Buehner; Peter Young; Douglas Hittle; Charles Anderson; Jilin Tu; David Hodgson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Techno-economic evaluation of a ventilation system assisted with exhaust air heat recovery, electrical heater and solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energy consumed to condition fresh air is considerable, particularly for the buildings such as cinema, theatre or gymnasium saloons. The aim of the present study is to design a ventilation system assisted with exhaust air heat recovery unit, electrical heater and stored solar energy, then to make an economical analysis based on life cycle cost (LCC) to find out its payback period. The system is able to recover thermal energy of exhaust air, store solar energy during the sunlight period and utilize it in the period between 17:00 and 24:00 h. The transient behaviour of the system is simulated by the TRNSYS 16 software for winter period from 1st of November to 31st of March for Izmir city of Turkey. The obtained results show that the suggested ventilation system reduces energy consumption by 86% compared to the conventional ventilation system in which an electrical heater is used. The payback period of the suggested system is found to be 5 years and 8 months which is a promising result in favour of the solar energy usage in building ventilation systems.

Gamze Ozyogurtcu; Moghtada Mobedi; Baris Ozerdem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

56

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

57

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide fron gas appliances;quality, infiltration, nitrogen dioxide, radon, ventilation.carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (N02)• formaldehyde (

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

59

US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides Public Information for Convening Interviews for US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - air volume air Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use Summary: pressure, and for modeling the change in system pressure as function of compressed air storage volume... important system variables such as system pressure and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yocum, "A Study of Indoor Air Quality," ~_Air Pollut. Contr.discusses the Indoor Air Quality research supported by theAssociation, "Community Air Quality Guides, Aldehydes," Am.

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and air quality implications of passive stackemployer. Energy and air quality implications of passivean acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Impact of a task-ambient ventilation system on perceived air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008. Comfort, perceived air quality, and work performanceon the perception of indoor air quality during immediate andassessments of indoor air-quality in five European

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Improved Air Volume Control Logic for VAV Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a VAV (variable air volume) system, the set point of the static pressure (usually measured at 213 downstream of the main supply air duct) is maintained by modulating the fan speed or inlet guide vane position. The set point of the static pressure...

Wei, G.; Claridge, D. E.; Sakuri, Y.; M. Liu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

17th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers presented at the following sessions: adsorption; noble gas treatment; personnel education and training; filtration and filter testing; measurement and instrumentation; air cleaning equipment response to accident related stress; containment venting air cleaning; and an open end session. Twenty-eight papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. Ten papers had been entered earlier.

First, M.W. (ed.)

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Authors Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords absence, building s, carbon dioxide, demand - controlled ventilation, energy, indoor air quality, schools, ventilation Abstract This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included:  The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).  Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.

68

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The resultsthe indoor air quality and energy use of passive stacks.of the improved air quality is energy consumption increases

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Reducing Ventilation Energy Demand by Using Air-to-Earth Heat Exchangers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-to-Earth heat exchangers (earth tubes) utilize the fact that the temperature in the ground is relatively constant during the year. By letting the air travel through an air-to-earth heat exchanger before re...

Hans Havtun; Caroline Törnqvist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning.control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air

Sidheswaran, Meera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lurmann.2010. "Air pollution, health and economic benefits-health impact factors from the literature are used to quantify total harm attributable to indoor air pollution.

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of {+-}3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s ({+-}18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r{sup 2} is equal to 0.997; for the bi-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r{sup 2} is equal to 0.990 for positive flows (inspiration) and 0.988 for negative flows (expiration). Measurement uncertainty {delta}Q of air flow rate has been evaluated by means of the propagation of distributions and the percentage error in the arrangement of bi-directional sensor ranges from a minimum of about 0.5% at -18.0 l/min to a maximum of about 9% at -12.0 l/min.

Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A. [Department of Engineering, ROMA TRE University, via della Vasca Navale 79/81, Rome (Italy)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Dianne Griffiths April 29, 2013 Presentation Outline * Basic Objectives * Exhaust Systems * Make-up Air Systems Two Primary Ventilation Objectives 1) Providing Fresh Air - Whole-House 2) Removing Pollutants - Local Exhaust Our goal is to find the simplest solution that satisfies both objectives while minimizing cost and energy impacts. Common Solution: Align local exhaust with fresh air requirements (Ex: 25 Bath + 25 Kitchen) Exhaust-Driven Fresh Air Design * Exhaust slightly depressurizes the units * Outside air enters through leaks, cracks, or planned inlets * Widely used in the North Multifamily Ventilation Best Practice * Step 1: Understand ventilation requirements * Step 2: Select the simplest design that can

75

Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes.  A critical aspect of...

77

Removal of submicron particles using a carbon fiber ionizer-assisted medium air filter in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory tests of particle removal were performed with a pair of carbon fiber ionizers installed upstream of a glass fiber air filter. For air flow face velocities of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 m/s, the overall particle removal efficiencies of the filter for all submicron particles were 17%, 16%, and 14%, respectively, when the ionizers were not turned on. These values increased to 27%, 23%, and 19%, respectively, when the ionizers were used to generate ions of 6.0 × 109 ions/cm3 in concentration. The carbon fiber ionizers were then installed in front of a glass fiber air filter located in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Field tests were performed in a test office room with a total indoor particle concentration of 2.2 × 104 particles/cm3. When the flow rate was 75 cubic meters per hour (CMH), the steady-state values of the total indoor particle concentrations using the glass fiber air filter with and without ionizers decreased to 0.87 × 104 particles/cm3 and 1.15 × 104 particles/cm3, respectively, resulting in a 25% decrease of the ionizer effect. When the operation flow rate was increased to 115 and 150 CMH, the effect of the ionizer decreased to 19% and 17%, respectively. These experimental data match the results calculated using a mass-balance model whose parameters were determined from laboratory tests.

Jae Hong Park; Ki Young Yoon; Jungho Hwang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

79

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

80

Ventilating Existing Homes in the US Air Infiltration Review. 2010;31(2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.energy.gov/buildings/building_america/)). In these new homes it was relatively simple to include air retarders in walls, floors or ceilings and to seal this in existing homes, however, presents a significantly tougher challenge. Air sealing has historically (e.g., in US DOE weatherization programs: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/weatherization/wxtech_air_sealing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding certification of commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning, water-heating, and refrigeration equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 7, 2014.

82

IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.contaminants-. ;--- ---- nitrogen dioxide from gas stoves,buildings: nitrogen dioxide (N02), formaldehyde (HCHO), and

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.22 Gaseous Emissions: Nitrogen Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide,3- 4 GASEOUS EMISSIONS: NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE,

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Optimization of the Fin Heat Pipe for Ventilating and Air Conditioning with a Genetic Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation, and it is urgent. At the same time, the energy consumption about air-conditioning of buildings continues to increase and the new wind energy accounts for 4%~12% of the buildings total energy consumption [1]. A heat recovery system for air...

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Indoor Air Is a Significant Source of Tri-decabrominated Diphenyl Ethers to Outdoor Air via Ventilation Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four apartments in each building were selected randomly for air sampling and these contained household goods, electronic equipment, and furniture typical of Swedish households. ... The PBDE levels in Japan are comparable to those found in European countries. ...

Justina Awasum Björklund; Kaj Thuresson; Anna Palm Cousins; Ulla Sellström; Gunnel Emenius; Cynthia A. de Wit

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Why We Ventilate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Why We Ventilate Why We Ventilate Title Why We Ventilate Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-5093E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Conference Name Proceedings of the 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st Tightvent Conference Date Published October 2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium Keywords indoor environment department, resave, ventilation and air cleaning Abstract It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of "good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

87

Ventilation of Electrical Substations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE type of construction used for substations is generally governed by requirements, for example, fire and air-raid precautions, which ... Electrical Engineers, F. Favell and E. W. Connon record their experiences in overcoming substation ventilation problems in particular cases. Adequate and suitably planned ventilation will maintain ...

1943-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Austria, September 2006. Modelica As- sociation and Arsenalsystems. The ?exibility of Modelica has been T room in [° C]lss. AirConditioning - a Modelica li- o brary for dynamic

Wetter, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

channel wheel heat exchanger under different ambient conditions using the model developed. These include frost formation on the surface of the channel wheel heat exchanger, and impacts on the operational performance of the channel wheel fresh air...

Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using aquality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energyquality procedure” (IAQP), with both objective and subjective components, intended to provide greater flexibility and potentially enable energy

Dutton, Spencer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

92

Building Science - Ventilation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com Build Tight - Ventilate Right Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Build Tight - Ventilate Right How Tight? What's Right? Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Air Barrier Metrics Material 0.02 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Assembly 0.20 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Enclosure 2.00 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa 0.35 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.25 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.15 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Getting rid of big holes 3 ach@50 Getting rid of smaller holes 1.5 ach@50 Getting German 0.6 ach@50 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Best As Tight as Possible - with - Balanced Ventilation Energy Recovery Distribution Source Control - Spot exhaust ventilation Filtration

93

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Title Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5889E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Max H. Sherman Journal Building and Environment Volume 59 Start Page 456 Pagination 456-465 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, filtration, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, ozone, simulation Abstract Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone---associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor---generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air---exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

94

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

95

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

96

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Literature Review of Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Nielsen et al. (1988) showed the impact of supply diffusers whereby increasing the entrainment of room air can decrease the temperature gradient in the occupied zone. #0;? Two important parameters to evaluate the performance of displacement ventilation... of Ventilated Rooms, Oslo, Norway. Nielsen, P.V., Hoff, L., Pedersen, L.G. 1988. Displacement Ventilation by Different Types of Diffusers. Proceedings of the 9 th AIVC Conference, Warwick. Niu, J. 1994. Modeling of Cooled-Ceiling Air-Conditioning Systems Ph...

Cho, S.; Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.

99

A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of six air pollutants, Journal of the Air Pollution ControlAir Pollutants MAINTENANCE OR RENOVATION ACTIVITIES WITHOUT SUFFICIENT CONTROL

Daisey, Joan M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Whole Building Ventilation Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole-Building Whole-Building Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Home Performance / Weatherization  Addressing ventilation is the exception  Max tightness, e.g. BPI's "Building Airflow Standard" (BAS)  References ASHRAE 62-89  BAS = Max [0.35 ACH, 15 CFM/person], CFM50 eq.  If BD tests show natural infiltration below BAS...  Ventilation must be recommended or installed.  SO DON'T AIR SEAL TO MUCH! © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Ventilation Requirements Ventilation systems for existing homes that are:

103

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control should be the first priority instead of dilution of pollutants by ventilation or by cleaning the air.air quality, could better provide healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutantsair quality, could better document healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutants

Mendell, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

US Department of Energy's Regulatory Negotiations Convening on US Department of Energy's Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment Public Information for Convening Interviews I. What are the substantive issues DOE seeks to address? Strategies for grouping various basic models for purposes of certification; Identification of non-efficiency attributes, which do not impact the measured consumption of the equipment as tested by DOE's test procedure; The information that is certified to the Department; The timing of when the certification should be made relative to distribution in commerce; and Alterations to a basic model that would impact the certification.

106

Scale model studies of displacement ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation is an air conditioning method that provides conditioned air to indoor environments with the goal to improve air quality while reducing energy consumption. This study investigates the performance ...

Okutan, Galip Mehmet

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy analysis of a personalized ventilation system in a cold climate: influence of the supplied air temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2). The supply temperature and its control strategyAir supply Control strategy of temper. a temperature the aircontrol over the temperature of the supplied personalized air, the building manager has to define the air supply temperature (

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Design of a Natural Ventilation System in the Dunhuang Museum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fresh air and good air quality can be obtained by a natural ventilation system, to fulfill the requirement of near natural conditions for the psychological health of mankind. A natural ventilation system is an ecological, energy saving system...

Zhang, Y.; Guan, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bennett, Deborah H., William J. Fisk, Michael G. Apte, X. Wu, Amber L. Trout, David Faulkner, and Douglas P. Sullivan Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 4 Pagination 309-20 Abstract This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale.

110

Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH0), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 13.7 Next, calculate the ventilation air mass flow rate for Zone #2 using m2,min = CFMZMIN2 x 60 x 1/v m2,min= 1311.7 1312.8 moa,(zone#l+#2)=(ml,min + m2,min) moa,l+2= 2189.7 2191.5 Next, calculate the mass of the return air = mra = (ml+m2) NOTE: 7....7 13.7 Next, calculate the ventilation air mass flow rate for Zone #2 using m2,min = CFMZMIN2 x 60 x 1/v m2,min= 1311.7 1312.8 moa,(zone#l+#2)=(ml,min + m2,min) moa,l+2= 2189.7 2191.5 Next, calculate the mass of the return air = mra = (ml+m2) NOTE: 7...

Haberl, J. S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutant Control Index: A New Method of Characterizing Ventilation in Commercial Buildings." Proceedings of Indoor Air'

Lunden, Melissa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Building ventilation and acoustics for people who don’t know much about building ventilation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The architectural composition required for building ventilation used both for low energy cooling and improved air quality can be anathema to acoustical goals of speech privacy and noise control. This paper presents a short tutorial on the basics of cross ventilation stack ventilation comfort ventilation and indoor air quality as it relates to climate building type and indoor pollutants. It is geared to those without significant prior knowledge and follows a similar tutorial on geothermal systems presented at the Miami ASA conference.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. What does this mean for me? Whole-house ventilation is critical in an energy-efficient home to maintain adequate indoor air quality and comfort. The whole-house ventilation system you choose will depend upon your climate, budget, and the availability of experienced contractors in your area. Energy-efficient homes -- both new and existing -- require mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. There are four basic mechanical

114

Why We Ventilate - Recent Advances  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WHY WE VENTILATE: WHY WE VENTILATE: Recent Advances Max Sherman BA Stakeholders meeting ASHRAE BIO  Distinguished Lecturer  Exceptional Service Award  Board of Directors; TechC  Chair of committees:  62.2; Standards Committee  TC 4.3; TC 2.5  Holladay Distinguished Fellow OVERVIEW QUESTIONS  What is Ventilation? What is IAQ?  What functions does it provide?  How much do we need? Why?  How should ventilations standards be made? LBL has working on these problems Who Are You?  Engineers (ASHRAE Members & not);  architects,  contractors,  reps,  builders,  vendors,  code officials WHAT IS VENTILATION  Medicine: To Exchange Air In the Lungs  Latin: Ventilare, "to expose to the wind"  Today: To Bring In Outdoor Air And Replace

115

Impact of the Variable Refrigerant Volume Air Conditioning System on Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of the variable refrigerant volume multi-zone air conditioning systems has met with mixed results since the publication of the Design Standard for Energy Efficiency of Public Buildings. This paper analyzes the characteristics...

Zhu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the California Healthy Building Study, Phase 1.ASHRAE IAQ 91 Healthy Buildings, Atlanta, GA, ASHRAE, 228-1 of the California Healthy Building Study. Indoor Air, 3:

Daisey, Joan M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse conservation Title Development of an isothermal 2D zonal air volume model with impulse conservation Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2010 Authors Victor, Norrefeldt, Thierry Stephane Nouidui, and Gunnar Gruen Conference Name Clima 2010, 10th Rehva World Congress "Sustainable Energy Use in Buildings" Conference Location Antalya, Turkey Abstract This paper presents a new approach to model air flows with a zonal model. The aim of zonal models is to perform quick simulations of the air distribution in rooms. Therefore an air volume is subdivided into several discrete zones, typically 10 to 100. The zones are connected with flow elements computing the amount of air exchanged between them. In terms of complexity and needed computational time zonal models are a compromise between CFDcalculations and the approximation of perfect mixing. In our approach the air flow velocity is used as property of the zones. Thus the distinction between normal zones and jet or plume influenced zones becomes obsolete. The model is implemented in the object oriented and equation based language Modelica. A drawback of the new formulation is that the calculated flow pattern depends on the discretization. Nevertheless, the results show that the new zonal model performs well and is a useful extension to existing models.

119

The impact of demand-controlled and economizer ventilation strategies on energy use in buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies for constant-air-volume (CAV) systems in commercial buildings. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation, and energy analyses were performed for four typical building types, eight alternative ventilation systems, and twenty US climates. Only single-zone buildings were considered so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates and for buildings that have relatively low internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 20% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger but were strongly dependent upon the building type and occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules and large internal gains (i.e., restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was virtually eliminated by demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates. For both heating and cooling, the savings associated with demand-controlled ventilation are dependent on the fixed minimum ventilation rate of the base case at design conditions.

Brandemuehl, M.J.; Braun, J.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Results of the Evaluation Study DeAL Decentralized Facade Integrated Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most office buildings in Germany have either no mechanical ventilation system or a centralized ventilation system with fresh and exhaust air supply. Within the last 10 years some projects using decentralized ventilation systems (DVS) came up. Common...

Mahler, B.; Himmler, R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after which the filters in the HVAC systems were sprayedPoor HVAC Condensation Drain Poor Access to Filters, etc.Low Filter Efficiency Poor Outdoor Air Intake Location HVAC

Daisey, Joan M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Marr, Morrison, Nazaroff, and Harley Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 899  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to control CO emissions from motor vehicles with the goal of reducing CO concentra- tions in outdoor air pollutant." States and local air districts monitor concen- trations of criteria pollutants in outdoor airMarr, Morrison, Nazaroff, and Harley Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste Management

Harley, Robert

124

Optimized Fan Control In Variable Air Volume HVAC Systems Using Static Pressure Resets: Strategy Selection and Savings Analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The potential of static pressure reset (SPR) control to save fan energy in variable air volume HVAC systems has been well documented. Current research has… (more)

Kimla, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reduced energy and volume air pump for a seat cushion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient pump system is described for transferring air between sets of bladders in a cushion. The pump system utilizes a reversible piston within a cylinder in conjunction with an equalizing valve in the piston which opens when the piston reaches the end of travel in one direction. The weight of a seated user then forces air back across the piston from an inflated bladder to the previously deflated bladder until the pressure is equalized. In this fashion the work done by the pump is cut in half. The inflation and deflation of the different bladders is controlled to vary the pressure on the several pressure points of a seated user. A principal application is for wheel chair use to prevent pressure ulcers. 12 figs.

Vaughn, M.R.; Constantineau, E.J.; Groves, G.E.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - air conditioning maintenance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... : Use of mechanical equipment...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - air handling systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

129

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The temperature of the air outside of this area is allowed to rise above normal conditions. The idea was to let this temperature rise so that it was either equal to or higher than the outdoor temperature, thus reducing heat gain. Computer simulation programs were...

Simmonds, P.; Gaw, W.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Mortality and intensive care volume in ventilated patients from 1995 to 2009 in the Australian and New Zealand binational adult  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Patricia J. Solomon, BSc(Hons), DipMathStats, PhD; for the ANZICS Centre for Outcome and Resource- erature (2). Attendant on the contentious health policy implications (3, 4) has been a methodologic debate dif- ferent methodologies have reported a variable volume-(mortality)-outcome re- lationship (8, 14

Solomon, Patty

132

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yifeng Wu Honglin Wang Doctoral Candidate Associate Professor Master Master Master Master School of Municipal & Environmental Eng, Harbin Institute of Technology Harbin P.R. China, 150090 hitbai@163.com Abstract: The energy consumption... region and the same operating strategy was adopted[1]. Wang Li analyzed the temperature control principles to achieve economical operation in CAV system, and presented improved control strategy to integrate fresh air control with indoor air...

Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Design of industrial ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This latest edition has a title change to reflect an expansion to cover the interrelated areas of general exhaust ventilation and makeup air supply. More coverage is also given the need for energy conservation and for the physical isolation of the workspace from major contaminant generation zones. Excellent and generous illustrative matter is included. Contents, abridged are as follows: flow of fluids; air flow through hoods; pipe resistance; piping design; centrifugal exhaust fans; axial-flow fans; monitoring industrial ventilization systems; isolation; and energy conservation.

Alden, J.L.; Kane, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

137

A. Buonomano, M. Sherman, USA: Analysis of residential hybrid ventilation performance in U.S. climates 1 Intern. Symposium on Building and Ductwork Air tightness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Buonomano, M. Sherman, USA: Analysis of residential hybrid ventilation performance in U Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley 94720, CA, USA. (phone:+1 510 486 4022, fax: +1 510 486 6658, email on analysis methods for hybrid ventilation system is limited. #12;2 A. Buonomano, M. Sherman, USA: Analysis

138

Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensation in winter, reduced life and reliability of ventilation equipment, and high repair bills cooling and heating systems. VENTILATION SYSTEMS The operating efficiency of a ventilation fan can be pockets of stagnant air, inadequate cooling from evaporative cooling pads, high heating expenses, heavy

Watson, Craig A.

139

Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

requirements must be met? * What is the scope of the renovation project? * What heating, air conditioning, and ventilation systems are currently in the home? * What type of...

140

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to provide needed ventilation under drier summer and winter conditions and reduce the air introduced during periods of peak space conditioning. For more information, see the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stevens, Lanning, Anderson, Jacoby, and Chornet Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the control of particulate and gas- eous indoor air pollutants. Removal of particulates uti- lizes fibrous out chemical decomposition reactions with gas-phase pollutants. Although the use of air cleaningStevens, Lanning, Anderson, Jacoby, and Chornet Volume 48 October 1998 Journal of the Air & Waste

142

A large volume 2000 MPA air source for the radiatively driven hypersonic wind tunnel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultra-high pressure air source for a hypersonic wind tunnel for fluid dynamics and combustion physics and chemistry research and development must provide a 10 kg/s pure air flow for more than 1 s at a specific enthalpy of more than 3000 kJ/kg. The nominal operating pressure and temperature condition for the air source is 2000 MPa and 900 K. A radial array of variable radial support intensifiers connected to an axial manifold provides an arbitrarily large total high pressure volume. This configuration also provides solutions to cross bore stress concentrations and the decrease in material strength with temperature. [hypersonic, high pressure, air, wind tunnel, ground testing

Constantino, M

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

The International Journal of Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Buildings: Harrington C and Modera M 345 Estimates of Uncertainty in Multi-Zone Air Leakage Measurements. Introduction Heating, cooling and ventilation can account for 50 percent of total building energy use flow rate. Over the past 15 years, the subject of duct leakage in buildings other than single-family

California at Davis, University of

144

Integrating VAV zone requirements with supply fan operation. [Variable Air Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of communicating direct digital controls (DDC) with distributed intelligence offers new opportunities for energy conservation while maintaining occupant comfort in commercial buildings. Integrating control within a single DDC panel improves performance. Integrating control by communications between multiple controllers can further enhance system operation. One example is a DDC static pressure reset strategy for supply fan operation in variable air volume (VAV) supply air distribution systems. This strategy integrates the requirements of the VAV terminal units serving the building zones to minimize fan energy use. This article describes terminal unit operation, supply fan control, concurrent polling, operational data and power savings.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (United States)); Norford, L.K. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Neuro-optimal operation of a variable air volume HVAC&R system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low operational efficiency especially under partial load conditions and poor control are some reasons for high energy consumption of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems. To improve energy efficiency, HVAC&R systems should be efficiently operated to maintain a desired indoor environment under dynamic ambient and indoor conditions. This study proposes a neural network based optimal supervisory operation strategy to find the optimal set points for chilled water supply temperature, discharge air temperature and VAV system fan static pressure such that the indoor environment is maintained with the least chiller and fan energy consumption. To achieve this objective, a dynamic system model is developed first to simulate the system behavior under different control schemes and operating conditions. A multi-layer feed forward neural network is constructed and trained in unsupervised mode to minimize the cost function which is comprised of overall energy cost and penalty cost when one or more constraints are violated. After training, the network is implemented as a supervisory controller to compute the optimal settings for the system. Simulation results show that compared to the conventional night reset operation scheme, the optimal operation scheme saves around 10% energy under full load condition and 19% energy under partial load conditions.

Min Ning; M. Zaheeruddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - air monitoring adjacent Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ventilation rate on perceived quality of air polluted by different materials, small - scale and full - scale... the ventilation required for acceptable indoor air...

148

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Title Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5035E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Building and Environment Volume 47 Pagination 368-372 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords cost-benefit analysis, economizer, health, office, ventilation rate, work performance Abstract This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

149

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

150

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Ventilation | Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation Ventilation The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ventilation air; exhaust air; control strategies; carbon dioxide sensors; economizers. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_ventilation.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies

151

Solar ventilation and tempering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents basic information about solar panels designed realized and used for solar ventilation of rooms. Used method of numerical flow simulation gives good overview about warming and flowing of the air in several kinds of realized panels (window facade chimney). Yearlong measurements give a good base for calculations of economic return of invested capital. The operation of the system in transient period (spring autumn) prolongs the period without classical heating of the room or building in winter the classical heating is supported. In the summer period the system furnished with chimney can exhaust inner warm air together with necessary cooling of the system by gravity circulation only. System needs not any invoiced energy source; it is supplied entirely by solar energy. Large building systems are supported by classical electric fan respectively.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Optimized Fan Control In Variable Air Volume HVAC Systems Using Static Pressure Resets: Strategy Selection and Savings Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of static pressure reset (SPR) control to save fan energy in variable air volume HVAC systems has been well documented. Current research has focused on the creation of reset strategies depending on specific system features...

Kimla, John

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Ventilated Building Speaker(s): Sezin Eren Ozcan Date: May 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Due to limited energy sources, countries are looking for alternative solutions to decrease energy needs. In that context, natural ventilation can be seen as a very attractive sustainable technique in building design. However, understanding of ventilation dynamics is needed to provide an efficient control. Ventilation rate has to be determined not only in terms of energy, but also for controlling indoor air quality and emissions. For these reasons, agricultural buildings (livestock houses, greenhouses, etc.), naturally ventilated industrial buildings, and residences require a reliable ventilation rate measuring technique. Measuring techniques suffer

154

Study on Influencing Factors of Night Ventilation in Office Rooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology Harbin P.R.China, 150090 wzjw02@yahoo.com.cn Abstract: A mathematical and physical model on night ventilation is set up. The fields of indoor air temperature, air velocity and thermal comfort... & Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology Harbin P.R.China, 150090 wzjw02@yahoo.com.cn Abstract: A mathematical and physical model on night ventilation is set up. The fields of indoor air temperature, air velocity and thermal comfort...

Wang, Z.; Sun, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Effectiveness Research Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic, House 1: Vented attic lower loads + PV Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 2 * 1475 ft 2 , 3-bedroom houses * House 2 was mirrored plan * 45 cfm 62.2 ventilation rate * Garage connected to house on only one wall * Access to attic via pull-down stairs in garage * Further access to House 2 unvented attic through gasket sealed door Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 3 Testing Approach  Building enclosure and building mechanical systems characterization by measurement of building enclosure air leakage, central air distribution system airflows, and ventilation system airflows.

156

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

157

Experimental Study of the Circulation Air Volume of Recirculation Evaporative Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-3 Experimental Study of the Circulation Air Volume of Recirculation Evaporative Cooling 1 Jun Xiong ZeHua Liu Chao Wang GuoJie Chen Bachelor Senior.... Pre-design and design tools for evapora- tive cooling[J]. ASHRAE Transaction: Symposia. 2001.Vol. 107 part1: 501-510. [5] LiangShi Ding, JianJun Wang, MingJian Jiang. Investigations of the thermal performance of in- direct evaporative plate heat...

Xiong, J.; Liu, Z.; Wang, C.; Chen, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review...

Sherman, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

columns indicate the energy and cost savings for demandand class size. (The energy costs of classroom ventilationTotal Increase in Energy Costs ($) Increased State Revenue

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption by the station. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Cape Canaveral AFS. It is A companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profiles to be used to improve the current energy system on the station. The characteristics of electricity, diesel fuel, No. 2 fuel oil, and motor vehicle gasoline (MOGAS) are analyzed for on-base facilities. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Cape Canaveral AFS facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985--1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the North, South, and Titan Substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutant Control Index: A New Method of Characterizing Ventilation in Commercial Buildings." Proceedings of Indoor Air'

Sherman, Max H.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Indoor air environment and night cooling energy efficiency of a southern German passive public school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently built school building has adopted a novel heat recovery air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification have been numerically investigated concerning the effects of the heat flow flux of passive cooling within the ceiling concrete in the classroom due to night ventilation in summer which could result in cooling energy storage. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of passive cooling can simultaneously decrease the volume averaged indoor temperatures and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air-cooling unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of exhaust air and the heat flux value for passive cooling within the classroom ceiling concrete. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Xiao-Hong Li; Han-Qing Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

Turner, William; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a ventilation and air conditioning system for the ECN3 experimental area and the TCC8 and GHN300 service tunnels and for the dismantling of the existing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a ventilation and air conditioning system for the ECN3 experimental area and the TCC8 and GHN300 service tunnels and for the dismantling of the existing system

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). Projects considered can be either in the form of energy management or energy conservation. The overall efforts of this task are based on a model program PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Cape Canaveral AFS, which is located approximately 10 miles north of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1: Executive Summary and Volume 2: Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M), and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. Descriptions of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions are also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost- effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Eichman, C.J.; King, D.A.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; Shankle, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A study of time-dependent responses of a mechanical displacement ventilation (DV) system and an underfloor air distribution (UFAD) system : building energy performance of the UFAD system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climates, annual electricity consumption of UFAD is alwaysso the cooling electricity consumption has become importantsummers, the electricity consumption for air conditioning

Yu, Jong Keun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

columns indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand class size.   (The energy costs  of classroom ventilation Total Increase in Energy Costs ($) Increased State Revenue

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Natural ventilation in buildings : modeling, control and optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ventilation in buildings has the potential to reduce the energy consumption usually associated with mechanical cooling while maintaining thermal comfort and air quality. It is important to know how building parameters, ...

Ip Kiun Chong, Karine

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Economic Passive Solar Warm-Air Heating and Ventilating System Combined with Short Term Storage within Building Components for Residential Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Warm-air heating systems are very suitable for the exploitation of solar energy. A relatively low temperature level combined ... used for transportation and distribution equipment or as storage elements.

K. Bertsch; E. Boy; K.-D. Schall

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ventilation for an enclosure of a gas turbine and related method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ventilation scheme for a rotary machine supported on pedestals within an enclosure having a roof, end walls and side walls with the machine arranged parallel to the side walls, includes ventilation air inlets located in a first end wall of the enclosure; a barrier wall located within the enclosure, proximate the first end wall to thereby create a plenum chamber. The barrier wall is constructed to provide a substantially annular gap between the barrier wall and a casing of the turbine to thereby direct ventilation air axially along the turbine; one or more ventilation air outlets located proximate a second, opposite end wall on the roof of the enclosure. In addition, one or more fans are provided for pulling ventilating air into said plenum chamber via the ventilation air inlets.

Schroeder, Troy Joseph (Mauldin, SC); Leach, David (Simpsonville, SC); O'Toole, Michael Anthony (Greenfield Center, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology of the U.S. Department measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local exhaust

175

Hysteresis effects in hybrid building ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross- breeze Kitchen Stove Ambient air Case study #3 #12;· Wind plays an integral role in low-energy remains a central challenge for the successful implementation of natural ventilation Case study - summary of population, urban energy consumption grows by 2.1% · Buildings consume 40% of world's energy

Flynn, Morris R.

176

Underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and installation of an underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This facility is designed to demonstrate safe underground disposal of U.S. defense generated transuranic nuclear waste. To improve the operability of the ventilation system, an underground remote monitoring and control system was designed and installed. The system consists of 15 air velocity sensors and 8 differential pressure sensors strategically located throughout the underground facility providing real-time data regarding the status of the ventilation system. In addition, a control system was installed on the main underground air regulators. The regulator control system gives indication of the regulator position and can be controlled either locally or remotely. The sensor output is displayed locally and at a central surface location through the site-wide Central Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS operator can review all sensor data and can remotely operate the main underground regulators. Furthermore, the Virtual Address Extension (VAX) network allows the ventilation engineer to retrieve real-time ventilation data on his personal computer located in his workstation. This paper describes the types of sensors selected, the installation of the instrumentation, and the initial operation of the remote monitoring system.

Strever, M.T.; Wallace, K.G. Jr.; McDaniel, K.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A case study of photovoltaic attic ventilator fans was conducted on an occupied single family home in Central Florida. Two fans were installed at mid-summer in an instrumented home where attic air temperature, meteorological conditions and space cooling electric power were measured. The home already had an attic radiant barrier, but still experienced attic air temperatures in excess of 130oF.

178

Relationship between formation water rate, equivalent penetration rate and volume flow rate of air in air drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formation water invasion is the most troublesome problem associated with air drilling. However, it is not economical to apply mist drilling when only a small amount of water flows into wellbore from formation dur...

Wang Kexiong; Zhang Laibin; Jiang Hongwei

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic Solutions for Air Handling Unit–Variable Air Volume and Air Handling Unit–Constant Air Volume Systems- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Jin Wen, Drexel University The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a library of diagnostics decision-support tools for medium-to-large-sized commercial buildings that use air handling unit (AHU) systems that can enable cost-effective diagnostics solutions (both embedded and add-on solutions) for existing buildings.

180

FEMP-FS--Solar Ventilation Preheating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a building, called solar ventilation preheating, is one of the most efficient ways of reducing energy costs using clean and renewable energy. The system works by heating outside air with a south-facing solar collector-a dark-colored wall made of sheet metal and perforated with tiny holes. Outdoor air is drawn through the holes and heated as it absorbs the wall's warmth. The warm air rises in the space between the solar wall and the building wall and is moved into the air-duct system, usually by means of a fan, to heat the building. Any additional heating needed at night or on cloudy days is supplied by the build- ing's conventional heating system. During summer months, intake air bypasses the solar collector,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Performance Analysis of Dual-Fan, Dual-Duct Constant Volume Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,d) or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving cooling coil (Tc,o) is the smaller of either the cold deck set point or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving heating coil (Th,o) is the larger of either the hot deck...,d) or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving cooling coil (Tc,o) is the smaller of either the cold deck set point or the mixed air temperature (Tm,c). The value of the air leaving heating coil (Th,o) is the larger of either the hot deck...

Joo, I. S.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Economizer control assembly for regulating the volume flow of outdoor ambient air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economizer assembly is disclosed wherein a sliding door is utilized for covering an outdoor ambient air opening allowing outdoor ambient air flow into a space to be conditioned. A motor shaft arrangement connected via a rotating drive rod is utilized to slidably displace the door to any position necessary to effectively regulate air flow. The utilization of this economizer control arrangement with a rooftop type air conditioning unit is further disclosed.

Michaels, D.D. Jr.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Environmental Health Perspectives volume 119 | number 8 | August 2011 1123 Predicting air pollution concentrations at reso-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution concentrations at reso- lutions capable of capturing local-scale pollut- ant gradients of approaches may be used to model air pollution over large areas, includ- ing interpolation of fixed use for producing local- scale pollution estimates. Interpolation of fixed-site air pollution

Martin, Randall

184

Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 2: Appendices A-E  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations. This volume consists of appendices A-E, containing field data and data validation.

Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Tomasko, D. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Control Humidity With Single-Duct, Single-Zone, Constant Air Volume System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the AHLJ after Adjusted Conditions I I Return Fan: off; Return Damper: closed; Outside Air Damper: closed (signal) I 7- 14-99 9:44 AM AHU Dimensions Total Air Flow (CW Average Velocity (FPM) Temperature ("F) Humidity (% RH) Dew Point (OF... (FPM) Humidity (% RH) 1 83.0 -... r------ L -/ Dew Point (OF) Static Pressure supply 24" x 24" 4450 1180 Outside Air N/ A 2490 N/ A Mix Air 20" x 36" 4530 1091 T~mnrmt~w~ (OF) I 67.6 1 73.0 I 72.1 I 85.7 I . - 62.9 10.75 Return Air...

Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Natural Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 7:56pm Addthis Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion What does this mean for me? If you live in a part of the country with cool nights and breezes, you may be able to cool your house with natural ventilation. If you're building a new home, design it to take advantage of natural ventilation. Natural ventilation relies on the wind and the "chimney effect" to keep a home cool. Natural ventilation works best in climates with cool nights and regular breezes. The wind will naturally ventilate your home by entering or leaving windows, depending on their orientation to the wind. When wind blows against your

187

Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

Aldrich, R.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Title Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Wenhao Chen, Michael G. Apte, Nuan Li, Michael Spears, Jérémie Almosni, Gregory Brunner, Jianshun(Jensen) Zhang, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 45 Start Page 3561 Issue 21 Pagination 3561-3568 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group

189

Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CAVRH), and variable volume with reheat (VAVRH), four pipe fan coil unit (FC), four pipe induction unit (FI), and a single zone air conditioning system (SZ). These calculations are presented in spreadsheets that include a running commentary so...

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Flame kernel characterization of laser ignition of natural gas–air mixture in a constant volume combustion chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, laser-induced ignition was investigated for compressed natural gas–air mixtures. Experiments were performed in a constant volume combustion chamber, which simulate end of the compression stroke conditions of a SI engine. This chamber simulates the engine combustion chamber conditions except turbulence of air–fuel mixture. It has four optical windows at diametrically opposite locations, which are used for laser ignition and optical diagnostics simultaneously. All experiments were conducted at 10 bar chamber pressure and 373 K chamber temperature. Initial stage of combustion phenomena was visualized by employing Shadowgraphy technique using a high speed CMOS camera. Flame kernel development of the combustible fuel–air mixture was investigated under different relative air–fuel ratios (?=1.2?1.7) and the images were interrogated for temporal propagation of flame front. Pressure-time history inside the combustion chamber was recorded and analyzed. This data is useful in characterizing the laser ignition of natural gas–air mixture and can be used in developing an appropriate laser ignition system for commercial use in SI engines.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Kewal Dharamshi; Avinash Kumar Agarwal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?, a law of physics, shows why electricity savings can be high (Figure 5). 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 102030405060708090100 Air volume [CFM %] Power [H.P. %] P o w e r [ H .P . % ] A i r v o l u m e [ C FM %] C F M = 50 % of b l ast... and dust could settle. An on-demand dust collecting system solves this problem by using a PLC (industrial computer) which calculates necessary air volume based on information from the sensors. The PLC is adjusting the RPM of the fan accordingly...

Litomisky, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - air transportation volume Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air... Awareness 12;Triad ... Source: North Carolina State University, North Carolina Solar Center Collection: Renewable Energy ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 29...

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

designed to remove the acutely toxic chemicals before the air is discharged into the environment. Acutely... Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences 2 Are You Good Enough? The First Crossword on Biological Techniques for Air Pollution Control. By Marc Deshusses, University of California. http:...

195

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Why We Ventilate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air flow is needed to control concentrations of pollutantscontrol is feasable for reducing chlorine exposure. CONCLUSION The main air pollutants

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 2: Long-term monitoring and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. This is the second volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. The first volume described the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. This second volume updates and completes the presentation of data to compare performance of fresh coatings with weathered coatings.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fitted finite volume positive difference scheme for a stationary model of air pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new approach is proposed for the numerical solution of boundary value one-dimensional problem of advection-diffusion equation which arises, among others, in air pollution modeling. Since the problem is posed in...

Tatiana Chernogorova; Lubin Lubin Vulkov

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Improved particle impactor assembly for size selective high volume air sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air containing entrained particulate matter is directed through a plurality of parallel, narrow, vertically oriented apertures of an inlet element toward an adjacently located, relatively large, dust impaction surface preferably covered with an adhesive material. The air flow turns over the impaction surface, leaving behind, the relatively larger particles and passes through two elongate apertures defining the outer bounds of the impaction collection surface to pass through divergent passages which slow down and distribute the air flow, with entrained smaller particles, over a fine filter element that separates the fine particles from the air. By appropriate selection of dimensions and the number of inlet apertures air flow through the inlet element is provided a nonuniform velocity distribution with the lower velocities being obtained near the center of the inlet apertures, to separate out particles larger than a certain predetermined size on the impaction collection surface. The impaction collection surface, even in a moderately sized apparatus, is thus relatively large and permits the prolonged sampling of air for periods extending to four weeks. 6 figs.

Langer, G.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

Natural ventilation generates building form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

Chen, Shaw-Bing

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

202

Industrial Ventilation Statistics Confirm Energy Savings Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is based on installed on-demand ventilation systems, where sensors and PLC are installed with each system, so data is easily collected. Another critical factor for effective dust collecting is proper air velocities in duct system. Having measured air... of the cutting tool is active or not. Information from the sensor is transmitted to the Omron PLC. The Omron PLC saves data in binary form every 5 minutes (24/7) to the CompactFlash card (a similar card is used in digital cameras) along with the time...

Litomisky, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Title Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5969E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., Jennifer M. Logue, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 07/2012 Keywords commissioning, energy, health, indoor air quality, residential, valuation, ventilation Abstract Due to changes in building codes, whole-house mechanical ventilation systems are being installed in new California homes. Few measurements are available, but the limited data suggest that these systems don't always perform as code and forecasts predict. Such deficiencies occur because systems are usually field assembled without design specifications, and there is no consistent process to identify and correct problems. The value of such activities in terms of reducing energy use and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) is poorly understood. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and IAQ.

205

Variable Speed Drive Volumetric Tracking (VSDVT) for Airflow Control in Variable Air Volume (VAV) Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume Systems.? Proceedings of ACEEE 1994 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Vol. 5, pp. 219-223. 3. Liu M., Zhu Y., Claridge D.E., and White E., 1997. ?Impact of Static Pressure Set Level on HVAC Energy Consumption and Indoor... Volume Systems.? Proceedings of ACEEE 1994 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Vol. 5, pp. 219-223. 3. Liu M., Zhu Y., Claridge D.E., and White E., 1997. ?Impact of Static Pressure Set Level on HVAC Energy Consumption and Indoor...

Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of VAV boxes to maintain room temperature at their setpoints. The thermostat action is switched from direct acting (DA) to reverse acting (RA) when the season changes from fall to winter and vice versa from winter to spring, based on the out side air...

Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

96 ASHRAE Transactions: Research Current duct design methods for variable air volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Hourlyairflowrequirements, part-load fan characteristics, and duct static pressure control are incorporated into the problem airflow. Fan power is also influ- enced if static pressure at the end of the longest duct line for effective, energy-efficient, and comfortable heating, ventilat- ing, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems

209

Improving Control of a Dual-Duct Single-Fan Variable Air Volume Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cold and hot air duct static pressure set points is presented. The paper also explores the interactions between the cold and hot deck temperatures and duct static pressures, and discusses the impact of non-ideal deck temperature settings on duct static...

Wei, G.; Martinez, J.; Minihan, T.; Brundidge, T.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy! W H A T I S A I R L E A K A G E ? Ventilation is fresh at stopping air leakage. It is critical to seal all holes and seams between these sheet goods with durable air that enters a house in a controlled manner to exhaust excess moisture and reduce odors

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

212

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Projects | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- Grenada, MS -- International Copper Association - New York, NY -- Wieland - Ulm, Germany -- Heat Transfer Technologies - Abington, PA Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump...

213

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and radon from buildinginsulation materials, textiles, adhesives, etc. , used in large quantities by Although particleboard and urea formaldehyde foam

Hollowell, C.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Title Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5796E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy.Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

215

Griffiss Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Electric resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). FEMP, with support from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is designing this model program for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. The program with Griffiss AFB will (1) identify and evaluate all cost-effective electric energy projects; (2) develop a schedule for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have them procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the ACC Griffiss AFB facility located near Rome, New York. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in seven common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO provides information on the initial cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. The evaluation methodology and technical and cost assumptions are also described for each ERO. Summary tables present the operational performance of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Armstrong, P.R.; Shankle, S.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Stucky, D.J.; Keller, J.M.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Dagle, J.E.; Gu, A.Y.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-conditioning units part Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fans... : Use of mechanical equipment such as refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans... -handling units and mechanical, compressed air, and electric ......

217

Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 III. Current ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (satisfied with indoor air quality in office buildings inthe U.S. in taking indoor air quality seriously, in the same

Mendell, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Indoor air pollution: a public health perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...control tobacco smoke or gas adsorbers, air filters, and electrostatic tion by-products...ventilation air; formaldehyde sorbant filters Behavioral adjustment: Reduction in human...monitoring equipment, and performance of HVAC systems Table 4. Components of comprehensive...

JD Spengler; K Sexton

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs and coal smoke contain a large number of pollutants and known health haz- ards, including particulateEnvironmental Health Perspectives · VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts

Kammen, Daniel M.

220

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does but about the environment in which they lived. Historically, people have ventilated buildings to provide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Control of airborne infectious diseases in ventilated spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Badeau, A. , A. Afshari, T. Goldsmith...control of SARS virus aerosols in indoor environment-transmission routes and ward ventilation...transmission of infectious agents in the built environment-a multidisciplinary systematic review...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation J.M.Logue1,P.H. Sherman, B.C. Singer, Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation; LBNL-4945E #12;Logue et al., Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

224

Experimental analysis and model validation of an opaque ventilated facade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was created and validated against the experimental data. The experimental results showed that the flow rates induced in the façade cavity were due to mixed driving forces: wind and buoyancy. Depending on the weather conditions one of them was the main driving force, or both were of the same order. When the wind force was the main driving force, higher flow rates were found. In these cases buoyancy acted as supporting driving force. When the wind speed was low and buoyancy prevailed lower flow rates were found. Air and surface temperatures were predicted by the numerical model with a better accuracy than flow and energy rates. The model predicts correctly the influence of the wind and buoyancy driving forces. The experimental OVF module showed potential for free ventilation and air preheating, although it depends on weather and geometrical variables. The use of the numerical model using the right parameters was found viable for analyzing the performance of an OVF.

F. Peci López; R.L. Jensen; P. Heiselberg; M. Ruiz de Adana Santiago

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

OPTIMAL EFFICIENCY-POWER TRADEOFF FOR AN AIR MOTOR/COMPRESSOR WITH VOLUME VARYING HEAT TRANSFER CAPABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of air. These results could ben- efit applications such as compressed air energy storage where both high and expansion is both energy efficient and power-dense. An ex- ample would be compressed air energy storage. One density of compressed air storage (about 20 times greater than hydraulic accumulators), and the high power

Li, Perry Y.

226

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

simple, cost-effective techniques for providing fresh air throughout the home, including exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Building America has refined simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing As high-performance homes get more air-tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. Building America has effectively guided the nation's home builders to embrace whole-house ventilation by developing low-cost options that adapt well to their production processes. When the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research teams began

227

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

228

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

University of Colorado Indoor Air Quality Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Image Courtesy of Ohio Image Courtesy of Ohio State University INDOOR AIR QUALITY Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Integrate technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies Minimize occupant distraction User-friendly controls Minimize pollutant sources Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Exhaust Fans Heating And Cooling Systems Passive Ventilation Low VOC materials Each of these features is described in more detail below. Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Knowing that our home has a tight envelope, due to our Bio-SIP construction, we needed to use mechanical ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air

231

In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

234

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

235

Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

237

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Jump to: navigation, search Name Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne (VIB) Place Ploudalmezeau, France Zip 29839 Sector Geothermal energy, Solar Product Ploudalmezeau-based company producing and marketing energy efficient and ventilation products including air source heat pumps, geothermal water source heat pumps, efficient air filtration systems and solar products. Coordinates 48.540325°, -4.657904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.540325,"lon":-4.657904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

research determines optimal HVAC system design for research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evalu- ated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air tempera-

240

Eco Design and the Optimization of Passive Cooling Ventilation for Energy Saving in the Buildings: A Framework for Prediction of Wind Environment and Natural Ventilation in Different Neighborhood Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The idea of utilizing natural ventilation for passive cooling and hence reducing the energy for air conditioning systems of buildings has increasingly attracted the attention of researchers. In urban areas how...

Mohammad Reza Masnavi; Hasan-Ali Laghai…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation? Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation? Speaker(s): Pawel Wargocki Date: October 14, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Guidelines for health-based ventilation in Europe are proposed. They follow the premise of controlling exposures to indoor air pollutants of both indoor and outdoor origin. Exposures are controlled through a two-step sequential approach, in which source control is the primary strategy, while ventilation is the secondary strategy once all options for source control have been fully implemented. World Health Organization (WHO) air quality (AQ) guidelines are used to set the exposure limits. A decision diagram is created for guidance through the process of source control and to aid in

242

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, DC with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modelling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy and first costs analysis of displacement and mixing ventilation systems for U.S. buildings and climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past two decades, displacement ventilation has been increasingly used in Scandinavia and Western Europe to improve indoor air quality and to save energy. By using a detailed computer simulation method, this study ...

Hu, ShiPing, 1970-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Energy Recovery Ventilator Membrane Efficiency Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A test setup was designed and built to test energy recovery ventilator membranes. The purpose of this test setup was to measure the heat transfer and water vapor transfer rates through energy recover ventilator membranes and find their effectiveness...

Rees, Jennifer Anne

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Ian S. Buchanan, David Faulkner, William J. Fisk, Chi-Ming Lai, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms

247

Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Building America program, LBNL has simulated the effects of mechanical ventilation systems that meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2 on ventilation, energy use and indoor humidity levels. In order to capture moisture related HVAC system operation..., LBNL has simulated the effects of mechanical ventilation systems that meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2 on ventilation, energy use and indoor humidity levels for houses that meet current (2005) International Energy Conservation Code requirements...

Walker, I. S.; Sherman, M. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cooling energy efficiency and classroom air environment of a school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently-built school buildings have adopted novel heat recovery ventilator and air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification and indoor air quality indicated by the CO2 concentration have been numerically modeled concerning the effects of delivering ventilation flow rate and supplying air temperature. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of mechanical ventilation rate can simultaneously boost the dilution of indoor air pollutants and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal and pollutant distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of supplying air. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Di Liu; Li-Qun Liu; Xiao-Chuan Pan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

16 P R O G R E S S R E S E a R c h & D i S c O v E R y Nu-Air Ventilation Systems began nearly three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Canada's first LEED platinum buildings. Nu-Air thrives on innovation. In-house engi- neers design all systems to energy efficient buildings across Canada and into the U.S. market Partners: Dalhousie Council of Canada `s Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC- IRAP), a federal government program

Brownstone, Rob

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - air transport safety Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

teex.orgitsi Code Enforcement Disaster... Management Electric Power Environmental Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Heavy Equipment Highway Source: Texas A&M...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - air Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goodrich, B. Prezant , and D. Leonard 2nd... International Conference on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Energy Conservation in Buildings, Montreal, May... periods each, to...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - air izmerenie ehffektivnosti Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goodrich, B. Prezant , and D. Leonard 2nd... International Conference on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Energy Conservation in Buildings, Montreal, May... periods each, to...

254

RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to account for 1/3 to 1/2 of the space conditioning energy. There is not a great deal of measurement data opportunities, the United States Department of Energy and others need to put into perspective the energy based on energy conservation and ventilation strategies. Because of the lack of direct measurements, we

255

Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

Rudd, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: VentAir 62  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

VentAir 62 VentAir 62 VentAir 62 logo. A ventilation airflow calculator that allows easy, accurate compliance with ASHRAE Standard 62-89. The program automates the cumbersome calculations presented by the Standard's Equation 6-1. The Windows-based program helps building designers design multiple-space ventilation systems that meet the requirements of the Standard. This tool analyzes space and system information from the VAV terminal and air handler unit schedules, calculates ventilation airflow requirements (space minimums and system-level required minimum), and provides additional or revised information for the VAV and AHU schedules. Keywords ventilation design, ASHRAE Standard 62 Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge of ASHRAE Standard 62 requirements and ventilation design.

257

Installation restoration program, preliminary assessment/site inspection. Volume I: 223rd Combat Communications Squadron, Hot Springs Air National Guard Station, Arkansas Air National Guard, Hot Springs, Arkansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection (PA/SI) was conducted at the 223rd Combat Communications Squadron (CBCS), Hot Springs Air National Guard Station (ANGS), Hot Springs, Arkansas. Information obtained through interviews, review of Station records, and field observations resulted in the identification of four potentially contaminated disposal and/or spill areas. These areas are designated as the Old Drum Storage (ODS) Area of Concern (AOC), the Northeast and East Fence Line (NEF) AOC, the Current Temporary Waste Storage (CTS) AOC, and the Northwest Ditch (NWD) AOC. The SI was conducted as outlined in the PA/SI Work Plan submitted to ANGRC/CEVR in November 1993 and approved in January 1994. The field work commenced at the 223rd CBCS on 23 February 1994 and was completed on 28 February 1994.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Title Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6259E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte Journal Indoor Air Keywords carbon dioxide, Illness absence, indoor environmental quality, schools, ventilation Abstract Limited evidence associates inadequate classroom ventilation rates (VRs) with increased illness absence (IA). We investigated relationships between VRs and IA in Californiaelementary schools over two school years in 162 3rd-5th grade classrooms in 28 schools in three school districts: South Coast (SC), Bay Area (BA), and Central Valley (CV). We estimated relationships between daily IA and VR (estimated from real-time carbon dioxide) in zero-inflated negative binomial models. We also compared IA benefits and energy costs of increased VRs. All school districts had median VRs below the 7.1 L/sec-person California standard. For each additional 1 L/sec-person of VR, IA was reduced significantly (p<0.05) in models for combined districts (-1.6%) and for SC (-1.2%), and non-significantly for districts providing less data: BA (-1.5%) and CV (-1.0%). Assuming associations were causal and generalizable, increasing classroom VRs from the California average (4 L/sec-person) to the State standard would decrease IA by 3.4%, increase attendance-linked funding to schools by $33 million annually, and increase costs only $4 million. Further increasing VRs would provide additional benefits. These findings, while requiring confirmation, suggest that increasing classroom VRs above the State

259

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values William J.N. Turner, Jennifer M. Logue, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012 LBNL-5969E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

260

Software Verification & Validation Report for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Ventilation System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the analysis, testing and conclusions of the software verification and validation for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization ventilation system. Automation control system will use the Allen-Bradley software tools for programming and programmable logic controller (PLC) configuration. The 244-AR Interim Stabilization Ventilation System will be used to control the release of radioactive particles to the environment in the containment tent, located inside the canyon of the 244-AR facility, and to assist the waste stabilization efforts. The HVAC equipment, ducts, instruments, PLC hardware, the ladder logic executable software (documented code), and message display terminal are considered part of the temporary ventilation system. The system consists of a supply air skid, temporary ductwork (to distribute airflow), and two skid-mounted, 500-cfm exhausters connected to the east filter building and the vessel vent system. The Interim Stabilization Ventilation System is a temporary, portable ventilation system consisting of supply side and exhaust side. Air is supplied to the containment tent from an air supply skid. This skid contains a constant speed fan, a pre-filter, an electric heating coil, a cooling coil, and a constant flow device (CFD). The CFD uses a passive component that allows a constant flow of air to pass through the device. Air is drawn out of the containment tent, cells, and tanks by two 500-cfm exhauster skids running in parallel. These skids are equipped with fans, filters, stack, stack monitoring instrumentation, and a PLC for control. The 500CFM exhaust skids were fabricated and tested previously for saltwell pumping activities. The objective of the temporary ventilation system is to maintain a higher pressure to the containment tent, relative to the canyon and cell areas, to prevent contaminants from reaching the containment tent.

YEH, T.

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

Marshall, B.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimising the Fresh Air Economiser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimising the Fresh Air Economiser Rob Bishop Technical Director Energy Solutions Ltd. Wellington New Zealand ABSTRACT This paper proposes using measurements of CO2 to infer the amount of Outside Air (OA) ventilation delivered to a... and the number of occupants only, but since 2004 has also included a value based on the floor area of the space. In New Zealand, the ventilation code is based on ASHRAE Standard 62:1989 (with local amendments), and has not been updated to include the area...

Biship, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Test Plan to Evaluate the Relationship Among IAQ, Comfort, Moisture, and Ventilation in Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental plan describes research being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in coordinatation with Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Florida HERO, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to evaluate the impact of ventilation rate on interior moisture levels, temperature distributions, and indoor air contaminant concentrations. Specifically, the research team will measure concentrations of indoor air contaminants, ventilation system flow rates, energy consumption, and temperature and relative humidity in ten homes in Gainesville, FL to characterize indoor pollutant levels and energy consumption associated with the observed ventilation rates. PNNL and FSEC have collaboratively prepared this experimental test plan, which describes background and context for the proposed study; the experimental design; specific monitoring points, including monitoring equipment, and sampling frequency; key research questions and the associated data analysis approach; experimental logistics, including schedule, milestones, and team member contact information; and clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of each team in support of project objectives.

Widder, Sarah H.; Martin, Eric

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program Interim Report on Cross Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels within a commercial retail building. Indoor Air, 18,and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores  Wanyu R.  Chan, exchange rates of the nine retail stores estimated from the

Chan, Wanyu R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project investigates the impact of air infiltration and ventilation on space cooling and moisture in residential buildings; research was conducted in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

266

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System Performance System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the installation of a data monitoring system to analyze the efficiency and performance of a large solar ventilation preheat (SVP) system. The system was installed at a Federal installation to reduce energy consumption and costs and to help meet Federal energy goals and mandates. SVP systems draw ventilation air in through a perforated metal solar collector with a dark color on the south side of a build-

267

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Performance evaluation of PM?? and high-volume air samplers using a Coulter Counter Particle Size Analyzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the HiVol/Coulter process. The HiVol/Coulter process includes the determination of the percent of particles less than 10 um (AED) on a total suspended particulate matter filter. Representative particle size distributions were obtained for cotton dust... with an aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED) larger than 10 micrometers (um) were seldom found in the air spaces of the lungs, Particles larger than 10 um (AED) do not pass the filtering mechanisms of the respiratory tract and are of less concern (AMA, 1963...

Herber, Douglas John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of solar ventilation preheating (SVP) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply SVP within the Federal sector.

270

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

272

Flywheel Cooling: A Cooling Solution for Non Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Flywheel Cooling" utillzes the natural cooling processes of evaporation, ventilation and air circulation. These systems are providing low-cost cooling for distribution centers, warehouses, and other non air-conditioned industrial assembly plants...

Abernethy, D.

273

Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold air distribution systems may reduce the operating energy consumption of air-conditioned air supply system and improve the outside air volume percentages and indoor air quality. However, indoor temperature patterns and velocity field are easily...

Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Ventilation Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

275

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple...

276

Smart Ventilation (RIVEC) - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technology. Their mechanical ventilation systems dominate for energy use; as the foundation, wall, and roof work together. Smart ventilation is expected to save at least 40% on...

277

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory This presentation was delivered at the...

278

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated, commissioning, procedures, standards, ASHRAE 62.2 Please use the following citation for this report: Stratton, J.C. and C.P. Wray. 2013. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning

279

Using EMCS Data to Document and Improve Air Handler Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditionally, energy monitoring and control systems (EMCS) have been used, as the name implies, to monitor and control heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, however, this paper will identify other benefits of an EMCS. Recording EMCS...

Brightbill, E. L.; Rutt, J. P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE modelmodels that calculate energy demand by solving a series ofand (b) the change in energy demand resulting in a change in

Logue, Jennifer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Current Concepts: Weaning Patients from the Ventilator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...neurologic ICUs. Patients who require reintubation have an increased risk of death, a prolonged hospital stay, and a decreased likelihood of returning home, as compared with patients in whom discontinuation of mechanical ventilation is successful. Thus, it is essential that critical care physicians identify... In the United States, almost 800,000 patients who are hospitalized each year require mechanical ventilation.1 This estimate excludes neonates, and there is little doubt that mechanical ventilation will be increasingly used as the number of patients 65 ...

McConville J.F.; Kress J.P.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will focus on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

283

Fault tolerant control of outdoor air and AHU supply air temperature in VAV air conditioning systems using PCA method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a fault tolerant control method to control the outdoor air ventilation and AHU supply air temperature, which concerned indoor air quality and humidity, respectively to satisfy ASHRAE Standard in VAV systems. The principal component analysis method, joint angle method, and compensatory reconstruction are used to detect, isolate, and reconstruct the fault, respectively for fault tolerant control. They are tested and evaluated in a simulation environment under the condition of temperature and flow sensors with fix bias faults.

Xinqiao Jin; Zhimin Du

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

CAPTURE AND USE OF COAL MINE VENTILATION AIR METHANE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second semi-annual Technical Progress report under the subject agreement. During the second six months of the project the following items were accomplished: (1) the detailed engineering design was started by MEGTEC Systems, (2) a pre-investigation meeting was held with Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) to discuss the allegations in the 101(c) Petition for Modification of Application of Mandatory Safety Standard, (3) the 101(c) Petition for Modification was withdrawn, although negotiations continue with MSHA, and (4) detailed engineering was started by CONSOL Energy. These aspects of the project, as well as progress on public communications are discussed in detail in this report.

Deborah A. Kosmack

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environ.   15,  List of Acronyms Energy  Commission: California Energy Commission  CREL: Chronic reference by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007) “Ozone Removal by HVAC Filters. ” Atmos.  Environ.  HVAC filters  ozone deposition in  HVAC filters and byproduct formation, 

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roll–O–Mat polyester type HVAC filter with a thin tackifiera Petri dish. A 47mm cut HVAC filter piece was mounted on anwas loaded on HVAC particle filters, and the formaldehyde

Sidheswaran, Meera

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Smart School Symposium Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Session  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in Schools Efficiency Metrics for HVAC Equipment Historical Perspective on Efficiency · Weather data is not the same, and has a big impact on building loads as well as the performance of HVAC;School Load Data Metrics · Using the ASHRAE 90.1 benchmark buildings models I have developed

California at Davis, University of

289

Building America Best Practices Series, Vol. 10- Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing, A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This guide provides information to contractors and homeowners to identify ways to seal unwanted air leaks in homes, while ensuring healthy levels of ventilation and avoiding indoor air pollution.

290

Chlorofluorocarbon Constraints on North Atlantic Ventilation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The North Atlantic Ocean vigorously ventilates the ocean interior. Thermocline and deep water masses are exposed to atmospheric contact there and are sequestered in two principal classes: Subtropical Mode Water (STMW: 26.5 ? ?? ? 26.8) and ...

Thomas W. N. Haine; Kelvin J. Richards; Yanli Jia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector Speaker(s): Peter V. Nielsen Date: November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Rongxin Yin We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in the indoor environment by supplying fresh air to the room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles as e.g. mixing ventilation, downward ventilation, displacement ventilation, etc. A large amount of air is supplied to the room to ensure dilution of airborne infection. The talk discusses both the macroenvironment and the microenvironment. The macroenvironment is the conditions created by the air distribution system, and the microenvironment is the conditions created by the local flow around persons in combination

292

Experimental study on flow and ventilation behaviours over idealised urban roughness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flows in the urban boundary layer (UBL) are strongly affected by the inhomogeneous roughness elements at the bottom surface. In particular, in the near-ground region (roughness sublayer), the effect of the surface roughness dominates that complicates the behaviours of mean flow and turbulence and subsequently the near-wall transport processes. To safeguard the health of urban inhabitants, it is crucial to develop an in-depth understanding of the correlation among near-wall fluid motions, UBL turbulence and city ventilation. However, rather limited information is available. In this study, physical modelling in a laboratory wind tunnel is employed to measure the profiles of both stream-wise and vertical velocities over an array consisting of idealised two-dimensional (2D) roughness elements. Various arrangements are adopted in attempt to cover different flow regimes to examine city ventilation problems. The ventilation performance is measured by the air exchange rate (ACH). Consistent with our previous large-eddy simulation (LES) results, the current wind tunnel measurements suggest that city ventilation is dominated by the ACH turbulent component, i.e., air masses are mainly driven by atmospheric turbulence (at least 80% of the total ACH).

Yat-Kiu Ho; Chun-Ho Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Literature review supporting assessment of potential radionuclides in the 291-Z exhaust ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature review was prepared to support a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assess the potential deposition and resuspension of radionuclides in the 291-Z ventilation exhaust building located in the 200 West Area of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Project near Richland, Washington. The filtered ventilation air from three of the facilities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex are combined together in the 291-Z building before discharge through a common stack. These three facilities contributing filtered exhaust air to the discharge stream are (1) the PFP, also known as the Z-Plant or 234-5Z, (2) the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF or 236-Z), and (3), the Waste Incinerator Building (WIB or 232-Z). The 291-Z building houses the exhaust fans that pull air from the 291-Z central collection plenum and exhausts the air to the stack. Section 2.0 of this report is a description of the physical characteristic of the ventilation system from the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters to the exhaust stack. A description of the processes performed in the facilities that are vented through 291-Z is given in Section 3.0. The description focuses on the chemical and physical forms of potential aerosols given off from the unit operations. A timeline of the operations and events that may have affected the deposition of material in the ventilation system is shown. Aerosol and radiation measurements taken in previous studies are also discussed. Section 4.0 discusses the factors that influence particle deposition and adhesion. Mechanisms of attachment and resuspension are covered with specific attention to the PFP ducts. Conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 5.0.

Mahoney, L.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Jette, S.J.; Thomas, L.M. Glissmeyer, J.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Davis, W.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Cooling airflow design tool for displacement ventilation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overhead Air Distribution (Mixed)  Design  Temperature  Tto “Design Temperature,” the “Overhead Air Distribution”T d   Design Control  Strategy  Zone Air  Distribution 

Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10 of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal

Kammen, Daniel M.

296

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are connected to a fan coil unit by flexible ductwork asvariable air volume fan coil units typically used in

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Total analysis of cooling effects of cross-ventilation affected by microclimate around a building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to develop a simulation system for evaluating the passive cooling effects, such as cross-ventilation, solar shading by trees, etc. Since the passive cooling effects are strongly affected by the spatial distributions of airflow, air temperature and radiative heat transports around a building, the microclimate around a building should be accurately predicted for this type of simulations. In this study, convective and radiative heat transports around buildings are analyzed by CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and radiation computations. Furthermore, the heat load calculation with the program “TRNSYS” was carried out, using the values of the cross-ventilation rates predicted by CFD computation and incoming solar radiation onto the building walls under the shade of trees obtained by the radiation computation as boundary conditions. Indoor velocity and indoor air temperature obtained by the simulation system developed here showed generally good agreement with measured data.

Akashi Mochida; Hiroshi Yoshino; Satoshi Miyauchi; Teruaki Mitamura

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

SOME ENGINEERING PROBLEMS IN VENTILATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exercised in the operation of the plant, upon...remove. In dry windy weather when there is a...continual supply of cold water. Purehased...independent of weather conditions, the...cooled. The cost of operation altogrether depends...and exhaust fans, heaters and an air washer...

D. D. Kimball

1915-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Proceedings of the Intern. Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Toulouse (2002) 577 Cost efficiency of ventilation systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the Intern. Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Toulouse (2002 of a corresponding low-energy house have been per- formed for a full heating period. They reproduce measurements from, air quality, control of humidity) [1, 2]. In such houses, the ventilation and infiltration losses

Gieseler, Udo D. J.

300

Design Feature 7: Continuous Preclosure Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design feature (DF) is intended to evaluate the effects of continuous ventilation in the emplacement drifts during preclosure and how the effects, if any, compare to the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design for postclosure long term performance. This DF will be evaluated against a set of criteria provided by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) group. The VA reference design included a continuous ventilation airflow quantity of 0.1 m{sup 3}/s in the emplacement drifts in the design of the repository subsurface facilities. The effects of this continuous ventilation during the preclosure was considered to have a negligible effect on postclosure performance and therefore is not included during postclosure in the assessment of the long term performance. This DF discusses the effects of continuous ventilation on the emplacement drift environment and surrounding rock conditions during preclosure for three increased airflow quantities. The three cases of continuous ventilation systems are: System A, 1.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 8), System B, 5.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 9), and System C, 10.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 10) in each emplacement drift split. An emplacement drift split is half total length of emplacement drift going from the east or west main to the exhaust main. The difference in each system is the quantity of airflow in the emplacement drifts.

A.T. Watkins

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Safeguarding indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California has created and implemented the first state program devoted exclusively to the investigation of nonindustrial indoor air quality. The program is responsible for promoting and conducting research on the determining factors of healthful indoor environments and is structured to obtain information about emission sources, ventilation effects, indoor concentrations, human activity patterns, exposures, health risks, control measures and public policy options. Data are gathered by a variety of methods, including research conducted by staff members, review of the available scientific literature, participation in technical meetings, contractual agreements with outside agencies, cooperative research projects with other groups and consultation with experts. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Sexton, K.; Wesolowski, J.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

Coutts, D

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Speaker(s): Hwataik Han Date: July 10, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Heat recovery ventilators are frequently used to save heating/cooling loads of buildings for ventilation. There are several types of HRV's, including a parallel plate type, a rotary type, a capillary type, and a heat pipe type. The breathing HRV is a heat recovery ventilator of a new kind using the concept of alternating-current ventilation. The AC ventilation is the ventilation with the airflow directions reversed periodically. It has an advantage of using a single duct system, for both supply and exhaust purposes. In order to develop a breathing HRV system, the thermal recovery performance should be investigated depending on many parameters, such as

305

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 ?m. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were then used to determine the ventilation rates, filtration strategies, or source reductions needed to maintain indoor contaminant concentrations below reference levels. Several scenarios of potential concern were considered: (i) formaldehyde levels in furniture/hardware stores, (ii) contaminants associated with cooking (e.g., PM, acrolein, and acetaldehyde) in grocery stores, and (iii) outdoor contaminants (e.g., PM and O{sub 3}) impacting stores that use natural ventilation. Estimated formaldehyde emission rates suggest that retail stores would need to ventilate at levels far exceeding the current Title 24 requirement to lower indoor concentrations below California’s stringent formaldehyde reference level. Given the high costs of providing ventilation but only modest chronic health benefit is expected, effective source control is an attractive alternative, as demonstrated by some retail stores in this study. Predictions showed that grocery stores need MERV 13 air filters, instead of MERV 8 filters that are more commonly used, to maintain indoor PM at levels that meet the chronic health standards for PM. Exposure to acrolein is a potential health concern in grocery stores, and should be addressed by increasing the use of kitchen range hoods or improving their contaminant removal efficiency. In stores that rely on natural ventilation, indoor PM can be a health concern if the stores are located in areas with high outdoor PM. This concern may be addressed by switching to mechanical ventilation when the outdoor air quality is poor, while continuing natural ventilation when outdoor air quality is good.

Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Home Standards DOE Workshops Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference Proceedings Qualified Filter List News Items Related Sites HEPA Related Lessons Learned Contact Us HSS Logo High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters The HEPA Filter web site provides a forum for informing and reporting department-wide activities related to filtration and ventilation issues with special reference to the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters' use, inspection, and testing. This site contains essentials of DOE HEPA filter test program, procedures, requirements and quality assurance aspects applicable to HEPA filters used in DOE facilities. This site contains information about the DOE-accepted Filter Test Facility and its management, operation and quality assuranceprogram.

307

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of a Ventilation Strategy to Prevent Barotrauma in Patients at High Risk for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...site classified the primary cause of deaths in the intensive care units as respiratory failure (due to profound hypoxemia), multiple-organ failure (three or more organs), sepsis, cardiac arrhythmia, or withdrawal of life support from a patient because of an irreversible chronic condition. Secondary outcomes... A strategy of mechanical ventilation that places limits on airway pressure and tidal volume has been recommended for patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome.1–4 This recommendation is based on the observation that mechanical ventilation, ...

Stewart T.E.; Meade M.O.; Cook D.J.

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of repository underground ventilation on emplacement drift temperature control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repository advanced conceptual design (ACD) is being conducted by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Management & Operating Contractor. Underground ventilation analyses during ACD have resulted in preliminary ventilation concepts and design methodologies. This paper discusses one of the recent evaluations -- effects of ventilation on emplacement drift temperature management.

Yang, H.; Sun, Y.; McKenzie, D.G.; Bhattacharyya, K.K. [Morrison Knudson Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy saving by integrated control of natural ventilation and HVAC systems using model guide for comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrated control by controlling both natural ventilation and HVAC systems based on human thermal comfort requirement can result in significant energy savings. The concept of this paper differs from conventional methods of energy saving in HVAC systems by integrating the control of both these HVAC systems and the available natural ventilation that is based on the temperature difference between the indoor and the outdoor air. This difference affects the rate of change of indoor air enthalpy or indoor air potential energy storage. However, this is not efficient enough as there are other factors affecting the rate of change of indoor air enthalpy that should be considered to achieve maximum energy saving. One way of improvement can be through the use of model guide for comparison (MGFC) that uses physical-empirical hybrid modelling to predict the rate of change of indoor air potential energy storage considering building fabric and its fixture. Three methods (normal, conventional and proposed) are tested on an identical residential building model using predicted mean vote (PMV) sensor as a criterion test for thermal comfort standard. The results indicate that the proposed method achieved significant energy savings compared with the other methods while still achieving thermal comfort.

Raad Z. Homod; Khairul Salleh Mohamed Sahari; Haider A.F. Almurib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An experimental investigation of an inclined passive wall solar chimney for natural ventilation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ongoing investigations into solar chimney development have resulted in constantly evolving new designs. In this study, experiments are carried out with an inclined passive wall solar chimney (IPWSC) model with a uniform heat flux on the active (absorptive) wall. The effectiveness of this design has been examined for the heat flux range of 100 W/m2–500 W/m2 with a fixed base air gap width of 0.1 m and inclination angles of the passive wall in the range of 0–6 degrees. The experimental results show that the inclination angle of the passive wall has no significant effect on the temperature distribution across the air gap width and along the chimney height. On the other hand, the averaged air flow velocity across the air gap width is strongly affected by the inclination angle. The experimental results also show that the IPWSC with 0.7 m absorber height and 0.1 m air gap width at an inclination angle of 6° and input heat flux of 500 W/m2 can produce sufficient ventilation for a 27 m3 room based on ASHREA standards. Further, the present experimental results show that the IPWSC design can significantly improve the ventilation performance of a solar chimney in comparison to the conventional chimney design with vertical passive wall configuration. The experimental results are supported by flow visualization experiments and are consistent with scaling predictions.

Rakesh Khanal; Chengwang Lei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioning: General Guidance and Site Considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dehumidification or latent cooling in buildings is an area of growing interest that has been identified as needing more research and improved technologies for higher performance. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems typically expend excessive energy by using overcool-and-reheat strategies to dehumidify buildings. These systems first overcool ventilation air to remove moisture and then reheat the air to meet comfort requirements. Another common strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove moisture from the air more efficiently; however, these systems increase fan energy consumption because of the high airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors and can add heat of absorption to the ventilation air. Alternatively, liquid desiccant air-conditioning (LDAC) technology provides an innovative dehumidification solution that: (1) eliminates the need for overcooling and reheating from traditional cooling systems; and (2) avoids the increased fan energy and air heating from solid desiccant rotor systems.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Experimental simulation of wind driven cross-ventilation in a naturally ventilated building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A device was designed and constructed to simulate cross-ventilation through a building due to natural wind. The wind driver device was designed for use with a one tenth scale model of an open floor plan office building in ...

Hult, Erin L. (Erin Luelle), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential ventilation standard, ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Because meeting this standard can significantly change, Kansas City, Seattle, Minneapolis and Phoenix). In order to capture moisture related HVAC system.2, design strategies for moisture control, humidity and comfort. #12;INTRODUCTION ASHRAE standards 62

315

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of both indoor air quality and energy.   References  ASHRAE both indoor air quality and building energy consumption.  acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Investigation of Methods of Disinfection in an All-air System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The experiment of removing bacteria and indoor air particulates by a bag ventilation filter with synthetic media and an electrostatic filter was carried out, and the effect of killing bacteria by ozone application was also tested. The results show...

Wang, J.; Yan, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Temperature inversion breakup with impacts on air quality in urban valleys influenced by topographic shading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Urban valleys can experience serious air pollution problems as a combined result of their limited ventilation and the high emission of pollutants from the urban areas. Idealized simulations were analysed in order to elucidate the breakup of an ...

Angela M. Rendón; Juan F. Salazar; Carlos A. Palacio; Volkmar Wirth

318

Development of Diagnostic Rules for a Dry Bulb Economizer Mixed Air Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagnostics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is becoming increasingly important because of the rising cost of operation and maintenance of HVAC systems. At the same time, computer costs are tumbling allowing their use...

Underwood, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comparison of Conventional and Fuzzy Control of Indoor Air Quality in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article compares various techniques for the control of indoor air quality in a naturally ventilated building: ON-OFF, proportional-integral-derivative PID, proportional-integral with deadband PIdb, and fuzzy control. The control system for the fuzzy ...

A. I. Dounis; M. Bruant; M. Santamouris; G. Guarracino; P. Michel

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Kids 4 Clean Air | Pollution | Climate | Recycling What can you do  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appliances are working correctly. Good ventilation will improve indoor air quality by dispersing biological air quality, and increases emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Turning off lights when the world have already taken action for these different environmental problems (i.e. Acid Rain, Air Quality

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

322

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND COMFORT IN HIGHLY efficient buildings; Research priorities; Effort; Indoor air quality; Ventilation 1 INTRODUCTION Buildings Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA 3 VentGuide, the Netherlands 4 Air Infiltration

323

Reaerosolization of Fluidized Spores in Ventilation Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high-efficiency particulate air filters were added to the air...and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particles...deposited on the walls of the HVAC test apparatus (Fig...reaerosolization under simulated HVAC operational conditions...particulate air (HEPA) filter cartridges were added...

Paula Krauter; Arthur Biermann

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air Conditioning ... CHEMISTS and engineers use air conditioning as a valuable tool in more than two hundred industries. ... Air conditioning is a tool with many facets. ...

MARGARET INGELS

1938-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools We recently undertook a survey and critical review of the published literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, particularly those in the state of California. The survey's objectives included identifying the most commonly reported building-related health symptoms involving schools, and assembling and evaluating existing measurement data on key indoor air pollutants most likely to be related to these symptoms. The review also summarizes existing measurements of ventilation rates in schools and information on the causes of IAQ and health problems in schools. Most of the literature we reviewed (more than 450 articles and reports) dealt with complaint or problem schools. Among the papers were

326

Frequency domain and finite difference modeling of ventilated concrete slabs and comparison with field measurements: Part 1, modeling methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is the first of two papers that focus on the thermal modeling of building-integrated thermal energy storage (BITES) systems using frequency response (FR) and lumped-parameter finite difference (LPFD) techniques. Structural/non-structural building fabric components, such as ventilated concrete slabs (VCS) can actively store and release thermal energy effectively by passing air through their embedded air channels. These building components can be described as ventilated BITES systems. To assist the thermal analysis and control of BITES systems, modeling techniques and guidelines for FR and LPFD models of VCS are presented in this two-part paper. In this first part, modeling techniques for FR and LPFD approaches based on network theory are presented. A method for calculating the heat transfer between flowing air and ventilated components is developed for these two approaches. Discretization criteria for explicit LPFD models are discussed. For the FR approach, discrete Fourier series in complex frequency form are used to represent the boundary excitations. In the treatment of heat injection from the flowing air as internal source in the VCS, network techniques such as Thévenin theorem, heat flow division, and Y-diakoptic transform are employed. The techniques presented in this paper are applicable to other BITES with hydronic or electric charging/discharging systems. With the FR techniques, model-based control strategies based on transfer functions can be readily developed.

Yuxiang Chen; Andreas K. Athienitis; Khaled E. Galal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Building America Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

Not Available

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

CX-001530: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on existing structures); JJC Day Room Variable Air Volume (VAV) Retrofit; Central Library Air Handler Replacement; Library Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)...

329

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall than in steel ducts. Trends that were observed in steel ducts were present, but weaker, in insulated ducts.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A process vessel ventilation system is being installed in a facility that houses two tanks that will process decontaminated salt solution at the Saltstone Production Facility. A...

331

Issue #9: What are the Best Ventilation Techniques?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

How do we address ventilation in all climates? What is the best compromise between occupant health and safety and energy efficiency?

332

Radionuclide Releases During Normal Operations for Ventilated Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculation estimates the design emissions of radionuclides from Ventilated Tanks used by various facilities. The calculation includes emissions due to processing and storage of radionuclide material.

Blunt, B.

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Technical Review Meeting April 29-30, 2013 A Research Institute of the University of Central...

334

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America webinar, held on Sept. 24, 2014, focused on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

335

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hot-humid PERFORMANCE DATA Costs for reducing infiltration and incorporating mechanical ventilation in buildings will vary greatly depending on the condition and...

336

Phase-change wallboard and mechanical night ventilation in commercial buildings: Potential for HVAC system downsizing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As thermal storage media, phase-change materials (PCMs) such as paraffin, eutectic salts, etc. offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. By embedding PCMs in dypsum board, plaster, or other wall-covering materials, the building structure acquires latent storage properties. Structural elements containing PCMs can store large amounts of energy while maintaining the indoor temperature within a relatively narrow range. As heat storage takes place inside the building where the loads occur, rather than at a central exterior location, the internal loads are removed without the need for additional transport energy. Distributed latent storage can thus be used to reduce the peak power demand of a building, downsize the cooling system, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. The authors used RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, to numerically evaluate the thermal performance of PCM wallboard coupled with mechanical night ventilation in office buildings offers the opportunity for system downsizing in climates where the outside air temperature drops below 18 C at night. In climates where the outside air temperature remains above 19 C at night, the use of PCM wallboard should be coupled with discharge mechanisms other than mechanical night ventilation with outside air.

Stetiu, C.; Feustel, H.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Natural Ventilation Applications in Hot-humid Climate: A Preliminary Design for the College of Design at NTUST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to create a comfortable architectural environment, especially in a hot, humid climate such as that of Taiwan. However, the air currents of urban wind fields are unpredictable and whimsical. The conventional architectural design process does not employ... awkward. In addition, with increased awareness of the impact of climate change and greenhouse emissions, the effective usage of natural ventilation will likely become a crucial element in reducing the energy consumption of buildings. In improving...

Lin, M. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Lin, Y. J.; Wu, H. F.; Liu, P. H.

338

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

A robust CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation control strategy for multi-zone HVAC systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There have been increasingly growing concerns over the quality of the air inside buildings and the associated energy use. The CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV is one of the strategies that could offer a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems. However, implementing CO2-based DCV under ASHRAE Standard 62.1 2004–2010 is not simple as it was under previous versions due to the changes in breathing-zone ventilating rate calculations. Thus, this paper provides insight into the performance of a multi-zone VAV system under different operating and ventilation conditions, discusses the difficulties in the CO2-based DCV, and proposes a robust DCV strategy based on the supply air CO2 concentration. The proposed strategy offers great benefits in terms of better indoor air control and improved energy efficiency. To evaluate the proposed strategy, energy simulations were performed on various USA locations and for a typical two-story office building conditioned by a VAV system. The results show that a significant energy saving could be achieved by implementing the proposed strategy as compared to the design-occupancy ASHRAE Standard 62.1 2010 multi-zone procedure and the amount of saving that could be up to 23% depends mainly on locations and the actual occupancy profile.

Nabil Nassif

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Helical Tomotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer Based on Ventilation Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the feasibility of lung ventilation-based treatment planning, computed tomography and hyperpolarized (HP) helium-3 (He-3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ventilation images of 6 subjects were coregistered for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning in Tomotherapy. Highly-functional lungs (HFL) and less-functional lungs (LFL) were contoured based on their ventilation image intensities, and a cylindrical planning-target-volume was simulated at locations adjacent to both HFL and LFL. Annals of an anatomy-based plan (Plan 1) and a ventilation-based plan (Plan 2) were generated. The following dosimetric parameters were determined and compared between the 2 plans: percentage of total/HFL volume receiving {>=}20 Gy, 15 Gy, 10 Gy, and 5 Gy (TLV{sub 20}, HFLV{sub 20}, TLV{sub 15}, HFLV{sub 15}, TLV{sub 10}, HFLV{sub 10}, TLV{sub 5}, HFLV{sub 5}), mean total/HFL dose (MTLD/HFLD), maximum doses to all organs at risk (OARs), and target dose conformality. Compared with Plan 1, Plan 2 reduced mean HFLD (mean reduction, 0.8 Gy), MTLD (mean reduction, 0.6 Gy), HFLV{sub 20} (mean reduction, 1.9%), TLV{sub 20} (mean reduction, 1.5%), TLV{sub 15} (mean reduction, 1.7%), and TLV{sub 10} (mean reduction, 2.1%). P-values of the above comparisons are less than 0.05 using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. For HFLV{sub 15}, HFLV{sub 10}, TLV{sub 5}, and HTLV{sub 5}, Plan 2 resulted in lower values than plan 1 but the differences are not significant (P-value range, 0.063-0.219). Plan 2 did not significantly change maximum doses to OARs (P-value range, 0.063-0.563) and target conformality (P = 1.000). HP He-3 MRI of patients with lung disease shows a highly heterogeneous ventilation capacity that can be utilized for functional treatment planning. Moderate but statistically significant improvements in sparing functional lungs were achieved using helical tomotherapy plans.

Cai Jing; McLawhorn, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Altes, Tallisa A.; Lange, Eduard de [Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M.; Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Sheng Ke, E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation (DV) is a promising ventilation concept due to its high ventilation efficiency. In this paper, the application of the CFD method, the velocity and temperature fields of three-dimensional displacement ventilation systems...

Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

344

Natural Ventilation Design for Houses in Thailand Chalermwat Tantasavasdia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the potential of using natural ventilation as a passive cooling system for new house windows in suburban houses can be opened. Passive cooling design elements are mostly ignored in modern1 Natural Ventilation Design for Houses in Thailand Chalermwat Tantasavasdia , Jelena Srebricb

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

345

HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Simulated Performance Speaker(s): Emanuele Naboni Date: May 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Opaque ventilated façade systems are increasingly used in buildings, even though their effects on the overall thermal performance of buildings have not yet been fully understood. The research reported in this presentation focuses on the modeling of such systems with EnergyPlus. Ventilated façade systems are modeled in EnergyPlus with module "Exterior Naturally Vented Cavity." Not all façade systems can be modeled with this module; this research defined the types of systems that can be modeled, and the limitations of such simulation. The performance of a ventilated façade

347

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Speaker(s): Alexander M. Zhivov Date: April 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Dr. Alexander Zhivov is currently the chairman of the International Task Force "Autovent International" focusing on environmental problems within the Automotive Industry. This Task Force was formed in 1997 to develop the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry". The guide was to be seen as a building block within the EU sponsored "Industrial Ventilation Design Guide Book" project, covering both theory and applications. In his presentation, Dr. Zhivov will talk about his work with the automotive industry, describe major highlights from the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry" and talk about building, process and HVAC

348

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Installation-restoration program. Phase 2. Confirmation/quantification Stage 1 for Minot Air Force Base, Minot, North Dakota. Volume 1. Final report, September 1985-October 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the procedures developed for the Department of Defense (DOD) Installation-Restoration Program (IRP), a Phase II, Stage I site investigation was performed at the Minot Air Force Base (MAFB), Minot, North Dakota. Fred C. Hart Associates (HART) conducted investigations at three areas of concern at the installation, the Sanitary Landfill Area (SLA), the Firefighting Training Area (FTA) and the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Area (EOD). The investigation of the SLA consisted of the installation and sampling of ground-water monitoring wells and of surface water within the SLA. The investigation of the FTA consisted of the installation and sampling of subsurface soil from a test boring drilled in the center of the FTA and the sampling of surface sediment within the drainage ditch leading away from the FTA.

Not Available

1988-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Compressed Air  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPA Utility Reimbursement Programs for Compressed Air Projects Customer Proposal Template Measurement & Verification Plan for Compressed Air CA 2006-15 A template for utilities to...

351

Reaerosolization of Fluidized Spores in Ventilation Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particles...velocity included the static charge attraction between...determined (12). The static charge from plastic was...deposited on the walls of the HVAC test apparatus (Fig...the duct system. Air pressure was exerted in the chamber...

Paula Krauter; Arthur Biermann

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

353

Modeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategy is designed to track a desired demand curve and to ensure a stable and smooth response. I for a large fraction of electric demand. HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and air conditioning) systems and water heaters are examples of TCLs. They use local hysteresis control to maintain either air or water

Zhang, Wei

354

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Extremum seeking control for efficient and reliable operation of air-side economizers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economizers have been recognized as a class of energy-saving devices for heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems that may increase the energy efficiency by taking advantage of outdoor air during cool or cold weather. There has been a ...

Pengfei Li; Yaoyu Li; John E. Seem

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

Weber, Rodney

358

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Recirculation of Factory Heat and Air to Reduce Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-makeup ventilation systems. First we must distinguish between gaseous and particulate contaminants in order to select appropriate types of air cleaning equipment. Next the physical (and chemical) char acteristics of those specific contaminants must be considered... particles. (Note that most gases and vapors are colorless and invisible ?...suspended particulates are almost the only visible air con taminants .) Because the chemical vapor pressure of the nuisance contaminants which create visibly polluted factory...

Thiel, G. R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Title Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6142E Year of Publication 2013 Authors J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Keywords ASHRAE 62.2, commissioning, procedures, residential, standards, ventilation Abstract Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recovering Energy From Ventilation and Process Airstreams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Heat is transferred from the hot to the cold airstreams as the two move through the plate-type device. Heat can be recovered from exhaust air by using one of these three systems: process to-process, process-to-comfort, and comfort to... between surfaces. One excellent application for a high latent heat recovery device is used in the textile industry. Slide 5 shows air-to liquid plate-type heat exchangers used in a carpet mill to recover energy from hot, .moist exhaust air...

Cheney, W. A.

362

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

363

Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transcript of Building America webinar, "Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements," held on Sept. 24, 2014.

364

Experimental and numerical VOC concentration field analysis from flooring material in a ventilated room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in "7th International Conference, Healthy Buildings 2003, Singapore : Singapore (2003)" #12;Ventilation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Exploring the consequences of climate change for indoor air quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change will affect the concentrations of air pollutants in buildings. The resulting shifts in human exposure may influence public health. Changes can be anticipated because of altered outdoor pollution and also owing to changes in buildings effected in response to changing climate. Three classes of factors govern indoor pollutant levels in occupied spaces: (a) properties of pollutants; (b) building factors, such as the ventilation rate; and (c) occupant behavior. Diversity of indoor conditions influences the public health significance of climate change. Potentially vulnerable subpopulations include not only the young and the infirm but also those who lack resources to respond effectively to changing conditions. Indoor air pollutant levels reflect the sum of contributions from indoor sources and from outdoor pollutants that enter with ventilation air. Pollutant classes with important indoor sources include the byproducts of combustion, radon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Outdoor pollutants of special concern include particulate matter and ozone. To ensure good indoor air quality it is important first to avoid high indoor emission rates for all pollutants and second to ensure adequate ventilation. A third factor is the use of air filtration or air cleaning to achieve further improvements where warranted.

William W Nazaroff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

each apartment were much higher than the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and...

367

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. , Charvat, K. 2004. “Solar Chimneys for ResidentialStudy of Performance of Solar Chimney with Air-conditionedM.S. 1994. “A Study of Solar Chimney Assisted Wind Towed

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

Lstiburek, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

370

Analyzing Ventilation Effects of Different Apartment Styles by CFD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-3-5 Analyzing Ventilation Effects of Different Apartment Styles by CFD Xiaodong Li Lina Wang Zhixing Ye Associate Professor School...

Li, X.; Wang, L.; Ye, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-7-2 Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ1 Xiaotong Wang Junjun Chen Yike Li Zhiwei Wang Associate Professor...

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Comparison of Two Ventilation Systems in a Chinese Commercial Kitchen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical simulation of an indoor thermal environment in a Chinese commercial kitchen has been carried out using indoor zero-equation turbulence model. Two different ventilation systems in a Chinese commercial kitchen have been simulated...

Wan, X.; Yu, L.; Hou, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

SURFACE CIRCULATION AND VENTILATION Lynne D. Talley(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of autonomous subsurface profiling to include oxygen and turbulence profiling, and implementation of local of subsurface circulation in the wind-driven gyres (section 2), and (2) ventilation/upwelling processes

Talley, Lynne D.

374

High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) radial air bearing heat exchangers. Rotary air bearing heat exchanger technology simultaneously solves four long standing problems of conventional "fan-plus-finned-heat-sink" heat exchangers. Project Description This project seeks to design, fabricate, and test successive generations of prototype radial air bearing heat exchanger devices based on lessons learned and further insights into device optimization, computational fluid dynamic studies for parametric optimization and determination of scaling laws, and laboratory measurement of flow field and heat transfer

376

System dynamics based models for selecting HVAC systems for office buildings: a life cycle assessment from carbon emissions perspective.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study aims to explore the life cycle environmental impacts of typical heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems including variable air volume (VAV) system,… (more)

Chen, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The relationship between air pollution and asthma in Malaysian schoolchildren  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid increases in traffic volumes in countries such as Malaysia may lead to exposure to poor air quality both outdoors and indoors. This study ... Malaysian schoolchildren in relation to indoor and outdoor air pollution

Emilia Zainal Abidin; Sean Semple; Irniza Rasdi…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Commissioning and Diagnosis of VAV Air-Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) strategy based on system knowledge, qualitative states and object-oriented statistical process control (SPC) models for typical pressure-independent variable air volume (VAV) air...

Qin, J.; Wang, S.; Chan, C.; Xiao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accurate control of supply air volume and temperature willof a control strategy to reset supply air temperature at thecontrol strategies and more efficient motors and fans; (b) System-powered induction boxes; and (c) Direct supply of low temperature

Bauman, F.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Weschler. Cleaning products and air fresheners; exposurepollutants from cleaning product and air freshener use inand terpenes from cleaning products and air fresheners [27].

Morrison, G.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy saving strategies with personalized ventilation in tropics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The strategy to control the supply air temperature does notopportunity to control the supply air temperature because itpersonalized air supply temperature control strategy on the

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen; Chandra Sekhar, Chandra Sekhar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity to control the supply air temperature. In Case 8the personalized supply air temperature control strategy onreveal that the supply air temperature control strategy has

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Attic Air Sealing Guidelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Terminology Terminology Air Barrier Material (ABM) --- A does not allow air to pass throu plywood/OSB, foam board, duc lumber. Backing --- Any material that s be sprayed so as to provide an glass batts. Baffle (B) --- Manufactured chu direct ventilation air flow up an foam board or cardboard. Thermal Blocking --- Any rigid heat sources like chimneys or metal and gypsum board. Fasteners --- Staples, screws o

384

The effect of wind speed and direction and surrounding maize on hybrid ventilation in a dairy cow building in Denmark  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study evaluated the effect of wind speed and direction and surrounding maize field on the air exchange rate (ACH) and indoor air velocity in a dairy cow building with hybrid ventilation, which combined auto-controlled natural and partial mechanical pit ventilation. The standard k ? ? turbulence model and standard wall function were applied in CFD modeling with extension of capability to account for the aerodynamics effect of surrounding maize plant canopy in the wind domain by using user defined functions (UDF). This extended model was validated by on-site measured velocities and temperatures. A reasonably good agreement was found between simulated and measured results. The wind speed influenced ACH greatly while modeling the maize field had little effect on ACH with low wind speed. With wind speed of 3.86 m s?1 in validation case, modeling the maize field reduced total ACH by 24%, ACH via bottom openings on the sidewall by 89.7% and air speed measured upwind by 71%. The results revealed that the plant canopy had the most significant effect on ACH through the opening on the sidewall. With the variation of wind direction from 0° to 90°, the difference of ACH could be 60%.

L. Rong; D. Liu; E.F. Pedersen; G. Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Title A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5267E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Start Page 216 Pagination 216-222 Date Published 11/2011 Keywords air toxics, criteria pollutants, DALYs, exposure, impact assessment, indoor air pollutants, indoor air quality Abstract Background: Indoor air pollutants (IAPs) cause multiple health impacts. Prioritizing mitigation options that differentially impact individual pollutants and comparing IAPs to other environmental health hazards requires a common metric of harm. Objectives: The objective was to demonstrate a methodology to quantify and compare health impacts from IAPs. The methodology is needed to assess population health impacts of large-scale initiatives - including energy efficiency upgrades and ventilation standards - that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Methods: Available disease incidence and disease impact models for specific pollutant-disease combinations were synthesized with data on measured concentrations to estimate the chronic heath impact, in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), due to inhalation of a subset of IAPs in U.S. residences. Model results were compared to independent estimates of DALYs lost due to disease. Results: PM2.5, acrolein, and formaldehyde accounted for the vast majority of DALY losses caused by IAPs considered in this analysis, with impacts on par or greater than estimates for secondhand tobacco smoke and radon. Confidence intervals of DALYs lost derived from epidemiology-based response functions are tighter than those derived from toxicology-based, inter-species extrapolations. Statistics on disease incidence in the US indicate that the upper-bound confidence interval for aggregate IAP harm is implausibly high. Conclusions: The demonstrated approach may be used to assess regional and national initiatives that impact IAQ at the population level. Cumulative health impacts from inhalation in U.S. residences of the IAPs assessed in this study are estimated at 400-1100 DALYs annually per 100,000 people.

386

DOE-HDBK-1169-2003; DOE Handbook Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1-1 1-1 CHAPTER 11 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH 11.1 Industrial Hygiene 11.1.1 Chemical Safety and Hazard Communication Ventilation systems control exposures to toxic and radiological materials, therefore, ventilation system filters can collect hazardous materials. In addition to exposure to the hazardous materials contained in the ventilation system or on filters, workers are often exposed to chemicals, such as test aerosols, when conducting testing. Workers can also be exposed to a wide variety of process materials including large amounts of inert gas. Equipment such as cryogenic systems can vent materials such as liquid nitrogen into ventilation systems. Such materials expand to produce large volumes of inert gas, which may produce an

387

Compressed Air Load Reduction Approaches and Innovations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are assessed. It is a common practice in facilities to simply add compressor capacity when faced with supply pressure or volume deficiencies, increasing the energy consumption associated with compressed air systems in industry. Additionally, in recent years...

D'Antonio, M.; Epstein, G.; Moray, S.; Schmidt, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Advanced Variable Air Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on VAV airside system design. Total large office building energy savings of up to 12% are achievable and controls for commercial buildings and in performing peer reviews of mechanical designs of commercial was developed as part of the Integrated Energy Systems -- Productivity and Building Science project, a Public

389

Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal Comfort Prediction Speaker(s): Malcolm Cook Date: February 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Malcolm's presentation will cover both his research and consultancy activities. This will cover the work he has undertaken during his time spent working with architects on low energy building design, with a particular focus on natural ventilation and passive cooling strategies, and the role computer simulation can play in this design process. Malcolm will talk about the simulation techniques employed, as well as the innovative passive design principles that have led to some of the UK's most energy efficient buildings. In addition to UK building projects, the talk will

390

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

391

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Title Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Wenhao Chen, Agatha Chang, Robert Miller, Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, William J. Fisk, Kazukiyo Kumagai, and Hugo Destaillats Journal Environmental Science and Technology Date Published 04/18/2013 Abstract A method combining life cycle assessment (LCA) and real options analyses is developed to predict project environmental and financial performance over time, under market uncertainties and decision-making flexibility. The method is applied to examine alternative uses for oil sands coke, a carbonaceous byproduct of processing the unconventional petroleum found in northern Alberta, Canada. Under uncertainties in natural gas price and the imposition of a carbon price, our method identifies that selling the coke to China for electricity generation by integrated gasification combined cycle is

392

CO 2 - Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation Control Strategies for Multi-Zone HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV strategy offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems while providing the required ventilation. However, implementing CO 2-based DCV under ASHRAE 62.1.2004 through 2010...

Nassif, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator for use in mass casualty cases and resource-poor environments. The ventilator delivers breaths by compressing a conventional ...

Powelson, Stephen K. (Stephen Kirby)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A sweating model for the internal ventilation of a motorcycle Claudio Canutoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sweating model for the internal ventilation of a motorcycle helmet Claudio Canutoa , Flavio and optimization of the internal ventilation of a motorcycle hel- met, with the purpose of enhancing the comfort

Ceragioli, Francesca

395

Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

Burdick, A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fire tests to evaluate the potential fire threat and its effects on HEPA filter integrity in cell ventilation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 7920  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of a DOE (Tiger Team) Technical Safety Appraisal (November 1990) of the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), ORNL Building 7920, a number of fire protection concerns were identified. The primary concern was the perceived loss of ventilation system containment due to the thermal destruction and/or breaching of the prefilters and/or high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA `s) and the resultant radioactive release to the external environment. The following report describes the results of an extensive fire test program performed by the Fire Research Discipline (FRD) of the Special Projects Division of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) and funded by ORNL to address these concerns. Full scale mock-ups of a REDC hot cell tank pit, adjacent cubicle pit, and associated ventilation system were constructed at LLNL and 13 fire experiments were conducted to specifically answer the questions raised by the Tiger Team. Our primary test plan was to characterize the burning of a catastrophic solvent spill (kerosene) of 40 liters and its effect on the containment ventilation system prefilters and HEPA filters. In conjunction with ORNL and Lockwood Greene we developed a test matrix that assessed the fire performance of the prefilters and HEPA filters; evaluated the fire response of the fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) epoxy ventilation duct work; the response and effectiveness of the fire protection system, the effect of fire in a cubicle on the vessel off-gas (VOG) elbow, and other fire safety questions.

Hasegawa, H.K.; Staggs, K.J.; Doughty, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Sean Maxwell  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is included in the Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014.

398

Impact of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging-Based Functional Avoidance for Lung Cancer Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) pulmonary ventilation imaging-based functional treatment planning that avoids high-functional lung regions. Methods and Materials: 4D-CT ventilation images were created from 15 non-small-cell lung cancer patients using deformable image registration and quantitative analysis of the resultant displacement vector field. For each patient, anatomic and functional plans were created for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Consistent beam angles and dose-volume constraints were used for all cases. The plans with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617-defined major deviations were modified until clinically acceptable. Functional planning spared the high-functional lung, and anatomic planning treated the lungs as uniformly functional. We quantified the impact of functional planning compared with anatomic planning using the two- or one-tailed t test. Results: Functional planning led to significant reductions in the high-functional lung dose, without significantly increasing other critical organ doses, but at the expense of significantly degraded the planning target volume (PTV) conformity and homogeneity. The average reduction in the high-functional lung mean dose was 1.8 Gy for IMRT (p < .001) and 2.0 Gy for VMAT (p < .001). Significantly larger changes occurred in the metrics for patients with a larger amount of high-functional lung adjacent to the PTV. Conclusion: The results of the present study have demonstrated the impact of 4D-CT ventilation imaging-based functional planning for IMRT and VMAT for the first time. Our findings indicate the potential of functional planning in lung functional avoidance for both IMRT and VMAT, particularly for patients who have high-functional lung adjacent to the PTV.

Yamamoto, Tokihiro, E-mail: Tokihiro@stanford.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Kabus, Sven; Berg, Jens von; Lorenz, Cristian [Department of Digital Imaging, Philips Research Europe, Hamburg (Germany); Keall, Paul J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Volume Tracking  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" ,"Daily Period",,"Containment Total" ,"Oil","Gas","Oil","Gas" "End Period","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Rate","Rate","Cumulative","Cumulative" "MM/DD/YY 00:00","(bo)","(mmcf)","(bbls)","(mmcf)","Comment" 40333,16.486,0,16.486,0,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40334,6060.70543,15.666,6077.19143,15.666,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40335,10496.19429,22.00800001,16573.38572,37.674,"Oil rate based on metered volume"

400

Air pollution study of Laredo Customs Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the accuracy of the scaled model with that of the actual station a complete survey of veloc1ty, pressure, temperature and video tape recordings were taken in Laredo. These results were then compared with those simulated in the wind tunnel. Good correlation... Circuitry for Model Ventilation System. . . 3-14 Instrumentation in the Control Room. . 22 24 25 26 27 28 31 32 4-1 Existing Forced Air System. 4-2 Video Taping at Laredo. 4-3 Exhaust Fan Velocity Measurement. 4-4 Wind Velocity Measurement...

Welling, Vidyadhar Yeshwant

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Saving Guidelines for Portland State University Heating and Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Saving Guidelines for Portland State University Heating and Ventilation Conditioned spaces when a space is not being occupied and be selected with energy efficiency and safety as top priorities scheduling team to consolidate activities into energy efficient buildings on campus. Purchasing When

Caughman, John

402

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

403

The Ventilation, Heating, and Management of Churches and Public Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THIS book is addressed chiefly to the architects, managers and caretakers of buildings, and its opening chapter deals with the physical principles bearing on ventilation. An interesting ... the writer makes the cryptic statement that "the friction caused by the wind passing over buildings is so great that it is scarcely possible to demonstrate it accurately,"and later ...

J. H. V.

1903-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

404

Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both natural processes and human activities contribute to air pollution, with the combustion of fossil fuels being the largest anthropogenic source of air pollutants. Adverse health effects (above all respiratory and cardiovascular complications), damage to crops, natural vegetation and materials, reduced visibility and changed radiation balance of the atmosphere are the major consequences of high concentrations of air pollutants. Technical fixes can sharply reduce emissions from large stationary sources and lower the rates of automotive emissions, but the rising number of vehicles and longer time spent on the road will call for more radical solutions to traffic-generated photochemical smog now present in all major urban areas.

V. Smil

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Bos > AIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of air travel has produced a building typology completely new to the 20th century. The outdated planning of regions for airports render most existing airports as isolated, autonomous instances in the urban ...

Lee, Kevin Young

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

slides below The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in...

407

In-depth survey report: Control technology for small business: Evaluation of a flexible duct ventilation system for radiator repair, at A-1 Radiator, Reno, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering control evaluation was conducted at a radiator repair shop which operated at a very high level of production. The shop had the potential for high exposures to lead (7439921) because of the high volume of work, the number of radiator repair stations, and repairs to huge radiators for mining equipment. Local exhaust ventilation which utilized adjustable arm elephant trunk exhaust hoods had been installed 18 months prior to the visit. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system to control lead exposures during work operations. Time weighted average personal exposures for lead were at or below the OSHA permissible exposure level for ten of 15 mechanics during a high level of production. The elephant trunk ventilation system was capable of controlling lead fumes while shop doors were open, except at one tank in a corner. Work practices were found to be a source of excessive lead exposure. Emissions from a worker's own soldering and from soldering activity upwind of the worker were a major source of lead exposure. Collapse of flexible portions of ducts could reduce exhaust volume. Dampers also showed a tendency to close automatically.

Sheehy, J.W.; Cooper, T.C.; Hall, R.M.; Meier, R.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Indoor Air Quality Plan Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety Original: December 15, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in place for heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC) systems in this workplace. Damaged) the following is completed on every unit: a) Filters are changed. b) System is checked for proper operation. c and cleaned as needed. Most campus HVAC equipment, other than individual residence hall rooms, is remotely

Rainforth, Emma C.

409

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background - The goal of this project, with a focus on commercial buildings in California, was to develop a new framework for evidence-based minimum ventilation rate (MVR) standards that protect occupants in buildings while also considering energy use and cost. This was motivated by research findings suggesting that current prescriptive MVRs in commercial buildings do not provide occupants with fully safe and satisfactory indoor environments. Methods - The project began with a broad review in several areas ? the diverse strategies now used for standards or guidelines for MVRs or for environmental contaminant exposures, current knowledge about adverse human effects associated with VRs, and current knowledge about contaminants in commercial buildings, including their their presence, their adverse human effects, and their relationships with VRs. Based on a synthesis of the reviewed information, new principles and approaches are proposed for setting evidence-based VRs standards for commercial buildings, considering a range of human effects including health, performance, and acceptability of air. Results ? A review and evaluation is first presented of current approaches to setting prescriptive building ventilation standards and setting acceptable limits for human contaminant exposures in outdoor air and occupational settings. Recent research on approaches to setting acceptable levels of environmental exposures in evidence-based MVR standards is also described. From a synthesis and critique of these materials, a set of principles for setting MVRs is presented, along with an example approach based on these principles. The approach combines two sequential strategies. In a first step, an acceptable threshold is set for each adverse outcome that has a demonstrated relationship to VRs, as an increase from a (low) outcome level at a high reference ventilation rate (RVR, the VR needed to attain the best achievable levels of the adverse outcome); MVRs required to meet each specific outcome threshold are estimated; and the highest of these MVRs, which would then meet all outcome thresholds, is selected as the target MVR. In a second step, implemented only if the target MVR from step 1 is judged impractically high, costs and benefits are estimated and this information is used in a risk management process. Four human outcomes with substantial quantitative evidence of relationships to VRs are identified for initial consideration in setting MVR standards. These are: building-related symptoms (sometimes called sick building syndrome symptoms), poor perceived indoor air quality, and diminished work performance, all with data relating them directly to VRs; and cancer and non-cancer chronic outcomes, related indirectly to VRs through specific VR-influenced indoor contaminants. In an application of step 1 for offices using a set of example outcome thresholds, a target MVR of 9 L/s (19 cfm) per person was needed. Because this target MVR was close to MVRs in current standards, use of a cost/benefit process seemed unnecessary. Selection of more stringent thresholds for one or more human outcomes, however, could raise the target MVR to 14 L/s (30 cfm) per person or higher, triggering the step 2 risk management process. Consideration of outdoor air pollutant effects would add further complexity to the framework. For balancing the objective and subjective factors involved in setting MVRs in a cost-benefit process, it is suggested that a diverse group of stakeholders make the determination after assembling as much quantitative data as possible.

Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wave energy devices with compressible volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...author and source are credited. Wave energy devices with compressible volumes Adi...1BJ, UK We present an analysis of wave energy devices with air-filled compressible...wave period range of about-4s. wave energy|compressible volume|axisymmetric device...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the course of this project, an affordable and high performance ductwork system to directly address the problems of thermal losses, poor efficiency, and air leakage was designed. To save space and enable direct connections between different floors of the building, the ductwork system was designed in such a way that it occupied interior or exterior frame wall cavities. The ductwork system satisfied building regulations for structural support when bridging multiple floors, the spread of fire and smoke, and insulation to reduce the heat flow into or out of the building. Retrofits of urban residential buildings will be the main focus for the application of this ductwork system. Highly reflective foils and insulating materials were used to aid in the increase of the overall R-value of the ductwork itself and the wall assembly. It is expected that the proposed system will increase the efficiency of the HVAC system and the thermal resistance of the building envelope. The performance of the proposed ductwork design was numerically evaluated in a number of different ways. Our results indicate that the duct method is a very cost attractive alternative to the conventional method.

Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

414

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results Srinandini Parthasarathy, Thomas E. McKone, Michael G. Apte Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 29, 2111 Prepared for the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program Legal Notice The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a national laboratory of the DOE managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the Sponsor and pursuant to an M&O Contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Neither the

415

Good seal construction and ventilation controls improve airflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As workings become deeper and more distant from the ventilation inlet, better seal construction technology is needed. Tekseal, a specially formulated pumpable grout which allows a seal to be erected quickly and safety, is Minova's answer to the limitations of traditional block seals. Its use is explained in this article. An alternative product is the Carbonfill range which comprises a two-component phenolic resin based foam generating by a pump. 3 photos.

NONE

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Transpired Collectors (Solar Preheaters for Outdoor Ventilation Air)--023385m FTA collectors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

requests that no alterations be requests that no alterations be made without permission in any reproduction of this document. Federal Technology Alert A publication series designed to speed the adoption of energy- efficient and renewable technologies in the Federal sector The President's Million Solar Roofs Initiative aims to install 1 million solar energy systems on residential, commercial, and public-sector buildings by 2010. Twenty thousand of those systems will be installed on Federal buildings. In support of the Initiative, and as part of a continual effort to ensure U.S. buildings are energy efficient and environmentally sustainable, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will help install those solar systems targeted for the Federal sector. FEMP is focusing on solar systems that

417

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circuit layout layout Electrical Pump rack wiring schematicMain instrumentation rack panel layout System flow diagramRear View Main Instrumentation Rack CBB Front Interior Wall

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

jn Ne~ Building Desig~, ASHRAE 90-75R (New York, 1975). 4.in 1975. This standard, ASHRAE 90-75R, Energy Conservation

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the trailer to allow rear supports and a hydraulic liftThe hydraulic lift platform at the rear of the trailer canhydraulic lift gate which extends across the entire width of the trailer.

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the trailer to allow rear supports and a hydraulic 1ift8. hydraulic 1 ift platform at the rear of the trailer canhydraulic lift which extends across the entire width of the trailer.

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems for Occupant Symptoms in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

upper respiratory symptoms, cough, eye symptoms, fatigue orof breath, or chest tightness); cough; upper respiratory (atrespiratory symptoms, cough, and eye symptoms. Calibration

Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat rate estimated by the Edison Electric Institue for 1975). In addition, 9% electrical transmission-distribution losses

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy EfficiencyBuilding Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

VFD Technology's Energy Conservation Application at Metro Ventilation Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shenzhen metro has been applied the VFD control technique and close loop negative control logic to adjust and control the temperature and humidity of public area and conserve the energy on HVAC system of children palace station and Fumin station...

Li, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard, ASHRAE 90-75R, Energy Conservation in New Building Design, 3 has stipulated that the minimum

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ozone andppm) 10 mg/m 3 (9 ppm) Nitrogen dioxide EPA 100 M91m 3 (50and except for nitrogen dioxide in one of the classrooms.

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rubber and resins Chloro Benzenes Strong narcotic; possible lung. liver, and kidney damage Used in production

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ventilating characteristics of a recirculating air-curtain laboratory exhaust hood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reduce this enrich- ment and provide more representative indications of average contami- nant concentration. Contam1nant Release Rate In order to generate contaminant levels to wh1ch the available instrumentation would readily respond, a propane... to reduce this enrich- ment and provide more representative indications of average contami- nant concentration. Contam1nant Release Rate In order to generate contaminant levels to wh1ch the available instrumentation would readily respond, a propane...

Janes, Dale Floyd

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems for Occupant Symptoms in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling units (e.g. , fan coil units) in office buildingsinduction units, fan coil units, individual room packaged ACsystems, cooling tower, fan coil unit, and terminal units.

Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASHRAE. California Energy Commission (2008). 2008 BuildingCA, California Energy Commission. Dutton, S. M. , W. R.to the California Energy Commission is to pursue option 2

Dutton, Spencer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to do this after the foam insulation and false cei1ing wereInsulation Polyurethane foam insulation was applied to thewas then filled in with foam insulation and This floor was

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and radon from variousand urea-formaldehyde foam insulation have recently otherformaldehyde (UF) based foam insulation materials because of

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, plywood, and particleand urea- formaldehyde foam insulation. It is apparent thatand urea-formaldehyde insulation foam; also generated by

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to do this after the foam insulation and false ceiling wereInsu1 ati on Polyurethane foam insulation was applied to thewas then filled in with foam insulation and covered with 1"

Berk, James V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BSC worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to redesign three floor plans in order to locate the HVAC system in conditioned space. The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses. This is in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. The builder wishes to develop an upgrade package that will allow for a seamless transition to the new code mandate. The following research questions were addressed by this research project: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost? BSC and the builder developed a duct design strategy that employs a system of dropped ceilings and attic coffers for moving the ductwork from the vented attic to conditioned space. The furnace has been moved to either a mechanical closet in the conditioned living space or a coffered space in the attic.

Kerrigan, P.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation to which the general population is exposed. Radon- 222 is an inert, radioactive, naturally-occurring

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

many hospitals for energy audits and for energy-conserving1980, will include an energy audit, modifications to theannotated bibliography of energy audit source materials will

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thermal comfort in naturally-ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms in the tropics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in kindergartens. IAQ '91 Healthy Buildings, Atlanta, GA,kindergartens. in IAQ '91 Healthy Buildings. 1991. Atlanta,in kindergartens. IAQ '91 Healthy Buildings, Atlanta, GA,

Kwok, Alison G

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reducing Ventilation Energy Demand by Using Air-to-Earth Heat Exchangers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the cases where the duct spacing was investigated, results showed that the outlet temperature of the earth ducts changed only marginally for the three cases simulated. The energy saving per duct showed a slig...

Hans Havtun; Caroline Törnqvist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Predicting hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformer windings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test data indicates that hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA are too low. A mathematical model to predict hottest spot temperature rises in ventilated dry type transformers was developed. Data from six layer type test windings and a 2500 kva prototype was used to refine the model. A correlation for the local heat transfer coefficient in the cooling ducts was developed. The model was used to study the effect of various parameters on the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The number of conductor layers, insulation thickness, and conductor strand size were found to have only a minor effect on the ratio. Winding height was found to be the main parameter influencing the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The study based on the mathematical model confirmed previous conclusions based on test data that the hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA should be revised.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) PTHP = Packaged Terminal Heat Pump, WLHP = Water Loop Heat Pump. 2) PTAC = Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume 1: Chillers, Refrigerant Compressors, and Heating Systems, Apr. 2001, Figure 5-5, p. 5-14 for cooling and Figure 5-10, p. 5-18 for heating

442

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

443

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume I. Recent airport measurement programs, data analyses, and sub-model development. Final report Jan78-Jul 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, such as a packaged terminal air conditioner (PTAC) * Continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device,...

445

Integrated Technology Air Cleaners (ITAC): Design and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to design, build, and test an air cleaner for residential use with the potential to substantially improve indoor air quality, or maintain indoor air quality unchanged, when outdoor air ventilation rates are reduced to save energy. Two air cleaners were designed and fabricated. The design targets for airflow rate, fan power, and projected cost were met. In short term laboratory studies, both units performed as expected; however, during field studies in homes, the formaldehyde removal performance of the air cleaners was much lower than expected. In subsequent laboratory studies, incomplete decomposition of some indoor air volatile organic compounds, with formaldehyde as a product of partial decomposition of volatile organic compounds, was confirmed as the explanation for the poor formaldehyde removal performance in the field studies. The amount of formaldehyde produced per unit of decomposition of other volatile organic compounds was substantially diminished by increasing the amount of catalyst on the filter and also by decreasing the air velocity. Together, these two measures reduced formaldehyde production, per unit destruction of other volatile organic compounds, by a factor of four, while increasing the removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds by a factor of 1.4. A company with a southern California office is conducting studies in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with the goal of incorporating the ITAC catalytic air cleaning technology in their future commercial products.

Fisk, William J.; Cohn, Sebastian; Destaillats, Hugo; Henzel, Victor; Sidheswaran, Meera; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

446

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controls 1 Introduction Indoor chemistry is now recognized as an important factor influencing occupant exposure to air pollutants,

Morrison, G.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research on simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements.

448

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Joe Lstiburek  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation will be delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014. Joe...

449

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIZER SYSTEM COST EFFECTIVENESS: ACCOUNTING FOR THEand economic benefits of an economizer ventilation controlanalyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs

Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality survey. In: Healthy Buildings 2006. Lisbon,In: Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006. Lisbon, Portugal:as ventilation varies. In: Healthy Buildings 2012. Brisbane,

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Influence of Mobile Air-Conditioning on Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption:? A Model Approach for Modern Gasoline Cars Used in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, apart from studies involving MOBILE6 in the United States (1) and other U. S. studies (2?5), air-conditioning activity in relation to meteorological conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. ... For manual air conditioners, a good setting was sought before the test and the knobs for cooling and ventilation were readjusted if the temperature drifted more than 1 °C. ... The temperatures of the conditioned air range from 5 to 11 °C. ...

Martin F. Weilenmann; Ana-Marija Vasic; Peter Stettler; Philippe Novak

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - air bag performance Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

since... of the expanding air volume allowing for a smooth controlled ascent. Index Terms-- Lift bag, recovery device, purge... valve. I. INTRODUCTION he concept of using...

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced air bag Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

since... of the expanding air volume allowing for a smooth controlled ascent. Index Terms-- Lift bag, recovery device, purge... valve. I. INTRODUCTION he concept of using...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pressure effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure, and for modeling the change in system pressure as function of compressed air storage volume... of this method for estimating energy savings ... Source: Kissock,...

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pressure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure, and for modeling the change in system pressure as function of compressed air storage volume... of this method for estimating energy savings from reducing...

457

Analysis and feasibility study of residential integrated heat and energy recovery ventilator with built-in economizer using an excel spreadsheet program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Currently, heat recovery ventilator (HRV) and energy recovery ventilator (ERV) are commonly studied. Nevertheless, there is limited information regarding the dual-core approach energy recovery. This paper investigates the feasibility of an integrated HRV and ERV system, namely HERV, with a built-in economizer used in the residential sector to reduce dependency on furnace and air conditioning systems. In order to achieve this goal, an excel-based analysis tool was developed, providing a quick estimate of system performance and comparison with the HRV and ERV that are currently being used in research houses. The potential of integrated heat and energy recovery ventilator was evaluated based on its calculated operating cost ratio (OCR) and its payback period. Results collected for Vancouver and Toronto, corresponding to temperate and continental climate, indicated that the \\{OCRs\\} of the HERV were four times smaller than the ERV's, meaning that the proposed system was cost-efficient. It was also evidenced that the high demand on the economizer resulted in higher energy saving and shorter payback period of the system. In conclusion, the integrated HERV system with a built-in economizer could be a feasible option for both temperate and continental climates.

Junlong Zhang; Alan S. Fung; Sumeet Jhingan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Influences of ambient air speed and internal heat load on the performance of solar chimney in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar chimney is a combination of solar assisted stack and wind driven ventilation where air in the solar chimney expands under heating from solar irradiance and being relatively lighter, rises out from the chimney outlets, drawing the cooler air into the building through the fenestrations. This pull effect is complemented further by the push effect from the outdoor ambient wind. The study of solar chimney system within the zero energy building in tropical Singapore aims to determine the effects of ambient air speed and internal heat load on the thermal environment of the solar chimney ducts and classroom’s interior. Experimental and computational results show that high ambient air speed greater than 2.00 m/s improves the air speed within the solar chimney ducts; both low and high ambient air speeds are found to improve the classroom’s interior air speed. However, the significance of ambient air speed drops when solar irradiance is greater than 700 W/m2. Furthermore, under the tropical weather conditions of high solar irradiance and low ambient air speed, cross ventilation performs better compared to solar chimney; hence, solar chimney is recommended to be employed under zero ambient air speed. Lastly, results show that the influences of internal heat load on the air temperature and speed within solar chimney ducts as well as classroom’s interior are limited.

Alex Yong Kwang Tan; Nyuk Hien Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

460

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

462

Laser sheet light flow visualization for evaluating room air flowsfrom Registers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forced air heating and cooling systems and whole house ventilation systems deliver air to individual rooms in a house via supply registers located on walls ceilings or floors; and occasionally less straightforward locations like toe-kicks below cabinets. Ideally, the air velocity out of the registers combined with the turbulence of the flow, vectoring of air by register vanes and geometry of register placement combine to mix the supply air within the room. A particular issue that has been raised recently is the performance of multiple capacity and air flow HVAC systems. These systems vary the air flow rate through the distribution system depending on the system load, or if operating in a ventilation rather than a space conditioning mode. These systems have been developed to maximize equipment efficiency, however, the high efficiency ratings do not include any room mixing effects. At lower air flow rates, there is the possibility that room air will be poorly mixed, leading to thermal stratification and reduced comfort for occupants. This can lead to increased energy use as the occupants adjust the thermostat settings to compensate and parts of the conditioned space have higher envelope temperature differences than for the well mixed case. In addition, lack of comfort can be a barrier to market acceptance of these higher efficiency systems To investigate the effect on room mixing of reduced air flow rates requires the measurement of mixing of supply air with room air throughout the space to be conditioned. This is a particularly difficult exercise if we want to determine the transient performance of the space conditioning system. Full scale experiments can be done in special test chambers, but the spatial resolution required to fully examine the mixing problem is usually limited by the sheer number of thermal sensors required. Current full-scale laboratory testing is therefore severely limited in its resolution. As an alternative, we used a water-filled scale model of a room in which whole-field supply air mixing maps of two vertical planes were measured using a Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurement technique. Water marked with fluorescent dye was used to simulate the supply airflow; and the resulting concentrations within the water filled model show how the supply air mixes with the room air and are an analog for temperature (for thermal loads) or fresh air (for ventilation). In addition to performing experiments over a range of flow rates, we also changed register locations and examined the effects for both heating and cooling operation by changing the water density (simulating air density changes due to temperature changes) using dissolved salt.

Walker, Iain S.; Claret, Valerie; Smith, Brian

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A scaling investigation of the laminar convective flow in a solar chimney for natural ventilation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The flow behavior due to natural convection of air (with a Prandtl number less than 1) inside a solar chimney with an imposed heat flux on a vertical absorber wall is investigated by a scaling analysis and a corresponding numerical simulation. Three distinct flow regimes are identified, one with a distinct thermal boundary layer and the other two without a distinct thermal boundary layer, depending on the Rayleigh number. The two regimes without a distinct thermal boundary layer are further classified into low and medium Rayleigh number sub-regimes respectively. These sub-regimes are characterized by conduction dominance in which the thermal boundary layer grows to encompass the entire width of the channel before convection becomes important. Flow development in each of these flow regimes and sub-regimes is characterized through transient scaling, and scaling correlations are developed to describe the temperature, flow velocity and mass flow rate, which characterize the ventilation performance of the solar chimney. The scaling arguments are validated by the corresponding numerical data.

Rakesh Khanal; Chengwang Lei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

465

Evaluation of pulmonary ventilation in horses during methoxyflurane anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and venous pH, pCO2, p02, and HCO3 in evaluating pulmonary ventilation and the metabolic status of the horse. LITERATURE REVIEW 8oth methoxyflurane and halothane were first used in the early 1960's as inhalation anesthetics ' ' ' ' ' . These agents were... 7)12, 13, 15, 28&36 primarily responsible for the increase in popularity of gas anesthesia in veterinary medicine. Inhalation anesthesia with these agents pro- duced some long awaited advantages over intravenous long-acting bar- biturates...

McDonald, Don Reed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Air quality in the Carlsbad cavern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air quality in the Carlsbad Cavern has been investigated, but there are no reports on radon progeny and aerosols. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the activity size distribution of radon progeny and the air exchange rate inside the Cavern. Teams from ITRI and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) conducted the field study in July 1994. The ITRI graded diffusion battery (GDB) was used to determine the activity size distribution, progeny concentration, equilibrium factor, and unattached fraction of the radon progeny. The design, calibration, and performance of the GDB have been described. For this study, each stage of the GDB contained one stainless steel screen, with the mesh sizes arranged in a series of 30, 50, 145, 200, and 635 mesh from the air inlet to the outlet. A 47-nm type A/E glass fiber filter was used to collect all particles that penetrated the screens. The flow rate was 5 L/min. The average ventilation rate in the cavern is 0.0026 V/hr. Our results showed that the cavern atmosphere may be quite different from other underground environments. The atmosphere in the summer is stable and relatively free of airborne particles, partly due to the extremely slow air exchange rate.

Cheng, Yung-Seng; Chen, Tou-Rong [Tsing-Hua Univ. (Taiwan, Province of China); Wasiolek, P.T. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LBNL-203E LBNL-203E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Appendix Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 A-1 Tables Table A-1. Thermal Comfort Results - May 2005, September 2005, November 2005 Room 13 - 9/19/2005 AM/PM Time Period Operative T and RH Acceptable (% of time) Operative T and RH, and Air Velocity acceptable (% of time) Average Indoor Air T (°C) Average Indoor Air RH (%) AM AM1 66.7 0.0 21.3 67.1 PM PM1 40.0 0.0 24.9 46.8 Room 13 - 5/16/2005 AM AM1 0.0 0.0 21.1 0.4 PM PM1 0.0 0.0 20.8 55.5 Room 13 - 12/1/2005 AM AM1 0.0% 0.0% 17.8 38.5

468

Building America Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, Building America team IBACOS performed field testing in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to evaluate heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. Four air-based HVAC distribution systems were assessed:-a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a system with transfer fans to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms. The relative ability of each system was considered with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

Hughes, Douglas E.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

Effect of fluctuating wind direction on cross natural ventilation in buildings from large eddy simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind direction, and the simulated results agree reasonably with the corresponding experimental data is the use of small-scale models in a wind tunnel to simulate natural ventilation. In general, the mean flow1 Effect of fluctuating wind direction on cross natural ventilation in buildings from large eddy

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

472

Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 ...................................................................................3-5 #12;Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-2 A without compromising safety or system integrity. The following should be included unless alternate design

Queitsch, Christine

473

Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,* , Kisup Leeb building, but cannot provide detailed flow information in a room. The zonal model can be useful when a user ventilation systems for buildings requires a suitable model to assess system performance. The performance can

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

474

ENERGY ANALYSISF FOR WORKSHOPS WITH FLOOR-SUPPLY DISPLACEMENT VENTILATION UNDER THE U.S. CLIMATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use more fan and boiler energy but less chiller energy than the mixing ventilation system. The total in order to handle the high cooling loads found in U.S. buildings. Thus, the displacement ventilation, the chiller efficiency is increased. Besides, the

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

475

A New Empirical Model for Predicting Single-Sided, Wind-Driven Natural Ventilation in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ventilation rate due to the pulsating flow and eddy penetration of single-sided, wind-driven natural Normal to the opening q Fluctuating flow rate e Eddy penetration Wang, H. and Chen, Q. 2012. "A new buildings. A new empirical model was developed that can predict the mean ventilation rate and fluctuating

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

476

The impact of demand-controlled ventilation on energy use in buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation controls and energy analyses were performed for a range of typical buildings, systems, and climates. Only single zone buildings were considered, so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates, and for buildings that have low relative internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 10% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger, but were strongly dependent upon the occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules (e.g., stores and restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was reduced by a factor of 10 with demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates.

Braun, J.E.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The Improvement of Natural Ventilation in an Industrial Workshop by Solar Chimney  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical simulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method on the enhancement of natural ventilation in an industrial workshop with heat source induced by solar chimney (SC). Four types of SC were designed to attach ... Keywords: natural ventilation, solar chimney, industrtial workshop, numerical simulation, thermal comfort

Yu-feng Xue; Ya-xin Su

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the pollution in the atmosphere originates from emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the region; published 12 September 2007. [1] It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a nonfrontal day that occurred on 9 May

Dacre, Helen

479

Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Overall Ventilation System Flow Network Calculation for Site Recommendation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this calculation is to determine ventilation system resistances, pressure drops, airflows, and operating cost estimates for the Site Recommendation (SR) design as detailed in the ''Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout'' (BSC (Bechtel SAIC Company) 2001a). The statutory limit for emplacement of waste in Yucca Mountain is 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and is considered the base case for this report. The objective is to determine the overall repository system ventilation flow network for the monitoring phase during normal operations and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. Any values derived from this calculation will not be used to support construction, fabrication, or procurement. The work scope is identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY01 Work Activities'' (CRWMS M&O 2001, pp. 6 and 13). In accordance with the technical work plan this calculation was prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' and other procedures invoked by AP-3.12Q. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI1.Q, ''Software Management''.

Jeff J. Steinhoff

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air volume ventilation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into advanced variable speed air-source integrated heat pumps (AS-IHPs). Project Description This project seeks to develop AS-IHP products for the larger air-source system market. Development focuses on a fully variable capacity or variable speed AS-IHP option. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and a CRADA partner. Project Goals The goal of this project is the development of a fully variable-speed version of an AS-IHP product that can provide heating, ventilation, and air

482

Microsoft PowerPoint - S05-05_Zapp_Liquid Air Interface.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Studies at SRS Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Studies at SRS EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 Philip E. Zapp Savannah River National Laboratory November 17, 2010 SRNL-STI-2010-00695 Print Close 2 Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Studies at SRS SRNL-STI-2010-00695 Introduction Pitting Corrosion in Carbon Steel Waste Tanks Pitting Induced by Dilute Waste Solutions Dilution for feed preparation for vitrification; waste removal Focus: Pitting Susceptibility at Liquid-Air Interface Service Experience Hydroxide Depletion Model Type III tanks under constr. Tank with ventilation & cooling equip. Print Close 3 Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Studies at SRS SRNL-STI-2010-00695 Background Pitting in carbon steel at and above liquid-air interface in dilute wastes ([Nitrate] < 1 M)

483

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

NONE

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

484

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.J. : Effect of ventilation rate in a healthy building.IAQ '91: Healthy Buildings, American Society of Heating,

Thatcher, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

measures included mastic sealing ducts, installing properly sized high-efficiency HVAC, thoroughly air sealing the building envelope, using water-resistant exterior finishes,...

486

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided  by  HVAC  system  filters,  it  was  assumed  filtration  from  the  HVAC  system  filters  brings  down  HVAC  system  air  leakage   and  ozone  deposition  on  HAVC  system  filters.      

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Application Study on Combined Ventilation System of Improving IAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System[D]. Qingdao: Qingdao Technological university dissertation for master degree, 2005.(In Chinese) [3] Q Chen,A Moser,P Suter. A numerical study of indoor air quality and thermal comfort under six kinds of air diffusion[J].ASHRAE Trans, 1992, 98... System[D]. Qingdao: Qingdao Technological university dissertation for master degree, 2005.(In Chinese) [3] Q Chen,A Moser,P Suter. A numerical study of indoor air quality and thermal comfort under six kinds of air diffusion[J].ASHRAE Trans, 1992, 98...

Hu, S.; Li, G.; Zhang, C.; Ye, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Indoor air quality: The legal landscape II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s office environment is as different from its predecessor as an automobile is from a horse and buggy. A 1950s office typically contained tile floors, painted walls, plaster ceilings, carbon paper, and plentiful fresh air circulating through windows that were usually open when weather permitted. In the 1990s, the decor has shifted to carpeted floors, synthetic wall coverings, ceiling tile and multiple copiers. Sophisticated building materials and motorized office products can emit unwelcome constituents into the indoor air, yet ventilation is limited by windows that do not open. One result of these changes has been an unprecedented and ever-increasing concern about indoor air quality (IAQ). Some studies rank indoor air pollution as today`s number one environmental health risk. Increased media attention to the topic has increased public awareness, which has increased litigation and regulatory activity in the area. This paper explores the legal landscape of IAQ in the US, ranging from legislative to regulatory activity on both the federal and state levels, and from civil litigation to actions brought before administrative boards. Along the way, the paper defines and discusses such IAQ problems as building-related illness (BRI) and sick building syndrome (SBS), examining the magnitude of the problems and their possible causes. Finally, the paper provides suggestions to those potentially liable for alleged injuries from indoor air pollution, including architects, builders, contractors, building product manufacturers, building owners and managers, building sellers, employers, and engineering and environmental consultants. This paper is an update of a paper presented at the Air and Waste Management Association`s Annual Meeting in 1992.

Neet, J.O. Jr.; Smith, T.A. [Shook, Hardy and Bacon, Kansas City, MO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Innovative, Cost Effective and Energy Efficient Desgin for New Construction at a Texas High School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which includes innovative dual-duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems for cooling and pre-treated ventilation air delivery integrated with occupancy sensors and digital controls, and optimized HVAC controls for dynamic balancing of air and hydronic sides...

Khan, S.; Bible, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

491

Air pollution, the automobile, and public health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author reviews a volume of articles written by experts in the study of air pollution and its effects. The Health Effects Institute, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, commissioned the articles. Described as an excellent review of scientific and technological work in the field, its weakness is a failure to adequately address risk assessment.

Wilson, R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z