Sample records for air toxics standards

  1. Summary of EPA Final Rules for Air Toxic Standards for Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summary of EPA Final Rules for Air Toxic Standards for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional (ICI) Boilers and Process Heaters, February 2013 Summary of EPA Final Rules for Air...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics volume Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designed to remove the acutely toxic chemicals before the air is discharged into the environment. Acutely... Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics sources Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics regulatory Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics compliance Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

  6. Ambient Air Quality Standards (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set statewide ambient air quality standards for various contaminants. The state code follows the regulations set forth in the National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics control Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air toxics control Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title:...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics releases Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Cu) and lead (Pb) (typically) Toxic chemical release reporting... standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July ... Source: Wechsler, Risa H. - Kavli...

  9. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

  10. Research priorities for mobile air toxics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Health Effects Institute, a cooperative effort of the auto industry and the EPA, whose mission is to provide health effects information to ensure that motor vehicle emissions do not pose unreasonable risks, recently undertook a project to define priorities for research that would decrease uncertainties in risk assessments for mobile air toxics. At a workshop held in December 1992, scientists from academia, industry, and government worked to identify uncertainties in understanding the potential risk of exposure to mobile air toxics, including methanol, an important potential alternate fuel. Although cancer risk was the primary concern regarding most compounds, there was also much discussion of non-cancer effects of potential importance. Participants discussed research priorities for scientific issues that apply across all compound groups, such as dosimetry, high-to-low dose extrapolation, exposure assessment, and molecular biology approaches.

  11. Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.

  12. March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , 6 were identified as significant contributors to national emissions of hazardous air pollutants EPA Mobile Source Air Toxics Rules March 2001 rule relied on existing control programs (Tier 2March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis for FHWA Projects Jeff Houk FHWA Resource Center

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic regulations Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control... -volatile organic compound TAC toxic air contaminant TCA trichloroethane TCE...

  14. air toxics emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Zhao, Y., and H.C. Frey, "Development of Probabilistic Emission Inventory of Air Toxics for Jacksonville, FL," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste...

  15. air toxics emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Zhao, Y., and H.C. Frey, "Development of Probabilistic Emission Inventory of Air Toxics for Jacksonville, FL," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste...

  16. Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total...

  17. Air Quality Standards & ATOC/CHEM 5151

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    1 Lecture 22 Air Quality Standards & Control ATOC/CHEM 5151 #12;2 Primary Pollutants Things to reduce air pollution emissions ­ Latest version ­ 1990 (original, 1963) ­ What is an "air pollutant that are directly emitted Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Hydrocarbons (VOCs) Carbon Monoxide (CO) #12;3 Secondary Pollutants

  18. Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

  19. SNRB{trademark} air toxics monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is currently conducting a project under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT II) Program to demonstrate its SO{sub x}NO{sub x}-Rox Box{trademark} (SNRB{trademark}) process in a 5 MWe Field Demonstration Unit at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The objective of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project was to provide data on SNRB{trademark} air toxics emissions control performance to B&W and to add to the DOE/EPRI/EPA data base by quantifying the flow rates of selected hazardous substances (or air toxics) in all of the major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} process as well as the power plant. Work under the project included the collection and analysis of representative samples of all major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} demonstration unit and the power plant, and the subsequent laboratory analysis of these samples to determine the partitioning of the hazardous substances between the various process streams. Material balances for selected air toxics were subsequently calculated around the SNRB{trademark} and host boiler systems, including the removal efficiencies across each of the major air pollution control devices. This report presents results of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project. In addition to the Introduction, a brief description of the test site, including the Boiler No. 8 and the SNRB{trademark} process, is included in Section H. The concentrations of air toxic emissions are presented in Section II according to compound class. Material balances are included in Section IV for three major systems: boiler, electrostatic precipitator, and SNRB{trademark}. Emission factors and removal efficiencies are also presented according to compound class in Sections V and VI, respectively. A data evaluation is provided in Section VII.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air toxics Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics exposure Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

  2. Mobile Source Air Toxics Rule (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 9, 2007, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its MSAT2 rule, which will establish controls on gasoline, passenger vehicles, and portable fuel containers. The controls are designed to reduce emissions of benzene and other hazardous air pollutants. Benzene is a known carcinogen, and the EPA estimates that mobile sources produced more than 70% of all benzene emissions in 1999. Other mobile source air toxics, including 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and naphthalene, also are thought to increase cancer rates or contribute to other serious health problems.

  3. ULTRA HIGH EFFICIENCY ESP DEVELOPMENT FOR AIR TOXICS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David K. Anderson

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because more than 90 percent of U.S. coal-fired utility boilers are equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), retrofitable ESP technologies represent a logical approach towards achieving the Department of Energy's (DOE) goal of a major reduction in fine particulate and mercury emissions (air toxics) from coal based power systems. EPA's recent issuance of significantly tightened ambient air standards for particles smaller than 2.5 {micro}m (PM{sub 2.5}) creates a new urgency for developing cost-effective means to control fine particulate emissions. This challenge is compounded by the on-going switch in the utility industry to low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, that generate higher resistivity and difficult-to-collect fly ash. Particulate emissions can increase by a factor of ten when a utility switches to a low-sulfur coal. Numerous power plants are presently limited in operation by the inability of their ESPs to control opacity at high loads. In Phase I of this program, ABB investigated five technologies to improve the collection of fine particulate and trace metals in ESPs. These included: (1) flue-gas cooling, (2) flue-gas humidification, (3) pulsed energization, (4) wet ESP and precharger modules, and (5) sorbent injection for mercury control. Tests were conducted with an Eastern bituminous coal and a Powder River Basin sub-bituminous low-sulfur coal in an integrated pilot-scale combustor and ESP test facility. The impacts of the different retrofit technologies on ESP performance, individually and in combination, were evaluated indepth through advanced sampling and measurement techniques. In Phase II, the most promising concepts identified from Phase I testing, flue-gas cooling and humidification, pulsed energization, and sorbent injection at low flue-gas temperatures for mercury control, were integrated into a commercially oriented sub-scale system for field testing at Commonwealth Edison's Waukegan Unit No. 8. The main objective of the proposed Phase II testing was to determine longer term ESP performance and mercury capture improvements with the above enhancements for a range of low-sulfur coals currently fired by utilities. Unanticipated cost growth in readying the Pilot Plant for shipment and during slipstream construction at the utility host site resulted in the issuance of a preemptive stop work order from ABB until a detailed technical and budgetary review of the project could be completed. Four program recovery scenarios were developed and presented to the DOE. After careful review of these options, it was decided to terminate the program and although the Pilot Plant installation was essentially completed, no testing was performed. The Pilot Plant was subsequently decommissioned and the host site returned to its preprogram condition.

  4. Optimizing electric utility air toxics compliance with other titles of the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, A.P.; South, D.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of regulatory issues under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments that could affect electric utilities. Title III contains provisions relating to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and provides special treatment for electric utilities. Generally, this discussion documents that if utility toxic emissions are regulated, one of the chief difficulties confronting utilities will be the lack of coordination between Title III and other titles of the Act. The paper concludes that if the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines that regulation of utility HAPs is warranted under Title III, savings can be realized from flexible compliance treatment.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics provisions Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Collection: Physics 64 Assembly Bill No. 118 CHAPTER 750 Summary: air pollutants and air toxics. (j) This act will be implemented in a manner to ensure the fair......

  6. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  7. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  8. Attempt to estimate measurement uncertainty in the Air Force Toxic Chemical Dispersion (AFTOX) model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zettlemoyer, M.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Force Toxic Chemical Dispersion (AFTOX) model is a Gaussian puff dispersion model that predicts plumes, concentrations, and hazard distances of toxic chemical spills. A measurement uncertainty propagation formula derived by Freeman et al. (1986) is used within AFTOX to estimate resulting concentration uncertainties due to the effects of data input uncertainties in wind speed, spill height, emission rate, and the horizontal and vertical Gaussian dispersion parameters, and the results are compared to true uncertainties as estimated by standard deviations computed by Monte Carlo simulations. The measurement uncertainty uncertainty propagation formula was found to overestimate measurement uncertainty in AFTOX-calculated concentrations by at least 350 percent, with overestimates worsening with increasing stability and/or increasing measurement uncertainty.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic emissions Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... report permit renewal July 31 National Emissions Standards for...

  10. Geothermal Direct-Use Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal direct-use applicationssuch as greenhouses, district and space heating, and aquaculturecan easily meet local and federal clean air standards, which help protect our environment.

  11. Old, the new, the states, the evolution of the regulation of air toxics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vecera, D.R.

    1993-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The activism associated with America in the 1960s spilled over into many areas, one of which was a new environmental movement. A product of that movement was the Clean Air Act passed in 1970. The new law included a selection aimed specifically at controlling emissions of hazardous or toxic air pollutants. However, over the next 20 years there was very little government regulation of air toxics, and this section of the Clean Air Act was considered to be a resounding failure. What went wrong. How did this lofty goal to protect human health and the environment end up on the back burner. The article will address the idealism that led to the Clean Air Act legislation, in particular the air toxics program, and explore the realities that scuttled those ideals when it came time to implement the law.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics information Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leachate, Water Air Soil Pollut., 69, pp. 99... or risks? 2-5 June 2009 Toxicity Analysis and Public Health Aspects of Municipal Landfill Leachate: A Case... of these...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual international air Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overall Federal SMOP (Title V) Clean Air Act Annual... standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

  14. Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

  15. Evaluation of air toxic emissions from advanced and conventional coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, P.; Epstein, M. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Gould, L. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Botros, P. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the air toxics measurements at three advanced power systems and a base case conventional fossil fuel power plant. The four plants tested include a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, integrated gasification combined cycle, circulating fluidized bed combustor, and a conventional coal-fired plant.

  16. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  17. Air toxics being measured more accurately, controlled more effectively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the directives of the Clean Air Act Amendments, Argonne National Laboratory is developing new or improved pollutant control technologies for industries that burn fossil fuels. This research continues Argonne`s traditional support for the US DOE Flue Gas Cleanup Program. Research is underway to measure process emissions and identify new and improved control measures. Argonne`s emission control research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. Whenever appropriate, the work has emphasized integrated or combined control systems as the best approach to technologies that offer low cost and good operating characteristics.

  18. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Michael A. McNeilFigure 1 MEPS for 1.5 ton Window Air Conditioners 1994-4 Figure 2 Air Conditioner Test Data and Rating Plan -

  19. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

  20. {open_quotes}Fine particulate control and air toxics{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Greiner, G.P. [ETS International, Inc., Roanoke, VA (United States); Harrison, W. [Southern Company Services, Birmingham, AL (United States); Nichols, G.B. [Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tables 1-4 give an overview of current TSP control capabilities of fabric filters on some applications. Very little data is available as to the control of PM{sub 10} and under. Most air toxic limitations will require much higher control as can be seen in Tables 5 and 6. The control of most air toxics is definitely related to the control of TSP and PM{sub 10}, however it appears that meeting current limits of TSP do not ensure meeting the desired air toxic limits. Since TSP is desired to be used as a surrogate and is all that is routinely monitored through opacity or other stack CEM systems, lower TSP limits would have to be met which opens the question of how accurate we can monitor TSP or PM{sub 10} on a continuous basis. Tables 3 and 4 provide some insight as to the uniformity of TSP results between identical operating units and over time at two NSW installation. Except for the 9/10/91 test, the baghouses were inspected for failing bags prior to testing. Tables 7 and 8 show the impact of TSP and air toxic metals of a plant upset. In this case it took up to one day for the emissions to return to normal following a 30 minute complete shutdown of the incinerator and three baghouse systems being tested. Table 9 describes the impact of broken bags on emissions for a typical size baghouse. As emission levels become tighter in attempts to control air toxics, response to broken bags will take on new importance. More importantly, system design changes to promote longer bag life and better emission monitoring will be needed. Once continuous monitoring of outlet particulate is required, the industry will be challenged. Until then it will be business as usual with designs aimed at passing a one time or yearly stack test with the baghouse primed for peak performance. This won`t do much to protect the environment from air toxics to the proposed units.

  1. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

  2. 1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  3. 1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  4. New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health, Co- benefits of Carbon Standards: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing-by-state changes in harmful air pollution, it is the first study to quantify and map the co-benefits of power plant

  5. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nations site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale background levels or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved critical receptor stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

  6. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing -...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution standards Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution standards Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 We have become accustomed to thinking...

  8. air quality standard: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in the South Coast Air Basin of California. It has also been modified to model pollution in South Korea, Mexico Manohar, Rajit 78 Predicting Air Quality: Current Status...

  9. air quality standards: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in the South Coast Air Basin of California. It has also been modified to model pollution in South Korea, Mexico Manohar, Rajit 78 Predicting Air Quality: Current Status...

  10. Air Quality Standards and Nuisance Issues for Animal Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Auvermann, Brent W.

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    them reduce the effect their facilities may have on air quality. By understanding issues pertaining to air pollutants, producers then can more effectively communicate with their neighbors and communities....

  11. The role of Health Impact Assessment in the setting of air quality standards: An Australian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.au [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia) [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Katscherian, Dianne [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia) [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Harris, Patrick [CHETRE UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia)] [CHETRE UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The approaches used for setting or reviewing air quality standards vary from country to country. The purpose of this research was to consider the potential to improve decision-making through integration of HIA into the processes to review and set air quality standards used in Australia. To assess the value of HIA in this policy process, its strengths and weaknesses were evaluated aligned with review of international processes for setting air quality standards. Air quality standard setting programmes elsewhere have either used HIA or have amalgamated and incorporated factors normally found within HIA frameworks. They clearly demonstrate the value of a formalised HIA process for setting air quality standards in Australia. The following elements should be taken into consideration when using HIA in standard setting. (a) The adequacy of a mainly technical approach in current standard setting procedures to consider social determinants of health. (b) The importance of risk assessment criteria and information within the HIA process. The assessment of risk should consider equity, the distribution of variations in air quality in different locations and the potential impacts on health. (c) The uncertainties in extrapolating evidence from one population to another or to subpopulations, especially the more vulnerable, due to differing environmental factors and population variables. (d) The significance of communication with all potential stakeholders on issues associated with the management of air quality. In Australia there is also an opportunity for HIA to be used in conjunction with the NEPM to develop local air quality standard measures. The outcomes of this research indicated that the use of HIA for air quality standard setting at the national and local levels would prove advantageous. -- Highlights: Health Impact Assessment framework has been applied to a policy development process. HIA process was evaluated for application in air quality standard setting. Advantages of HIA in the air quality standard setting process are demonstrated.

  12. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  13. air kerma standards: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are required to balance the benefits of such reductions with the costs incurred, energy requirements, and other health and environmental impacts. Residual risk standards will...

  14. air kerma standardization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are required to balance the benefits of such reductions with the costs incurred, energy requirements, and other health and environmental impacts. Residual risk standards will...

  15. Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Warm Air Furnaces, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Warm Air Furnaces, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  16. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Air emissions standards, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a regulatory overview of the RCRA air emission standards as they apply to hazardous waste facilities. It outlines the history of RCRA air emission standards as well as the air emission controls required by the standards. It explains the differences between the parts 264/265, Subpart AA BB, CC, air emission standards and summarizes the requirements of each of these Subparts. It identifies the types of units subject to these requirements as well as specific exemptions.

  17. Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control Standard NESHAPs National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NOx oxides of nitrogen NPOC nonAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner

  18. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

  19. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Technical Services

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

  20. Upgraded recovery boiler meets low air emissions standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Fond, J.F.; Jansen, J.H. (Jansen Combustion and Boiler Technologies, Inc., Woodinville, WA (United States)); Eide, P. (Boise Cascade Corp., International Falls, MN (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fall of 1990, the Boise Cascade mill in International Falls, MN, carried out a millwide modernization project. One critical element of the project was the upgrade of their recovery boiler. As a result of the recovery boiler upgrade, the mill was required to obtain a prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) air permit. A best available control technology (BACT) assessment was performed as a requirement of the PSD regulations. Ultimately, a number of more stringent air pollution emission limits were established for the boiler, and a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) was purchased and installed to report daily results to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This paper describes efforts to achieve increased firing capacity in the mill's recovery boiler while meeting more severe air emissions regulations. The authors will show that each of the emissions limits, including CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], TRS, and opacity, are met by the upgraded boiler, while achieving an increase in firing capacity over pre-upgrade levels of up to 40%.

  1. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

  2. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2012 INL Report for Radionuclides (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  4. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  5. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Grossman

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

  6. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  7. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  8. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

  9. Co-benefits of Carbon Standards Part 1: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    Co-benefits of Carbon Standards Part 1: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for existing power plants would decrease emissions of co-pollutants that contribute to local and regional air pollution standard would improve air quality and decrease the deposition of harmful pollutants. It is well

  10. Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

  11. Dump fire leaves toxic air, sludge A fire which burned for four days at a landfill site in Thessaloniki, sending thick black

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Dump fire leaves toxic air, sludge A fire which burned for four days at a landfill site to break. This led to sludge flowing into some nearby houses. Authorities are due to begin the cleanup

  12. 13 SEER Standard for Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 2004, after years of litigation in a case that pitted environmental groups and Attorneys General from 10 states against the U.S. Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reestablished the central air conditioner and heat pump standard originally set in January 200. The Courts ruling, which struck down a May 2002 rollback of the 2001 standard to a 12 Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) mandates that all new central air conditioners and heat pumps meet a 13 SEER standard by January 2006, requiring a 30% increase in efficiency relative to current law. The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 reference case incorporates the 13 SEER standard as mandated by the Courts ruling.

  13. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics index Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calcium and sulfate as causes of toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in a hard rock mining... Received in revised form 2 June 2010 Accepted 8 June 2010 Available online 10 July...

  15. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Ryan, P. Barry; Ozkaynak, Haluk

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and quantifying outdoor and indoor sources of human exposure are essential but often not adequately addressed in health-effects studies for air pollution. Air pollution epidemiology, risk assessment, health tracking and accountability assessments are examples of health-effects studies that require but often lack adequate exposure information. Recent advances in exposure modeling along with better information on time-activity and exposure factors data provide us with unique opportunities to improve the assignment of exposures for both future and ongoing studies linking air pollution to health impacts. In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches. For example, different groups may advocate exposure indicators, biomonitoring, mapping methods (GIS), modeling, environmental media monitoring, and/or personal exposure modeling. However, emerging research reveals that the greatest progress comes from integration among two or more of these efforts.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 40 Substance and perceptions of environmental impacts of Summary: dioxins in the feed and to minimizase formation on cooling. MACT: Air Pollution Control...

  17. Summary of EPA Final Rules for Air Toxic Standards for Industrial,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S.Improve Emitter4-014 VolumeDepartment of EnergyCommercial, and

  18. A primary high-pressure air flow measurement standard in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiunn-Haur Shaw; Fong-Ruey Yang; Yao-Fu Chen [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-pressure air-flow national measurement standard is constructed in Taiwan with a capacity of 8400 Nm{sup 3}/h and a projected measurement uncertainty of {plus_minus}0.2% in the pressure range of 1 {approximately} 84 bars. it is a blow-down type facility, and its main purpose is to serve as the primary standard of a larger-flowrate natural gas flow measurement facility to be built in the future by Chinese Petroleum Company (CPC). The system has a gyroscopic weighing platform suitable for high precision gravimetric measurements and several sonic nozzles with different throat diameters situated in a chamber to be the reference flow meters. A set of two turbine meters, 50mm and 100mm, are sued as the transfer standard. The facility has two test sections separated by the nozzle chamber and four different calibration modes could be arranged. To make calibration, the storage tank, the temperature control loop, and two sets of pressure regulating valve establish a pressurized air flow with stable temperature and pressure in the test section. The control of the air-flow diversion, connect-disconnect mechanism, sonic nozzle array is made through a hydraulic power unit operating at 200 bars. Real time measurements of temperature, pressure, flow signal, and time are collected through a Honeywell 9000-series PLC and a FIX DMAC data acquisition/control software. This paper describes the key components of the test facility and presents the preliminary results of performance assessment.

  19. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption in each sc

  20. A Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Waters of Puget Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Danielle

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    , Washington, it is vital to determine what the impacts of such growth have had on air and water quality and if greater needs in regulation are needed to curtail emissions. A bi-weekly deposition study of atmospheric particulate matter at seven sites around...

  1. The COMPLY computer program for demonstrating compliance with national radionuclide air emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colli, A.; Beal, S.; Loomis, D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed national radionuclide air emission standards for a number of source categories. One of these standards applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and non-Department of Energy facilities having the potential to release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Approximately 6000 facilities are subject to the standard, which limits the effective whole-body dose commitment to the maximally exposed individual from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. A computer program to assist the regulated community in determining compliance has been developed by the EPA's Office of Radiation Programs. The computer program COMPLY calculates the dose to an individual residing outside the facility. The program considers dose from inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food, air immersion, and ground deposition. It is based on models developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Compliance procedures provided in COMPLY are designed to reduce the burden on the regulated community. The approach begins with simple-to-use methods that are very conservative in determining compliance. The methods become progressively less conservative but more complicated at succeeding levels. Each higher level requires the input of site-specific information, but allows a more realistic estimate of dose. This paper describes the COMPLY program, and provides estimates of the work required and the degree of conservatism in the dose computed at each level.

  2. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Air emission standards (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts aa, bb, and cc) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a regulatory overview of the RCRA air emission standards as they apply to hazardous waste facilities. It outlines the history of RCRA air emission standards as well as the air emission controls required by the standards. It explains the difference in the parts 264/265 and subparts AA, BB and CC, air emission standards. It summarizes the requirements of each of these subparts and identifies the types of units subject to these requirements as well as specific exemptions.

  3. Air Pollution 7.1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    CHAPTER 7 Air Pollution 7.1 INTRODUCTION 7.2 OVERVIEW OF EMISSIONS 7.3 THE CLEAN AIR ACT 7.4 THE POLLUTANT STANDARDS INDEX 7.5 CRITERIA POLLUTANTS 7.6 TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS 7.7 AIR POLLUTION IN THE WORLD'S MEGACITIES 7.8 MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS 7.9 STATIONARY SOURCES 7.10 AIR POLLUTION AND METEOROLOGY 7

  4. Fluorine Gas Management Guidelines Fluorine is a highly toxic, pale yellow gas about 1.3 times as heavy as air at atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Fluorine Gas Management Guidelines Overview Fluorine is a highly toxic, pale yellow gas about 1.3 times as heavy as air at atmospheric temperature and pressure. Fluorine gas is the most powerful oxidizing agent known, reacting with practically all organic and inorganic substances. Fluorine gas

  5. Hospital ventilation standards and energy conservation: chemical contamination of hospital air. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainer, D.; Michaelsen, G.S.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an era of increasing energy conservation consciousness, a critical reassessment of the validity of hospital ventilation and thermal standards is made. If current standards are found to be excessively conservative, major energy conservation measures could be undertaken by rebalancing and/or modification of current HVAC systems. To establish whether or not reducing ventilation rates would increase airborne chemical contamination to unacceptable levels, a field survey was conducted to develop an inventory and dosage estimates of hospital generated airborne chemical contaminants to which patients, staff, and visitors are exposed. The results of the study are presented. Emphasis is on patient exposure, but an examination of occupational exposure was also made. An in-depth assessment of the laboratory air environment is documented. Housekeeping products used in survey hospitals, hazardous properties of housekeeping chemicals and probable product composition are discussed in the appendices.

  6. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    urban analysis of air pollution health effects, remainsderived from community air pollution health studies. Recentused to link them, in air pollution health studies including

  7. Characterization of air toxics from a laboratory coal-fired combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions of hazardous air pollutants from coal combustion were studied in a laboratory-scale combustion facility, with emphasis on fine particles in three size ranges of less than 7.5 {mu}m diameter. Vapors were also measured. Substances under study included organic compounds, anions, elements, and radionuclides. Fly ash was generated by firing a bituminous coal in a combuster for 40 h at each of two coal feed rates. Flue gas was sampled under two conditions. Results for organic compounds, anions, and elements show a dependence on particle size consistent with published power plant data. Accumulation of material onto surface layers was inferred from differences in chemical composition between the plume simulating dilution sampler and hot flue samples. Extracts of organic particulate material were fractionated into different polarity fractions and analyzed by GC/MS. In Phase II, these laboratory results will be compared to emissions from a full-scale power plant burning the same coal.

  8. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Topical report for Phases 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract with the US Department of Energy (DE-AC22-92PCO0367), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Radian Corporation has conducted a test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPS). Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical charactization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions.

  9. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  10. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Final report for Phases 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) was conducted . Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical characterization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions. Field testing was conducted in two phases. The Phase I field program was performed over the period of August 24 through September 20, 1992, at the Tennessee Valley Authority Widows Creek Unit 8 Power Station, located near Stevenson (Jackson County), Alabama, on the Tennessee River. Sampling activities for Phase II were conducted from September 11 through October 14, 1993. Widows Creek Unit 8 is a 575-megawatt plant that uses bituminous coal averaging 3.7% sulfur and 13% ash. Downstream of the boiler, a venture wet scrubbing system is used for control of both sulfur dioxide and particulate emissions. There is no electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in this system. This system is atypical and represents only about 5% of the US utility industry. However, this site was chosen for this study because of the lack of information available for this particulate emission control system.

  11. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

  12. Will cheap gas and efficient cars imperil air-quality goals under relaxed emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBelle, S.J.; Saricks, C.L.; Moses, D.O.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term trends, to the year 2000, of urban household travel were forecast for prototype metropolitan areas under several sets of energy prices, auto fuel economy, and emission standards. Dramatic improvements in air quality were forecast due to redistribution of travel and lowered emissions. The exception to this trend to rapidly growing cities, such as those in the west and southwest experiencing sprawl development that characterized many urbanized areas in the industrial northeast and midwest during the 1950's and 1960's. In one test city, where the rate of urbanization has slowed significantly, analysis indicated that relaxation of the light-duty-vehicle NO/sub x/ standard from 1.0 gm/mi to 2.0 gm/mi would not severely threaten attainment of the ambient NO/sub x/ standards by 1987 owing to redistribution of population and activities. The difference in total energy impacts was determined to be negligible, assuming moderate increase in petroleum prices through 1995 (3.1%/year). In another policy test, without changing emission standards, an increase in fuel price of 3.75%/year from 1980 to 2000 reduced travel and provided a 4% decrease in energy use and a corresponding decrease in CO, HC and NO/sub x/. Virtually all of the reduction in travel and emissions was due to non-work travel, which fell 9%. The price increase damped the increase in auto travel per person that would occur as autos become cheaper to operate and as household wealth increases, making the answer to the title a cautious yes, given steady or slowly rising fuel prices.

  13. Development of minimum efficiency standards for large capacity air conditioners, and commercial water heaters, refrigerators, and freezers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, P.S.; Rettberg, R.J.; Erickson, R.C.; Toor, J.S.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission has promulgated appliance energy efficiency standards and energy conservation standards for new construction with the objective of reducing energy consumption in the State of California. The following appliance categories are specifically addressed: large capacity air conditioners; commercial water heaters; and commercial refrigerators and freezers. The tasks that have been performed include: an energy use pattern study for the subject equipment; an examination of the size distribution of commercial air conditioning equipment; an examination of the different types of commercial air conditioning systems; an evaluation of the effectiveness of economizers in reducing commercial air conditioning system energy consumption in California; an examination of the effects of oversizing commercial air conditioners; a detailed study of supermarket refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; an evaluation of the economic feasibility of utilizing air conditioner waste heat to heat water; an assessment of the applicability of existing test procedures for small water heaters to large water heaters; and a brief investigation of the marketing and distribution systems for air conditioning and refrigeration equipment. Results of the efforts are described.

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  15. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclides concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  16. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclides concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2012, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 0.5% to a maximum of 11.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  17. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  18. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  19. 2014-06-23 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-in Coolers and Freezers; Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Refrigeration Institute Petition for Reconsideration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the agency response to the Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-in Coolers and Freezers; Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Refrigeration Institute Petition for Reconsideration.

  20. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

  1. EA-1892: Direct Final Rule Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and Residential Central Air Conditioners & Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to adopt energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including residential furnaces and residential air conditioners and heat pumps, as required by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6291 et seq.)

  2. When Must EPA Set Ambient Air Quality Standards - Looking Back at NRDC v. Train

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Craig N.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    re- specting control of lead or other air pollutant" (citingcontrol the pollutant 5 7 and-si- multaneously with the issuance of the criteria-propose primary and secondary ambient air

  3. Technical comments on EPA`s proposed revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for particulate matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed new ambient air quality standards specifically for fine particulate matter, regulating concentrations of particles with median aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m (PM{sub 2.5}). Two new standards have been proposed: a maximum 24-hr concentration that is intended to protect against acute health effects, and an annual concentration limit that is intended to protect against longer-term health effects. EPA has also proposed a slight relaxation of the 24-hr standard for inhalable particles (PM{sub 10}), by allowing additional exceedances each year. Fine particles are currently being indirectly controlled by means of regulations for PM{sub 10} and TSP, under the Clean Air Act of 1970 and subsequent amendments. Although routine monitoring of PM{sub 2.5} is rare and data are sparse, the available data indicate that ambient concentrations have been declining at about 6% per year under existing regulations.

  4. Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such as gasoline and/or diesel) combustion as source inputs of combustion by-products to the atmosphere of the region and subsequently to the waters of Puget Sound.

  5. Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

  6. Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

  7. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR. FINAL REPORT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHH1ICAL CONTAMINATION OFSTANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OFSTANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF

  8. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

  9. The effect of air currents on the toxicity of spray and dust formulations of toxaphene, aldrin, and dieldrin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Bernard Lawton

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    recognizing a turbulent motion because of thc pronounced irregularities in the motion, A sensitive anemometer set up near the ground reveals that the motion of the air is made up of rapid succecsions of gusts and lulls accompanidd by simultaneous changes... are chilled and become denser than those above, The maintenance of the turbulent state implies that masses of air are being moved continually in the vertical, so that if the fall of density with height i" very pronounced, considerable work has to be done...

  10. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India. Michael A.followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliancesfrost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have

  11. 1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  12. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  13. Conceptual Approach For Estimating Potential Air Toxics And Radionuclide Airborne Emissions From A Temporary Exhaust System For The 216-Z-9 Crib Removal Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.; Sutter, C.; O'Brien, P.; Bates, J.; Klos, B. [Fluor Hanford Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Teal, J. [Fluor Federal Services, Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [Environmental Quality Management, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 216-Z-9 Crib, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeastern Washington State, was the site of a successful mining effort to recover plutonium from the contaminated soils at the disposal site. A CERCLA Action Memorandum (AM) issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires the removal of the buildings associated with this mining effort to facilitate a remedial action planned for the near future. The decontamination and demolition of the 216 Z-9 Crib facilities is required under a consent order between the DOE, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Removal of the buildings located on and near the concrete cover slab over the 216-Z-9 Crib will require removal of the large soil-packaging glovebox located inside the 216-Z- 9A Building. Prior to cleaning out the glovebox, it will be necessary to provide active filtered ventilation capability to ensure a negative pressure exists between the glovebox and the adjacent airspace while hands-on work proceeds within. The glovebox floor is open to the Z-9 crib cavern environment below. For this reason the crib and glovebox currently share a common airspace. The functional requirements for safely conducting work within the glovebox include provision of a negative pressure in the box of about 0.5 inches of water gage (nominal) less than the interior of the building. In addition, the building surrounding the glovebox will be maintained at a slight negative pressure with respect to outdoor ambient pressure. In order to assess the relevant and appropriate clean air requirements for the new temporary ventilation system and associated emissions monitoring, it was necessary to reliably predict the nature of the exhaust air stream. Factors used to predict the presence and concentrations of certain radionuclide particulates and certain gases considered to be air toxics, included reliability parameters, flow rates, radionuclide content, and off-gas compositions. Radionuclide content includes transuranic isotopes, primarily of plutonium and americium. Air toxics include carbon tetrachloride, butane, methanol, acetone and toluene. Flow rate prediction was based on available design and test data and considered equipment sizes, glovebox negative pressure requirements, and filter flow characteristics. The approach used to predict the off-gas composition from the crib required experience-based predictive analysis combined with crib head space analytical results. Input information for emission estimates included: (1) gas composition sample data obtained from recent samples taken within the crib head space during static conditions, and (2) air in-leakage/dilution estimates based on physical characteristics of both the crib and the new temporary ventilation system. The conceptual approach combined measurement-based data with conservative assumptions, and provides the estimates necessary to determine relevance and appropriateness of substantive requirements under federal and state laws and regulations. (authors)

  14. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

  15. Conservation Division regiulations for appliance-efficiency standards relating to refrigerators and freezers, room air conditioners, central air conditioners, gas space heaters, water heaters, plumbing fittings, gas clothes dryers, and gas cooking appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The text of the appliance efficiency standards for certain types of new appliances sold in California is presented. Specifications and test methods to identify complying refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, gas space heaters, water heaters, plumbing fittings, gas clothes dryers, and gas cooking appliances are covered.

  16. 2014-03-12 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Air Compressors; Notice of Public Meeting and Extension of Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting and extension of public comment period regarding energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial air compressors, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on March 12, 2014.

  17. Development of fireside performance indices, Task 7.33, Development of methods to predict agglomeration and deposition in FBCS, Task 7.36, Enhanced air toxics control, Task 7.45

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Laudal, D.L.; Miller, S.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been developing advanced indices that rank coals according to their fouling and slagging propensity in utility boilers. The indices are based on sophisticated analytical techniques for identifying and quantifying coal inorganics and are useful in predicting the effects of proposed operational changes on ash deposition in coal-fired boilers. These indices are intended to provide an economical way to reduce the amount of full-scale testing needed to determine the best means of minimizing ash-related problems. The successful design and operation of the fluidized-bed combustor requires the ability to control and mitigate ash-related problems. The major ash-related problems in FBC are agglomeration of bed material, ash deposition on heat-transfer surfaces, ash deposition on refractory and uncooled surfaces, corrosion, and erosion. The focus of the Development of Methods to Predict Agglomeration and Deposition in FBCs is on the agglomeration and deposition problems in atmospheric bubbling and circulating beds. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require study of air toxic emissions from coal combustion systems. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine-particle control appears to be the best approach to achieving a high level of air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and are not typically collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, the goal of this project is to develop methods that capture the vapor-phase metals while simultaneously achieving ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxics.

  18. 2014-11-25 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Extension of Public Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register extension of the public comment period regarding energy conservation standards for small, large and very large air-cool commercial package air conditioning and heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on November 25, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  19. Traffic-related air toxics and preterm birth: a population-based case-control study in Los Angeles County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Michelle; Ghosh, Jo Kay; Su, Jason; Cockburn, Myles; Jerrett, Michael; Ritz, Beate

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air pollution exposures and preterm birth based on single pollutant models Exposure Metric Adjusted a Crude N (cases, controls)

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air quality-a Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EHHE; January 2006 7 Topics Air, Ambient (Outdoor) Air, Indoor Disasters Lead... pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air monitoring Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EHHE; January 2006 7 Topics Air, Ambient (Outdoor) Air, Indoor Disasters Lead... pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute oral toxicity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology 9 Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic Chemicals Summary: Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic...

  3. 2014-09-23 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Walk-in Coolers and Freezers; Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Refrigeration Institute Petition for Reconsideration Notice of Public Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting regarding energy conservation standards for walk-in coolers and freezers; Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Refrigeration Institute petition for reconsideration, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 23, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  4. 2015-02-13 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Portable Air Conditioners; Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting regarding energy conservation standards for portable air conditioners, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 13, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  5. Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy ConservationCentral Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps. Washington DC:Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy Conservation

  6. Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Products: Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps EnergyResidential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps.Products: Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy

  7. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

  8. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  9. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  10. AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Summary of EPA Final Rules for Air Toxic Standards for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional (ICI) Boilers and Process Heaters, February 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601 High Integrity -Magnesium

  11. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro's estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  12. Air Pollution Issues of the 1990's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, J. C.

    of 1990 will contain. However, many political and economic battles remain to be fought. Currently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that more than $30 billion a year is being spent to control air pollution in this country (1... or simply air toxics. Like ambient ozone nonattainment, air toxics exemplify the pollution problems of the 1990's. Toxic air emissions often occur in tiny amounts compared to criteria pollutants. The causes and effects can vary dramatically from city...

  13. INEEL AIR MODELING PROTOCOL ext

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. S. Staley; M. L. Abbott; P. D. Ritter

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various laws stemming from the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 require air emissions modeling. Modeling is used to ensure that air emissions from new projects and from modifications to existing facilities do not exceed certain standards. For radionuclides, any new airborne release must be modeled to show that downwind receptors do not receive exposures exceeding the dose limits and to determine the requirements for emissions monitoring. For criteria and toxic pollutants, emissions usually must first exceed threshold values before modeling of downwind concentrations is required. This document was prepared to provide guidance for performing environmental compliance-driven air modeling of emissions from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities. This document assumes that the user has experience in air modeling and dose and risk assessment. It is not intended to be a "cookbook," nor should all recommendations herein be construed as requirements. However, there are certain procedures that are required by law, and these are pointed out. It is also important to understand that air emissions modeling is a constantly evolving process. This document should, therefore, be reviewed periodically and revised as needed. The document is divided into two parts. Part A is the protocol for radiological assessments, and Part B is for nonradiological assessments. This document is an update of and supersedes document INEEL/INT-98-00236, Rev. 0, INEEL Air Modeling Protocol. This updated document incorporates changes in some of the rules, procedures, and air modeling codes that have occurred since the protocol was first published in 1998.

  14. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-470E-201 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Estimating Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides fromStandards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides),

  15. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with the enjoyment of life and property. The criteria for determining compliance is listed in the regulations, and is based on other air pollution and ambient air standards...

  16. Air kerma standard for calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and its traceability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Prinzio, Renato; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas-Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/UERJ), R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Pavilhao Haroldo Lisboa da Cunha, Terreo, Sala 136-Maracana, CEP 20550-900-Rio de Janeiro/RJ-Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Jacarepagua-CE22780-160-Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas-Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/UERJ), R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Pavilhao Haroldo Lisboa da Cunha, Terreo, Sala 136-Maracana, CEP 20550-900-Rio de Janeiro/RJ-Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Brazil there are over 100 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy facilities using well-type chambers for the determination of the air kerma rate of {sup 192}Ir sources. This paper presents the methodology developed and extensively tested by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR) and presently in use to calibrate those types of chambers. The system was initially used to calibrate six well-type chambers of brachytherapy services, and the maximum deviation of only 1.0% was observed between the calibration coefficients obtained and the ones in the calibration certificate provided by the UWADCL. In addition to its traceability to the Brazilian National Standards, the whole system was taken to University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) for a direct comparison and the same formalism to calculate the air kerma was used. The comparison results between the two laboratories show an agreement of 0.9% for the calibration coefficients. Three Brazilian well-type chambers were calibrated at the UWADCL, and by LCR, in Brazil, using the developed system and a clinical HDR machine. The results of the calibration of three well chambers have shown an agreement better than 1.0%. Uncertainty analyses involving the measurements made both at the UWADCL and LCR laboratories are discussed.

  17. Healthy Air Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Healthy Air Act was developed with the purpose of bringing Maryland into attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and fine particulate matter by the...

  18. Regulations for Air Quality (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Regulation establishes emission standards for particulates and gases, emission opacity standards, standards of air quality and control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the emission of...

  19. Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in Stochastic Receiving Media quality standards, for in- stance SO2 emissions are capped under Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments while ambient SO2 concentrations are limited under National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS

  20. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  1. Scholastic Standards Scholastic Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholastic Standards _______________ 1.8 Page 1 Scholastic Standards Center for Advising-7095 Gaye DiGregorio, Executive Director Scholastic standards are mandated by the faculty through the Faculty Council Committee on Scholastic Standards. Procedures relative to scholastic standards

  2. Air Products effective way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PE O A e s a b O T A O ENNST Overview Air Products effective way standard me Departm Shipping has recently y of shipping eans. Air Pro ontainer that es of this pro onduct mark eep accelera eep the cost tilize widely a earch and m m visited Air er needs wer model was cr m approache ms

  3. Air Quality Chapter Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Chapter 30 Air Quality Chapter Outline 1 Overview 2 1.1 Hazards / Impacts 2 1.2 Exposure Sources 3 Manual Chapter 30: Air Quality 7 References 20 8 Implementation 21 9 Ownership 22 1 Overview SLAC operations produce a wide range of air emissions. Sources of emissions include standard equipment

  4. acetaminophen toxicity evidence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - No national standards - Less Bertini, Robert L. 17 Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging...

  5. Chapter 63 General Standards of Performance (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 63, entitled Air Quality: General Standards of Performance, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and...

  6. TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT: ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    design measure than the levels ana The proposed efficiency standards will decrease air pollution b future energy demand. The greatest decreases in air pollution will oxides...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of power plant emissiohs. The proposed efficiency standards will gnerally decrease air pollution by decreasing future energy demand. The greatest d6er"eases in air pollution...

  8. Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA. CEC(2008b). ResidentialAlternativeCalculationStandardforAirHandlersinResidentialSpaceConditioningofStandardsOptionsforResidentialAirHandlerFans.

  9. Atmospheric Processes: Transport of Air Toxics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -chloroaniline) acenaphthene pyrene tetraethyl lead methoxychlor bis (tributyltin) oxide anthracene fluoranthene

  10. Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy ConservationW.R. Coleman. 1990. Heat Pump Life and Compressor LongevityC.C.. 1990. Predicting Future Heat Pump Production Volume

  11. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed. Government Commercial AgriculturalDepartment of

  12. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CL SENIOR; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; I OLMEZ; J LIGHTY; JOL WENDT; JOSEPH J HELBLE; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, the Lignite Research Council, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO combustion systems, and new power generation x plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1998 through 30 September 1998. During this period distribution of all three Phase II coals was completed. Standard analyses for the whole coal samples were also completed. Mssbauer analysis of all project coals and fractions received to date has been completed in order to obtain details of the iron mineralogy. The analyses of arsenic XAFS data for two of the project coals and for some high arsenic coals have been completed. Duplicate splits of the Ohio 5,6,7 and North Dakota lignite samples were taken through all four steps of the selective leaching procedure. Leaching analysis of the Wyodak coal has recently commenced. Preparation of polished coal/epoxy pellets for probe/SEM studies is underway. Some exploratory mercury LIII XAFS work was carried out during August at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the new synchrotron facility at Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL. Further analysis of small-scale combustion experiments conducted at PSI in Phase I was completed this quarter. The results of these experiments for the first time suggest almost complete vaporization of certain trace elements (Se, Zn) from coal combustion in the flame zone, in accordance with theoretical equilibrium predictions. Other elements (As, Sb, Cr) appeared considerably less volatile and may react with constituents in the bulk ash at combustion temperatures. The combustion section of the University of Arizona's Downflow Combustor was completely rebuilt. The University of Utah worked on setting up EPA Method 26A to give the capability to measure chlorine in flue gas. The chlorine kinetic calculations performed as part of the Phase I program were found to have an error in the initial conditions. Therefore, the calculations were re-done this quarter with the correct starting conditions. Development of a quasi-empirical emissions model based on reported emissions of particulate matter from field measurements was continued this quarter. As a first step in developing the ToPEM, we developed a sub-model that calculates the evaporation of major elements (Na, K, Fe, Si, Al, Ca and Mg) from both inherent and extraneous minerals of coal. During this quarter, this sub-model was included into EMAF, which formed the ToPEM. Experimental data from the Phase I program were used to test and modify the sub-model and the ToPEM.

  13. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    which set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States. 76 FR 37408. DOE has initiated...

  14. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group; Notice of Open Meetings...

  15. Economic impact analysis for proposed emission standards and guidelines for municipal waste combustors: A description of the basis for, and impacts of, proposed revisions to air pollutant emission regulations for new and existing municipal waste combustors under Clean Air Act Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jellicorse, B.L.; Dempsey, J.L.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA is proposing revised and expanded air pollutant emission standards for new, and guidelines for existing, municipal waste combustors (MWCs), pursuant to Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129 of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The regulations will replace or supplement those promulgated by EPA on February 11, 1991. The standards and guidelines will apply to MWCs with a capacity to combust 35 or more Mg of municipal solid waste per day. The pollutants to be regulated are particulate matter (total and fine), opacity, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, lead, cadmium mercury, and dibenzofurans and dioxins. The report describes the standards and guidelines, their potential economic impacts, and related matters. EPA estimates the national annual cost of the standards in 1994 will be $44 million, plus the cost of the 1991 standards, $157 million, for a total of $201 million. EPA estimates the equivalent cost of the guidelines at $280 million plus $168 million for a total of $448 million.

  16. Got Standards? "Got Standards?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    9000 standards were developed by the International Organization for Standardization, which was founded in 1946. The purpose of the organization was to promote the development of international standards in order to bring harmony to global standards for international trade. Enter ISO 9000. The Basics In order

  17. VINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The "irreversible effects threshold" is the maximum concentration of pollutant in the air for a given exposure timeVINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING URBAN DEVELOPMENT OR LAND of vinyl Chloride , the french procedure to set acute toxicity thresholds in the context of controlling

  18. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  19. Air Pollutant Data for Linking Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollutant Data for Linking Studies New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services #12;New Jersey Close-up View View from Space #12;Air Pollutant/Health Linking Studies in New Jersey · CDC 03074 ­ Air toxics (carcinogens) in relation to: · incidence of selected cancers · prevalence of selected

  20. Nebraska Air Quality Regulations (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to ambient air quality standards, pollution source operating permits, emissions reporting,...

  1. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fugitive emissions in an emissions trading program, as theexists between an emissions trading program that allows aircreation of other ROC emissions trading programs. JOURNAL OF

  2. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Why Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Environmental toxicants and autism spectrum disorders: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    , polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), solvents, toxic waste sites, air pollutants and heavy metals, with the strongest evidence found for air pollutants and pesticides. Gestational exposure to methylmercury (through fish retrospective case­control, ecological or prospective cohort studies, although a few had weaker study designs

  4. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  5. Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standards for Consumer Products: Room Air Conditioners,Energy Savings -- Residential Products Room Air Conditionersfor Consumer Products: Residential Central Air Conditioners

  6. Status of China's Energy Efficiency Standards and Labels for Appliances and International Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    testing in 2006 for refrigerators, freezers and room air-three products (refrigerators, freezers, air-conditionersStandards Domestic refrigerators/freezers* Room air

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality criteria Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is in the spotlight as a Summary: quality. Criteria pollutant -- One of six air pollutants that may adversely affect human health... Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) -- Air...

  8. Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority -Setting Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conservation Standard for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Meeting...

  9. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Small,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conservation Standard for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-Cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Meeting...

  10. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact of room air conditioners energy labels in Malaysia."of electric Room Air Conditioner." Energy Economics 20Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners. McNeil, M. A. ,

  11. 2014-08-19 Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2014-08-19 Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group; Notice of Open...

  12. ASRAC Regional Standards Enforcement Notice of Open Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part 460 Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Enforcement Standards Working Group AGENCY: Department of Energy,...

  13. Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them...

  14. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporating energy efficient designs. Indoor air qualityincorporating energy efficient designs. In the future, theenergy efficient ventilation standards and ventilation designs

  15. Brand Standards Brand StandardsBrand Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Brand Standards 6.6.11 #12;Brand StandardsBrand Standards VISUAL IDENTITY AND BRANDING INITIATIVE, the visual image presented to the public by the units of the University and UMMC often is confusing the organizations' public image under a cohesive, easily recognized visual identity that relies upon a common

  16. Investigation of Feasibility of All-Fresh Air Supply in an All-Air System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Yan, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of an all-fresh air supply in an all-air system is investigated in theory, and the problem of AHU-handling air in low efficiency in summer and winter conditions is analyzed. The air supply temperature is almost up to standards when a...

  17. Optimising the Fresh Air Economiser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biship, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , S., ?Economizers in Air Handling Systems?, CED Engineering Course M01-014, Stony Point New York, 2000. Moser, D., ?Free Cooling: Don?t Let Savings Slip Away?, Portland Energy Conservation Inc., published in Building Operating Management.... New Zealand, Standard NZS 4303:1990, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, Standards Association of New Zealand, Wellington. Portland Energy Conservation Inc., from Functional Testing Guide on website: (http...

  18. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) first adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) in September 2003. The original standards provided for 5 levels of...

  19. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York first adopted uniform interconnection standards in 1999 (see history below). The Standard Interconnection Requirements (SIR) have subsequently been amended several times since, most...

  20. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission was required to adopt interconnection standards and net-metering rules by the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act of 2004.The PUC subsequently...

  1. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) adopted comprehensive interconnection standards for distributed generation in June 2008. The NCUC standards, which are similar to the Federal Energy...

  2. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    standard I[ o Fig. 2. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in aCritical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards,with gas appliances. Nitrogen dioxide levels in kitchens of

  3. Optimal Supply Angle of Upside Air Supply in Manned Spacecraft Cabin-Based Air Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The age of air in the workaround of a manned spacecraft cabin that contain astronauts, apparatus and simple living establishments was numerically simulated by use of commercial software and a standard k-e turbulence model. An air inlet installed...

  4. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

  5. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

  6. Human Exposure to Toxic Materials The New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    )are examplesof toxic chemicals historically produced and used in industry. Air pollution by particulates York-New Jersey met- ropolitan region around New York City are ex- posed to toxic chemicals or elements, such as SO, and NO, and other petroleum combustion products, is pro- duced by the operation of internal

  7. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affect IAQ negatively (health + productivity) InappropriateIAQ standards that support occupant comfort, health, productivity, and

  8. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    irritant effects. For energy models, we estimated buildingreduced outdoor air VRs. The energy models estimate that, inof commercial building energy models. The study assessed the

  9. ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review...

  10. Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

  11. Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

  12. Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act, revised significantly in 2006, seeks to mitigate the use of toxic substances and the production of toxic byproducts through reporting requirements as well as resource conservation plans...

  13. Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

  14. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control should be the first priority instead of dilution of pollutants by ventilation or by cleaning the air.air quality, could better provide healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutantsair quality, could better document healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutants

  15. Impacts of China's Current Appliance Standards and Labeling Program to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David; Aden, Nathaniel; Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standards Domestic refrigerators/freezers* Room airLabeling Domestic refrigerators/freezers* Room air3-star compartment Refrigerator/Freezer Chest frozen food

  16. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  17. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, Roger L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - air regulations consistency Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences 3 An assessment of the effectiveness of California's local air pollution controls on Summary: and local air quality standards. This paper examines...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - air currents Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solvent cleaners (currently four units on-site) Emissions standards for air pollutants... Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety...

  20. Systematic Evaluation of Nanomaterial Toxicity: Utility of Standardized

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object Damage 3Nationalmimic keyProcessingMaterials

  1. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2004, the Wisconsin Public Service Commission adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) systems up to 15 megawatts (MW) in capacity. All investor-owned...

  2. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia has two interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems and one for systems that are not net-metered.

  3. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2007, the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) systems up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity. The...

  4. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2005, the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted standards for net metering and interconnection, as required by Amendment 37, a renewable-energy ballot initiative approved...

  5. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's interconnection standards apply statewide to all electric distribution utilities, but not to the small number of municipal utilities and electric cooperatives in the state. The rules,...

  6. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Legislation enacted in August 2012 required the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (DPU) to develop an enforceable, standard interconnection timeline for distributed generation...

  7. Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

    Inert material heated by alectrical energy to a tempera ture range up to 2000 Fahrenheit. The reaction of organic vapors and oxygen In the bed Is exothermic, thereby reducing the power Input JOHN B. ~ILCOX, PH.D. VICE PRESIDENT IN...

  8. Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards....

  9. Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosar, D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the standard. To mitigate or nullify these additional weather loads, outdoor air preconditioning technologies are being promoted in combination with conventional HVAC operations downstream as a means to deliver the required fresh air and control humidity...

  10. Toxic Inhalation Fatalities of US Construction Workers, 1990 to 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    space standard could save lives, particularly among water, sewer, and utility line industry workers. (J numbers of fatalities. The majority of these deaths occurred in confined spaces. Water, sewer, and utility line workers are at increased risk for poisoning fatality. Toxic inhalation fatalities

  11. Mold or Toxic Mold? An Indoor Air Pollutant Page 1 Mold or Toxic Mold? An Indoor Air Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -like symptoms, respiratory problems, nasal and sinus congestion, watery eyes, sore throat, coughing and skin

  12. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon has three separate interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems, one for small generator facilities (non-net metered systems) and one for large generator facilities (non-net...

  13. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Dakotas interconnection standards for distributed generation, adopted by the state Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in May 2009, apply to customers of investor-owned utilities.* The rules...

  14. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont has adopted separate interconnection standards for net-metered energy systems that are 150 kW or less, and for all other distributed-generation (DG) systems.

  15. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2003, the Nevada Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted interconnection standards for customers of NV Energy (formerly Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific Power) with on-site generation...

  16. Modern Compressed Air Piping Selection and Design Can Have a Great Impact on Your Compressed Air Energy Dollars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Ormer, H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces new concepts in compressed air piping, sizing, and system design beyond the conventional pipe sizing charts and standard system layout guide lines. The author shows how compressed air velocity has a very significant impact...

  17. Polarimetric Standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Landi Degl'Innocenti; S. Bagnulo; L. Fossati

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of polarimetric techniques is nowadays widespread among solar and stellar astronomers. However, notwithstanding the recommandations that have often been made about the publication of polarimetric results in the astronomical literature, we are still far from having a standard protocol on which to conform. In this paper we review the basic definitions and the physical significance of the Stokes parameters, and we propose a standardization of the measurement of polarized radiation.

  18. 2014-08-28 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Packaged...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conservation Standards for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Meeting 2014-08-28 Issuance: Energy...

  19. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Domestic Electric Storage Water Heater (DESWH) Test Methodsand Renewable Energy (2000). Water Heater Energy StandardsAir Conditioners, Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment,

  20. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Minimum Appliance Standards DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards June 3, 2010 - 2:17pm Addthis...

  1. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAPAgendaConditioning AirWhy » Air

  2. Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calm, James M.

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

  3. Setting Environmental Standards: A Statistician's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    In order to protect the population from adverse health effects due to pollution of air, water and soil of using compliance monitoring networks to assess health effects of air pollution. #12;2. A statistical value of pollution, measured or actual, not to be exceeded. We consider the standard for ozone

  4. Development of guidelines for Modeling Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Systems in EnergyPlus, eQUEST, and EnergyPro for use in California non-residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the comparison for the supply plenum cooling rate. The roomMass Figure 2.10(a): Supply plenum cooling load, FloorMass (b): Supply plenum cooling load for Standard Mass

  5. {open_quotes}Methods for the determination of the Clean Air Act Title III metallic HAPS in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, J. [Standard Laboratories, Inc., Evansville, IN (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act was amended in 1990 and additional requirements were added to Title III {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} Title III identified one hundred eighty-nine hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) and Congress directed the EPA to study the effects of emissions of these HAPS on public health and the environment. EPA is to report to Congress in the fall of 1995 concerning their findings and make recommendations regarding fossil fuel fired combustion units. The outcome of the EPA recommendations will be of great interest to coal producers and users. Of the one hundred eighty-nine listed HAPS, eleven are trace metals found in coal. The producers and users may be required to analyze coal for these HAPS, to determine if selective mining and/or beneficiation can lower their occurrence, to determine their fate in the combustion process, etc. Indeed many coal companies have begun to study their reserves to aid the EPA investigation. Currently there are no EPA promulgated test methodologies for these elements in coal. Moreover, the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) does not provide standards for the analyses of all of the eleven HAPS either. In view of this lack of standardized analytical protocols the commercial laboratory is left with finding the best methods for meeting these analytical needs. This paper describes how Standard Laboratories, Inc. as a whole and particularly its Environmental Laboratory Division has met this need.

  6. Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Keywords: Indoor air quality; hazard analysis; residential; criteria pollutants; VOCs; air toxics Citation Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through

  7. Leads Tactical Air Control Party (TACP) and Air Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    leadership in the demanding environment of Joint operations -Meet medical standards for Ground Based Control as an ALO. Joint Air Operations Command and Control Course: The JAOC2C will provide the 13L ALO an overview, Ranger School, the Joint Operational Fires and Effects Course, and others. initiAL trAining AdvAnced tr

  8. inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    to the development of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, heart disease, and lung cancer. Complicating with our loved ones [6]. Yet, some of our activities degrade the environmental quality of these spaces into the air, and laser printers give off toxic chemicals [8]. To make indoor spaces clean and amenable, we

  9. China Cools with Tighter RAC Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang; Rosenquist, Gregory

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After boiling summer brought brown-out to most part of the country in 2004, China announced a new set of minimum energy efficiency standards for room air conditioners in September 2004, with the first tier going into effect on March 1, 2005 and the reach standard taking effect on January 1, 2009. This represents a milestone in China's standard setting process since the reach standard levels are significantly more stringent than previous standards for other appliances. This paper first analyzes cost-effectiveness of China's new standards for room air conditioners, and then attempts to evaluate the impact of the new standards on energy savings, electric generation capacity, and CO2 emissions reductions.

  10. Air Quality Conformity Trip Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    Management Districts (AQMDs) and Air Pollution Control Districts (APCDs) #12;Source: http standards #12;PROBLEM #12;http://www.epa.gov/airtrends/2008/graphics/Figure3.gif Progress! #12;http_graph.html #12;http://www.epa.gov/airtrends/2008/graphics/HighlightsNumber.gif Number of people living in non

  11. Air Quality: Construction Project Air Permit Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Construction Project Air Permit Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 All manager or operator must submit the completed form to the air quality program manager before the project

  12. California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toxic Substances Control Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Place: Sacramento, California Website:...

  13. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

  14. 1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS VERSION 4, APRIL 30, 2012 #12;2michigan state university brand STandardS TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 brand baSicS 5 The Michigan STaTe UniverSiTy brandUrTher gUidance #12;3michigan state university brand STandardS 1. BrANd BASICS 1a whaT iS a brand? We build

  15. Standards, Ethics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy Sciences (BES)Standards for

  16. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

  17. Literature Review of Air Pollution Control Biofilters and Biotrickling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Literature Review of Air Pollution Control Biofilters and Biotrickling Filters for Odor Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants and Title V permitting) as well as local and state for the treatment of complex odorous waste air containing hydrogen sulfide (H2S), organic reduced sulfur com- pounds

  18. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  19. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  20. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Netherlands, Indoor Air 2, 127 136. BuildingPaliaga, G. (2009) Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal,ventilation system on perceived air quality, Indoor Air

  1. Disruption of Iron Homeostasis Increases Phosphine Toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    stored products from insect infesta- tion since the 1930s, with extensive use for the last several decades (Chaudhry et al., 2004). Phosphine has a range of physical and chemical properties that make aerobic organisms and is a gas under standard conditions. Due to a density similar to air, phosphine can

  2. September 2004 Standards Forum and Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    16 Cancellation in Progress - 3 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http:tis.eh.doe.govtechstds September 2004 The Standards Forum and...

  3. Moving air for comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Turner, Stephen; Zhang, Hui; Paliaga, Gwelen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brager, L. Zagreus. 2007, Air movement preferences observed709-731. 9. Toftum, J. 2004. Air movement good or bad? Indoor Air 14, pp 40-45. 10. Gong, N. , K. Tham, A. Melikov,

  4. Feasibility of air capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjan, Manya

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capturing CO2 from air, referred to as Air Capture, is being proposed as a viable climate change mitigation technology. The two major benefits of air capture, reported in literature, are that it allows us to reduce the ...

  5. Hydrogen oxidation in soils as a possible toxic-effects indicator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D. (U.S. EPA, Las Vegas); McFarlane, J.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient soil bioassays are needed in a screening array to determine the toxicities of industrial products and wastes. Hydrogen consumption is a common soil microbiological process that we evaluated as a possible soil indicator of toxic effects. Elemental tritium was used as a tracer to determine the H/sub 2/ oxidation rates in soils. The H/sub 2/ bioassay can be completed within 24 h using liquid scintillation counting of the tritium tracer. This test was used to evaluate the effects of known toxic chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, herbicides, and air pollutants), as well as a variety of suspected environmentally harmful compounds (e.g., waste waters, particulates, and sludges from industrial processes) on H/sub 2/ oxidation in soils. This bioassay responded to test compounds at concentrations shown to be toxic in other soil microbiological investigations.

  6. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  7. Primary zone air proportioner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cleary, Edward N. G. (San Diego, CA)

    1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

  8. SUBJECT: Guidance on the Major Source Determination for Certain Hazardous Air FROM: John S. Seitz, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and State and Local air pollution control agencies concerning the proper interpretation of the major source Pollutants FROM: John S. Seitz, Director Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (MD-10) TO: Director for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as defined in Section 112(b) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

  9. QUANTIFYING THE POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF ATMS ON AIR QUALITY Bruce Hellinga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    to implement traffic control strategies that satisfy legislated air quality standards. Unfortunately of the pollutants is modelled. In this way, the air quality estimates are sensitive to the implemented traffic); and more than 50% of the hazardous air pollutants [1]. Many of the air pollutants emitted by motor vehicles

  10. Commissioning to avoid indoor air quality problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, E.M.; Collett, C.W. (Theodore D. Sterling and Associates, Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)); Turner, S. (Healthy Buildings International Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)); Downing, C.C. (Environmental Science and Technology Lab., Georgia Technology Research Inst., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on indoor air quality (IAQ) which has become a pervasive problem plaguing the building industry worldwide. Poor IAQ in commercial and office buildings is primarily related to new building technology, new materials and equipment and energy management operating systems. Occupants of buildings with air quality problems suffer from a common series of symptoms. As early as 1982, ASHRAE, realizing the significance of the problem, produced an IAQ position statement that identified strategies for solving IAQ problems. Many of those strategies have now been implemented, including Standard 62-1989, Ventilation for Acceptable Air Quality; Standard 90.1, Energy Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings; the 100 series of energy standards; and Guideline 1, Guideline for Commissioning of HVAC Systems.

  11. Look both ways: IE's Sarav Arunachalam models air pollution near roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    Look both ways: IE's Sarav Arunachalam models air pollution near roadways IE Research Associate potent carcinogens. These toxic pollutants have strong associations with other adverse health effects and depletion of air pollution within the first 550 yards downwind of the roadway and look at exposure patterns

  12. Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

  13. The Use of Remotely Sensed Bioelectric Action Potentials to Evaluate Episodic Toxicity Events and Ambient Toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, W. Tom; Acevedo, Miguel F.; Allen, H. J.; Schwalm, F. U.

    The exposure of an organism to a toxicant is defined by the magnitude, duration, and frequency with which the organism(s) interact with the toxicant(s). Predicting the exposure of organisms to toxicants during episodic events such as those resulting...

  14. AiR surface: AiR surface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    AiR surface: 1 PDA AiR surface 1 1: AiR surface () () 2 [1] [2] 3 AiR surface AiR surface surface surface surface 3.1 surface [3]( 3 ) surface 3.2 surface surface AiR surface 4 AiR surface surface AiR surface: Virtual Touch Panel

  15. FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2004 FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 199, STANDARDS FOR SECURITY Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology A new Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), recently approved by the Secretary of Commerce, will help federal agencies

  16. Air Pollution Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 555 Air Pollution Spring 2010 T Th 11:00 ­ 12:15, NESB 101 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis an understanding of types and sources of air pollution. 2. Examine concentrations of air pollutants and their effects on health and welfare. Review regulations governing air pollution. 3. Examine the meteorological

  17. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  18. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  19. 2014-06-23 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    23 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-in Coolers and Freezers; Air-Conditioning, Heating, & Refrigeration Institute Petition for Reconsideration 2014-06-23 Issuance:...

  20. For historical reference Current Title 24 Standards are available at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooling with Outdoor Air ..... Electric Resistance Heating Systems Power Consumption of Fans ... MaximumFor historical reference Current Title 24 Standards are available at: http . Design Conditions and Calculations of Energy Consumption . Compliance Approaches . Page 15 20 29 29

  1. Rapid guide to hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beim, H.J.; Spero, J.; Theodore, L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Concise and easy to use, this book brings together a wealth of hard-to-gather information in one compact pocket guide. It offers--in alphabetical order--detailed profiles of the 189 elements and compounds determined to be hazardous air pollutants by the 1990 Amendments of the Clean Air Act. The profile for each pollutant includes: fundamental identification data (CAS number, molecular formula, formula weight, synonyms); uses (primarily in the manufacture of chemicals and as a component in the manufacturing process); physical properties (such as boiling point, density, vapor pressures, color); chemical properties (such as air/water reactivity, reactivity with skin or metal, flash point, heat of combustion); health risks, including toxic exposure guidelines, toxicity data, and acute and chronic risks; hazard risks (the substance`s potential for accidents, fires, explosions, corrosion, and chemical incompatibility); exposure routes tracking the activities, environment, sources, and occupations that tend to lead to exposure; regulatory status, listing the primary laws and citations of regulated chemicals; and important additional information on symptoms, first aid, firefighting methods, protective equipment, and safe storage.

  2. Processing Equipment 2" Davis-Standard Extruder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bone, Gary

    Processing Equipment 2" Davis-Standard Extruder Improved Melting Grooved Feeding Capabilities Multiple Pressure Ports Along the Barrel Screw Cooling Kit Rod Die With Valved Adapter Higher Throughputs L Ring 1'' General Purpose Screw 3 Air-Cooled Barrel Zones Gala Industries Underwater Micropelletizer

  3. The Standard Model Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physics with top quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions 1 The Standard Model Building block quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions Building block The particles and forces The Standard Model the Standard Model New physics with top quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions Building block

  4. CAFE Standards (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Presidents announcement of a National Fuel Efficiency Policy, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EPA have promulgated nationally coordinated standards for tailpipe Carbon Dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions and fuel economy for light-duty vehicles (LDVs), which includes both passenger cars and light-duty trucks. In the joint rulemaking, the Environmental Protection Agency is enacting CO2-equivalent emissions standards under the Clean Air Act (CAA), and NHTSA is enacting companion Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  5. IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.contaminants-. ;--- ---- nitrogen dioxide from gas stoves,buildings: nitrogen dioxide (N02), formaldehyde (HCHO), and

  6. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.22 Gaseous Emissions: Nitrogen Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide,3- 4 GASEOUS EMISSIONS: NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE,

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - air conditioning automatic Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management and standard environmen- tal analysis of air pollution, data from remote sensing (aerial... and satellite images) can ehance all data sets. In spite of the...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - air regulations update Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    permit as well... permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to several... Standards, NAAQS", http:epa.govaircriteria.html...

  9. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: TechnicalEnergy Air Quality, and Fuels 2000. Schwarzenegger, Arnold.Order S-01-07: Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Sacramento, CA.

  10. HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the updated Energy Conservation Standards for Air Conditioners, Furnaces and Heat Pumps. DOE EX Parte Memo.pdf More Documents & Publications 3rd Semi-Annual Report to...

  11. Air-Con International: Noncompliance Determination and Proposed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conservation standards. DOE also alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Air-Con imported and distributed the noncompliant products in the U.S. Federal law...

  12. Four Central Air Conditioners Determined Noncompliant With Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Pumps DOE Orders AeroSys to Halt Distribution of Inefficient Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Models Shown to Violate Minimum Efficiency Standards DOE Orders AeroSys to Halt...

  13. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  14. Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembershipoftheManagementHasdec

  15. Enforcement Policy Statement: Off Mode Standards for Central Air Conditioners

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartment of Energy June

  16. Product Standards for Air Conditioners (Japan) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:JobInformation MccoyPrimusProEcoProcana

  17. Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartment ofCreatingCellStrategicYears

  18. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these values agree well with previous results and computer simulations of Ikon B performance versus R-22. The lower cooling capacity of Ikon B is not a concern unless a particular air conditioner is near its maximum cooling capacity in application. Typically, oversized A/C systems are installed by contractors to cover contingencies. In the extended run with Ikon B, which lasted about 4.5 months at 100 deg F ambient temperature and 68% compressor on time, the air conditioner performed well with no significant loss of energy efficiency. Post-run analysis of the refrigerant, compressor lubricant oil, compressor, compressor outlet tubing, and the filter/dryer showed minor effects but nothing that was considered significant. The project was very successful. All objectives were achieved, and the performance of Ikon B indicates that it can easily be retrofitted into R-22 air conditioners to give 15 - 20% energy savings and a 1 - 3 year payback of retrofit costs depending on location and use. Ikon B has the potential to be a successful commercial product.

  19. Environmental Standardization for Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagby, John

    Environmental Standardization for Sustainability by Professor John W. Bagby College of Information that environmental controls are expressed as environmental standards, a traditional driver of investment in pollution control. Environmental standards spur investment in green technologies that promise to stimulate

  20. August 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2007 1.5 DOE Technical Standards Published No entries were received in August 2007 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  1. July 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in June 2007 1.5 DOE Technical Standards Published No entries were received in June 2007 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  2. October 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project No. SAFT-0109 Continued on next page Standards Actions Page 2 October 2006 2.0 NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS ACTIONS 2.1 American National Standards Institute American...

  3. July 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    were received in June 2006. Continued on next page Standards Actions Page 2 July 2005 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  4. Communication Standards and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication Standards and Recommendations Introduction & Purpose 3 Standards & Recommendations Communication 4 Training 10 Evaluation 11 PMO Workgroup Participation 12 Staffing 12 Communications-related Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations 13

  5. Air Quality 4 4-2005 Site environmental report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs)--part of the Clean Air Act, and DOE Order 5400 (HFBR). Figure 4- indicates the locations of these monitored facilities, and Table 4- presents, the BMRR was fueled with enriched uranium, moderated and cooled by "light" (ordinary) water

  6. Lidocaine Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bursell, Benjamin; Smally, Alan J; Ratzan, Richard M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke Benjamin Bursell, MDdysfunction, manifested as a stroke, occurred acutely in andeterioration suggesting stroke. We will review the dosing,

  7. EPA Regulation Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    below: Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for Electric Generation Units - MATS Cross State Air Pollution Rule - CSAPR Carbon Pollution Standards for New Power Plants - 111(b) Carbon...

  8. Aesculap, Inc. Air Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Aesculap, Inc. Air Products Air Products Foundation Alaric Compliance Services, LLC Alvin H. Butz & Herger, Inc. Sodexo Campus Services Sodexo Inc. and Affiliates Stupp Bros., Inc. Sugarbush Products, Inc

  9. General Air Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any source, including a temporary source, which emits or has the potential to emit any air contaminant requires an air permit. Facilities with potential emissions less than 5 tons per year of any...

  10. Toxicity bioassays: Water pollution effects on aquatic animals and plants. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity bioassay studies of water pollution effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of aquatic fauna and flora. Industrial and agricultural water pollutants such as heavy metals, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides are evaluated and tested. Standard fish and algal assays are used to determine effects of potential toxicants. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. An Investigation of Alternative Methods for Measuring Static Pressure of Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Grant Benson

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was created to address an important issue currently faced by test facilities measuring static pressure for air-conditioning and heat pumps. Specifically, ASHRAE Standard 37, the industry standard for test setup, requires an outlet duct...

  12. Improving air handler efficiency in residential HVAC applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Mingee, Michael D.; Brenner, Douglas E.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In continuing the development of energy efficiency standards, consideration has turned to air handlers used for heating and air conditioning of consumer residences. These air handlers have typical efficiencies of about 10% to 15% due to poor electric motor performance and aerodynamically poor fans and fan housings. This study was undertaken to examine some of these performance issues, under carefully controlled laboratory conditions, to support potential regulatory changes. In addition, this study examined the performance of a prototype air handler fan assembly that offers the potential for substantial increases in performance. This prototype and a standard production fan were tested in a full-scale duct system and test chamber at LBNL which was specifically designed for testing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. The laboratory tests compared efficiency, total airflow, sensitivity to duct system flow resistance, and the effects of installation in a smaller cabinet. The test results showed that, averaged over a wide range of operating conditions, the prototype air handler had about twice the efficiency of the standard air handler and was less sensitive to duct system flow resistance changes. The performance of both air handlers was significantly reduced by reducing the space between the air handler and the cabinet it was installed in. Therefore any fan rating needs to be performed using the actual cabinet it will be used in.

  13. May 2008 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  14. May 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  15. February 2001 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technical Standards Program Document Status Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http:tis.eh.doe.govtechstds Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation...

  16. Energy Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada established a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) as part of its 1997 restructuring legislation. Under the standard, NV Energy (formerly Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific Power) must use...

  17. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of...

  18. on man, nature & air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on man, nature & air pollution About three decades ago, itand episodes of air pollution the following summer. Wetthe increase in air pollution. This hypothesis generated

  19. MAD-AIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N. A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with stress- related illness rather than the anwr that spells RELIEF. Air flow in, through ad arourd a house is an important concern in the building we call haw. !lb enhance air flow and change the various corditions or properties of the air, a variety...

  20. The CitiSense Air Quality Monitoring Mobile Sensor Node Piero Zappi, Elizabeth Bales, Jing Hong Park, William Griswold and Tajana Simuni Rosing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    conditions than the national ambient air quality standard [1]. Current air pollutant measurement networks. For example, The San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD) maintains only five air pollutant samplingThe CitiSense Air Quality Monitoring Mobile Sensor Node Piero Zappi, Elizabeth Bales, Jing Hong

  1. Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55F for space humidity control...

  2. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  3. Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

  4. Facilities Management CAD Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    Facilities Management CAD Standards 2011 #12;Facilities Management CAD Standards Providing: Layering Standards 2.1 Layer Name Format 2.2 Layer Name Modifiers 2.3 Layer Attributes 2.4 Special Layer of PDF and DWG Files APPENDIX A: DAL FM CAD Standard Layers APPENDIX B: DAL FM CAD Special Layers

  5. Standard 90, the planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the current proposed ANS/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 Energy Efficient Design of New Non-Residential Buildings and New High-Rise, Residential Buildings, this article offers background on the initial Standard, the organization of the Standard committee, and the objectives established for the proposed Standard 90.1.

  6. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technical Standards Program (TSP) promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Department of Energy (DOE), provides DOE with the means to develop needed technical standards, and manages overall technical standards information, activities, issues, and interactions. Cancels DOE O 1300.2A. Canceled by DOE O 252.1A

  7. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. Admin Chg 1 dated 3-12-13.

  8. Environmental Services Standard Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Environmental Services Operations Standard Tasks The primary function of Environmental Services developed and implemented standard custodial tasks that meet industry standards. The standards are as follows: Exterior Building Cleaning Daily Clean ash urns Clean entry area glass Clean steps and remove

  9. Air to Air Communication Protocol Arjan Durresi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    1 Air to Air Communication Protocol Arjan Durresi1 , Vamsi Paruchuri1 , Leonard Barolli2 and Raj. Louis, MO 63130, USA 314-935-4963, jain@cse.wustl.edu Abstract--We present Air to Air Communication (AAC........................................................2 3. AIR TO AIR COMMUNICATION..............................3 4. SIMULATIONS

  10. Chronic Toxicity and Reproduction Studies of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    as an unwanted by-product of certain processes associated with the chlorination of hydrocarbons. Studies were conducted to assess the potential long-term toxicity of HCBD. In a reproduction study conducted in rats, dose levels of 20 or 2.0 mg/kg-day of HCBD induced slight maternal toxicity

  11. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Toxic Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic plants can cause serious losses to livestock, but with the information in this leaflet producers will know how to manage grazing to minimize the danger of toxic plants. It is important to recognize problems early and know how to deal with them....

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulholland, James A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Emergency Department Visits Kristi Busico ambient air pollutants and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the roles of the physicochemical components the relation between ambient air pollution and cardiovascular conditions using ambient air quality data

  13. Information on the Department of Energy's analyses to determine the need for appliance efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A historical overview of three separate Department of Energy analyses performed to determine the need for appliance efficiency standards is presented. An identification of the assumptions used in each of the analyses and the conclusions reached in each analysis are covered. Standards for furnaces, water heaters, central air conditioners, refrigerators, ranges/ovens, clothes dryers, freezers, and room air conditioners are considered. (MCW)

  14. The proposed combustion standards and DOE thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFee, J. [IT Corp. (United States); Hinman, M.B. [Carter and Hinman, P.A. (United States); Eaton, D.; NcNeel, K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA) concerning emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the proposed Revised Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors on April 19, 1996 (EPA, 1996). These standards would apply to the existing Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive and mixed waste incinerators, and may be applied to several developing alternatives to incineration. The DOE has reviewed the basis for these regulations and prepared extensive comments to present concerns about the bases and implications of the standards. DOE is now discussing compliance options with the EPA for regulation of radioactive and mixed waste thermal treatment systems.

  15. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Fine Particulate Control/Air Toxics Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been performing comprehensive assessments of toxic substance emissions from coal-fired electric utility units. An objective of this program is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in evaluating hazardous air pollutant emissions as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has also performed comprehensive assessments of emissions from many power plants and provided the information to the EPA. The DOE program was implemented in two. Phase 1 involved the characterization of eight utility units, with options to sample additional units in Phase 2. Radian was one of five contractors selected to perform these toxic emission assessments.Radian`s Phase 1 test site was at southern Company Service`s Plant Yates, Unit 1, which, as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, was demonstrating the CT-121 flue gas desulfurization technology. A commercial-scale prototype integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) power plant was selected by DOE for Phase 2 testing. Funding for the Phase 2 effort was provided by DOE, with assistance from EPRI and the host site, the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI) project This document presents the results of that effort.

  16. Toxic substances form coal combustion--a co prehemsice assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on emission of these pollutants from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling their formation and partition will be needed. A new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) has been developed by a broad consortium to be useful to regulators and utility planners. During the last quarter coal analysis was completed on the final program coal, from the Wyodak Seam of the Powder River Basin, Combustion testing continued, including data collected on the self-sustained combustor. Efforts were directed to identify the governing mechanisms for trace element vaporization from the program coals. Mercury speciation and measurements were continued. Review of the existing trace element and organics emission literature was completed. And, model development was begun.

  17. Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oikari, A.O.J.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

  18. Comprehensive assessment of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) have two primary goals: pollution prevention and a market-based least-cost approach to emission control. To address air quality issues as well as permitting and enforcement, the 1990 CAAA contain 11 sections or titles. The individual amendment titles are as follows: Title I - National Ambient Air Quality Standards Title II - Mobile Sources Title III - Hazardous Air Pollutants Title IV - Acid Deposition Control Title V - Permits Title VI - Stratospheric Ozone Protection Chemicals Title VII - Enforcement Title VIII - Miscellaneous Provisions Title IX - Clean Air Research Title X - Disadvantaged Business Concerns Title XI - Clean Air Employment Transition Assistance Titles I, III, IV, and V will change or have the potential to change how operators of coal-fired utility boilers control, monitor, and report emissions. For the purpose of this discussion, Title III is the primary focus.

  19. A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    : Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction Subchapter 8.7). However, in-duct air cleaners including electronic air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators of an ozone analyzer. Viner et al. (1992) studied commercial in-duct electrostatic precipitators and observed

  20. Accepted on August 29, 2008 for publication in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The accuracy of most air pollution modeling and the efficiency of emission standard reinforcement depend and might mislead the political discussions. The European MEET (Methodologies for Estimating air pollutant1 Accepted on August 29, 2008 for publication in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management

  1. Efficiency of appliance models on the market before and after DOE standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency standards for appliances mandate that appliance manufacturers not manufacture or import models that have a test energy efficiency below a specified level after the standard effective date. Thus, appliance standards set a floor for energy efficiency. But do they also induce more significant changes in the efficiencies that manufacturers offer after the standard becomes effective? To address this question, we undertook an examination of before-standard and after-standard efficiency of models on the market for three products: (1) Refrigerators (1990, 1993, and 2001 standards); (2) Room air conditioners (1990 and 2000 standards); and (3) Gas furnaces (1992 standard).

  2. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic plants can pose a major threat to livestock during a drought. This publication explains the importance of knowing which plants are toxic, keeping the range healthy, and preventing toxic plant problems....

  3. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM); Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM); Levin, Bruce L. (Tijeras, NM); Leonard, Jonathan (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  4. Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Role of soil in Rhizobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendra Prasad Bharti; Abhilasha Shri Vastava; Kishor Soni; Asha Tiwari; Shivbhanu More

    Abstract- Our surrounding is filled up with a large number of toxicants in different forms. They contaminate our water, land and atmosphere where we live. Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes. Phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals could be carried out by using specific metallophytes. Green plants are the lungs of nature with unique ability to purifying impure air by photosynthesis and remove or minimize heavy metals toxicity from soil and water ecosystem by absorption, accumulation and biotransformation process. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal toxicity in contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from Rhizosphere of plants growing metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. Index Terms- Environmental, heavy metal toxicity,

  5. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference; Sessions 1--8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented at the meeting on nuclear facility air cleaning technology in the following specific areas of interest: air cleaning technologies for the management and disposal of radioactive wastes; Canadian waste management program; radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis; filter testing; US standard codes on nuclear air and gas treatment; European community nuclear codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; incineration and vitrification; adsorbents; nuclear codes and standards; mathematical modeling techniques; filter technology; safety; containment system venting; and nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. (MB)

  6. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  7. Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins...

  8. Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy Metals: The Next Generation of Personal Exposure Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy...

  9. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Ronald G. (Los Alamos, NM); Salazar, Samuel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  10. Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

  11. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Zaromb, S.; Findlay, M.W. Jr.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed which is capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas. This method utilizes a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component. An electrochemical sensor responds to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor. 6 figures.

  12. Detailed Information Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culviner, Peter

    2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this standard is to increase the required information that must accompany any parts submitted to the Registry of Standard Biological Parts. This will give users of the parts better assurance of their ...

  13. Clothing Quality Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clothing construction is a creative skill with certain standards for appearance and construction. This publication describes the standards that apply to general construction techniques such as preparing the fabric, creating darts and gathers...

  14. April 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Injury Surveillance Program Guidelines, 03222007; DOE-STD-1190-2007, OCSH-0005 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  15. Puerto Rico- Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the Autoridad de Energa Electrica de Puerto Rico (PREPA*) adopted interconnection standards based on the standard contained in the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. PREPA promulgated...

  16. SORORITY LIFE COMMUNITY STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    & FRATERNITY SORORITY LIFE COMMUNITY STANDARDS & GREEK JUDICIAL BOARD HANDBOOK 2013 OFFICE Judicial Board Handbook 2 I. COMMUNITY STANDARDS Fraternity & Sorority Life is one of the most rewarding Councils have standards of conduct for all chapters and their members. It is the responsibilty of every

  17. International MODIS and AIRS processing package: AIRS products and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    International MODIS and AIRS processing package: AIRS products and applications Elisabeth Weisz presented and discussed in this paper demonstrate that the IMAPP AIRS retrieval product is rigorously parameters from the operational AIRS L2 product and data from other instruments. Keywords: AIRS, IMAPP

  18. AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy! W H A T I S A I R L E A K A G E ? Ventilation is fresh air that enters a house in a controlled manner to exhaust excess moisture and reduce odors and stuffiness. Air leakage, or infiltration, is outside air that enters a house uncontrollably through cracks

  19. Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naspinski, Christine S.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in people who work in pulp and paper mills, at hazardous waste sites, municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, and those involved in production, use, and disposal of chlorinated pesticides and herbicides. The most toxic of the PCDDs, 2...

  20. Environmental toxicity of complex chemical mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Annika Margaret

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and wildlife tissues were collected from four National Priority List Superfund sites within the United States. In general, chemical analysis was not always predictive of mixture toxicity. Although biodegradation reduced the concentration of total...

  1. Differences in growth and toxicity of Karenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Tatum Elizabeth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the Gulf of Mexico are primarily caused by dense aggregations of the dinoflagellate species, Karenia brevis. Karenia brevis produces a highly toxic neurotoxin, brevetoxin which has been shown to cause Neurotoxic...

  2. Toxicity of trifluoroacetate to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berends, A.G.; Rooij, C.G. de [Solvay S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Boutonnet, J.C. [Elf Atochem, Levallois-Perret (France); Thompson, R.S. [Zeneca Ltd., Devon (United Kingdom). Brixham Environmental Lab.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the atmospheric degradation of several hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, trifluoroacetate (TFA) will be formed. Through precipitation, TFA will enter aquatic ecosystems. To evaluate the impact on the aquatic environment, an aquatic toxicity testing program was carried out with sodium trifluoroacetate (NaTFA). During acute toxicity tests, no effects of NaTFA on water fleas (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio retrio) were found at a concentration of 1,200 mg/L. A 7-d study with duckweed (Lemna gibba Ge) revealed a NOEC of 300 mg/L. On the basis of the results of five toxicity tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, they determined a NOEC of 0.12 mg/L. However, algal toxicity tests with NaTFA and Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus subspicatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Eugelan gracilis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Navicula pelliculosa, Skeletonema costatum, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Microcystis aeruginosa resulted in EC50 values that were all higher than 100 mg/L. The toxicity of TFA to S. capricornutum could be due to metabolic defluorination to monofluoroacetate (MFA), which is known to inhibit the citric acid cycle. A toxicity test with MFA and S. capricornutum revealed it to be about three orders of magnitude more toxic than TFA. However, a bioactivation study revealed that defluorination of TFA was less than 4%. On the other hand, S. capricornutum exposed to a toxic concentration of NaTFA showed a recovery of growth when citric acid was added, suggesting that TFA (or a metabolite of TFA) interferes with the citric acid cycle. A recovery of the growth of S. capricornutum was also found when TFA was removed from the test solutions. Therefore, TFA should be considered algistatic and not algicidic for S. capricornutum. On the basis of the combined results of the laboratory tests and a previously reported semi-field study, they can consider a TFA concentration of 0.10 mg/L as safe for the aquatic ecosystem.

  3. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

  4. Toxicity of Bitterweed (Actinea odorata) for Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boughton, I. B (Ivan Bertrand); Hardy, W. T. (William Tyree)

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, RFCAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 552 AUGUST, 1937 DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE TOXICITY OF BI'FTERWEED" FOR SHEEP (*Actinea odorata) AGRICULTURAL... AND MECHANICMIJ COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President Previous feeding tests and field observations* have established the toxicity of bitterweed (Actinea odorata) for sheep. The experi- ments reported herein prove that the minimum lethal dose of the fresh...

  5. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  6. Portable oven air circulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Jorgen A. (Bloomington, MN); Nygren, Donald W. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

  7. Compressed Air System Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aegerter, R.

    Several years ago I went to a gas station and noticed that my car's tires were low on air. I saw the gas station had an air compressor, but it cost a quarter to use the compressor. I paid my quarter and used the compressor. I realized...

  8. Hot air drum evaporator. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, R.L.

    1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  9. New State Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, F. A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential 2009 IECC, commercial 2009 IECC, air sealing and blower doors; ? A resource library of compliance tools, software, and PNNL checklists. 15 CATEE-Dallas 11-09-2011 Questions? Felix Lopez, P.E. State Energy Conservation Office 512...

  10. Standard and non-standard primordial neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. D. Serpico

    2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard cosmological model predicts the existence of a cosmic neutrino background with a present density of about 110 cm^{-3} per flavour, which affects big-bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background anisotropies, and the evolution of large scale structures. We report on a precision calculation of the cosmic neutrino background properties including the modification introduced by neutrino oscillations. The role of a possible neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry and the impact of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions on the relic neutrinos are also briefly discussed.

  11. Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Charles

    1 Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E. Management of exposure to oxygen toxicity myself using the good ole' FORTRAN programming language, I found that incorporating oxygen toxicity for others. Background Two oxygen toxicity parameters are typically "tracked" in technical diving

  12. CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 CAD Standards Guideline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 1 CAD Standards;CAD Standards Guideline rev July 28, 2011 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION (pg.3) CAD Standards Survey/GIS Standards Design Standards 1.0.0 CAD STANDARDS CHECKLIST (pg.4) 2.0.0 CAD

  13. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  14. Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed. GovernmentFed. Government CommercialPollution, Air

  15. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

  16. Texas Clean Air Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act is designed to safeguard the state's air resources from pollution by requiring the control and abatement of air pollution and emissions of air contaminants, consistent with the protection...

  17. Sources of toxicity and exposure information for identifying chemicals of high concern to children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Alex, E-mail: alst461@ecy.wa.go [Washington State Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600 (United States); Delistraty, Damon, E-mail: ddel461@ecy.wa.go [Washington State Department of Ecology, Spokane, WA 99205-1295 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the large number of chemicals in commerce without adequate toxicity characterization data, coupled with an ineffective federal policy for chemical management in the United States, many states are grappling with the challenge to identify toxic chemicals that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. Specific populations (e.g., children, elderly) are particularly sensitive to these toxic chemicals. In 2008, the Children's Safe Product Act (CSPA) was passed in Washington State. The CSPA included specific requirements to identify High Priority Chemicals (HPCs) and Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCCs). To implement this legislation, a methodology was developed to identify HPCs from authoritative scientific and regulatory sources on the basis of toxicity criteria. Another set of chemicals of concern was then identified from authoritative sources, based on their potential exposure to children. Exposure potential was evaluated by identifying chemicals detected in biomonitoring studies (i.e., human tissues), as well as those present in residential exposure media (e.g., indoor air, house dust, drinking water, consumer products). Accordingly, CHCCs were defined as HPCs that also appear in biomonitoring studies or relevant exposure media. For chemicals with unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, we identified 2044 HPCs and 2219 chemicals with potential exposure to children, resulting in 476 CHCCs. The process of chemical identification is dynamic, so that chemicals may be added or subtracted as new information becomes available. Although beyond the scope of this paper, the 476 CHCCs will be prioritized in a more detailed assessment, based on the strength and weight of evidence of toxicity and exposure data. Our approach was developed to be flexible which allows the addition or removal of specific sources of toxicity or exposure information, as well as transparent to allow clear identification of inputs. Although the methodology was constrained by specific requirements in the CSPA, the intent of this work was to identify HPCs and CHCCs that might guide future regulatory actions and inform chemical management policies, aimed at protecting children's health.

  18. CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards.

  19. Air heating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Primeau, John J. (19800 Seminole Rd., Euclid, OH 44117)

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  20. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  1. A history of the Building Energy Standards Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, D.L.; Merrick, J.A.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the history of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) work in development of energy standards for commercial and residential construction in the United States. PNL`s standards development efforts are concentrated in the Building Energy Standards Program (the Program), which PNL conducts for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards. The Program has worked with DOE, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), and other building codes and standards organizations to develop, evaluate, and promulgate energy standards in all sectors of the building industry. This report describes the recent history of U.S. code development and PNL`s contributions through the 1980s and early 1990s, up to the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Impacts to standards development resulting from the passage of this act will be described in other reports.

  2. National Certification Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standard for the Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Principal Investigator John Kelly Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium GSHP Demonstration Projects May 18, 2010 This...

  3. Appliance Standards Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The federal government, and some states, have established minimum efficiency standards for certain appliances and equipment, such as refrigerators and clothes washers.

  4. Distributed Generation Standard Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The second enrollment period for standard contracts in 2013 closed June 28. The third is scheduled to begin in September.'''''

  5. State Building Energy Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2007, South Carolina enacted legislation (the Energy Independence and Sustainable Construction Act of 2007) to promote effective energy and environmental standards for construction,...

  6. November 2000 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    19, 2000. IEEE 1379-2000, Recommended Practice for Data Com- munications Between Remote Terminal Units and Intelligent Electronic Devices in a Substation (new standard) -...

  7. November 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection...

  8. November 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National...

  9. October 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National...

  10. February 2008 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection...

  11. Standard Subject Classification System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1979-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the DOE Standard Subject Classification System for classifying documents and records by subject, including correspondence, directives, and forms.Cancels DOE O 0000.1.

  12. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report to Congress August 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Conservation Standards Activities Report to Congress | Page i Message from the...

  13. Standards Actions, October 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    61326-1-am2-2000, Electrical equipment for measure- ment, control and laboratory use - EMC requirements - Part 1: General requirements. American National Standards Projects...

  14. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under Hawaii's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), each electric utility company that sells electricity for consumption in Hawaii must establish the following percentages of "renewable electrical...

  15. ORISE: Standards development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of industry standards that provide guidance and support to decontamination and decommissioning projects across the United States. Because of our extensive experience...

  16. The Standard Model

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the Standard Model of particle physics, covering both the particles that make up the subatomic realm and the forces that govern them.

  17. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's Renewable Energy Standard (RES), established in June 2004, requires the state's retail electricity providers -- including non-regulated power producers and distribution companies --...

  18. Understanding Building Energy Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Halverson, Mark A.; Shankle, Diana L.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy codes and standards play a vital role by setting minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction. They outline uniform requirements for new buildings as well as additions and renovations. The Difference Between Energy Codes, Energy Standards and the Model Energy Code Energy codes--specify how buildings must be constructed or perform, and are written in mandatory, enforceable language. States or local governments adopt and enforce energy codes for their jurisdictions. Energy standards--describe how buildings should be constructed to save energy cost-effectively. They are published by national organizations such as the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). They are not mandatory, but serve as national recommendations, with some variation for regional climate. States and local governments frequently use energy standards as the technical basis for developing their energy codes. Some energy standards are written in mandatory, enforceable language, making it easy for jurisdictions to incorporate the provisions of the energy standards directly into their laws or regulations.

  19. Retrofit Air Preheat Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goolsbee, J. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrofit air preheat systems are the most reliable and efficient means to effect significant energy conservation for large existing industrial furnaces. Units can be quickly installed without a lengthy shutdown, and the furnace efficiency can...

  20. Breathing zone air sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, John (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  1. Breathing zone air sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J.

    1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling apparatus is presented which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  2. Padding with Compressed Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We commonly find plants using padding to transport liquids or light solids short distances from tankers into storage tanks. Padding can wreck havoc in compressed air systems with limited storage, undersized cleanup equipment (dryers and filters...

  3. Air Carrier Flight Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midkif, Alan H.

    Most air carriers operate under a system of prioritized goals including safety, customer service (on-time departures and arrivals) and operating economics. The flight operations department is responsible for the safe and ...

  4. Air conditioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Miller, Jeffrey; Gruendeman, Peter; DaSilva, Michael

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air conditioner comprises a plurality of plates arranged in a successively stacked configuration with portions thereof having a spaced apart arrangement, and defining between successive adjacent pairs of plates at the spaced apart portions a first and second series of discrete alternating passages wherein a first air stream is passed through the first series of passages and a second air stream is passed through the second series of passages; and said stacked configuration of plates forming integrally therewith a liquid delivery means for delivering from a source a sufficient quantity of a liquid to the inside surfaces of the first series of fluid passages in a manner which provides a continuous flow of the liquid from a first end to a second end of the plurality of plates while in contact with the first air stream.

  5. Canned Air in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Not that long ago, coal smoke made the air here in Beijing so caustic that your nasal passages were seared with each breath. Those were the good old days: Car ownership was limited to government ...

  6. Air bag restraint device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  7. 66 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-155. 1996. Quality Assurance, Training, and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto Air Resources Board. 1990 air quality standards--1990 Update. Mailout No. 90­ 68. Mobile Source Division, On­Road­Control data: summary of 1990 air quality data-- gaseous and particulate pollutants. Annual summary. Technical

  8. Epidemiologic evidence for asthma and exposure to air toxics: linkages between occupational, indoor, and community air pollution research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delfino, Ralph J

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    709 (1999). 47. Health Effects Institute. Executive Summary:Cambridge, MA:Health Effects Institute, 48. Wade JF III,asthmatic subjects. Health Effects Institute Research Report

  9. Identification and treatment of lithium as the primary toxicant in a groundwater treatment facility effluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Crow, K.R. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    {sup 6}Li is used in manufacturing nuclear weapons, shielding, and reactor control rods. Li compounds have been used at DOE facilities and Li-contaminated waste has historically been land disposed. Seep water from burial grounds near Y-12 contain small amounts of chlorinated hydrocarbons, traces of PCBs, and 10-19 mg/L Li. Seep treatment consists of oil-water separation, filtration, air stripping, and carbon adsorption. Routine biomonitoring tests using fathead minnows and {ital Ceriodaphnia}{ital dubia} are conducted. Evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that toxicity was most likely due to Li. Laboratory tests showed that 1 mg Li/L reduced the survival of both species; 0.5 mg Li/L reduced {ital Ceriodaphnia} reproduction and minnow growth. However, the toxicity was greatly reduced in presence of sodium (up to 4 mg Li/L, Na can fully negate the toxic effect of Li). Because of the low Na level discharged from the treatment facility, Li removal from the ground water was desired. SuperLig{reg_sign} columns were used (Li-selective organic macrocycle bonded to silica gel). Bench-scale tests showed that the material was very effective for removing Li from the effluent, reducing the toxicity.

  10. Efficiency of compressed-air systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program undertaken by this contract is intended to quantify the current state of knowledge in American industry concerning the energy efficient design and operation of industrial compressed air systems and system components. Since there is no standard reference for designers and operators of compressed air systems which provides guidelines for maximizing the energy efficiency of these systems, a major product of this contract was the preparation of a guidebook for this purpose.

  11. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  12. An Analysis of Efficiency Improvements in Room Air Conditioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Penson, S. B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NAECA NATIONAL APPLIANCE ENERGY CONSERVATION ACT NBS NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS NECPA NATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY ACT NTU NUMBER OF TRANSFER UNITS OEM ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER ORNL OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RAC ROOM AIR CONDITIONER.... There are two public domain models that we have considered using for this analysis: the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) heat pump model [1] and the Arthur D. Little (ADL) room air conditioner model [2]. The ORNL model was completed in 1981. Although...

  13. Combustion Air Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughart, C. L.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calibration and tune-up: ? A measure of combustion efficiency must be selected as a target operating goal for the combustion control system. Possible measures and typical targets include: Stack Gas Excess Air, 15% Stack Gas Opacity, 0.3 RN Stack Gas CO... Fuel Flows ? Preheater Inlet Temperature ? Btu Flow (Fuel Flow ? Preheater Outlet Temperature Controller Measurement) ? Ambient Temperature ? Oxygen in the Stack ? Boiler Master Controller Output ? Opac i ty Normalize the steam, air and fuel flow...

  14. Toxicity of herbicides. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning occupational surveys, clinical investigations, and laboratory analyses pertaining to the toxic effects of herbicides. Topics include terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem responses, regulatory aspects, transport and metabolism, and registration standards and procedures. The detection of specific compounds and their effects on selected species are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 205 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected automotive rubber components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalkowski, Mark Henry

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the types of anti-pollution control methods utilized on the incinerator. B. Smoke Analysis An Arapahoe smoke chamber was used to generate smoke for this research, in accordance with ASTM D4100, Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Smoke... the criteria pollutants, incinerators also emit small amounts of trace organics and trace metals, which are classified as toxic pollutants. Trace organics such as dioxins (polychlorinated p-dibenzodioxins-PCDDs) and furans (polychlorinated dibenzofurans...

  16. Global residential appliance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Lebot, B. (Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l'Energie, Valbonne (France))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

  17. Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnier, Stefan

    Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

  18. MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs, the standard for all new commercial buildings, the standard for utility commercial conservation RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region should acquire all electric energy conservation measure savings from new residential and new commercial buildings that have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than

  19. DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

  20. Maintaining Standards: Differences between the Standard Deviation and Standard Error, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Maintaining Standards: Differences between the Standard Deviation and Standard Error, and When to Use Each David L Streiner, PhD1 Many people confuse the standard deviation (SD) and the standard error of the findings. (Can J Psychiatry 1996;41:498­502) Key Words: statistics, standard deviation, standard error

  1. Clearing the Air: "AIR" Training Session Wednesday, December 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    Clearing the Air: "AIR" Training Session Wednesday, December 18 12 p.m. ­ 1:00 p.m. Human Resources/Tobacco- Free! Join us for an interactive session and learn more about "AIR" (Approach, Inform, Refer, and safe campus environment. Visit Clearing the Air website (http://tobaccofree.ucr.edu/) for more

  2. Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air distribution systems Kisup Lee* Zheng Jiang, Ph.D Qingyan Chen, Ph.D. Student Member ASHRAE Fellow ASHRAE ABSTRACT Stratified air distribution systems such as Traditional Displacement Ventilation (TDV) and Under- Floor Air Distribution (UFAD

  3. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  4. Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to severalAir Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

  5. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN AIR-TO-AIR HEAT PUMP COUPLED WITH TEMPERATE AIR-SOURCES INTEGRATED INTO A DWELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN AIR-TO-AIR HEAT PUMP COUPLED WITH TEMPERATE AIR-SOURCES INTEGRATED.peuportier@mines-paristech.fr, Tel.: +33 1 40 51 91 51 ABSTRACT An inverter-driven air-to-air heat pump model has been developped capacity air-to-air heat pump coupled with temperate air sources (crawlspace, attic, sunspace, heat

  6. DOE Coordination Meeting CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the International Standards Organization's standards for hydrogen refueling and storage, by 2006; · Complete. Provide technical resources to harmonize the development of international standards among IEC, ISO negotiations with critical Standard Development Organizations and develop draft generic licensing agreement

  7. Air PSE (Problem Solving Environment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    PSE - 1 Air PSE (Problem Solving Environment) MODELLING OF AIR POLLUTION IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN WITH AIR PSE Developed by Prof. Donald Dabdub Computational Environmental Sciences Laboratory Mechanical COMPUTER MODELS An air pollution model is a computer program that computes how the different chemical

  8. EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services Singleton Park Swansea to Air Department: Estates and Facilities Site: All Author: Ambreen Jahangir Approved by: Mark Durdin PURPOSE: To minimise emissions and discharges to air from boilers, fume cupboards, air conditioning

  9. DOE technical standards list. Department of Energy standards index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listing of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  10. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  11. Air pollutant interactions with vegetation: research needs in data acquisition and interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, S.E.; McLauglin, S.B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this discussion is to consider problems involved in the acquisition, interpretation, and application of data collected in studies of air pollutant interactions with the terrestrial environment. Emphasis will be placed on a critical evaluation of current deficiencies and future research needs by addressing the following questions: (1) which pollutants are either sufficiently toxic, pervasive, or persistent to warrant the expense of monitoring and effects research; (2) what are the interactions of multiple pollutants during deposition and how do these influence toxicity; (3) how de we collect, report, and interpret deposition and air quality data to ensure its maximum utility in assessment of potential regional environmental effects; (4) what processes do we study, and how are they measured to most efficiently describe the relationship between air quality dose and ultimate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems; and (5) how do we integrate site-specific studies into regional estimates of present and potential environmental degradation (or benefit).

  12. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standards list (TSL) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31) on the basis of currently available technical information. Periodic updates of this TSL will be issued as additional information is received on standardization documents being issued, adopted, or canceled by DOE. This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other standards-related documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  13. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  14. AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

  15. Survey of Geothermal Solid Toxic Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darnell, A.J.; Gay, R.L.; Klenck, M.M.; Nealy, C.L.

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an early survey and analysis of the types and quantities of solid toxic wastes to be expected from geothermal power systems, particularly at the Salton Sea, California. It includes a literature search (48 references/citations), descriptions of methods for handling wastes, and useful quantitative values. It also includes consideration of reclaiming metals and mineral byproducts from geothermal power systems. (DJE 2005)

  16. EPCglobal : a universal standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Juan Ignacio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the likelihood of EPCglobal becoming the universal RFID standard by presenting a framework of ten factors used to analyze and determine if EPCglobal is moving in the right direction. The ten factors ...

  17. Renewable Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montanas renewable portfolio standard (RPS), enacted in April 2005 as part of the Montana Renewable Power Production and Rural Economic Development Act, requires public utilities and competitive...

  18. August 2001 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ASME A120.1-1996) - July 3, 2001. ANSIASTM D4382-01, Test Method for Barium in Water, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry, Graph- ite Furnace (new standard) - May 10, 2001....

  19. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York Public Service Commission (PSC) adopted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in September 2004 and issued implementation rules in April 2005. As originally designed, New York's RPS had...

  20. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  1. Renewables Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Californias Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) was originally established by legislation enacted in 2002. Subsequent amendments to the law have resulted in a requirement for Californias...

  2. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the DOE Technical Standards Program. Cancels DOE O 252.1 and DOE G 252.1-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-13 cancels DOE O 252.1A.

  3. Reliability Standards Owner

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Internal Operations and Asset Management group of Planning and Asset Management (TP). A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Reliability Standards...

  4. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  5. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In November 2006, the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) adopted [http://images.edocket.azcc.gov/docketpdf/0000063561.pdf final rules] to expand the state's Renewable Energy Standard (RES) to 15%...

  6. Standardization of Firearms

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for the standardization of firearms and limitations of firearms inventories maintained in support of safeguards and security activities. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. Renewables Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2005, the District of Columbia Council enacted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by...

  8. Standards Actions - May 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dard) - February 11, 2000. ANSIUL 80-2000, Standard for Safety for Steel Tanks for Oil-Burner Fuel (revision of ANSIUL 80-1992) - March 15, 2000. The following international...

  9. SAE Standards Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes PNNL activities in FY 2012 in support of the following two vehicle communication standards activities: Technical support to SAE, ANSI and NIST technical working groups. PNNL actively contributed to the use case development, harmonization, and evaluation of the SAE standards activities for vehicle to grid communication Tested and validated a set of potential technologies for meeting SAE communication requirements and provided recommendations for technology choices.

  10. Surface Water Quality Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recreational uses. ?The Commission will seek substantial additional public comment on any proposed changes to the standards before adopting them into the state admin- istrative code,? Davenport said. ?Because of the com- plexity and regulatory importance... Conservation Board?s state watershed coordinator, said the standards for contact recreation, with only a few exceptions, are uniformly applied regardless of water body type or the actual level of recreation use. ?Because a minimum of 10 water samples over a...

  11. Reducing Air Compressor Work by Using Inlet Air Cooling and Dehumidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Mark James

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . These compressors can account for a significant portion of a manufacturing facility?s electric consumption and any increase in efficiency can lead to economic benefits. Air compressors are sensitive to ambient conditions, as evidenced by the fact... fall as low as 20% below their 4 rated generation capacity (standard ISO power output at 59?F ambient) when temperatures are over 95?F. Further, warmer days result in increased electric power demand due to the need for household cooling. In order...

  12. Risk assessment of toxic pollutants from fossil fuel power plants: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolten, J.G.; Morrison, P.F.; Solomon, K.A.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development and application of a methodology for assessing the control costs and chronic health risks of toxic pollutant emissions from coal-fired electric power plants. The approach emphasizes surface water discharges and pollution, but incorporates emissions to air, water, soil, and groundwater and transfers of pollutants between these media. The components of the general framework include (1) pollutant emission characterization, (2) environmental transport and fate analysis, (3) population exposure calculation, and (4) quantitative health risk assessment. The report provides a basic overview of the approach, discusses each component in detail, and describes its application to an hypothetical, simplified case study. 234 refs., 32 figs., 32 tabs.

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    section legs Legislation and Regulations Introduction ...Read full section Cross-State Air Pollution Rule ...Read full section Mercury and air toxics standards ...Read full...

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    section legs Legislation and Regulations Introduction.... Read full section Cross-State air pollution rule.... Read full section Mercury and air toxics standards.... Read full...

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and the implementation of Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) 69 and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) 70. These factors influence how existing plants are used,...

  16. Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khattar, M.; Brandemuehl, M. J.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity. Optional Morning Warm-up If connected to a liquid condenser bundle, the icemaking chiller can serve as a heat recovery heat pump. The chiller can freeze ice in the early morning to provide heat for morning warm-up, and use the ice... the cooling coil or drain pan re-evaporates and is delivered to occupied space during compressor off-cycles. Although heat recovery between the exhaust air and ventilation air can reduce the impact on the HVAC system, many buildings do not have central...

  17. Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards are established pursuant to the provisions of Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Act 472 of the Acts of Arkansas...

  18. Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

  19. Effect of trifluoperazine on toxicity, HIF-1? induction and hepatocyte regeneration in acetaminophen toxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra, E-mail: SCHAUDHURI@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States) [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); McCullough, Sandra S., E-mail: mcculloughsandras@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Hennings, Leah, E-mail: lhennings@uams.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States) [Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Brown, Aliza T., E-mail: brownalizat@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Li, Shun-Hwa [Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Simpson, Pippa M., E-mail: psimpson@mcw.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Hinson, Jack A., E-mail: hinsonjacka@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); James, Laura P., E-mail: jameslaurap@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are important mechanisms in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity. The MPT inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP) reduced MPT, oxidative stress, and toxicity in freshly isolated hepatocytes treated with APAP. Since hypoxia inducible factor-one alpha (HIF-1?) is induced very early in APAP toxicity, a role for oxidative stress in the induction has been postulated. In the present study, the effect of TFP on toxicity and HIF-1? induction in B6C3F1 male mice treated with APAP was examined. Mice received TFP (10 mg/kg, oral gavage) prior to APAP (200 mg/kg IP) and at 7 and 36 h after APAP. Measures of metabolism (hepatic glutathione and APAP protein adducts) were comparable in the two groups of mice. Toxicity was decreased in the APAP/TFP mice at 2, 4, and 8 h, compared to the APAP mice. At 24 and 48 h, there were no significant differences in toxicity between the two groups. TFP lowered HIF-1? induction but also reduced the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of hepatocyte regeneration. TFP can also inhibit phospholipase A{sub 2}, and cytosolic and secretory PLA{sub 2} activity levels were reduced in the APAP/TFP mice compared to the APAP mice. TFP also lowered prostaglandin E{sub 2} expression, a known mechanism of cytoprotection. In summary, the MPT inhibitor TFP delayed the onset of toxicity and lowered HIF-1? induction in APAP treated mice. TFP also reduced PGE{sub 2} expression and hepatocyte regeneration, likely through a mechanism involving PLA{sub 2}. -- Highlights: ? Trifluoperazine reduced acetaminophen toxicity and lowered HIF-1? induction. ? Trifluoperazine had no effect on the metabolism of acetaminophen. ? Trifluoperazine reduced hepatocyte regeneration. ? Trifluoperazine reduced phospholipase A{sub 2} activity and prostaglandin E{sub 2} levels.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity due Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic mode-of-action Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute testis toxicity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity results Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... not cause overt fetal or maternal toxicity, but not rats...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic encephalopathy Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute renal toxicity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - acutely toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute urinary toxicity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver toxicity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity syndromes Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

  12. Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. Keywords: SustainableHuman Toxicity Potential (HTP) is used for the human healthassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  13. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guine andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weightingmodel environment [5]. The HTP values of toxic chemicals are

  14. Schematic Characterization of Human Health Impact of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Y.; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. With an explicitHuman toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guine andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  15. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program chemicals of concern that may impact the estuary's ecosystem. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE identified weak associations between mortality and bulk-phase chlordane and silver concentrations at Redwood

  16. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound...

  17. IX. Standards for Student Organizations Standards of all Student Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    1 of 8 IX. Standards for Student Organizations Standards of all Student Organizations As stated to the same standards of conduct to which students are held on an individual basis. Standards for Fraternities on February 25, 1976 - the University has developed the following standards for fraternity/sorority life

  18. Hadronic multiparticle production at ultrahigh energies and extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Ralf; Engel, Ralph; Unger, Michael [Pennsylvania State University, Center for Particle Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the nature of cosmic ray particles at the highest energies are based on the measurement of extensive air showers. Most cosmic ray properties can therefore be obtained only from the interpretation of air shower data and are thus dependent on predictions of hadronic interaction models at ultrahigh energies. We discuss different scenarios of model extrapolations from accelerator data to air shower energies and investigate their impact on the corresponding air shower predictions. To explore the effect of different extrapolations by hadronic interaction models we developed an ad hoc model. This model is based on the modification of the output of standard hadronic interaction event generators within the air shower simulation process and allows us to study the impact of changing interaction features on the air shower development. In a systematic study we demonstrate the resulting changes of important air shower observables and also discuss them in terms of the predictions of the Heitler model of air shower cascades. It is found that the results of our ad hoc modifications are, to a large extent, independent of the choice of the underlying hadronic interaction model.

  19. Detecting and defining air pollutants: one laboratory's experiences and approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, J.L.; Krauss, H.J.; Mgebroff, J.S.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Air Control Board is the agency responsible for maintaining the quality of the ambient air of Texas. An extensive network of continuous and noncontinuous monitors is used to defect air quality trends in the state. The samples submitted may be gaseous, liquid, or solid. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is used for various elements. XRF was used specifically for lead emissions, sulfur dioxide emissions and toxic metals. However, atomic absorption is better for beryllium and arsenic. Gas chromatography (GC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are employed in organic analysis as complements to each other. HPLC has been effectively used in the analysis of samples for herbicides. The defection of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is accomplished with a photoionization defector (PID) and flame ionization detector (FID) in series. There are many examples of a multi-instrument approach to analysis of samples. Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy were used for nitrobenzene analysis. The complexity of ambient air sampler often requires a multinstrumental approach if the sample is to be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed so that the information can be used for corrective action or to identify potential problems of air pollution. 2 figures. (DP)

  20. Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

  1. Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

  2. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - air surveillance air Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: air surveillance air Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation Project Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation (PHASE)...

  4. Sticking with air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, S.N. [Entergy (US). Independence Plant

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A decision to replace more than 300 aging damper actuators at Independence Plant in Newark, Arkensas forced Entergy to make a choice between pneumatic and electric actuator designs. The dampers route air flow through separate dedicated compartments to ensure proper firing of pulverised coal. The reasons that pneumatics was chosen are discussed in this article. 4 figs.

  5. The Standard Cosmological Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Scott

    2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics (SMPP) is an enormously successful description of high energy physics, driving ever more precise measurements to find "physics beyond the standard model", as well as providing motivation for developing more fundamental ideas that might explain the values of its parameters. Simultaneously, a description of the entire 3-dimensional structure of the present-day Universe is being built up painstakingly. Most of the structure is stochastic in nature, being merely the result of the particular realisation of the "initial conditions" within our observable Universe patch. However, governing this structure is the Standard Model of Cosmology (SMC), which appears to require only about a dozen parameters. Cosmologists are now determining the values of these quantities with increasing precision in order to search for "physics beyond the standard model", as well as trying to develop an understanding of the more fundamental ideas which might explain the values of its parameters. Although it is natural to see analogies between the two Standard Models, some intrinsic differences also exist, which are discussed here. Nevertheless, a truly fundamental theory will have to explain both the SMPP and SMC, and this must include an appreciation of which elements are deterministic and which are accidental. Considering different levels of stochasticity within cosmology may make it easier to accept that physical parameters in general might have a non-deterministic aspect.

  6. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ?0.5 baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ?2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ?2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ?3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ?2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted.

  7. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

  8. Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

  9. Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) from High Efficiency Clean Combustion: Catalytic Exhaust Treatment Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) strategies such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and pre-mixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer much promise for the reduction of NOx and PM from diesel engines. While delivering low PM and low NOx, these combustion modes often produce much higher levels of CO and HC than conventional diesel combustion modes. In addition, partially oxygenated species such as formaldehyde (an MSAT) and other aldehydes increase with HECC modes. The higher levels of CO and HCs have the potential to compromise the performance of the catalytic aftertreatment, specifically at low load operating points. As HECC strategies become incorporated into vehicle calibrations, manufacturers need to avoid producing MSATs in higher quantities than found in conventional combustion modes. This paper describes research on two different HECC strategies, HCCI and PCCI. Engine-out data for several MSAT species (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, PAHs, diesel PM) as well as other HC species are presented and compared when possible with conventional operation. In addition, catalyst-out values were measured to assess the destruction of individual MSATs over the catalyst. At low engine loads, MSATs were higher and catalyst performance was poorer. Particle sizing results identify large differences between PM from conventional and HECC operation.

  10. Proposed Identification of Environmental Tobacco Smoke as a Toxic Air Contaminant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Environmental Protection Agency: Air Resources Board

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depending on the heat of combustion, the tobacco content,vary depending on heat of combustion, tobacco content and

  11. Merging Energy Conservation and Air Toxic Compliance for DOD Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northrup, J.; Lin, M. C.; Edgar, D.; Smith, W.

    Program (SERDP) that addresses the energy and environmental issues at the same time, taking into account that how energy is used may greatly affect the environment. This paper discusses the development of analysis tools which could help DoD managers make...

  12. Toxic Contaminants and Their Effects on Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science-Policy Exchange September 10, 2009 #12;Take-away themes Toxic contaminants are present are source areas for toxic contaminants for multiple fish stocks A better understanding of the effects and restore fish and ecosystem health #12;Take-away themes Toxic contaminants are present in the Columbia

  13. Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

  14. REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles: history The relationship between toxic marine microalgae species and climate change has become a high profile and well examine the current state of toxic microalgae species around the UK, in two ways: first we describe

  15. The toxicity of certain new chlorinated hydrocarbons to cotton pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkl, Marvin Eugene

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE TOXICITY OF CERTAIN NEW CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS TO COTTON PESTS A Dissertation 5y MARVIN EUGENE MERKL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of CouBlttee Head of Departnent May 19*3 THE TOXICITY OF CERTAIN NEW CHLORINATED... .....................................................78 CONCLUSIONS............................................... ..81 BIBLIOGRAPHI .............................................. ..82 Pag? FIGURES 1* Dosage-?ortality curve for the toxicity of endrin to aphids...

  16. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  17. DOE Orders AeroSys to Halt Distribution of Inefficient Air Conditioner...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Orders AeroSys to Halt Distribution of Inefficient Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Models Shown to Violate Minimum Efficiency Standards DOE Orders AeroSys to Halt Distribution of...

  18. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

  19. Industrial HVAC Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Retrofit Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, E. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrofitting air-to-air energy recovery equipment is relatively simply to design and easy to install. Additionally, HVAC energy recovery is almost risk free when compared to process retrofit. Life cycle cost analysis is the best way to illustrate...

  20. Department of Energy Standards Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This TSL, intended for use in selecting and using DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards, provides listing of current and inactive DOE technical standards, non-Government standards adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and cancelled DOE technical standards.

  1. 4-2009 Site environmental report Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of airborne radioactive material include 40 CFR 6 Subpart H: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air-1 indicates the locations of these monitored facilities, and Table 4- pres- ents the airborne release data- erated and cooled by "light" (ordinary) water, and was operated intermittently at power levels up to 3 MW

  2. 4-1 2010 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include 40 CFR 61 Subpart H: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollut- ants (NESHAPs inactive facility, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Figure 4-1 indicates the locations of these monitored operating in late December 2000, the BMRR was fueled with enriched uranium, mod- erated and cooled by "light

  3. Air Quality 4 4-2008 Site environmental report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radioactive material include 40 CFR 6 Subpart H: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollut- ants (TPL), and one inactive facility, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Figure 4- indicates the locations in late December 2000, the BMRR was fueled with enriched uranium, mod- erated and cooled by "light

  4. Air Quality 4 4-2007 Site environmental report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of airborne radioactive material include 40 CFR 6 Subpart H: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air (HFBR). Figure 4- indicates the locations of these monitored facilities, and Table 4- presents was fueled with enriched uranium, mod- erated and cooled by "light" (ordinary) water, and was operated

  5. Air Quality 4 4-1 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    61 Subpart H: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs)--part of the Clean-1 indicates the locations of these monitored facilities, and Table 4-1 presents the airborne release data from in late December 2000, the BMRR was fueled with enriched uranium, moderated and cooled by "light

  6. Air Quality 4 4-2006 Site environmental report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radioactive material include 40 CFR 6 Subpart H: Na- tional Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (TPL), and one inactive facility, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Figure 4- indicates the locations in late December 2000, the BMRR was fueled with enriched uranium, mod- erated and cooled by "light

  7. Steam generator air-cooling and ways to increase its effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulichikhin, V.V.; Tazhiev, E.I.; Leshchinskii, A.M.; Zubov, P.A.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To shorten the downtime for repair of steam turbines, various methods for rapid cooling of the turbine can be used. One method is to cool the turbine with free air whose movement is controlled by a standard ejector through the flow passage in sequence of the high-, medium-, and low-pressure zones of the turbine. The effectiveness of air cooling the turbine through use of a counterflow system for controlling air flow through the turbine is discussed.

  8. Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion Practical Air Pollution Dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncrieff, John B.

    Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion 1 of 5 Practical ­ Air Pollution Dispersion in the lectures how such models can be used to explain observed concentrations of air pollutants in an area and to test `what-if' scenarios for pollution control and reduction. You will use the Gaussian Plume Model

  9. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical standards list (TSL) was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of US DOE technical standards and other government and non-government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and cancelled DOE technical standards. Standards are indexed by type in the appendices to this document. Definitions of and general guidance for the use of standards are also provided.

  10. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  11. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site, Calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.; Diediker, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jette, S.J.; Rhoads, K.; Soldat, S.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1994, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the ``MEI.`` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  12. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rokkan, D.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  13. The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Plan 111(b) & (d) Nature of Regulation Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Cross State Air Pollution Rule and Cooling Water Regulations (316(b)) New air quality standards Coal...

  14. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU focused on the behavior of trace metals in the combustion zone by studying vaporization from single coal particles. The coals were burned at 1700 K under a series of fuel-rich and oxygen-rich conditions. The data collected in this study will be applied to a model that accounts for the full equilibrium between carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model also considers many other reactions taking place in the combustion zone, and involves the diffusion of gases into the particle and combustion products away from the particle. A comprehensive study has been conducted at UA to investigate the post-combustion partitioning of trace elements during large-scale combustion of pulverized coal combustion. For many coals, there are three distinct particle regions developed by three separate mechanisms: (1) a submicron fume, (2) a micron-sized fragmentation region, and (3) a bulk (>3 {micro}m) fly ash region. The controlling partitioning mechanisms for trace elements may be different in each of the three particle regions. A substantial majority of semi-volatile trace elements (e.g., As, Se, Sb, Cd, Zn, Pb) volatilize during combustion. The most common partitioning mechanism for semi-volatile elements is reaction with active fly ash surface sites. Experiments conducted under this program at UC focused on measuring mercury oxidation under cooling rates representative of the convective section of a coal-fired boiler to determine the extent of homogeneous mercury oxidation under these conditions. In fixed bed studies at EERC, five different test series were planned to evaluate the effects of temperature, mercury concentration, mercury species, stoichiometric ratio of combustion air, and ash source. Ash samples generated at UA and collected from full-scale power plants were evaluated. Extensive work was carried out at UK during this program to develop new methods for identification of mercury species in fly ash and sorbents. We demonstrated the usefulness of XAFS spectroscopy for the speciation of mercury captured on low-temperature sorbents from combustion flue gases and dev

  15. HEDL air filter examination system software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapleton, E.E.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the system software and operation of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) air filter sample counting systems. Included are a description of how each program functions with flow charts, sample printouts, program listings and a listing with comments of test routines that exercise the hardware. This effort is a result of a work order from HEDL Operational Safety to the Instrument Calibration and Evaluations section of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to upgrade the HEDL counting systems to include standardization, radon subtraction, and detector cooling.

  16. 2006-01-1085 Air Path Estimation on Diesel HCCI Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : fresh air and EGR temperature probes. INTRODUCTION Increasingly stringent pollution standards norms have2006-01-1085 Air Path Estimation on Diesel HCCI Engine J. Chauvin, N. Petit, P. Rouchon ´Ecole des Mines de Paris G. Corde IFP C. Vigild Ford Forschungszentrum Aachen GmbH Copyright c 2006 Society

  17. Indoor Air Quality Plan Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety Original: December 15, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    Air Quality (IAQ) Standard (N.J.A.C. 12:100-13)(2007), which was proposed on December 18, 2006's health and productivity. The College has established the following plan to promote good indoor air quality for employees in our buildings. This plan follows the requirements established by the PEOSH IAQ

  18. 4-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 4: AIR QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    locations are also discussed. In 1999, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, the High Flux Beam Reactor) The BMRR is fueled with enriched ura- nium, moderated and cooled by light water, and is operated include 40 CFR 61 Subpart H (the National Air Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants or NESHAPs

  19. Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and...

  20. Fundamentals of Compressed Air Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how a compressed air system works and the benefits of optimal compressed air system performance. This initial class demonstrates how to compute the current cost of your plant's compressed...