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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

2

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.

3

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission...

4

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and

5

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

6

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info Start Date 11/30/1995 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average: 110 ug/m3; 30-day average: 90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean: 60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing

7

HVAC System Design Strategies to Address Indoor Air Quality Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes strategies that can be employed in the design and operation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to address the ASHRAE Standard 62 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality" requirements. The report examines a wide variety of approaches to meeting the standard and their impact on energy consumption, occupant comfort, and other factors.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

9

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

10

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

11

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

12

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

13

Energy Department Releases Study of Electricity System Ahead of Proposed EPA Air Quality Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In anticipation of forthcoming Environmental Protection Agency proposals for clean air standards, DOE released a new report examining the potential impact those proposed standards could have on the reliability of our nations energy systems.

14

Urban scale integrated assessment for London: Which emission reduction strategies are more effective in attaining prescribed PM10 air quality standards by 2005?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightening of air quality standards for populated urban areas has led to increasing attention to assessment of air quality management areas (AQMAs) where exceedance occurs, and development of control strategies to eliminate such exceedance. Software ... Keywords: Air quality management, Dispersion modelling, Emission reduction strategies, Integrated assessment, Particulate matter, Urban air pollution

A. Mediavilla-Sahagn; H. M. ApSimon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Applications of a method for setting air quality standards based on epidemiological data  

SciTech Connect

A method for setting air quality standards for long-term cumulative exposures of a population based on epidemiological studies has been developed. It uses exposure estimates interpolated from monitoring stations to zip code centroids, each month applied to zip code by month residence histories of the population. Two alternative cumulative exposure indices are used--hours in excess of a threshold, and the sum of concentrations above a threshold. The indices are then used with multiple logistic regression models for the health outcome data to form dose response curves for relative risk, adjusting for covariates. These curves are useful for determination of at what exposure amounts and threshold levels, effects which have both statistical and public health significance begin to occur. The method is applied to a ten year follow-up of a sub cohort of 7,343 members of the National Cancer Institute-funded Adventist Health Study. Up to 20 years of residence history was available. Analysis for prevalence of symptoms was conducted for four air pollutants--total oxidants, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and total suspended particulates. For each pollutant, cumulated exposures were calculated above each of five different thresholds. Statistically significant effects were noted for total suspended particulates, total oxidants, sulfur dioxide, past and passive smoking.

Abbey, D.E.; Euler, G.L.; Moore, J.K.; Petersen, F.; Hodgkin, J.E.; Magie, A.R.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Projected compliance with the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the State of Maryland had no available ambient Federal Reference Method data on particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) but did have annual ambient data for particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM10) at twenty-four sites. The PM10 data was analyzed in conjunction with local annual and seasonal ZIP code-level emission inventories and with speciated PM2.5 data from four nearby monitors in the IMPROVE network (located in the national parks and wilderness areas) in an effort to predict annual average and seasonal high PM2.5 concentrations at the twenty-four PM10 monitor sites operated from 1992 to 1996. All seasonal high concentrations were predicted to be below the 24-hour PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at the sites operated in Maryland between 1992 and 1996. A geographic analysis of the emission inventories was also performed to evaluate the impact of PM2.5 emissions from Maryland`s power plants on fourteen monitor locations that were predicted to have a reading exceeding the annual NAAQS for any year.

Walsh, K.; Gardner, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Regulations for Air Quality (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Regulation establishes emission standards for particulates and gases, emission opacity standards, standards of air quality and control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the emission of...

18

Indoor Air Quality and Volatile Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The unit was sized to comply with the outdoor air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62.2 Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Urban and Regional Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment equipment Urban and Regional Air Quality Research in this area is concerned with regional air quality issues such as: Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds, to manage tropospheric ozone pollution. Hazardous air pollutants: using science to base standards on rigorously studied risks. Air quality and climate: how does climate influence air quality at a regional or local level? Current modeling practices often do not capture variations in pollutants such as ozone-they represent a limited sample of the diverse meteorology and human behavior that affect air pollution. Improved modeling of regional air quality will help understand variability, reveal patterns of behavior, and pollutant transport issues. Controlled experiments in lab and field can help validate improved models.

20

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Indoor Air Quality Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CONTAM has been used at NIST to study the indoor air quality impacts of HVAC systems in single-family residential buildings, ventilation in large ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Quality Standards for Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QUALITY STANDARDS FOR ABSTRACTS American Oil Chemists Society (AOCS) An abstract allows you to concisely convey to the scientific community the value and importance of your research. Its restricted length allows the reader to quickly eva

23

Air Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air Quality Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAirQuality&oldid612070" Category: NEPA Resources...

24

Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and...

25

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers DOE/NETL’s Air Quality Research Program is in direct response to the need to ensure that fossil-fuel-fired power systems continue to meet current and future environmental requirements. Specific environmental regulatory requirements driving this research are briefly summarized below: I. Clean Air Act (Including 1990 Amendments) Title I - Air Pollution Prevention and Control Part A - Air Quality and Emission Limitations Sect. 109 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards In July 1997 EPA promulgated new standards for particulate matter finer than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) and revised the ambient ozone standards. Sect. 111 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources Part C - Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality

26

Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Improving Regional Air Quality with Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Power National Renewable Energy Laboratory Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Power National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Clean Air Act (CAA) framework * Air quality challenges * CAA policies as market drivers * Met. Wash. Council of Governments (MWCOG) case study * Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance on State Implementation Plan (SIP) credit for EERE * Model SIP documentation for wind purchases * Related marketing innovations Overview Overview * CAA requires regional air quality plans (SIPs) * "Window of opportunity" - Revised SIPs required by 2006/2007 to meet new 8-hour ozone and PM standards - August 2004 EPA guidance and NREL model SIP documentation for wind purchases Clean Air Act Framework Clean Air Act Framework

27

Review and Assessment of Air Quality Management Activities in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many air quality studies indicate that ozone, fine particulates, and haze are interrelated and often regional in extent. Emission management strategies to mitigate these pollutants are likely to involve regional control measures. This report summarizes recent air quality studies in the State of Texas to support the development of integrated air quality management strategies to meet new air quality standards.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sound quality descriptors for HVAC equipment from ARI Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) has several standards that provide methods to evaluate the sound quality of heating ventilating and air?conditioning (HVAC) equipment. These include Standard 270 Sound rating of outdoor unitary equipment

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Judging Air Quality Model Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the direction of the AMS Steering Committee for the EPA Cooperative Agreement on air quality modeling, a small group of scientists was convened to review and recommend procedures to evaluate the performance of air quality models. Particular ...

Douglas G. Fox

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Uncertainty in Air Quality Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the direction of the AMS Steering Committee for the EPA Cooperative Agreement on Air Quality Modeling, a small group of scientists convened to consider the question of uncertainty in air quality modeling. Because the group was particularly ...

Douglas G. Fox

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Notification to Mirant by the Commonwealth of Virginia of Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2005 9, 2005 Lisa D. Johnson, President Mirant Potomac River, LLC 8711 Westphalia Road Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20774 Dear Ms. Johnson: DEQ is in receipt of the results of Mirant's "downwash" modeling provided by Mirant to DEQ pursuant to the consent special order between the State Air Pollution Control Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC. A cursory review of the modeling reveals that emissions from the Potomac River Generating Station result in, cause or substantially contribute to serious violations of the primary national ambient air quality standards or "NAAQS" for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and PM 10 . NAAQS are established by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at concentrations necessary to protect human health with an adequate margin of safety.

32

Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model documentation is designed to assist State and local governments in pursuing wind energy purchases as a control measure under regional air quality plans. It is intended to support efforts to draft State Implementation Plans (SIPs), including wind energy purchases, to ensure compliance with the standard for ground-level ozone established under the Clean Air Act.

Not Available

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

International Quality Assurance Standards (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tests to make quantitative predictions about photovoltaic (PV) modules are needed. This presentation proposes the creation of international quality assurance standards for PV modules.

Kurtz, S.; Hacke, P.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Yamamichi, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

35

Air Pollution- Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010,...

36

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

37

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-2008 5-2008 September 2008 DOE STANDARD WEAPON QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD NNSA Weapon Quality Assurance Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1025-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1025-2008 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1025-2008 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE....................................................................................................................................

39

Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Climate Policies Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them. The AQCA

40

Manual on indoor air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of...

42

InAir: sharing indoor air quality measurements and visualizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes inAir, a tool for sharing measurements and visualizations of indoor air quality within one's social network. Poor indoor air quality is difficult for humans to detect through sight and smell alone and can contribute to the development ... Keywords: air quality, domestic technology, environment, health, iphone, persuasive technology, sensors, sustainability

Sunyoung Kim; Eric Paulos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Quality Standards Fuel Quality Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Quality Standards The South Dakota Department of Public Safety may promulgate rules establishing: Standards for the maximum volume percentages of ethanol and methanol

44

Chapter 50 Division for Air Quality: General Administrative Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Chapter 50 Division for Air Quality: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) Chapter 50 Division for Air Quality: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Chapter 50 of the Division of Air Quality section within Energy and Environment Cabinet Department For Environmental Protection outlines the general administrative procedures for maintaining air quality standards. These procedures are created in adherence to 42 USC 7410 which requires the

45

NETL: Air Quality III Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Air Quality III Conference - September 12, 2002 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

46

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

47

Analysis of Efficiency Standards for Air Conditioners, Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal agencies to select ENERGY STAR and ... analyze the proposed air conditioner and heat pump standards, a new baseline ... square foot office building 0.4 to 0.8 ...

48

South Coast Air Quality Management District  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

South Coast Air Quality Management District. NVLAP Lab Code: 101567-0. Address and Contact Information: 21865 Copley ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Water Quality Standards Implementation (Oklahoma) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation (Oklahoma) Water Quality Standards Implementation (Oklahoma) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor Investor-Owned...

50

Workshop on indoor air quality research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: radon  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has a long-standing interest in investigating the impact of energy conservation measures on indoor air quality. The Office of Environmental Analysis has prepared this handbook in an effort to bring together available information on the impact of radon and its decay products on residential indoor air quality and on human health. The handbook is designed to enhance the understanding of the current state-of-knowledge regarding indoor radon for both homeowners and technical persons with an interest in indoor air quality issues. It provides the technical reader with a comprehensive review and reference source on the sources of radon and its transport mechanisms; reported indoor concentrations; building, and meteorological effects on radon concentration; models for predicting indoor concentrations; health effects and standards; and control technologies. The major questions and concerns of homeowners regarding the issue of indoor radon are addressed in a separate section entitled Radon in the Home: A Primer for Homeowners. This section also provides a starting point for readers desiring a general overview of the subject.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal, May, Arens, E. ,17-22, Copenhagen. . ASHRAE Standard 55- 2010. ThermalSensations of Sedentary Man, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 80 (

Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Water Quality Standards (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa) Water Quality Standards (Iowa) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local...

54

Groundwater Quality Standards (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Standards (Nebraska) Quality Standards (Nebraska) Groundwater Quality Standards (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality,

55

Indoor Air Quality & Ventilation Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. Andrew K. Persily, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical Engineer, 301-975-6418. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

University of Colorado Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Courtesy of Ohio Image Courtesy of Ohio State University INDOOR AIR QUALITY Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Integrate technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies Minimize occupant distraction User-friendly controls Minimize pollutant sources Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Exhaust Fans Heating And Cooling Systems Passive Ventilation Low VOC materials Each of these features is described in more detail below. Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Knowing that our home has a tight envelope, due to our Bio-SIP construction, we needed to use mechanical ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air

57

Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Standards (Kansas) Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer...

58

Water Quality Standards (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards (Ohio) Standards (Ohio) Water Quality Standards (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the minimum water quality requirements for all surface waters of the state. Water quality standards contain two distinct elements: designated uses; and

59

Air Quality Program Specialist Vandenberg AFB, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Quality Program Specialist Vandenberg AFB, California POSITION An Air Quality Program, California. ORGANIZATION CEMML is a research, education and service unit within the Warner College of Natural of Santa Barbara on the central coast of California. The base and its 45 miles of scenic coastline is home

60

Model Representation of Local Air Quality Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily (24 h) and hourly air quality data at several sites are used to examine the performance of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5)Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) system over a 3-month ...

Stephen F. Mueller

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Updated projections of air quality impacts for electric cars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Future air pollution emissions and resulting air quality are projected for the five primary air pollutants: total suspended particulates (TSP), sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/), nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x), total hydrocarbons (THC), and carbon monoxide (CO). Separate projections are made for three future years - 1980, 1990, and 2000 - and for three assumed levels of electric car use - zero, 10%, and 100%. Emissions and air quality are analyzed for each of the 24 Air Quality Control Regions (AQCRs) having the largest populations in 1975. Emission projections are made using an improved version of the Regional Emissions Projection System which uses the 1975 National Emissions Data System, 1977 state OBERS growth projections, recent state implementation plans and new source performance standards, and electric utility fuel forecasts from the Recharge Capacity Projection System.

Collins, M.M.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Passive ventilation for residential air quality control  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has long served the residential ventilation needs in North America. In Northern Europe it has been augmented by purpose-provided natural ventilation systems--so-called passive ventilation systems--to better control moisture problems in dwellings smaller than their North American counterparts and in a generally wetter climate. The growing concern for energy consumption, and the environmental impacts associated with it, has however led to tighter residential construction standards on both continents and as a result problems associated with insufficient background ventilation have surfaced. Can European passive ventilation systems be adapted for use in North American dwellings to provide general background ventilation for air quality control? This paper attempts to answer this question. The configuration, specifications and performance of the preferred European passive ventilation system--the passive stack ventilation (PSV) system--will be reviewed; innovative components and system design strategies recently developed to improve the traditional PSV system performance will be outlined; and alternative system configurations will be presented that may better serve the climatic extremes and more urban contexts of North America. While these innovative and alternative passive ventilation systems hold great promise for the future, a rational method to size the components of these systems to achieve the control and precision needed to meet the conflicting constraints of new ventilation and air tightness standards has not been forthcoming. Such a method will be introduced in this paper and an application of this method will be presented.

Axley, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

WEAPONS QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weapon Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Standard Reference Guide AUGUST 2009 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................... ii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ ii ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ iv PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

64

Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US Title Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US Publication Type Journal Article...

65

Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor Air Quality  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing by 18-44% the energy spent on ventilation. The system, the Residential Integrated ...

66

Kansas Air Quality Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All new air contaminant emission sources or alterations to emission sources that are required to be reported shall be in compliance with all applicable emission control regulations at the time that...

67

Kansas Air Quality Act (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall construct, own, operate, install, alter or use any air contaminant emission stationary source which, in accordance with rules and regulations, the secretary finds may cause or...

68

Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1150-2013 December 2013 DOE STANDARD QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1150-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program

69

esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules. This report considers two EPA regulations, the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) and the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), that are widely expected to have the greatest impact on

70

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

71

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 ACM asbestos-containing material AHA areaAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control

Wechsler, Risa H.

72

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8013: Air Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2008 Title: Air Quality and Population Update to: Record 5017 Originator: Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: November 19, 2008 Item: "Air quality is a major...

73

Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Webinar Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Webinar December 9, 2013 1:00PM...

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Quality Improvement Program Funding - Ventura County on AddThis.com... More in this section...

75

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential MunicipalPublic Utility...

76

Air Quality Approvals and Permits (New Brunswick, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality Approvals and Permits (New Brunswick, Canada) Air Quality Approvals and Permits (New Brunswick, Canada) Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial...

77

Imperial Valley environmental project: air quality assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential impact on air quality of geothermal development in California's Imperial Valley is assessed. The assessment is based on the predictions of numerical atmospheric transport models. Emission rates derived from analyses of the composition of geothermal fluids in the region and meteorological data taken at six locations in the valley over a 1-yr period were used as input to the models. Scenarios based on 3000 MW, 2000 MW, 500 MW, and 100 MW of power production are considered. Hydrogen sulfide is the emission of major concern. Our calculations predict that at the 3000-MW level (with no abatement), the California 1-h standard for H{sub 2}S(42 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) would be violated at least 1% of the time over an area of approximately 1500 km{sup 2} (about 1/3 of the valley area). The calculations indicate that an H{sub 2}S emission rate below 0.8 g/s per 100-MW unit is needed to avoid violations of the standard beyond a distance of 1 km from the source. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide, mercury, and radon are not expected to produce significant ground level concentrations, nor is the atmospheric conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur dioxide expected to result in significant SO{sub 2} levels.

Ermak, D.L.; Nyholm, R.A.; Gudiksen, P.H.

1979-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

Product Standards for Air Conditioners (Japan) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air Conditioners (Japan) Air Conditioners (Japan) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Product Standards for Air Conditioners (Japan) Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eccj.or.jp/top_runner/pdf/tr_air_conditioners_apr.2008.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/product-standards-air-conditioners-ja Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Industry Codes & Standards Regulations: Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling This Energy Conservation Center Japan (ECCJ) document was created as a guide in response to its newly established set of standards and labelling

79

Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

Scott, L.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, air quality, domestic computing, health ACM Classification Keywords H.m. Information interfacesinAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos Human}@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Good indoor air quality is a vital part of human health. Poor indoor air quality can contribute

Paulos, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Impact of Air Quality Regulations on Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively small projects for generating electrical power at or near the point of use--distributed generation (DG)--offer unique opportunities for enhancing the U.S. electric system. This report finds that current air quality regulatory practices are inappropriately inhibiting the development of DG through a failure to recognize the environmental benefits offered by DG or by imposing requirements designed for larger systems that are not appropriate to DG systems. The report recommends that air quality regulation be made more efficient and appropriate for DG by establishing national standards for DG equipment. This report also recommends that DG projects be evaluated on a''net'' emissions basis by being given credit for any emission sources that they displace. Air quality regulation should also recognize the benefits of combined heat and power (CHP).

Bluestein, J.; Horgan, S.; Eldridge, M. M.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Heating Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Other Incentive Provider Ohio Air Quality Development Authority The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) provides assistance for new air quality projects in Ohio, for both small and large businesses. For qualifying projects, the OAQDA also projects tax benefits. For qualifying projects, the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) can provide a 100 percent exemption from the tangible personal property tax

83

Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of indoor air qmlity or indoor environment problems were accomplished in seven different Texas schools. The schools were located in hot and humid climates. Comfort and mildew were the most frequent complaints. In all cases, the air-conditioning system maintenance and operation was a primary factor in the problem cause and solution. The significance of problems investigated cculd have been minimized had the symptoms been addressed when they were reported the first time. Preventive maintenance and better housekeeping of air-conditioning systems in Texas schools will improve the indoor environment. Schools are encouraged to be more aggressive in preventive maintenance and plan for indoor air quality and energy efficiency in school air-conditioning retrofits.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wind Power Quality Test for Comparison of Power Quality Standards  

SciTech Connect

Power quality testing is important to wind power applications for several reasons. The nature of wind turbine generation is different from conventional power plants. Although windfarms are growing in capacity and diversifying in nature in the U.S. and throughout the globe, there is no standard that addresses the power quality of wind turbines or wind farms. The International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC) has convened Working Group 10 (WG10) to address testing and assessment of power quality characteristics of wind turbines. A IEEE task force has been appointed to reconsider flicker measurement procedures in the U.S. Lastly, power quality tests are now required as part of the certification process for wind turbines. NREL began this work both in response to industry request and in support of the IEC working group. (Mr. Gregory is a member of the IEC working group) This paper presents the NREL Certification Testing Team's effort in developing procedures and equipment for power quality testing for wind turbine certification. Summaries of several power quality standards that are applicable to this process are also presented in this paper.

Jacobson, R.; Gregory, B. (National Wind Technology Center)

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wind Power Quality Test for Comparison of Power Quality Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power quality testing is important to wind power applications for several reasons. The nature of wind turbine generation is different from conventional power plants. Although windfarms are growing in capacity and diversifying in nature in the U.S. and throughout the globe, there is no standard that addresses the power quality of wind turbines or wind farms. The International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC) has convened Working Group 10 (WG10) to address testing and assessment of power quality characteristics of wind turbines. A IEEE task force has been appointed to reconsider flicker measurement procedures in the U.S. Lastly, power quality tests are now required as part of the certification process for wind turbines. NREL began this work both in response to industry request and in support of the IEC working group. (Mr. Gregory is a member of the IEC working group) This paper presents the NREL Certification Testing Team's effort in developing procedures and equipment for power quality testing for wind turbine certification. Summaries of several power quality standards that are applicable to this process are also presented in this paper.

Jacobson, R.; Gregory, B. (National Wind Technology Center)

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools We recently undertook a survey and critical review of the published literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, particularly those in the state of California. The survey's objectives included identifying the most commonly reported building-related health symptoms involving schools, and assembling and evaluating existing measurement data on key indoor air pollutants most likely to be related to these symptoms. The review also summarizes existing measurements of ventilation rates in schools and information on the causes of IAQ and health problems in schools. Most of the literature we reviewed (more than 450 articles and reports) dealt with complaint or problem schools. Among the papers were

87

Using National Air Quality Forecast Guidance to Develop Local Air Quality Index Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC) currently provides next-day forecasts of ozone concentrations over the contiguous United States. It was developed collaboratively by NOAA and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in order to ...

Brian Eder; Daiwen Kang; S. Trivikrama Rao; Rohit Mathur; Shaocai Yu; Tanya Otte; Ken Schere; Richard Wayland; Scott Jackson; Paula Davidson; Jeff McQueen; George Bridgers

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Coordination of energy and air quality management  

SciTech Connect

The project had two goals: first, to demonstrate industrial firms can improve plant energy efficiency as air pollution emissions are reduced; second, to demonstrate that both Seattle City Light and PSAPCA could more effectively accomplish their individual objectives through mutual cooperation, even though the two agencies have very different missions. The cooperative efforts promised benefits for all the parties involved. Seattle City Light hoped that PSAPCA`s knowledge of the likely developments in air pollution controls would help the utility better target energy conservation opportunities among its industrial customers. PSAPCA hoped that the financial assistance offer by Seattle City Light through its conservation programs would make industry less resistant to PSAPCA enforcement of new air pollution control regulations. Finally, individual industrial firms could mitigate some of the cost of meeting the new air pollution control standards. The results of the project were mixed. CEAM did demonstrate that industrial plants can improve energy efficiency as they reduce air pollution emissions, but the relationship between air pollution reduction and energy consumption is complicated; and the project was less successful in meeting its second goal. The project design did not include a measure by which results could be compared against what the two agencies would have accomplished had they not collaborated. Moreover, the project could have benefited substantially from a more complete implementation plan and the production of data quantifying the energy conservation potential resulting from the development of more stringent air pollution control regulations for each of Seattle`s major industries.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Station Air Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption

90

Livermore Regional Air Quality model (LIRAQ-1)  

SciTech Connect

The Livermore Regional Air Quality (LIRAQ) model is an Eulerian grid model developed for use in assessing the regional air quality of a region with temporally and spatially varying meteorology in complex terrain. The first implementation of this approach is embodied in the LIRAQ-1 model and is intended for use with either simple chemical systems or relatively inert pollutants. The basic model formulation is based on the conservation of mass equation integrated vertically from the surface to the base of an inversion layer, thereby creating a single layer model with a grid structure established in the two horizontal dimensions. Surface pollutant concentrations are related to vertical average concentrations using a logarithmic profile. Atmospheric transport, inversion height, source emissions, and topography are all prescribed. Data for the San Francisco Bay Area obtained during 1973 have been used in validation studies. (auth)

MacCracken, M.C.; Grant, K.E.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Meteorological Data Needs for Modeling Air Quality Uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A probabilistic framework for incorporating uncertainty in air quality models is described. The quantitative dependence of the uncertainty in calculated air quality concentrations on the uncertainty in the input meteorological data is illustrated ...

W. S. Lewellen; R. I. Sykes

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Relations between Optically Derived Aerosol Parameters, Humidity, and Air-Quality Data in an Urban Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with diurnal and mensual correlations between ground-based atmospheric observations of columnar and surface optical parameters, standard surface humidity parameters, and surface air-quality data. The implications of a significant ...

N. T. O'Neill; A. Royer; P. Cot; L. J. B. McArthur

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Project: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy Buildings Project. Summary: NIST is developing tools and metrics to both ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 5559 Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems Phase 11.AReport: Baseline and Preliminary Simulations ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

96

Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air Conditioners Go Into Effect Today Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air Conditioners Go Into Effect Today January 23, 2006 - 11:09am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- To increase the energy efficiency of residential air conditioners, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued new manufacturing standards that go into effect today, January 23, 2006, for products manufactured in, or imported into, the United States. "Homeowners who choose to buy more energy-efficient air conditioning systems after today will realize significant savings in their energy bills and greatly reduce their energy use," said Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "These new energy efficiency standards are the first of several

97

An integrated multi-model approach for air quality assessment: Development and evaluation of the OSCAR Air Quality Assessment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a new modelling system for studying air quality on local scales. A multi-model approach has been adopted to develop the OSCAR Air Quality Modelling System to conduct assessments at different levels ... Keywords: Air quality, Model evaluation, Modelling system, Nitrogen oxides, OSCAR, Particulate matter

Ranjeet S. Sokhi; Hongjun Mao; Srinivas T. G. Srimath; Shiyuan Fan; Nutthida Kitwiroon; Lakhumal Luhana; Jaakko Kukkonen; Mervi Haakana; Ari Karppinen; K. Dick van den Hout; Paul Boulter; Ian S. McCrae; Steinar Larssen; Karl I. Gjerstad; Roberto San Jos; John Bartzis; Panagiotis Neofytou; Peter van den Breemer; Steve Neville; Anu Kousa; Blanca M. Cortes; Ingrid Myrtveit

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and Conservation the Division of

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Fueling Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section...

100

Ohio Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) Ohio Air Quality Development Authority Tax Incentives (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Retail Supplier Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Ohio Air Quality Development Authority The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority provides financing for new air quality facilities for all types of Ohio businesses, ranging from small, family-owned shops to multi-million-dollar manufacturing plants. Many large Ohio companies, in fact, are required to purchase new equipment or make operational changes to comply with EPA air quality regulations. Smaller companies of 100 or fewer employees may also need to make similar changes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

US South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD Jump to: navigation, search Name US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Place Diamond Bar, California Zip CA 91765 Product String representation "The SCAQMD's Te ... nate emissions." is too long. References US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) is a company located in Diamond Bar, California . References ↑ "US South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=US_South_Coast_Air_Quality_Management_District_SCAQMD&oldid=352623

102

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Fueling Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Air Quality Permit Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section...

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Ice Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota on AddThis.com... Sept. 14, 2013

104

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Congestion Mitigation Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on AddThis.com...

105

WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and arrays of LEDs (light-emitting diodes). The T-shirt illuminates in response to the sensed air quality

Sadeh, Norman M.

106

Office of Standards & Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards & Quality Standards & Quality Assurance Office of Standards & Quality Assurance Hanford 100-HX facility Joe Guyette, Quality Assurance, inspects equipment ready for operations to begin in the 100-HX groundwater treatment facility. Hanford 100-HX facility Joe Guyette, Quality Assurance, inspects equipment ready for operations to begin in the 100-HX groundwater treatment facility. The Office of Standards and Quality Assurance ensures that the necessary technical, safety and quality requirements and standards are properly identified and put in place for all line-item, EM capital and major operating projects and facilities in a timely and technically sound manner. Major Responsibilities Ensure Quality Assurance (QA) standards are being consistently applied so that all EM projects are completed safely and correctly.

107

TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (CFBISD) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program was required to embrace the two needs with the overall objective to educate allteachers, administrators, various departments, and students. The educational outreach program chosen is TEAMS, which is the IAQ program designed to attain these goals. The CFBISD prides itself in acting quickly to resolve IAQ issues. Our belief is problems defined and recognized, create trust, and enable the District to maximize potential for performance improvements via reduced concerns by staff. Weve had our IAQ program in place since April of 2002. Recognizing the need to expand the program in depth and breadth, we designed TEAMS. We were able to do this by assistance from Mike Miller and the EPA, who gave the District six Tools for Schools test kits (TfS Kit). The information from these kits gave us a guideline to build TEAMS to meet our objectives of reaching a larger audience with additional material, and adding to the goals of TEAMS increased efficiency, reduced cost, and educated consumers.

Melton, V.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Residential HVAC Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) Tav Commins #12;Contact Information · Energy construction, Additions /Alterations · Nonresidential and Residential #12;Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) ·HVAC EfficiencyHVAC Efficiency ·Quality Installation (HERS Measures) S li b HERS R t

109

Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

110

Improving National Air Quality Forecasts with Satellite Aerosol Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate air quality forecasts can allow for mitigation of the health risks associated with high levels of air pollution. During September 2003, a team of NASA, NOAA, and EPA researchers demonstrated a prototype tool for improving fine ...

Jassim Al-Saadi; James Szykman; R. Bradley Pierce; Chieko Kittaka; Doreen Neil; D. Allen Chu; Lorraine Remer; Liam Gumley; Elaine Prins; Lewis Weinstock; Clinton MacDonald; Richard Wayland; Fred Dimmick; Jack Fishman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Impacts of alternative fuels on air quality  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the impact of alternative fuels on air quality, particularly ozone formation. The alternative fuels of interest are methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, and natural gas. During the first year of study, researchers obtained qualitative data on the thermal degradation products from the fuel-lean (oxidative), stoichiometric, and fuel-rich (pyrolytic) decomposition of methanol and ethanol. The thermal degradation of ethanol produced a substantially larger number of intermediate organic by-products than the similar thermal degradation of methanol, and the organic intermediate by-products lacked stability. Also, a qualitative comparison of the UDRI flow reactor data with previous engine test showed that, for methanol, formaldehyde and acetone were the organic by-products observed in both types of tests; for ethanol, only very limited data were located.

Taylor, P.H.; Dellinger, B. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Imperial Valley environmental project: baseline air quality and meteorological data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The baseline air quality and meteorological data are gathered by the Imperial Valley Environmental Project from December 1976 through April 1978. The air quality data obtained at the six fixed locations are reported in the form of histograms; histograms and wind roses are presented of the meteorological data collected at the six sites. The air quality and meteorological data obtained by the mobile laboratory in the vicinity of the Heber KGRA are listed in a similar format. (MHR)

Gudiksen, P.H.; Lamson, K.C.; Axelrod, M.C.; Fowler, V.; Nyholm, R.A.

1979-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Climatology of air quality of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Climatology of air quality of Long Valley Geothermal Resource Area Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search...

114

Regional air quality in the Four Corners study region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The body of information presented in this paper is directed to policy makers, regulators, and energy planners concerned with the effect of energy development and alternative regulatory policies on regional air quality in the Four Corners Study Region. This study was one of 5 regional studies conducted for the National Commission on Air Quality (NCAQ). Potential regional air quality impacts were evaluated out to the year 1995 for alternative energy scenarios under current and alternative regulatory policies. Highlights of the results from the regional air quality analysis are discussed in this paper.

Nochumson, D.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How to Cite. Tshudy, J. A. (1995), Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior products. J Vinyl Addit Technol, 1: 155158. doi: ...

116

Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia) Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia) Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes the requirements governing the discharge or deposit of sewage, industrial wastes and other wastes into waters and establishes water quality standards.

117

State water-quality standards summary: South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of water-quality standards for South Dakota. Included is information on use classification, water bodies, and other pertinent data.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality May 22, 2012 8:00AM CDT to May 24, 2012 4:30PM CDT Tulsa, Oklahoma The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) and the National Tribal Air Association (NTAA) would like to invite you to attend their joint air quality conference, the National Tribal Forum on Air Quality (NTF) to be held at the Cherokee Nation's Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Tulsa, Oklahoma. All interested tribal environmental professionals, US EPA representatives, and members of national or local organizations with links to Indian Country are encouraged to attend. This conference is designed to allow attendees a venue to share with and learn from one another. Conference highlights include: Virgil Masayesva Environmental Excellence Awards Ceremony

119

The Impact of Minimum Quality Standards on Firm Entry, Exit and Product Quality: The Case of the Child Care Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Theory of Minimum Standards, Journal of Politi- calto Minimum Quality Standards Regulation, NBER working paperDuopoly and Quality Standards, European Economic Review,

Hotz, V. Joseph; Xiao, Mo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality air is fundamental to people's health and well-being. Indoor air quality is an important issue from both a social and economic point of view. Continual advances in medicine and technology necessitate constant reevaluation of the air-conditioning needs of hospital and medical facilities. The application of air conditioning to health facilities presents many problems not encountered in the usual comfort air conditioning design. Hospital air conditioning assumes a more important role than just the promotion of comfort. Studies show that patients in controlled environment generally have more rapid physical improvement than do those in uncontrolled environment. Air quality at hospitals needs special precautions during design and maintenance stage to prevent infections from spreading. 50% of all illnesses are either caused by, or aggravated by, polluted indoor air. The main objective of this paper is to critically review and summarize the available information about IAQ particularly in health care industries. Symptoms of poor IAQ in a building, contaminants causing poor IAQ, features of HVAC systems for a hospital for better IAQ are briefly discussed in this paper. Strategies to improve indoor air quality in hospitals and the current international research to improve indoor air quality are reported in this paper. Based on the extensive interactions with different stake holders of a hospital it is concluded that maintenance of proper indoor quality in a hospital needs meticulous team work among the various members of the hospital at various stages .

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Adequacy Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations December 2011 RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS iii Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... V CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2. ALIGNMENT OF POTENTIAL COMPLIANCE PATHWAYS WITH REGULATORY DEADLINES ......... 5 CHAPTER 3. RESOURCE ADEQUACY.......................................................................................................... 15 APPENDIX A: NERC REGIONS ................................................................................................................... 26

122

Evaluating Air-Quality Models: Review and Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, much attention has been devoted to the evaluation of air-quality models with emphasis on model performance in predicting the high concentrations that are important in air-quality regulations. This paper stems from our belief ...

J. C. Weil; R. I. Sykes; A. Venkatram

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NCAQ Panel Examines Uses and Limitations of Air Quality Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a 22-member expert panel On dispersion modeling, which was convened by the National Commission on Air Quality in 1979, are reviewed. The panel affirmed the validity of using models in support of air quality regulations. It also ...

Douglas G. Fox; James E. Fairobent

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evolution of the Standard Helium Liquefier and Refrigerator Range designed by Air Liquide DTA, France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of the Standard Helium Liquefier and Refrigerator Range designed by Air Liquide DTA, France

Crispel, S; Caillaud, A; Delcayre, F; Grabie, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

ARM - Field Campaign - 2000 Houston, Texas Air Quality Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Houston, Texas Air Quality Study 0 Houston, Texas Air Quality Study Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2000 Houston, Texas Air Quality Study 2000.08.19 - 2000.09.12 Lead Scientist : Peter Daum For data sets, see below. Description Over 250 scientists and technicians from over 40 organizations participated in TexAQS 2000, a major air quality study focused on Houston, Texas. The study was one of the largest, most comprehensive and sophisticated studies of urban air quality that has ever been conducted in the US. Resources for the program included five aircraft; major chemistry sites at Laporte airport adjacent to the Houston Ship Channel, and on the 62nd floor of Williams Tower on the west side of Houston; EPA-funded (U. of Texas GC-ARCH

126

Air quality trends in Region VIII (1979 data). Final report  

SciTech Connect

Air quality trends and status for the calendar year 1979 were determined for the six states in Region VIII. These states include Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming. Data resident in the SAROAD national data bank was analyzed. Statistical test which detect significant differences between two populations were utilized to identify trends. The status and severity of air pollutants was reported as a direct measure of air quality in each nonattainment area.

Tabor, W.H.; Entzminger, T.A.; Bell, S.C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used. Temperature sensors are located at different locations inside the conditioned space in order to sense dry bulb temperatures, relative humidity to compare it with standard ASHRAE comfort values. The present investigation indicates that the radiant cooling system not only improves the indoor air quality but also reduces the building energy consumption in the conditioned space.

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown. Therefore, an investigative approach must usually be taken to identify the source(s) of the air quality problem, and if present, air contaminant concentrations. As the general public becomes more aware of the problems associated with poor indoor air quality conditions, an associated increase in air quality evaluation requests can be expected. This paper discusses some of the various investigative tools and techniques that can be utilized to identify air quality contaminants when performing an indoor air quality evaluation. These investigative tools and techniques can be used to develop a site specific list of possible contaminants and their sources, and can then be used to determine which contaminants are, in fact, present in adverse concentrations. Some of the investigative tools and techniques to be discussed in this paper include the following: visual inspections and site observations, information searches, review of building construction, review of ventilation systems, interviews, low and high volume sampling pumps, flow and oxygen meters, portable photoionization and flame ionization detectors (PID & FID), various types of vapor detector tubes, and gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS) analysis. This paper will be an introductory overview of the above listed investigative tools and techniques. The paper's attempt is to acquaint the reader with these investigative tools and techniques, and how they can assist the reader in an air quality evaluation.

Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Bureau of Water Quality Standards and Assessment These standards establish the designated uses and antidegradation

130

Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Office of Services » Program Management » Quality Assurance » Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence Office of Standards and Quality Assurance Correspondence The Safety and Security Program (EM-20) and subsequently the Office of Standards and Quality Assurance (EM-23) place a large emphasis on the fact that the Environmental Management (EM) work of safely cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Cold War is performed in the Field. A primary role of our Headquarters (HQ) office is assisting the Field to achieve mission success and recognizing that we are accountable for the quality, timeliness, and efficiency of our efforts, products, and support to the Field. EM-23 also embraces the EM Business Model which emphasizes completing these support functions in a proactive manner, not simply identifying issues.

131

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

132

Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the

133

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

134

Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial rooftop constant-air-volume direct expansion (DX) cooling units, with natural gas heat. Independent compressor/condenser

Apte, Michael G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

Fisk, W.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

SAFETY SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Software Safety Software Quality Assurance Qualification Standard Reference Guide MARCH 2011 This page intentionally left blank Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................... ii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ ii ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ iii PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 PREFACE ...................................................................................................................................... 1

137

The Value of Air Quality Forecasting in the Mid-Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality forecasts produced by the National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC), human air quality forecasters, and persistence are evaluated for predictive skill and economic value when used to inform decisions regarding pollutant emission ...

Gregory G. Garner; Anne M. Thompson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of the NCEP Mesoscale Eta Model Convective Boundary Layer for Air Quality Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric models are a basic tool for understanding the processes that produce poor air quality, for predicting air quality problems, and for evaluating proposed solutions. At the base of many air quality models is a mesoscale meteorological ...

Wayne M. Angevine; Kenneth Mitchell

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Energy; Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Powering America Fact Sheet Series Powering America Fact Sheet Series The Montgomery County, Maryland buying group purchases wind energy from the Mountaineer Wind Energy Center in West Virginia. This fact sheet provides an overview of how electricity generated from zero-emission wind energy can help states and municipalities improve air quality, achieve attainment of Clean Air Act standards, and reduce pollution control costs for taxpayers.

140

Estimates of Climatic Air Quality Potential at Shreveport, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality potential at Shreveport, Louisiana is evaluated using synoptic weather types, mixing heights, and dispersion. Mixing height and dispersion data for ten years are segregated by synoptic weather types twice a day for the months of ...

Robert A. Muller; Ann L. Jackson

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Eastern States Harness Clean Energy to Promote Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

States on the East Coast are including renewable energy and energy efficiency projects into their air quality plans that they submit to the EPA to address nonattainment for nitrogen oxides and other pollutants.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Air Quality Regulations (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

regulates more than 70,000 inspection points such as pollution control devices, boilers, fuels and paints at 3,650 facilities that produce air pollution in Pennsylvania. The...

143

Improving Air Quality with Solar Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet series highlights how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can and are being used to reduce air emissions and meet environmental goals, showcasing case studies and technology-specific topics. This one focus on solar energy technologies.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Improving Air Quality with Solar Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This fact sheet series highlights how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can and are being used to reduce air emissions and meet environmental goals, showcasing case studies and technology-specific topics. This one focus on solar energy technologies.

2008-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

145

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Speaker(s): Julian Marshall Date: May 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone It is well documented that exposure to ambient air pollution at concentrations typically found in U.S. cities causes significant health effects. Reducing exposure to air pollution is a large, long-term goal for the environmental health community. In this talk, I will address three questions: 1) How should we prioritize emission reduction efforts? 2) Can urban planning help reduce exposure to air pollution? 3) Are there correlations between exposure to air pollution and demographic attributes such as ethnicity and income? I use three case studies to address these

146

Sandia National Laboratories, California Air Quality Program : annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Air Quality Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Air Quality Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Shih, Richard (ERM, Walnut Creek, CA); Gardizi, Leslee P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Indoor Air Quality Primer for HVAC System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are major energy users in commercial and institutional buildings. Increased ventilation for acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ), besides increasing energy use, may result in unacceptably high indoor humidity, particularly in humid climates and/or applications requiring high ventilation rates. This report analyzes how increased ventilation affects the dehumidification capabilities of air conditioning systems in three applications -- offices, retail...

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Simple Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simple Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) Simple Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simple Interactive Models (SIM-air) Agency/Company /Organization: UrbanEmissions.info Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: urbanemissions.info/model-tools/sim-air.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies ProForm Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model (ENVISAGE) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A set of software-based integrated air pollution analysis tools that illustrate how cities in developing countries, despite the informational, institutional and infrastructural limitations they face, can begin to

149

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Summary Executive Summary December 2011 Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules.

150

Chapter 63 General Standards of Performance (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 63, entitled Air Quality: General Standards of Performance, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and...

151

Prev'air: An Operational Forecasting and Mapping System for Air Quality in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current state of the art in three-dimensional chemistry-transport models allows them to be considered as mature and reliable enough to be combined with observations networks for implementing integrated air quality monitoring systems over ...

Laurence Rouil; Ccile Honor; Bertrand Bessagnet; Laure Malherbe; Frdrik Meleux; Robert Vautard; Matthias Beekmann; Jean-Marie Flaud; Anne Dufour; Daniel Martin; Aline Peuch; Vincent-Henri Peuch; Christian Elichegaray; Nathalie Poisson; Laurent Menut

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A deterministic air quality forecasting system for Torino urban area, Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban air quality forecasting system for Torino city has been developed, within the EU funded project FUMAPEX, to support the prevention and management of urban air pollution episodes. The proposed forecasting system is designed to provide stakeholders ... Keywords: Air quality forecasting, Air quality management, Chemical transport models, Urban air pollution, Urban meteorology

S. Finardi; R. De Maria; A. D'Allura; C. Cascone; G. Calori; F. Lollobrigida

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Speaker(s): James Axley Date: March 12, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Developments in mathematical models for building air quality and ventilation analysis have changed the way we idealize buildings for purposes of analysis, the way we form system equations to effect the analysis, and the way we solve these equations to realize the analysis. While much has been achieved more is possible. This presentation will review the current state of the art - the building idealizations used, the system equations formed, and the solution methods applied - critically evaluate the completeness, complexity and utility of the most advanced models, and present proposals for future development

156

Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Overview of Strategies for Making Connections Between Transportation, Land Use and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Regulation : Designing Parking Policies to Reduce Automotive PollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection deals with the mobile monitoring of pollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection The Comprehensive Behavior Alternative approach views air pollution

Shirazi, Elham; Taylor, Brian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Numerical Daily Air Quality Forecast System for The Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time photochemical air quality forecast system has been implemented for the Puget Sound region to support public awareness of air quality issues. The Air Indicator Report for Public Access and Community Tracking (AIRPACT) forecast system ...

Joseph Vaughan; Brian Lamb; Chris Frei; Rob Wilson; Clint Bowman; Cristiana Figueroa-Kaminsky; Sally Otterson; Mike Boyer; Cliff Mass; Mark Albright; Jane Koenig; Alice Collingwood; Mike Gilroy; Naydene Maykut

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska) Nebraska) Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-2011 2-2011 March 2011 DOE STANDARD SAFETY SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1172-2011 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1172-2011 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1172-2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS APPROVAL ............................................................................................................................... iii ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ i

162

Potential air quality impact of geothermal power production in the Imperial Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A regional assessment of the potential impact on air quality of developing the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources for power production is presented. A network of six stations was installed to characterize the air quality and atmospheric transport properties of the valley before development. These measured the ambient air concentrations of H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO, NO/sub x/, CO/sub 2/, Hg, Rn, and particulates. Wind velocity and the directional variability of the winds were also measured to determine atmospheric stability. The geothermal fluids were analyzed chemically to estimate potential emission rates of H/sub 2/S, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, Hg, and Rn from future power plants. Using these data and advanced air quality modeling led to the prediction of the potential valley-wide impact of a 3000 MW development scenario. The impact analysis reveals that H/sub 2/S is the principal gaseous pollutant of concern due to its noxious odor and the potential release rate. The ambient H/sub 2/S concentrations that would result from generating 3000 MW without emission controls exceed the California air quality standard (30 ppb) at least 1% of the time for an area in the northern part of the valley that is roughly 1500 km/sup 2/ in size. This compares with current ambient air concentrations that exceed the standard much less than 0.1% of the time. The population center most impacted is Calipatria, where the standard could be exceeded almost 10% of the time. In addition, the odor of H/sub 2/S will be noticeable at least 1% of the time for most of the valley if the 3000 MW are placed on-line without abatement systems.

Gudiksen, P.H.; Ermak, D.L.; Lamson, K.C.; Axelrod, M.C.; Nyholm, R.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Indoor air quality measurements in energy efficient buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Efficient Buildings Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has designed and fabricated a mobile laboratory for research and development studies of ventilation requirements and energy utilization in residential and commercial buildings. The Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) Mobile Laboratory is used in studies of indoor air quality in buildings before and after energy conservation retrofits and in new buildings incorporating energy efficient designs. Indoor air quality measurements have been conducted in residential buildings and work in progress includes indoor air quality monitoring in schools, hospitals, and energy efficient residential buildings. The monitoring program includes measurement of CO, CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, NO, NO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, infiltration rate (tracer gas technique), and aerosol size distribution on a continuous basis. Total and respirable-fraction particulate samples are collected on membrane filter media for analysis by x-ray fluorescence (XRFA), photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), proton activation analysis (PAA), combustion, and wet-chemistry techniques for the determination of particulate elemental composition (S, N, C, etc.) and ionic species such as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/. Results of the initial phases of this program indicate that the concentrations of some gaseous and respirable particulate air pollutants in specific indoor environments exceed those levels commonly found in the outdoor urban air environment.

Hollowell, C.D.; Berk, J.V.; Traynor, G.W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Air quality prediction in yinchuan by using neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study was carried out in Yinchuan to gather and evaluate information about the real environment. O3 (Ozone), PM10 (particle 10 um in diameter and smaller) and SO2 (sulphur monoxide) constitute ... Keywords: air quality prediction, artificial neural networks, yinchuan

Fengjun Li

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

167

AIR QUALITY: MERCURY, TRACE ELEMENTS, AND PARTICULATE MATTER CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the planning/preparation, facilitation, and outcome of the conference entitled ''Air Quality: Mercury, Trace Elements, and Particulate Matter'' that was held December 1-4, 1998, in McLean, Virginia (on the outskirts of Washington, DC). The goal of the conference was to bring together industry, government, and the research community to discuss the critical issue of how air quality can impact human health and the ecosystem, specifically hazardous air pollutants and fine airborne particles; available and developing control technologies; strategies and research needs; and an update on federal and state policy and regulations, related implementation issues, and the framework of the future.

John H. Pavlish; Steven A. Benson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies  

SciTech Connect

After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Title Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63204 Year of Publication 2007 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 03/2007 Keywords India Air Conditioner Efficiency Standards Abstract The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency.

170

Quality assurance and standards plan for solar thermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a Quality Assurance and Standards (QA and S) plan for the photovoltaic (PV) and domestic solar heating (SHAC) technologies preceded that for solar thermal technologies, permitting a review and lessons-learned approach to developing solar thermal QA and S plan. It is noted that the state of the art for solar thermal technology is not as complicated or novel as PV and is better suited to engineering dialogues for input and implementation than SHAC. It is important to recognize the differences in legislative directives that influence the US Department of Energy's approach to the process of developing a QA and S plan. Specific legislative directives to develop criteria for PV and SHAC are replaced for solar thermal with directives to develop standards using a commercial approach. Accordingly, a series of standards matrices are proposed as the keystone to the plan which will identify the functions of components, subsystems, and systems.

Cobb, H.R.W.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses Figure 1: Measurements of total volatile organic compounds in five new houses in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Florida and median concentration in U.S. EPA study. In 1993, the Indoor Environment Program began investigating indoor air quality in new energy-efficient houses. Five new houses have been included in the study, all in the eastern U.S. Two had nearly identical floor plans and were part of a demonstration project near Pittsburgh, PA; one was built conventionally, while the other incorporated a number of energy-efficient features. The conventional house was studied for one year following construction, and the energy-efficient house was sampled on three occasions over a two-year period. The other three demonstration houses were in

172

Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air Quality Modeling System Development for the Evaluation of Dynamic Air Quality Impacts of DER Speaker(s): Robert Van Buskirk Date: January 30, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare A critical challenge for the atmospheric sciences is to understand the anthropogenic impacts on atmospheric chemistry over spatial scales ranging from the urban to the regional, and ultimately to the global, and over corresponding time scales ranging from minutes to weeks and ultimately annual trends. A similar challenge for energy policymakers is to integrate an understanding of impact dynamics into the economic dynamics of energy supply and demand. The challenges of dynamic analysis of emissions impacts from the energy sector have substantially increased with a new

173

Climatology of air quality of Long Valley Geothermal Resource Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Long Valley Known Geothermal Resource Area is one of the more promising regions for development of a large-scale geothermal energy center. This report discusses the climatology and air quality of the area. Details are given on the temperatures, temperature inversions, and winds. Estimates are presented for the present air quality and future air quality during and following development of the resource area. Also discussed are project impact from added pollutants, noise, and precipitation augmentation. The major deleterious effects from development of the Long Valley Geothermal Resource Area appear to be due to increased dust loading during and following construction, and noise from production testing and potential well blowouts. Increased pollution from release of hydrogen sulfide and other pollutants associated with hot water geothermal wells seems to present no problems with regard to surrounding vegetation, potential contamination of Lake Crowley, and odor problems in nearby communities. Precipitation augmentation will probably increase the water level of Lake Crowley, at the expense of possible additional fogging and icing of nearby highways.

Peterson, K.R.; Palmer, T.Y.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

175

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

176

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

177

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

178

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

179

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

180

GRR/Section 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit 5-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies WAC 173-400-110 WAC 173-400-111 WAC 173-400-171 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process for obtaining an Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit. The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) oversees the permitting process under WAC 173-400. 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf 15-WA-a - Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

Thompson, Tammy M.

182

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

185

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

187

Comparison of the NIST and ENEA Air Kerma Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mass stopping power ratio of graphite to air ... A number of polystyrene capacitors, of nominal capacity ... and U = kuc is the expanded uncertainty with a ...

1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality Monitoring Speaker(s): Igor Paprotny Date: November 12, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Lara Gundel Air-microfluidic devices that monitor particles suspended in air, as opposed to liquids, can dramatically reduce the size and cost of future air-quality sensors. The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and wafer-scale integration permits the inclusion of many different sensors onto a small footprint. Benefits of air-microfluidics are many. For example, air-microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices can be used as portable sensors for tracking individual exposure to airborne pollutants. Such sensors will enable linking exposure and biometric information to

189

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Case Study 12 - Airflow and Indoor Air Quality Models of DOE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Air Quality Models of DOE Reference Commercial Buildings. ... are intended to simultaneously reduce building energy consumption while maintaining ...

191

Program on Technology Innovation: Interactions of Climate Change and Air Quality: Research Priorities and New Direction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional air quality and global climate change are highly interrelated because emissions of many pollutants affect both air quality and climate change, and the fundamental chemistry affecting air quality and global climate is similar. There are major gaps in scientific understanding that limit the development of models that can be used to accurately assess impacts of the interactions between air quality and climate on global to regional scales. A two-day workshop was held to identify such gaps and develo...

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Satellite remote sensing of surface air quality Randall V. Martin a,b,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Satellite remote sensing of surface air quality Randall V. Martin a,b,* a Department 2007 Received in revised form 26 June 2008 Accepted 2 July 2008 Keywords: Remote sensing Air quality Satellite Pollution Emissions a b s t r a c t Satellite remote sensing of air quality has evolved

Martin, Randall

193

buy vsd air compressor - high quality Manufacturers,Suppliers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

vsd air compressor trade offers directory and vsd air compressor business offers list. Trade leads from vsd air compressor Suppliers and vsd air ...

194

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

195

Ozone Modeling for Compliance Planning: A Synopsis of "The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies--A Synthesis Report"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require that many nonattainment areas use gridded, photochemical air quality models to develop compliance plans for meeting the ambient ozone standard. This report reviews the status of photochemical air models--the computer simulation programs that will be used to set emission control programs to meet ground level (tropospheric) ozone standards currently in use for regulatory planning. Regulatory application guidelines are discussed, as are the limitations and reliabili...

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Air Quality Database and Analytical Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. with Ohio University and Texas A&M University - Kingsville as subcontractors, will develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust computer application for NETL to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. Efforts will be made to include, to the greatest extent possible, ambient air data collected by other agencies in the upper Ohio River valley region, such as U.S. EPA, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP), West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WV-DEP), Ohio EPA, and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). Although emphasis will be placed on data collected in the upper Ohio River valley region, the computer application developed under this Agreement will be designed, to the greatest extent possible, to access data collected at NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring sites outside the region, such as sites operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the Great Smoky Mountains (under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI26-98FT40406) and by Southern Research Institute in North Birmingham, AL (under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40770). The data base and analytical tool development effort will also be coordinated, to the greatest extent possible, with similar tools being developed for use by U.S. EPA. This will ensure that the database and analytical tools produced under this Agreement will be readily accessible to a wide variety of stakeholders.

197

DOE/EA-1673: Environmental Assessment for Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment (July 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air- Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment July 2009 8-i CHAPTER 8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 8.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 8-1 8.2 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................... 8-1 8.3 AIR POLLUTANT DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................ 8-1 8.4 AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 8-3

198

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Supplement. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supplement to the Technical Analysis presents additional results for a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. This supplementary analysis examines the new Department of Interior air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, and their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Technical analysis. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the detailed results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report examines the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This summary presents the significant results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report summarizes the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phases of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Congressional Addressees Subject: Air Pollution: Air Quality, Visibility, and the Potential Impacts of Coal-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

east-central Nevada and is home to diverse geologic, topographic, and wildlife resourcesincluding ancient bristlecone pines, the worlds longest living tree species. The park was created to preserve a representative segment of the Great Basin Region and receives about 80,000 visitors annually. The park features numerous scenic areas with views of the surrounding landscape, which includes both deserts and mountains. The National Park Service (NPS), within the Department of the Interior, is responsible for managing the park, and the parks management plan lists both air quality and visibility as outstanding resources. This plan identifies threats to air quality and visibilityincluding air pollution from the possible development of coal-fired power plants in the regionand states that even slight increases in air pollution could cause major decreases in visibility. In 2004 and 2006, two companies each initiated the process to build new coal-fired power plants about 55 miles northwest of Great Basin National Park, near the city of Ely, Nevada. 1 While the development of these new power plants would provide jobs,

Great Basin; National Park

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Mechanical Ventilation Exhaust Fans Air-to-Air Heatexpected from exhaust fan A-I Infiltration contribution toIndoor Air Quality -- Exhaust Fan Mitigation" Final Report

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

buy Adekom VSD Air Compressor - high quality Manufacturers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Adekom VSD Air Compressor trade offers directory and Adekom VSD Air Compressor business offers list. Trade leads from Adekom VSD Air Compressor ...

205

Measuring the benefits of air quality improvements: a hedonic salary approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates the compensating variation associated with nonmarginal changes in air quality using a hedonic salary model and 1970 data collected for a national sample of university professors. Recent advances in the theory of hedonic prices are utilized in constructing the theoretical model and formulating a procedure for generating empirical estimates. Lower bound estimates of the compensating variation associated with a one standard deviation increase in total suspended particulates (27.6 mgs/cu. meter/24 hours) were $419 for full professors, $234 for associate professors, and $209 for assistant professors in 1970. These results were not sensitive to the specification of the hedonic salary equations.

Bayless, M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

NSTec Environmental Technical Services

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality  

SciTech Connect

From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

An integrated assessment tool to define effective air quality policies at regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the Integrated Assessment of air quality is dealt with at regional scale. First the paper describes the main challenges to tackle current air pollution control, including economic aspects. Then it proposes a novel approach to manage the ... Keywords: Air quality modeling, Decision support, Integrated assessment modeling, Model reduction, Multi-objective optimization

Claudio Carnevale; Giovanna Finzi; Enrico Pisoni; Marialuisa Volta; Giorgio Guariso; Roberta Gianfreda; Giuseppe Maffeis; Philippe Thunis; Les White; Giuseppe Triacchini

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Application of an Adaptive Nudging Scheme in Air Quality Forecasting in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge for air quality forecasters is to reduce the uncertainty of air pollution emission inventory. Error in the emission data is a primary source of error in air quality forecasts, much like the effect of error in the initial ...

Xiangde Xu; Lian Xie; Xinghong Cheng; Jianming Xu; Xiuji Zhou; Guoan Ding

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

GRR/Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit GRR/Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit 15AKBAirQualityMinorPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code 18 AAC 50 Air Quality Control Regulations 40 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter C - Air Programs Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15AKBAirQualityMinorPermit.pdf 15AKBAirQualityMinorPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The mission of the Air Permit Program is to protect the Alaskan environment

211

Air quality effects of alternative fuels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To support the Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, a comparison of potential air quality effects of alternative transportation fuels is being performed. This report presents the results of Phase 1 of this program, focusing on reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol blended with 15 percent gasoline (M85), and compressed natural gas (CNG). The fuels are compared in terms of effects on simulated future concentrations of ozone and mobile source air toxics in a photochemical grid model. The fuel comparisons were carried out for the future year 2020 and assumed complete replacement of gasoline in the projected light-duty gasoline fleet by each of the candidate fuels. The model simulations were carried out for the areas surrounding Los Angeles and Baltimore/DC, and other (non-mobile) sources of atmospheric emissions were projected according to published estimates of economic and population growth, and planned emission control measures specific to each modeling domain. The future-year results are compared to a future-year run with all gasoline vehicle emissions removed. The results of the comparison indicate that the use of M85 is likely to produce similar ozone and air toxics levels as those projected from the use of RFG. Substitution of CNG is projected to produce significantly lower levels of ozone and the mobile source air toxics than those projected for RFG or M85. The relative benefits of CNG substitution are consistent in both modeling domains. The projection methodologies used for the comparison are subject to a large uncertainty, and modeled concentration distributions depend on meteorological conditions. The quantitative comparison of fuel effects is thus likely to be sensitive to alternative assumptions. The consistency of the results for two very different modeling domains, using very different base assumptions, lends credibility to the qualitative differentiation among these fuels. 32 refs., 42 figs., 47 tabs.

Guthrie, P.; Ligocki, M.; Looker, R.; Cohen, J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-2 Administrative Rules of Montana 17.8 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires a Montana Air Permit to construct and operate a new or modified source of air

213

STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

BENECKE MW

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

There's no justice in transit! : transit equity, land use, and air quality in Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of air pollution created by the Central Artery/Tunnel Project (CA/T), aka "the Big Dig," transit and other air quality mitigation projects were incorporated into the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The SIP is ...

Machala, Laura Beth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

217

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

218

Guide to Energy-Efficient Ventilation Methods for Acceptable Levels of Indoor Air Quality Levels in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality is important in commercial buildings to maintain employee health, well-being, and productivity and avoid employer liability. The most common method to improve indoor air quality in commercial buildings is to use outside ventilation air for dilution of the inside air. Unfortunately, the conditioning of outdoor ventilation air may result in increased energy use for cooling, dehumidification, and heating; and humid outdoor ventilation air also can degrade indoor air quality. Some commerci...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

The DOE-NETL Air Quality Research Program U.S. Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-NETL Air Quality Research Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Descriptor - include initials orgdate...

220

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

Robert F. Grossman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

GRR/Section 15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct 15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-ID-a - Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct 15IDAAirQualityPermitPermitToConstruct (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.01 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15IDAAirQualityPermitPermitToConstruct (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires an air quality

223

Coal quality control in the context of international standards ISO 9000-2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper sets forth scientific foundations and organizational-technical environment offered by ISO 9000 standards that are oriented to product quality management and, thus, product quality planning. The authors describe the results of coal product quality planning with using the QFD methodology, present a model of coal quality control through the coal product life cycle and mining technologies. It is proposed to evaluate the quality management efficiency by the coefficient of concordance between the product quality and consumer's demands.

Freidina, E.V.; Botvinnik, A.A.; Dvornikova, A.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Institute of Mining

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

Y. E. Townsend

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Elaboration of global quality standards for natural and low energy cooling in French tropical island buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric load profiles of tropical islands in developed countries are characterised by morning, midday and evening peaks arising from all year round high power demand in the commercial and residential sectors, due mostly to air conditioning appliances and bad thermal conception of the building. The work presented in this paper has led to the conception of a global quality standards obtained through optimized bioclimatic urban planning and architectural design, the use of passive cooling architectural components, natural ventilation and energy efficient systems such as solar water heaters. We evaluated, with the aid of an airflow and thermal building simulation software (CODYRUN), the impact of each technical solution on thermal comfort within the building. These technical solutions have been implemented in 280 new pilot dwelling projects through the year 1996.

Garde, F; Gatina, J C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Impact of Nudging in the Meteorological Model for Retrospective Air Quality Simulations. Part II: Evaluating Collocated Meteorological and Air Quality Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For air quality modeling, it is important that the meteorological fields that are derived from meteorological models reflect the best characterization of the atmosphere. It is well known that the accuracy and overall representation of the modeled ...

Tanya L. Otte

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Linking the Eta Model with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System to Build a National Air Quality Forecasting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOAA and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have developed a national air quality forecasting (AQF) system that is based on numerical models for meteorology, emissions, and chemistry. The AQF system generates gridded model forecasts ...

Tanya L. Otte; George Pouliot; Jonathan E. Pleim; Jeffrey O. Young; Kenneth L. Schere; David C. Wong; Pius C. S. Lee; Marina Tsidulko; Jeffery T. McQueen; Paula Davidson; Rohit Mathur; Hui-Ya Chuang; Geoff DiMego; Nelson L. Seaman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Drinking water quality standards and standard tests: Worldwide. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the laws, regulations, standards, and testing methods for drinking water from domestic and international sources. Citations discuss quality standardization and control. Topics include safety codes for drinking water systems and installations, contaminated water and toxicity analyses, biological and chemical standards, diseases derived from drinking water, plastic materials for water packaging, and natural mineral drinking water. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-318 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

230

Forest Fire Effects on Air Quality in Ontario: Evaluation of Several Recent Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several events were studied to examine the sources of smoke and pollutants that may affect air quality in Ontario as well as the transport mechanisms that result in effects on ground-level air quality. The selected events were strongly suspected of being ...

Frank Dempsey

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

MAQS: a personalized mobile sensing system for indoor air quality monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people spend more than 90% of their time indoors; indoor air quality (IAQ) influences human health, safety, productivity, and comfort. This paper describes MAQS, a personalized mobile sensing system for IAQ monitoring. In contrast with existing ... Keywords: air quality sensing, location based service, smartphone

Yifei Jiang; Kun Li; Lei Tian; Ricardo Piedrahita; Xiang Yun; Omkar Mansata; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Information Collection Request (ICR) Data Analysis to Meet Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of the new Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), power companies are looking for ways to comply with more stringent limits on emissions. This report summarizes the results of a study to identify trends among the operating parameters of various air pollutant control technologies that could explain differences in the levels of emissions for fine particulate matter, mercury, hydrochloric acid, and total metals reported to the ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

GRR/Section 15 - Air Quality Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 15 - Air Quality Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15 - Air Quality Assessment Process 15AirQualityAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Air Act (42 USC 1857 et seq.) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15AirQualityAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Clean Air Act is the law that defines EPA's responsibilities for

234

The real air quality benefits of gaseous-fueled vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a justification for prominent inclusion of currently available gaseous-fueled vehicles (i.e., vehicles powered by propane, sometimes called liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], or natural gas--chiefly, methane--stored onboard the vehicle in gaseous or liquid state but combusted as a gas) in the mix of strategies to (a) reduce public exposure to toxic and fine particulate emissions in the urbanized areas of the developing world and (b) achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. It also presents estimates of associated emission reduction credits into the future. Important considerations discussed are the location of fine particle and toxic emissions in congested urban areas, and the location and timing of ozone precursor emissions, with emphasis on how gaseous-fueled vehicles' role in the relationship among and magnitude of these variables differs from that of their conventionally-fueled counterparts. Efforts to enhance the measurement and quantification of gaseous-fuel benefits are also described.

Saricks, C. L.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

GRR/Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process GRR/Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process 15AKAAirQualityAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Statute Title 46 Alaska Administrative Code 18 AAC 50 Air Quality Regulations 40 CFR 71 Operating Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15AKAAirQualityAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

236

13 SEER Standard for Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In January 2004, after years of litigation in a case that pitted environmental groups and Attorneys General from 10 States against the U.S. Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reestablished the central air conditioner and heat pump standard originally set in January 2001 [3]. The Courts ruling, which struck down a May 2002 rollback of the 2001 standard to a 12 SEER, mandates that all new central air conditioners and heat pumps meet a 13 SEER standard by January 2006, requiring a 30-percent increase in efficiency relative to current law. The AEO2005 reference case incorporates the 13 SEER standard as mandated by the Courts ruling.

Information Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

AQUIS: A PC-based air quality and permit information system  

SciTech Connect

The Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS) was developed to calculate and track emissions, permits, and related information. The system runs on IBM-compatible personal computers using dBASE IV. AQUIS tracks more than 900 data items distributed among various source categories and allows the user to enter specific information on permit control devices, stacks, and related regulatory requirements. The system is currently operating at seven US Air Force Materiel Command facilities, large industrial operations involved in the repair and maintenance of aircraft. Environmental management personnel are responsible for the compliance status of as many as l,000 sources at each facility. The usefulness of the system has been enhanced by providing a flexible reporting capability that permits users who are unfamiliar with database structure to design and prepare reports containing specified information. In addition to the standard six pollutants, AQUIS calculates compound-specific emissions and allows users to enter their own emission estimates. This capability will be useful in developing air toxics inventories and control plans.

Smith, A.E.; Huber, C.C.; Tschanz, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ryckman, J.S. Jr. [Air Force Air Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... About Circular A-119About Us. Standards. Definition of Standards. Finding Standards. Information on Biometrics Standards.

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy Efficient Ventilation for Maintaining Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was presented at the 3rd International Conference on Cold Climate Heating, Ventilating and Air-conditioning, Sapporo, Japan, November 2000 C. Y. Shaw Rsum Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada Achieving good indoor air quality in large residential and commercial buildings continues to be a top priority for owners, designers, building managers and occupants alike. Large buildings present a greater challenge in this regard than do smaller buildings and houses. The challenge is greater today because there are many new materials, furnishings, products and processes used in these buildings that are potential sources of air contaminants. There are three strategies for achieving acceptable indoor air quality: ventilation (dilution), source control and air cleaning/filtration. Of the three, the most frequently used strategy, and in most cases the only one available to building operators, is ventilation. Ventilation is the process of supplying outdoor air to an enclosed space and removing stale air from this space. It can control the indoor air quality by both diluting the indoor air with less contaminated outdoor air and removing the indoor contaminants with the exhaust air. Ventilation costs money because the outdoor air needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer. To conserve energy, care must be taken to maximize the efficiency of the ventilation system. In this regard, a number of factors come into play

C. Y. Shaw; C. Y. Shaw Rsum

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Regional air quality in the four corners studys region: modeling approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional Eulerian air pollutant transport model was used in an air quality study of the Four Corners region conducted for the National Commission on Air Quality. The regional modeling methodology and some sample results from the regional air quality analysis are presented. One major advantage of the regional transport model that was employed is that its solution involves the calculation of transfer coefficients that relate emissions to ambient concentrations and deposition and which can be used repeatedly to evaluate alternative scenarios and regulatory policies which represent different emission source configurations. The regional transport model was used in the calculation of the concentration and deposition of SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 4/, and primary fine particulates; and these estimates were used as inputs to regional atmospheric visibility and mass budget calculations. Previous studies have shown that the methods used in the regional air quality analysis give good agreement when comparing observed and estimated values.

Nochumson, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modeling Ambient Air Quality In The Detroit-Windsor Airshed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial variability of airborne contaminants in an international airshed was investigated using geostatistics and air dispersion modeling. Analyses were conducted on contaminant species measured (more)

Molaroni, Shannon Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality impact of distributed generation. California Energyquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings ofquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings of

Jing, Qiguo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit 15IDBAirQualityPermitTierIIOperatingPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.01 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15IDBAirQualityPermitTierIIOperatingPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Tier II Operating Permits are issued to facilities or stationary sources

245

Sensitivity of a Complex Urban Air Quality Model to Input Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, urban-scale photochemical simulation models have been developed that are of practical value for predicting air quality and analyzing the impacts of alternative emission control strategies. Although the performance of some urban-...

Christian Seigneur; Thomas W. Tesche; Philip M. Roth; Larry E. Reid

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Evaluation of a Data Assimilation Technique for a Mesoscale Meteorological Model Used for Air Quality Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observational data assimilation (ODA) technique was evaluated based on both its direct effect on meteorological model fields and its indirect effect on the results of two air quality models that input these meteorological fields: a Lagrangian ...

Takato Umeda; Philip T. Martien

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Air Quality Forecasts in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Current Practice and Benchmark Skill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality forecasts for the mid-Atlantic region (including the metropolitan areas of Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia) began in 1992. These forecasts were issued to the public beginning in 1995 and predict daily peak O3 ...

William F. Ryan; Charles A. Piety; Eric D. Luebehusen

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Monitoring Air Quality from Space: The Case for the Geostationary Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality (AQ) is defined by the atmospheric composition of gases and particulates near the Earth's surface. This composition depends on local emissions of pollutants, chemistry, and transport processes; it is highly variable in space and time. Key ...

W. A. Lahoz; V.-H. Peuch; J. Orphal; J.-L. Atti; K. Chance; X. Liu; D. Edwards; H. Elbern; J.-M. Flaud; M. Claeyman; L. El Amraoui

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Pattern-Based Evaluation of Coupled Meteorological and Air Quality Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel pattern-based model evaluation technique is proposed and demonstrated for air quality models (AQMs) driven by meteorological model (MM) output. The evaluation technique is applied directly to the MM output; however, it is ultimately used ...

Scott Beaver; Saffet Tanrikulu; Ahmet Palazoglu; Angadh Singh; Su-Tzai Soong; Yiqin Jia; Cuong Tran; Bruce Ainslie; Douw G. Steyn

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Review of Procedures for Updating Air Quality Modeling Techniques for Regulatory Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality models are a key component in determining pollution control requirements. To ensure that the best techniques are used, modeling guidance must be flexible and include better techniques as they become available. Revisions to modeling ...

Jawad S. Touma; John S. Irwin; Joseph A. Tikvart; C. Thomas Coulter

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 3: air-quality impacts  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a mature oil shale industry on the air quality over the Green River Oil Shale Formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming is described. Climate information is supplied for the Piceance Creek Basin. (ACR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The air quality impact of aviation in future-year emissions scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth of aviation is critical to the world and US economy, and it faces several important challenges among which lie the environmental impacts of aviation on noise, climate and air quality. The first objective ...

Ashok, Akshay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas - House Subcommittee on Energy and the Air Quality  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Statement of Beth Campbell, Energy Information Administration; Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality; Committee on Energy and Commerce U. S. House of Representatives - Hearing on Natural GasFebruary 28, 2001

Information Center

2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Estimation of Meteorological Parameters for Air Quality Management: Coupling of Sodar Data with Simple Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper an attempt is made to couple sodar data and simple numerical models to calculate the wind field and the boundary layer parameters that are relevant to air quality monitoring and studies. For this purpose, a diagnostic, mass-...

Dimitrios Melas; Giulia Abbate; Dias Haralampopoulos; Alexandros Kelesidis

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evaluation of Urban Air Quality Models for Regulatory Use: Refinement of an Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical measures for evaluating the performance of urban air quality models have recently been strongly recommended by several investigators. Problems that were encountered in the use of recommended performance measures in an evaluation of ...

Mary W. Downton; Robin L. Dennis

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Proposed Method of Developing Air Quality Models for a Limited Wind Fetch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed for developing air quality models of a limited wind fetch. The basic model equation is a transient solution to a diffusion equation. This basic model equation is compared to those of the existing models, straightline airflow ...

Edward Y. T. Kuo

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Air time : another measure of the quality of passenger service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposal of a new metric called "Air Time" and its various components, show the advantage of having a broader perspective of the travel process of airline passengers. Travel time is basically affected by three different ...

Blake Betancourt, Juan Jamie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Illinois - High-Level Commitment Key to Air Quality Success  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet highlights how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can and are being used to reduce air emissions and meet environmental goals, showcasing case studies and technology-specific topics.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Small Business Air Quality Compliance Assistance Act (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A small business stationary source that is owned or operated by a person that employs 100 or fewer individuals, is not a major stationary source (as defined by the federal Clean Air Act), does not...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William; Berdahl, Paul

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home...

263

GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 40-50' wide, 400-500' length § Bird density: 1 square foot/bird, 20,000 birds1 GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm per house § Heating and cooling required § Intensive ventilation to maintain air

264

Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

An Improved Quality Control for AIRS Total Column Ozone Observations within and around Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides twice-daily global observations from which total column ozone data can be retrieved. However, 20% ~ 30% of AIRS ozone data are flagged to be of bad quality. Most of the flagged data were identified to ...

H. Wang; X. Zou; G. Li

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Strategies and Technologies for Improving Air Quality Around Ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, May 2010. 44. Solazyme. www.solazyme.com/technology.fuel was produced to Navy specifications by Solazyme, Inc.Solazyme uses standard industrial fermentation equipment and

Khan, Mohammad Yusuf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

News and Update: Sensors Continually Monitor Water and Air Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Initial Microstructural Analysis of A36 Steel from WTC Building 7 by J.R. Barnett, R.R. ... a system of sensors developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia ... The system is designed to continually monitor water or air, in- situ, so sample ... to develop a program to train water utilities to assess system vulnerabilities.

269

Sustainable Transport and Air Quality Conference for Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Air Quality Conference for Latin America and the and Air Quality Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean 2011 Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Sustainable Transport and Air Quality Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean 2011: on 2011/05/09 "This Conference is co-sponsored by the Clean Air Institute (CAI), the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the World Bank, the World Mayors Council on Climate Change, GIZ and the Governments of Argentina, Mexico and Spain. Participants will discuss "How to Achieve Sustainable Urban Transport?" Among other things, the Conference will examine health and environmental benefits of improving urban transport, emissions inventories and monitoring, use of alternative fuels, carbon financing to improve urban transport, and regional

270

Simulations of Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Impacts of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lighting load from ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ANSI/ASHRAE ... with a nonzero base ventilation rate, such ... and C-T24, will help to temper such exposure. ...

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

Effects of energy development on air quality in the Rocky Mountain West. [Environmental effects of coal and oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

Future need for fossil fuels may lead to an exploitation of Western coal and oil shale at the expense of the traditional clean air and clear skies of the West. This report evaluates the prospects for future changes in western air quality, the constraints imposed on western energy development by air quality regulations, and the impacts of that development.

Hinman, G.W.; Leonard, E.M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NAREL (National Air and Standard Environmental Laboratory) standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using diffusion barrier charcoal canisters  

SciTech Connect

Radon monitoring procedures for the National Air and Radiation Environment Laboratory (NAREL) are described. Radon is detected by sorption to activated charcoal, followed by detection of gamma ray emissions from the radon decay products lead-214 (295 KeV and 392 KeV) and bismuth-214 (609 KeV). The activated charcoal is held in an 8 ounce metal can, under a polyethylene diffusion barrier and a stainless steel screen, 30--50% open. The polyethylene barrier reduces water absorption by the charcoal, and improves integration over the exposure period. The proper use of the container is described, as is the counting system and calibration of the detecting system. Fabrication of reference standards and background canisters is described. Equations and sample calculations to determine radon concentrations are given. All terms in the equation are defined, and all calibration factors are calculated. The minimal detectable amounts of radon as a function of detector exposure time are calculated. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Gray, D.J.; Windham, S.T.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

California Motor Vehicle Standards and Federalism: Lessons for the European Union  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stringent federal air standards, have been important, indeedNational Air Quality Standards: Macro and Micro Mistakes, 22in State Environmental Standard-Setting, 8 C ORNELL J.L. & P

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Considering Climate Change in U.S. Air Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Despite the challenges in linking global and regional processes, evidence from recent studies suggests that the effects of a changing climate should not be neglected when planning for the future attainment of regional-scale ozone standards such as the U.S. NAAQS. Research underway should provide insight regarding the impact of climate change on Ozone and PM2.5 and of the complex interaction of climate, land-use, and technology change.

Hogrefe, C.; Leung, Lai R.; Mickley, L. J.; Hunt, Sherri W.; Winner, D. A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide provides guidance and recommended practices for establishing a comprehensive quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate health and safety practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The basic elements of a quality assurance program appear in the following order: FUNCTION SECTION Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Design Control 7 Instructions, Procedures & Drawings 8 Document Control 9 Procurement 10 Identification and Traceability 11 Processes 12 Inspection 13 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment 14 Handling, Storage and Shipping 15 Inspection, Test and Operating Status 16 Control of Nonconforming Items 17 Corrective Actions 18 Quality Assurance Records 19 Audits 20 TABLE 1 NQA-1 Basic Requirements Relat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Potential impacts on air quality of the use of ethanol as an alternative fuel. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ethanol/gasoline mixtures in motor vehicles has been proposed as an alternative fuel strategy that might improve air quality while minimizing US dependence on foreign oil. New enzymatic production methodologies are being explored to develop ethanol as a viable, economic fuel. In an attempt to reduce urban carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone levels, a number of cities are currently mandating the use of ethanol/gasoline blends. However, it is not at all clear that these blended fuels will help to abate urban pollution. In fact, the use of these fuels may lead to increased levels of other air pollutants, specifically aldehydes and peroxyacyl nitrates. Although these pollutants are not currently regulated, their potential health and environmental impacts must be considered when assessing the impacts of alternative fuels on air quality. Indeed, formaldehyde has been identified as an important air pollutant that is currently being considered for control strategies by the State of California. This report focuses on measurements taken in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the summer of 1993 and the winter of 1994 as an initial attempt to evaluate the air quality effects of ethanol/gasoline mixtures. The results of this study have direct implications for the use of such fuel mixtures as a means to reduce CO emissions and ozone in a number of major cities and to bring these urban centers into compliance with the Clean Air Act.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessing the sustainability of transportation fuels : the air quality impacts of petroleum, bio and electrically powered vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transportation fleet emissions have a dominant role in air quality because of their significant contribution to ozone precursor and greenhouse gas emissions. Regulatory policies have (more)

Alhajeri, Nawaf Salem

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Real-time air quality monitoring through mobile sensing in metropolitan areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, pollution measurements are performed using expensive equipment at fixed locations or dedicated mobile equipment laboratories. This is a coarse-grained and expensive approach where the pollution measurements are few and far in-between. ... Keywords: air quality, mobile sensing, participatory sensing, pollution, social networks, urban sensing

Srinivas Devarakonda, Parveen Sevusu, Hongzhang Liu, Ruilin Liu, Liviu Iftode, Badri Nath

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Airborne Particulate Matter in HVAC Systems and its Influence on Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the mechanisms governing movement of PMs in HVAC systems. Then, the basic equations governing PM deposition in ducts are introduced and investigations on airborne PMs distribution in HVAC systems are reviewed. The influence of PMs on indoor air quality and effectiveness of corresponding controlling measures is discussed extensively in the paper. Finally, recommendations for further research are given.

Fu, Z.; Li, N.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Summary of the setting, air quality problems, and meteorological activities in the oil shale region  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses air quality problems that may arise in the valleys of the Uinta mountains and the Roan Ridge in the oil shale area in western Colorado and eastern Utah. A meteorological field expedition that was undertaken in August 1980 by LASL and PNL is described. (DLC)

Barr, S.; Clements, W.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Australian Air Quality Forecasting System. Part I: Project Description and Early Outcomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Air Quality Forecasting System (AAQFS) is the culmination of a 3-yr project to develop a numerical primitive equation system for generating high-resolution (15 km) short-term (2436 h) forecasts for the Australian coastal cities ...

M. E. Cope; G. D. Hess; S. Lee; K. Tory; M. Azzi; J. Carras; W. Lilley; P. C. Manins; P. Nelson; L. Ng; K. Puri; N. Wong; S. Walsh; M. Young

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Air quality impacts due to construction of LWR waste management facilities  

SciTech Connect

Air quality impacts of construction activities and induced housing growth as a result of construction activities were evaluated for four possible facilities in the LWR fuel cycle: a fuel reprocessing facility, fuel storage facility, fuel fabrication plant, and a nuclear power plant. Since the fuel reprocessing facility would require the largest labor force, the impacts of construction of that facility were evaluated in detail.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE-STD-1150-2002; Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1150-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Department-Wide Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard

289

Large HVAC Codes and Standards Update 2000: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents EPRI activities in the year 2000 related to building codes and standards. The following activities are covered: attendance at the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) meetings and participation in technical committee and subcommittee meetings related to ASHRAE Standard 90.l; review of relevant U.S Department of Energy (DOE) appliance standards; review of developments of other building energy code organizations; and participation in the E...

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclides concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2012, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 0.5% to a maximum of 11.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Ambient Monitoring - NETL / OST Monitoring Site This project is part of the NETL In-House R&D Ambient Air Quality Research Program. As part of the overall DOE-FE air quality sampling and analysis activities, NETL's Office of Science & Technology (OST) has initiated an in-house ambient monitoring program that builds upon the Center's core capabilities and competencies in inorganic and organic analyses and instrumentation. The program has culminated with the establishment of a fine particulate/air toxics sampling station at the Center's research laboratory in Pittsburgh. This air monitoring station consists of a new 715 ft2 indoor facility housing equipment to monitor continuously gaseous pollutants O3, SO2, NH3, NOy, NOx, CO, H2S, and peroxide, and PM2.5 particulates containing carbon and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, a fully-instrumented, fourteen bay rack has been constructed to support a variety of ambient monitoring equipment. OST will also collaborate with Consol and the Allegheny (PA) County Health Department in evaluating the performance of PM2.5 FRM samplers. The NETL sampling station will use an existing 10-meter meteorological tower that has been collecting weather-related data for the past seven years. Two in-house laboratories have been completely renovated to support the analysis of PM2.5/air toxics samples, including the installation of a Kratos MS50 high-resolution mass spectrometer for the detailed characterization of organic compounds.

294

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

295

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

296

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

297

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Community, Environment Environmental Stewardship ...

299

File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:14, 1 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:14, 1 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (25 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file:

300

EVALUATION OF THE INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROCEDURE FOR USE IN RETAIL BUILDINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings Spencer M. Dutton, Wanyu R. Chan, Mark J. Mendell, Marcella Barrios, Srinandini Parthasarathy, Meera Sidheswaran, Douglas P. Sullivan, Katerina Eliseeva, William J. Fisk Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 February 1, 2013 The research reported here was supported by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy-Related Environmental Research Program, award number 500-09-049.The study was additionally supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Prescribed Fire Emission Factors Database for Land Management and Air Quality Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act, its amendments, and air quality regulations require that prescribed fire managers estimate the quantity of emissions that a prescribed fire will produce. Information on emissions is available for these calculations; however, it is often incomplete or difficult to find. Tables and computer models can also provide some of this information, but the quality and applicability of the data to a specific site are unknown. In conjunction with three research projects developing new emissions data and meteorological tools to assist prescribed fire managers, the Resource Conservation and Climate Change Program Area of the Department of Defense's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program is supporting development of a database that contains emissions information related to prescribed burning. Ultimately the vetted database will be available on the Internet and will contain emissions information that has been developed from laboratory and field-scale measurements and has been published.

Lincoln, Emily; Hao, WeiMin; Baker, S.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Urbanski, Shawn; Miller, J. Wayne; Weise, David; Johnson, Timothy J.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

Macrolichens as biomonitors of air-quality change in western Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Species richness of corticolous macrolichens was monitored at one- or two-year intervals on a total of 63 plots from 1997-2003 in a region of west-central Pennsylvania that included four coal-fired power generating stations and an industrial city. Lichen richness significantly increased from an average of 5.7 species/plot in 1997 to 9.3 species/plot in 2003. A linear mean rate of gain in species on regional monitoring plots was 0.56 species/yr. Plots along a major ridge top had a slower but significant gain in richness, and a localized area flanked by the city and two generating stations exhibited less lichen recolonization. Our results confirm the value of macrolichens as indicators of air quality and the importance of examining temporal as well as spatial changes in lichen richness to ascertain air-quality status.

McClenahen, J.R.; Davis, D.D.; Hutnik, R.J. [Ohio State Univ, Shreve, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies: A Synthesis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines conditions under which gridded photochemical air quality models are legitimate tools for determining the types of emission controls (VOC, NOx, or both) that would be most effective for reducing ozone concentration. In doing so, it emphasizes that models should not be used indiscriminately by pointing out their limitations and the resulting consequences. It also suggests ways to make models made more suitable for regulatory purposes by formulating results probabilistically.

1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Evaluating Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) as Modifying Factor in Designing Public School Buildings in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most fundamental goal in the design of educational facilities is to provide an environment that encourages learning achievement for students and teachers. Poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can negatively affect student health, comfort and performance that will eventually produce unacceptable learning environment. Poor IAQ can decrease a person's ability to perform specific mental tasks requiring concentration, calculation and memory. Therefore, schools should be designed, built and maintained in away to minimize and control the source of pollution. Around 29% of Jordanians occupy school buildings each day. A specific prototype building design was applied in the different locations of the country. This prototype could be appropriate for one location but it is not for the entire country that has diversity in climatic and environmental conditions The purpose of this research paper was to evaluate the indoor air quality in public school buildings in urban and rural area, through investigations of the causes and its effects on student health, comfort, and performance. Achieving healthy indoor air quality is a multifaceted a problem which can be arrived at by a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the design, construction and operation of the school building. Results indicate that the prototype system used was not appropriate as healthy school design, and it did not take into consideration the indoor environmental factors as crucial issue in designing school buildings.

Ali, H. H.; Al-Momani, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Application of an SVM-based regression model to the air quality study at local scale in the Avils urban area (Spain)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to build a regression model of air quality by using the support vector machine (SVM) technique in the Aviles urban area (Spain) at local scale. Hazardous air pollutants or toxic air contaminants refer to any substance that ... Keywords: Air quality, Machine learning, Pollutant substances, Support vector regression

A. SuRez SNchez; P. J. GarcA Nieto; P. Riesgo FernNdez; J. J. Del Coz DAz; F. J. Iglesias-RodrGuez

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

MULKEY, C.H.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration, and Air conditioning Engineers, Atlanta,Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta,Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta,

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the energy efficiency of end-use equipment in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can reduce air pollution emissions and greenhouse gases significantly. Because energy efficiency is an effective means of reducing multi-pollutant emissions, it is important to ensure that energy efficiency is a fully engaged component of emission-reduction programs. However, while energy-efficiency measures are perceived by many stakeholders to be important options for improving air quality, some members in the air quality community are concerned about the ability of these measures to fit in a regulatory framework-in particular, the ability of emissions reductions from energy-efficiency measures to be real, quantifiable, certifiable, and enforceable. Hence, there are few air quality programs that include energy efficiency as a tool for complying with air quality regulations. This paper describes the connection between energy consumption and air quality, the potential role of energy-efficiency measures to meet air quality regulations, the barriers and challenges to the use of these measures in the air quality regulatory environment, and the potential role that the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Building Technology, State and Community Programs (EERE-Buildings) could play in this area. EERE-Buildings can play a very important role in promoting energy efficiency in the air quality community, in ways that are fully consistent with its overall mission. EERE-Buildings will need to work with other stakeholders to aggressively promote energy efficiency via multiple means: publications, analytical tools, pilot programs, demonstrations, and program and policy analysis and evaluation. EERE-Buildings and state energy officials have considerable experience in implementing and monitoring energy-savings projects, as well as in designing documentation and verification requirements of energy-efficiency improvements. The following lists suggest potential EERE-Buildings activities, grouped by whether EERE-Buildings would play a lead or supporting role.

Vine, Edward

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

Michael Sandvig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Comparison between predicted duct effectiveness from proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and measured field data for residential forced air cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Forced Air Systems in Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P.ASHRAE Transactions, 104(1B), 1360-1375. Walker I, ShermanDuct Effectiveness from Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and

Siegel, Jeffrey A.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Impact of Nudging in the Meteorological Model for Retrospective Air Quality Simulations. Part I: Evaluation against National Observation Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is common practice to use Newtonian relaxation, or nudging, throughout meteorological model simulations to create dynamic analyses that provide the characterization of the meteorological conditions for retrospective air quality model ...

Tanya L. Otte

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I: Present Time Simulation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impacts of climate change on meteorology and air quality conditions in California by dynamically downscaling Parallel Climate Model (PCM) data to high resolution (4 km) using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) ...

Zhan Zhao; Shu-Hua Chen; Michael J. Kleeman; Mary Tyree; Dan Cayan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Defensive Investments and the Demand for Air Quality: Evidence from the NOx Budget Program and Ozone Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Willingness to pay for air quality is a function of health and the costly defensive investments that contribute to health, but there is little research assessing the empirical importance of defensive investments. The setting ...

Deschnes, Olivier

315

Preliminary assessment of the impact of commercial aircraft on local air quality in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the impact of aircraft emissions on local air quality by performing two analyses: an assessment of U.S. commercial aircraft contribution to county budgets of primary pollutants in nonattainment areas, ...

Ratliff, Gayle L. (Gayle Lois)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Australian Air Quality Forecasting System. Part III: Case Study of a Melbourne 4-Day Photochemical Smog Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 4-day photochemical smog event in the Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, region (69 March 2001) is examined to assess the performance of the Australian Air Quality Forecasting System (AAQFS). Although peak ozone concentrations measured during ...

K. J. Tory; M. E. Cope; G. D. Hess; S. Lee; K. Puri; P. C. Manins; N. Wong

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Field-Coherence Technique for Meteorological Field-Program Design for Air Quality Studies. Part I: Description and Interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new methodology developed to provide objective guidance for cost-effective siting of meteorological observations on the mesoscale for air quality applications. This field-coherence technique (FCT) is based on a statistical ...

David R. Stauffer; Nelson L. Seaman; Glenn K. Hunter; S. Mark Leidner; Annette Lario-Gibbs; Saffet Tanrikulu

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Dynamically Consistent Formulations in Meteorological and Air Quality Models for Multiscale Atmospheric Studies. Part II: Mass Conservation Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eulerian air quality models that require gridded meteorological inputs have to adapt to recent advances in meteorological models for fully compressible atmosphere. When the input meteorological data are recast with a robust fully compressible ...

Daewon W. Byun

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

DOE-STD-3025-99; DOE Standard Quality Assurance Inspection and Testing of HEPA Filters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-99 5-99 February 1999 Superseding DOE NE F 3-43 February 1990 DOE STANDARD QUALITY ASSURANCE INSPECTION AND TESTING OF HEPA FILTERS U.S. Department of Energy FSC 4460 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3025-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy standard supercedes DOE NE F 3-43 and is approved for use by all DOE

320

DOE-STD-1172-2003; Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72-2003 72-2003 December 2003 DOE STANDARD SAFETY SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1172-2003 This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1172-2003

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE-STD-3026-99; DOE Standard Filter Test Facility Quality Program Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-99 6-99 February 1999 Superseding DOE NE F 3-44 July 1986 DOE STANDARD FILTER TEST FACILITY QUALITY PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy FSC 4460 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3026-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy standard supercedes DOE NE F 3-44 and is approved for use by all DOE components and their contractors.

322

Review of air quality assessment studies and definitions of some research needs for the emerging oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the air quality assessment programs that have been conducted by the various private and government sponsored developers who propose to extract energy from the oil shale. These studies have ranged from regional comprehensive baseline and environmental impact studies over several years' period to intermittant localized small scale air quality monitoring programs. A review of the environmental programs, their location, retorting type, and extent of environmental program undertaken is given.

Parker, G.B.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

324

Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Ritschard, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

328

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND COMFORT IN HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS Pawel Wargocki 1* , Max Sherman 2 , Willem de Gids 3 , Peter Wouters 4 , Francis Allard 5 , Remi Carrie 6 , Paolo Carrer 7 , and Stylianos Kephalopolous 8 1 International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, DTU Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark 2 Residential Building Systems Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA 3 VentGuide, the Netherlands 4 Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre, Belgium 5 University of La Rochelle, France 6 International Network for Information on Ventilation, Belgium 7 The University of Milan, Italy 8 Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy ABSTRACT Research topics that need to be addressed so that the future highly energy efficient buildings do not compromise

329

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington States Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Resource Board, Sacramento, CA, April 2006. CARB (Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. CARB (2009a).Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. http://www.arb.ca.gov/

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Standard rock For at least two generations, the depth of underground muon experiments has been reduced to depth in "standard rock." This is by definition the overburden of the Cayuga Rock Salt Mine near Ithaca, New York, where K. Greisen and collaborators made seminal observations of muons at substantial depths[1]. Ref. 1 says only "Most of the ground consists of shales of various types, with average density 2.65 g/cm 2 and average atomic number 11." Menon and Murthy later extended the definition: Z 2 /A = 5.5, Z/A = 0.5, and and ρ = 2.65 g/cm 2 [2]. It was thus not-quite-sodium. Lohmann[3] further assumed the mean excitation energy and density effect parameters were those of calcium carbonate, with no adjustments for the slight density difference. We use their definition for this most important material. (Extracted from D.E. Groom, N.V. Mokhov, and S.I. Striganov,

333

Find Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may not be available from IHS: AHRI standards - from the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute AISC standards - from the American Institute of Steel Construction...

334

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

335

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

This research project has two primary objectives: (1) to further develop and refine the Multiscale Air Quality Simulation Platform-Variable Grid Resolution (MAQSIP-VGR) model, an advanced variable-grid-resolution air quality model, to provide detailed, accurate representation of the dynamical and chemical processes governing the fate of anthropogenic emissions in coastal environments; and (2) to improve current understanding of the potential impact of onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) emissions on O{sub 3} and particulate matter nonattainment in the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding states.

Kiran Alapaty; Adel Hanna

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Introducing a Partitioning Mechanism for PAHs into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling System and Its Application to Simulating the Transport of Benzo(a)pyrene over Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) that is widely used for simulating the transport and fate of air pollutants, a new module was inserted that accounts for the partitioning of semivolatile organic compoundsin ...

Armin Aulinger; Volker Matthias; Markus Quante

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

Streit, G.E. [comp.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

An Integrated Computer Modeling Environment For Regional Land Use, Air Quality, And Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menudriven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and areawide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future pr...

Charles Hanley Renewable; Norman L. Marshall; Charles J. Hanley; Charles J. Hanley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Chronic disease and early exposure to air-borne mixtures: 1. The environmental quality database  

SciTech Connect

This is the first in a continuing study examining the impact of early exposure to air-borne mixtures of chemicals from industrial sources on the etiology of cancer. The Environmental Quality Database (EQDB) contains lifetime residential histories for about 20,000 cases in 18 rare or poorly understood sites and about 5000 controls. The EQDB contains all known industrial point sources in about 50 U.S.-SIC code operating in Canada, all geolocated, from 1993 to about 1950. Cases and controls were collected in 1993-1995. Both source-centric and case-centric searching is possible. It is possible to search all instances of a source-type or only one. Three features of the design are the management of mobility and latency as epidemiological confounders and a considerable simplification of Retrospective Exposure Assessment by using the RASH relative potency methodology. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

James Argo [IntrAmericas Centre for Environment and Health, Wolfe Island, ON (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Parameters and Airborne Fungal Spore Concentrations by Season and Type of HVAC System in a School Building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An indoor air quality survey has been conducted in a school building. Samples were collected inone room in each wing and each level on a (more)

McLeod, Jeffrey D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tighter homes and the air sealing of existing homes.Tightening or air sealing of homes to reduce outdoor airhealth hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amounts of insulation and air sealing materials, which mayand (2) the impact of air sealing on radon exposure and itsstrategy, as well as house air sealing and duct sealing will

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOE/EA-1352: Environmental Assessment for Proposed Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (12/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

52 52 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 EA-i ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3.0 ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.3 Alternative Standards

354

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considerations. A heat exchanger will be installed in anAir Heat Exchangers . 14 Subcontractair-to- air heat exchangers; additional subcontract

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Finding of No Significant Impact for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (01/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 14 / Monday, January 22, 2001 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for Energy Conservation Standard for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps. SUMMARY: The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act, and the National Appliance Energy Conservation Amendments, prescribes energy conservation standards for certain major household appliances, and requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer an energy conservation program for these products. Based on an

356

Clean Cities ozone air quality attainment and maintenance strategies that employ alternative fuel vehicles, with special emphasis on natural gas and propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air quality administrators across the nation are coming under greater pressure to find new strategies for further reducing automotive generated non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established stringent emission reduction requirements for ozone non-attainment areas that have driven the vehicle industry to engineer vehicles meeting dramatically tightened standards. This paper describes an interim method for including alternative-fueled vehicles (AFVs) in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. This method could be used until EPA can develop the Mobile series of emissions estimation models to include AFVs and until such time that detailed work on AFV emissions totals by air quality planners and emissions inventory builders is warranted. The paper first describes the challenges confronting almost every effort to include AFVs in targeted emissions reduction programs, but points out that within these challenges resides an opportunity. Next, it discusses some basic relationships in the formation of ambient ozone from precursor emissions. It then describes several of the salient provisions of EPA`s new voluntary emissions initiative, which is called the Voluntary Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Program (VMEP). Recent emissions test data comparing gaseous-fuel light-duty AFVs with their gasoline-fueled counterparts is examined to estimate percent emissions reductions achievable with CNG and LPG vehicles. Examples of calculated MOBILE5b emission rates that would be used for summer ozone season planning purposes by an individual Air Quality Control Region (AQCR) are provided. A method is suggested for employing these data to compute appropriate voluntary emission reduction credits where such (lighter) AFVs would be acquired. It also points out, but does not quantify, the substantial reduction credits potentially achievable by substituting gaseous-fueled for gasoline-fueled heavy-duty vehicles. Finally, it raises and expands on the relevance of AFVs and their deployment to some other provisions embedded in EPA`s current guidance for implementing 1-hour NAAQS--standards which currently remain in effect--as tools to provide immediate reductions in ozone, without waiting for promised future clean technologies.

Santini, D.J.; Saricks, C.L.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

Analysis of an Ozone Episode during the San Diego Air Quality Study: The Significance of Transport Aloft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

San Diego is subject to transport of ozone and precursors from the Los Angeles area, 170 km to the northwest, as well as to high ozone concentrations from local emissions. The San Diego Air Quality Study was conducted during the summer of 1989. ...

Virginia Bigler-Engler; Hal W. Brown

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Australian Air Quality Forecasting System. Part II: Case Study of a Sydney 7-Day Photochemical Smog Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Australian Air Quality Forecasting System (AAQFS) is examined by means of a case study of a 7-day photochemical smog event in the Sydney region. This was the worst smog event for the 2000/ 01 oxidant season, and, because of ...

G. D. Hess; K. J. Tory; M. E. Cope; S. Lee; K. Puri; P. C. Manins; M. Young

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and the significant deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes of areas. It is required for potential sources of air contaminants to register with the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 1 - a geopressured-geothermal test well, 1978. Volume III. Appendix II. Air quality monitoring, Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The air monitoring program, instrument types, and bag sampling program are described in each of five quarterly reports. The operating statistics for each of the major subsystems contained in the monitoring station are presented. National ambient air quality standards are presented for criteria pollutants and the monthly statistics for the monitoring station for the month are displayed. Daily averages, maximum daily five-minute averages retained in the data base as well as the times of occurrence, the five largest averages, and the diurnal variation of various recording times are tabulated. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The role of the US Department of Energy in indoor air quality and building ventilation policy development  

SciTech Connect

Building ventilation consumes about 5.8 exajoules of energy each year in the US The annual cost of this energy, used for commercial building fans (1.6 exajoules) and the heating and cooling of outside air (4.2 exajoules), is about $US 33 billion per year. Energy conservation measures that reduce heating and cooling season ventilation rates 15 to 35% in commercial and residential buildings can result in a national savings of about 0.6 to 1.5 exajoules ($US 3-8 billion) per year assuming no reduction of commercial building fan energy use. The most significant adverse environmental impact of reduced ventilation and infiltration is the potential degradation of the buildings indoor air quality. Potential benefits to the US from the implementation of sound indoor air quality and building ventilation reduction policies include reduced building-sector energy consumption; reduced indoor, outdoor, and global air pollution; reduced product costs; reduced worker absenteeism; reduced health care costs; reduced litigation; increased worker well-being and productivity; and increased product quality and competitiveness.

Traynor, G.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Talbott, J.M.; Moses, D.O. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate. InGeophys. Res. . In review. Aerosol climate e?ects and airChem. Phys. 6, 44274459. Aerosol climate e?ects and air

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resin wood products, smoking, electric heating, air exchangeand wood burning fireplaces, and denatured alcohol heaters. All natural gas primary heating

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review. The standard is an attempt by the Society to address concerns over indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local exhaust ventilation, and source control. In addition to code-intended requirements, the standard also contains guidance information for the designer and/or user of the standard. This report summarizes the draft standard and attempts to address questions and concerns that those potentially affected by the standard might have. This report may also be of use to those considering public review comments on the draft standard.

Sherman, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation - Indian Standards and Labeling Program. USEPA,and Energy Efficiency Standards in India. Indian Bureau ofof Energy-Efficiency Standards for Indian Refrigerators.

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Impact of Ground-level Aviation Emissions on Air Quality in the Western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aviation industry has experienced sustained growth since its inception result- ing in an increase in air pollutant emissions. Exposure to particulate matter less than (more)

Clark, Eric Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currently existing natural gas- fired power plants in southnatural gas-based distributed generation of electricity in California, which resulted in more air pollution than central power plants (

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect

In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}5}, and 10{sup {minus}5} respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10{sup {minus}5}, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

Morrison, Glenn C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

SciTech Connect

We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present-day emissions suggest that future climate projections warrant particular scrutiny.

Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The State of California was given authority under CAAA90 to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed Federal standards. In addition, other States that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the EPA under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the Nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other States have adopted the California standards.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Importance of legal protection and international quality standards for environmental protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article discusses the importance of environmental protection requirements in the progressively liberalized energy market in the EU. We present environmental issues in general, focusing on a system of environmental management according to the ISO ... Keywords: ISO standards, energy market, environmental management, environmental protection, sustainable development

V. Pozeb; T. Krope

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Impact of GEM and MM5 Modeled Meteorological Conditions on CMAQ Air Quality Modeling Results in Eastern Canada and the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) is currently the meteorological model most widely used as input into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. In ...

Steven C. Smyth; Dazhong Yin; Helmut Roth; Weimin Jiang; Michael D. Moran; Louis-Philippe Crevier

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Study of Air Quality in the Southeastern HamptonNorfolkVirginia Beach Region with Airborne Lidar Measurements and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of air quality was performed using a compact, aircraft aerosol lidar designed in the Science Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. ...

Jasper Lewis; Russell De Young; D. Allen Chu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Influence of Meteorology on the Air Quality in the San Luis Obispo County-Southwestern San Joaquin Valley Region for 3?6 August 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large volume of data measured during the 1990 summer San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study/Atmospheric Utility Signatures, Predictions, and Experiments (SJVAQS/AUSPEX) provides a unique opportunity to examine the influence of meteorology on ...

Elizabeth M. Niccum; Donald E. Lehrman; William R. Knuth

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

TOGA COARE Upper-Air Sounding Data Archive: Development and Quality Control Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important datasets to wine from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) is the most complete, high-resolution upper-air sounding dataset ever collected in the equatorial ...

Scot M. Loehrer; Todd A. Edmands; James A. Moore

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

SciTech Connect

World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

Akbari, Hashem

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Software standards, methods and quality control for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Collaboration involves upwards of 50 scientists, many of whom are involved in the development and use of the software needed to acquire, process and archive the image and spectroscopic data sets. Fermilab has major responsibilities in the development and maintenance of the project`s software and for its software engineering practices. The authors report on the standards and methodologies they have developed in support of these activities.

Pordes, R.; Berman, E.; Petravick, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). Computing Div.] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte reservoirs for increased long-term baseline stability, and larger integral batteries allowing operation for in excess of 3 months without intervention. In this case sensors were sealed with rubber O-rings on the bottom of the enclosure behind a... The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks. M. I. Mead1*, O.A.M. Popoola1, G. B. Stewart1, P. Landshoff3, M. Calleja2, M. Hayes2, J. J. Baldovi1, T. F. Hodgson1, M. W. McLeod1, J. Dicks4...

Mead, M I; Popoola, O A M; Stewart, G B; Landshoff, P; Calleja, M; Hayes, M; Baldovi, J J; Hodgson, T F; McLeod, M W; Dicks, J; Lewis, A; Cohen, J; Baron, R; Saffell, J R; Jones, R L

384

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the

385

State Energy Office Perspective: What is the role for State Energy Offices in Integrating Renewables and Air Quality Goals?  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Energy Office Perspective:What is the Energy Office Perspective:What is the role for State Energy Offices in Integrating Renewables and Air Quality Goals? Sara Ward, Chief, Ohio Energy Office sward@odod.state.oh.us (614) 466- 8396 January 12, 2006 OEE's Vision and Mission * Vision :A robust economy supported by multiple energy sources, energy efficiency and advanced technology with added value for the quality of life for all Ohioans. * Mission: To promote viable and diverse energy options for Ohio * Ohio's Energy Office is housed in the Ohio Department of Development - the states' Economic Development/Job Creation arm * Renewable Energy stimulates job creation through construction of local facilities and development of domestic renewable resources and .................... * Reduces generation of electricity at pre-

386

Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban HeatIslandMitigation  

SciTech Connect

Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

Akbari, Hashem

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application, the coolant is pumped to a heat recovery system. A water-to-air heat exchange system or water-to-water heat

Victoria, University of

388

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality impacts from 1980 to 2030 Table 1. Description ofincreases to 309.9 Wm ?2 for 2030. References Albrecht B Aquality impacts from 1980 to 2030 Shindell D, Faluvegi G,

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Quality of Mobile Air Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Observations from the 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment (DTE10) took place from 28 January to 29 March 2010 in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area for the purposes of collecting and evaluating mobile data from vehicles. To examine the quality of ...

Amanda R. S. Anderson; Michael Chapman; Sheldon D. Drobot; Alemu Tadesse; Brice Lambi; Gerry Wiener; Paul Pisano

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Supplemental Environmental Projects Using Renewable Energy: A New Approach to Addressing Air Quality Violation Penalties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supplemental environmental projects, or SEPs, are environmentally beneficial projects that offer pollution prevention, energy efficiency, green energy, and community-based programs that may include investment in cost-effective alternative energy technologies, such as wind energy. This fact sheet explains how SEPs can help companies mitigate all or part of penalties imposed as a result of air pollution violations.

Sinclair, K.

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

391

Air quality implications associated with the selection of power plants in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

This assessment models emission inventories and pollutant emission rates for fossil fuel power plants. Ground-level air concentration of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and TSP are predicted. Pollutant deposition, non-acidic deposition, acidic deposition, ozone impacts, and visibility attenuation are considered. Human health effects, wildlife effects, effects on plants and crops, and residual environmental impacts are estimated from predicted emissions.

Baechler, M.C.; Glantz, C.S.; Edelmen, P.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Cloud business intelligent services to explore the synergies and interactions among climate change, air quality objectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, formal mathematical concepts of dimensions and their constrains, variables or facts, as well as of the optimization module are used to specify a GAINS (Greenhouse Gas - Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) multi dimensional model. ... Keywords: GAINS, UML, business intelligence, data warehouse

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Source Contributions to VOC's to Ozone Formation in Southeast Texas Using a Source-oriented Air Quality Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area is in severe non-attainment status for ozone compliance. Source-oriented mechanistic modeling was used to determine the major sources of VOCs that contributes to ozone formation during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) from August 16, 2000 to September 7, 2000. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)?s Community Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) version 4.6 was used as a host model to include a revised Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC99) photochemical mechanism with source-oriented extensions to track the contributions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from diesel engines, biogenic sources, highway gasoline vehicles, fuel combustion, off-highway gasoline engines, solvent utilization and petrochemical industries to ozone formation in the atmosphere. Source-oriented emissions needed to drive the model were generated using a revised Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model version 2.4. VOC/NOx ratios are found to be a critical factor in the formation of ozone. Highest ozone formation rates were observed for ratios from 5-15. The contributions of VOC to ozone formation were estimated based on the linear relationship between the rate of NO to NO2 conversion due to radicals generated from VOC oxidation and the rate of net ozone formation. Petroleum and other industrial sources are the largest anthropogenic sources in the urban Houston region and contribute to 45% of the ozone formation in the HGB area. Highway gasoline vehicles make contributions of approximately 28% to ozone formation. Wildfires contribute to as much 11% of ozone formation on days of high wildfire activity. The model results show that biogenic emissions account for a significant amount of ozone formation in the rural areas. Both highway and off-highway vehicles contribute significantly to ozone formation especially in the downwind region. Diesel vehicles do not contribute significantly to ozone formation due to their low VOC emissions.

Krishnan, Anupama

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Air-Quality Data from NARSTO (North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Sciences Division announced their sponsorship of the NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center (QSSC). The QSSC is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory within the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Quality Assurance and Data Management assistance and guidelines are provided by the QSCC, along with access to data files. The permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Center at the Langley Research Center. The archived data can be reached by a link from the QSSC.(Specialized Interface) See also the NARSTO web site at http://www.narsto.org/

None

395

1 Bayesian Analysis of a Reduced-Form Air Quality Model 2 Kristen M Foley,*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the societal benefits/disbenefits of four 14 hypothetical emission reduction scenarios in which domain-wide NOx then used to compare the probability of success of different 100 NOx emission reduction scenarios standard under four 414different types of hypothetical NOx reductions. 415Evaluating Emission Reduction

Reich, Brian J.

396

High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Home Standards DOE Workshops Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference Proceedings Qualified Filter List News Items Related Sites HEPA Related Lessons Learned Contact Us HSS Logo High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters The HEPA Filter web site provides a forum for informing and reporting department-wide activities related to filtration and ventilation issues with special reference to the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters' use, inspection, and testing. This site contains essentials of DOE HEPA filter test program, procedures, requirements and quality assurance aspects applicable to HEPA filters used in DOE facilities. This site contains information about the DOE-accepted Filter Test Facility and its management, operation and quality assuranceprogram.

397

Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

398

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

400

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

A survey and critical review of the literature on indoor air quality, ventilation and health symptoms in schools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey and critical review were undertaken of existing published literature and reports on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, including California schools. Over 450 relevant publications were obtained and reviewed, including papers published in the archival peer-reviewed scientific literature, proceedings of scientific meetings, government reports, 77 NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Reports (HHER) and 70 reports on investigations of problem schools in California. Most of the reviewed literature was for complaint or problem schools. The types of health symptoms reported in schools were very similar to those defined as sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, although this may be due, at least in part, to the type of health symptom questionnaires used. Some of the symptoms, e.g., wheezing, are indicative of asthma. In the studies in which complaint and noncomplaint buildings or areas were compared, complaint buildings generally had higher rates of health symptoms.

Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Angell, W.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Supplemental Environmental Projects Using Renewable Energy: A New Approach to Addressing Air Quality Violation Penalties  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Supplemental environmental projects Supplemental environmental projects can help companies mitigate all or part of penalties imposed as a result of air pollution violations. Supplemental envi- ronmental projects, or SEPs, are environ- mentally beneficial projects that offer pollution prevention, energy efficiency, green energy, and community-based programs that may include investment in cost-effective alternative energy tech- nologies, such as wind energy. In Colorado, one company is successfully mitigating 80% of a penalty through a SEP that takes advantage of the utility's wind energy program by purchasing wind energy for a minimum of 5 years. To meet the additional demand, the util- ity will need to add another turbine to its existing wind farm. The environmental benefits that result from this increased

404

Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Environmental and Air Quality Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Emissions and air pollution modeling, Vehicle energy and power analysis, Climate change impact studies, Alternative fuel station planning, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Experience on Commissioning of Heating/Cooling System and Thermal/Air Quality Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how the commissioning process should be and the related problems, through a case study of a residential house. The items to be commissioned, measurement methods and the commissioning results are shown. Through the commissioning process, the problems pertaining to residential houses, such as the measurement problems, are clarified and the importance of commissioning established. Development of a simple and appropriate measuring method, monitoring of energy consumption and the verification of that value based on a standard value, enhancement of the resident's interest in the indoor environment and energy consumption and attention to their life style require future study.

Hokoi, S.; Miura, H.; Huang, Y.; Nakahara, N.; Iwamae, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider ADEM This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution

407

NIST Information Quality Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... can determine will have or does have a ... of information that they plan to disseminate. ... human resources and strategic planning information submitted ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fans Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .expected from heat exchangers Ventilation expected fromventilation supplied by heat exchanger and exhaust flow. .

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and evaluated this new system. We completed the development of our variable-grid-resolution air quality model (MAQSIP-VGR) and performed various diagnostic tests related to an enhanced cloud parameterization scheme. We also developed an important tool for variable-grid graphics using Google Earth. We ran the MAQSIP-VGR for the Houston-Galveston and southern Louisiana domains for an August 23 to September 2, 2002, episode. Results of the modeling simulations highlighted the usefulness of the variable-grid modeling approach when simulating complex terrain processes related to land and sea close to an urban area. Our results showed that realistic SST patterns based on remote sensing are critical to capturing the land-sea breeze, in particular the inland intrusion of the reversed mesoscale circulation that is critical for simulating air pollution over urban areas near coastal regions. Besides capturing the correct horizontal gradient between land and sea surface temperatures, it is important to use an adequate ABL scheme in order to quantify correctly the vertical profiles of various parameters. The ABL scheme should capture the dynamics of the marine boundary layer, which is not often considered in a typical simulation over land. Our results further showed the effect of using satellite-derived SSTs on the horizontal and vertical extent of the modeled pollution pattern, and the increase in hourly ozone concentrations associated with changes in ABL characteristics resulting from the enhanced mesoscale circulation in the lower troposphere.

Adel Hanna

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Environmental implications of alternative-fueled automobiles: Air quality and greenhouse gas tradeoffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze alternative fuel-powerstrain options for internal combustion engine automobiles. Fuel/engine efficiency, energy use, pollutant discharges, and greenhouse gas emissions are estimated for spark and compression ignited, direct injected (DI), and indirect injected (II) engines fueled by conventional and reformulated gasoline, reformulated diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and alcohols. Since comparisons of fuels and technologies in dissimilar vehicles are misleading, the authors hold emissions level, range, vehicle size class, and style constant. At present, CNG vehicles have the best exhaust emissions performance while DI diesels have the worst. Compared to a conventional gasoline fueled II automobile, greenhouse gases could be reduced by 40% by a DI CNG automobile and by 25% by a DI diesel. Gasoline- and diesel-fueled automobiles are able to attain long ranges with little weight or fuel economy penalty. CNG vehicles have the highest penalty for increasing range, due to their heavy fuel storage systems, but are the most attractive for a 160-km range. DI engines, particularly diesels, may not be able to meet strict emissions standards, at least not without lowering efficiency.

MaClean, H.L.; Lave, L.B.

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

DOE/EA-1664: Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps June 2009 16-i CHAPTER 16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 16.1 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 16-1 16.2 AIR EMISSIONS ANALYSIS...................................................................................... 16-1 16.2.1 Air Emissions Descriptions............................................................................................ 16-1 16.2.2 Air Quality Regulation................................................................................................... 16-3 16.2.3 Global Climate Change..................................................................................................

412

Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Plume-in-Grid Modeling in Central California Using CMAQ-APT (Comprehensive Multiscale Air Quality Model with Advanced Plume Treatmen t)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CMAQ-APT, a state-of-the-science plume-in-grid (PiG) air quality model, has been updated and applied to the ten largest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitting facilities in central California. This report discusses the results of that modeling study.

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Field-Coherence Technique for Meteorological Field-Program Design for Air Quality Studies. Part II: Evaluation in the San Joaquin Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, a field-coherence technique (FCT) was developed to provide objective guidance for cost-effective siting of meteorological observations on the mesoscale for air quality applications. The FCT is evaluated here in Part II ...

Saffet Tanrikulu; David R. Stauffer; Nelson L. Seaman; Andrew J. Ranzieri

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Source- and Age-Resolved Mechanistic Air Quality Models: Model Development and Application in Southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM) existing in the atmosphere have adverse effects to human and environment. Southeast Texas experiences high O3 and PM events due to special meteorological conditions and high emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Quantitative knowledge of the contributions of different emissions sources to O3 and PM is helpful to better understand their formation mechanisms and develop effective control strategies. Tagged reactive tracer techniques are developed and coupled into two chemical transport models (UCD/CIT model and CMAQ) to conduct source apportionment of O3, primary PM, secondary inorganic PM, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and aging distribution of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM) existing in the atmosphere have adverse effects to human and environment. Southeast Texas experiences high O3 and PM events due to special meteorological conditions and high emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Quantitative knowledge of the contributions of different emissions sources to O3 and PM is helpful to better understand their formation mechanisms and develop effective control strategies. Tagged reactive tracer techniques are developed and coupled into two chemical transport models (UCD/CIT model and CMAQ) to conduct source apportionment of O3, primary PM, secondary inorganic PM, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and aging distribution of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Models successfully reproduce the concentrations of gas phase and PM phase species. Vehicles, natural gas, industries, and coal combustion are important O3 sources. Upwind sources have non-negligible influences (20-50%) on daytime O3, indicating that regional NOx emission controls are necessary to reduce O3 in Southeast Texas. EC is mainly from diesel engines while majority of primary OC is from internal combustion engines and industrial sources. Open burning, road dust, internal combustion engines and industries are the major sources of primary PM2.5. Wildfire dominates primary PM near fire locations. Over 80% of sulfate is produced in upwind areas and coal combustion contributes most. Ammonium ion is mainly from agriculture sources. The SOA peak values can be better predicted when the emissions are adjusted by a factor of 2. 20% of the total SOA is due to anthropogenic sources. Solvent and gasoline engines are the major sources. Oligomers from biogenic SOA account for 30-58% of the total SOA, indicating that long range transport is important. PAHs from anthropogenic sources can produce 4% of total anthropogenic SOA. Wild fire, vehicles, solvent and industries are the major sources. EC and OC emitted within 0-3 hours contribute approximately 70-90% in urban Houston and about 20-40% in rural areas. Significant diurnal variations in the relative contributions to EC are predicted. Fresh particles concentrations are high at morning and early evening. The concentrations of EC and OC that spend more than 9 hours in the air are low over land but almost accounts for 100% of the total EC and OC over the ocean.

Zhang, Hongliang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fast mode assignment for quality scalable extension of the high efficiency video coding (HEVC) standard: a Bayesian approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new compression standard, known as the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), aims at significantly improving the compression efficiency compared to previous standards. There has been significant interest in developing a scalable version of this standard. ... Keywords: low complexity compression, machine learning, scalable HEVC, video compression

H. R. Tohidypour, H. Bashashati, M. T. Pourazad, P. Nasiopoulos

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Battery Standard Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scenario: Fast Tracking a Battery Standard. ... with developing a new standard specifying quality controls for the development of batteries used in ...

419

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

420

Louisiana Air Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law states regulations for air quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about permits and licenses, air quality...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building materials (used i n construction, furnishings, and insulation),cooling buildings, we have been increasing insulation andBuilding Construction C o n c r e t e , Stone Particleboard Insulation

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A hybrid source apportionment model integrating measured data and air quality model results - article no. D07301  

SciTech Connect

The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility (BRAVO) study was an intensive air quality study designed to understand the causes of haze in Big Bend National Park. Daily speciated fine aerosols were measured from July through October 1999 at 37 sites located mostly in Texas. In support of BRAVO, two chemical transport models (CTMs) were used to apportion particulate sulfate at Big Bend and other sites in Texas to sources in the eastern and western United States, Texas, Mexico, and the Carbon I and II coal-fired power plants, located 225 km southeast of Big Bend in Mexico. Analysis of the CTM source attribution results and comparison to results from receptor models revealed systematic biases. To reduce the multiplicative biases, a hybrid source apportionment model, based on inverse modeling, was developed that adjusted the initial CTM source contributions so the modeled sulfate concentrations optimally fit the measured data, resulting in refined daily source contributions. The method was tested using synthetic data and successfully reduced source attribution biases. The refined sulfate source attribution results reduced the initial eastern U.S. contribution to Big Bend, averaged over the BRAVO study period, from about 40% to about 30%, while Mexico's contribution increased from 24 - 32% about 40%. The contribution from the Carbon facility increased from similar to 14% to over 20%. The increase in Mexico's contribution is consistent with more recent SO{sub 2} emissions estimates that indicate that the BRAVO Mexican SO{sub 2} emissions were underestimated. Source attribution results for other monitoring sites in west Texas were similar to results at Big Bend.

Schichtel, B.A.; Malm, W.C.; Gebhart, K.A.; Barna, M.G.; Knipping, E.M. [Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

423

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air...

424

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection Ecosystem Standards and Planning Biodiversity BranchThis page has been intentionally left blank ii Preface Preface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

British Columbia is recognized globally for its exceptional wildlife, diversity of ecosystems, and rich natural resources. The Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection (WLAP) works to maintain these valuable natural assets, which lie at the heart of many recreational and economic activities enjoyed by British Columbians in all regions of the province. The Ministry has responsibility for the protection and stewardship of British Columbias environment. To fulfil this responsibility, it develops policy and legislation, regulations, codes of practice, environmental contracts and covenants (legal agreements). It also monitors and reports on selected species and habitats, as well as acquires information on habitat and species health. It sets science- and results-based objectives and standards and provides best practices for activities that affect our environment. Together, clear goals and objectives, meaningful performance measures and science-based tools guide Ministry actions in improving environmental management. Regulatory frameworks allow headquarters and regional staff to

Instream Works

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff: Proceedings of Air Quality Workshop Held on Octo ber 2, 2002, Atlanta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EPRI-sponsored workshop, entitled "PM, Mercury, and Health Effects: A Workshop for Technical and Communications Staff," was held in Atlanta, Georgia on October 2, 2002. Members of the Air Quality and Media Relations Groups conducted the workshop. Attendees were all utility-associated, although several attendees were from non-utility companies. In all, there were 69 attendees, of whom 39 had technical positions and 30 were involved with communications. The workshop was intended to serve as a primer for...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Examining the Effects of Variability in Average Link Speeds on Estimated Mobile Source Emissions and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection Agency. Sacramento, CA. CARB (2003).Air Resources Board. Sacramento, CA. Cardelino, C. (1998). "of Transportation. Sacramento, CA. Girden, E. (1992). ANOVA

Sogutlugil, Mihriban

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago. The vast majority of homes in the United States and indeed the world are ventilated through natural means such as infiltration caused by air leakage. Newer homes in the western world are tight and require mechanical ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate norunder-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much mechanical ventilation is considered necessary to provide acceptable indoor air quality, but that standard is weak on how infiltration can contribute towards meeting the total requirement. In the past ASHRAE Standard 136 was used to do this, but new theoretical approaches and expanded weather data have made that standard out of date. This article will describe how to properly treat infiltration as an equivalent ventilation approach and then use new data and these new approaches to demonstrate how these calculations might be done both in general and to update Standard 136.

Sherman, Max

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Atmospheric emissions of one pulp and paper mill. contribution to the air quality of Viana do Castelo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most sensitive environmental impact of the pulp and paper mills is associated with the atmospheric pollution namely with sulphur compounds, particulate matter and nitrogen oxides. The study undertaken aimed to evaluate the influence of one ... Keywords: air pollution modelling, kraft pulp and paper mill, urban air pollution

Lgia T. Silva; Jos F. G. Mendes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Colorimetric Detection of Formaldehyde: A Sensor for Air Quality Measurements and a Pollution-Warning Kit for Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new chemical sensors for the detection of formaldehyde, a ubiquitous and carcinogenic indoor air pollutant is described. These sensors are based on the use of nanoporous matrices acting as sponge to trap the targeted pollutant and ... Keywords: Formaldehyde, colorimetric detection, chemical sensor, indoor air, nanoporous matrices, sol-gel

S. Mariano; W. Wang; G. Brunelle; Y. Bigay; T. H. Tran-Thi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Influence of seasonal variations on ambient air quality in Al Jahra governorate, in the state of Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes the air pollution yearlong hourly mean continuous data from one of the monitoring station located at the top of polyclinic in Al-Jahra city in the State of Kuwait. The measurements cover major pollutants such as carbon monoxide, methane, ... Keywords: Al-Jahra, air pollution, continuous monitoring, seasonal variations, traffic

Raslan Alenezi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989: Energy, Cost, and Program Implications.  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Standard 62-89) Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality'' is the new heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry consensus for ventilation air in commercial buildings. Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) references ASHRAE Standard 62-81 (the predecessor to Standard 62-89) in their current environmental documents for required ventilation rates. Through its use, it had become evident to Bonneville that Standard 62-81 needed interpretation. Now that the revised Standard (Standard 62-89) is available, its usefulness needs to be evaluated. Based on current information and public comment, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) revised Standard 62-1981 to Standard 62-89. Bonneville's study estimated the energy and cost implications of ASHRAE Standard 62-89 using simulations based on DOE-2.1D, a computer simulation program which estimates building use hourly as a function of building characteristics and climatic location. Ten types of prototypical commercial buildings used by Bonneville for load forecasting purposes were examined: Large and Small Office, Large and Small Retail, Restaurant, Warehouse, Hospital, Hotel, School, and Grocery. These building characterizations are based on survey and energy metering data and represent average or typical construction and operation practices and mechanical system types. Prototypical building ventilation rates were varied in five steps to estimate the impacts of outside air on building energy use. 11 refs., 14 tabs.

Steele, Tim R.; Brown, Marilyn A.

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989: Energy, Cost, and Program Implications.  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Standard 62-89) Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality'' is the new heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry consensus for ventilation air in commercial buildings. Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) references ASHRAE Standard 62-81 (the predecessor to Standard 62-89) in their current environmental documents for required ventilation rates. Through its use, it had become evident to Bonneville that Standard 62-81 needed interpretation. Now that the revised Standard (Standard 62-89) is available, its usefulness needs to be evaluated. Based on current information and public comment, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) revised Standard 62-1981 to Standard 62-89. Bonneville's study estimated the energy and cost implications of ASHRAE Standard 62-89 using simulations based on DOE-2.1D, a computer simulation program which estimates building use hourly as a function of building characteristics and climatic location. Ten types of prototypical commercial buildings used by Bonneville for load forecasting purposes were examined: Large and Small Office, Large and Small Retail, Restaurant, Warehouse, Hospital, Hotel, School, and Grocery. These building characterizations are based on survey and energy metering data and represent average or typical construction and operation practices and mechanical system types. Prototypical building ventilation rates were varied in five steps to estimate the impacts of outside air on building energy use. 11 refs., 14 tabs.

Steele, Tim R.; Brown, Marilyn A.

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

THE EFFECTS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AT AN OHIO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inorganic pollutants: carbon dioxides carbon monoxides ozonetotal aldehydes, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfurquality standards. Carbon dioxide concentrations increased

Berk, J.V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Heating Products Final Rule: Technical Support Document Chapter 16  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool Heaters March 2010 16-i CHAPTER 16. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ANALYSIS TABLE OF CONTENTS 16.1 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 16-1 16.2 AIR EMISSIONS ANALYSIS ...................................................................................... 16-1 16.2.1 Air Emissions Descriptions.......................................................................... 16-1 16.2.2 Air Quality Regulation ................................................................................. 16-4

436

Preparing for the clean air act amendments  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state air quality control agencies are in the midst of developing regulations and programs to meet the ambitious goals of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. The CAAA--which call for stricter air quality standards, a greater number of pollutants and sources to be regulated, new operating permits, and more stringent enforcement of air quality violations--are expected to have a significant impact on virtually every facility in the country. An important deadline in the implementation of the CAAA is November 1993. That is when individual states must submit their proposed operating permit programs to the EPA, as mandated by Title 5 of the Amendments. The EPA then has one year after receiving a state program to accept or reject it. Once a state's program is accepted, all major sources of air pollution in that state have one year to apply for an operating air permit. Although the initial deadlines for business and industry are up to two years away, sufficient information is now available to take the first steps toward compliance with the new air quality regulations. Even while the details of the new rules are being hammered out, plant engineering can and should begin laying the groundwork for their own permit applications. Time and effort spent preparing now for the provisions of the CAAA will pay off in the long run.

Boomer, B.; Bensinger, D. (Midwest Research Inst., Kansas City, MO (United States) Midwest Research Inst., Cary, NC (United States))

1993-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

438

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Voltage Unbalance: Power Quality Issues, Related Standards and Mitigation Techniques: Effect of Unbalanced Voltage on End Use Equipm ent Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unbalanced voltages can result in adverse effects on equipment and the electric distribution system. Under unbalanced conditions the distribution system will incur more losses and heating effects, and be less stable. The effect of voltage unbalance can also be detrimental to equipment such as induction motors, power electronic converters, and adjustable speed drives (ASDs). The purpose of this study is to investigate the causes and effects of voltage unbalance as well as the related standards and mitigat...

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air quality standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Oklahoma Clean Air Act (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the authority for the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to administer programs to maintain and monitor air quality across Oklahoma. The Department monitors...

442

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States Air Quality Analysis Based on AEO-2006 Assumptions for 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How would air quality and greenhouse gas emissions be affected if significant numbers of Americans drove cars that were fueled by the power grid? A recently completed assessment conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council made a detailed study of the question looking at a variety of scenarios involving the U.S. fleet of power generation and its fleet of light-duty and medium-duty cars and trucks. The study focused on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs...

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

443

On-line Chemistry within WRF: Description and Evaluation of a State-of-the-Art Multiscale Air Quality and Weather Prediction Model  

SciTech Connect

This is a conference proceeding that is now being put together as a book. This is chapter 2 of the book: "INTEGRATED SYSTEMS OF MESO-METEOROLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS" published by Springer. The chapter title is "On-line Chemistry within WRF: Description and Evaluation of a State-of-the-Art Multiscale Air Quality and Weather Prediction Model." The original conference was the COST-728/NetFAM workshop on Integrated systems of meso-meteorological and chemical transport models, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, May 21-23, 2007.

Grell, Georg; Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Peckham, Steven E.; McKeen, Stuart A.; Salzmann, Marc; Freitas, Saulo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Quality-Controlled Upper-Air Sounding Dataset for TiMREX/SoWMEX: Development and Corrections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Terrain-Influenced Monsoon Rainfall Experiment (TiMREX), which coincided with Taiwans Southwesterly Monsoon Experiment2008 (SoWMEX-08), the upper-air sounding network over the Taiwan region was enhanced by increasing the radiosonde (...

Paul E. Ciesielski; Wen-Ming Chang; Shao-Chin Huang; Richard H. Johnson; Ben Jong-Dao Jou; Wen-Chau Lee; Po-Hsiung Lin; Ching-Hwang Liu; Junhong Wang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Room Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Superefficient Room Air Conditioners year month keywords appliance energy efficiency energy efficiency incentives Market Transformation standards url https isswprod lbl gov...

447

Environmental quality  

SciTech Connect

Major emphasis is placed on man environment interactions and environment management. Topics include: ecology and living resources; the global environment; water and air quality; toxic substances and environmental health; energy; natural resources; NEPA regulations; and land use.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Rooftop Unitary Air Conditioner with Integral Dedicated Outdoor Air System  

SciTech Connect

Energy use of rooftop and other unitary air-conditioners in commercial applications accounts for about 1 quad (10{sup 15} Btu) of primary energy use annually in the U.S. [Reference 7]. The realization that this cooling equipment accounts for the majority of commercial building cooled floorspace and the majority also of commercial building energy use has spurred development of improved-efficiency equipment as well as development of stricter standards addressing efficiency levels. Another key market driver affecting design of rooftop air-conditioning equipment has been concern regarding comfort and the control of humidity. Trends for increases in outdoor air ventilation rates in certain applications, and the increasing concern about indoor air quality problems associated with humidity levels and moisture in buildings points to a need for improved dehumidification capability in air-conditioning equipment of all types. In many cases addressing this issue exacerbates energy efficiency, and vice versa. The integrated dedicated outdoor air system configuration developed in this project addresses both energy and comfort/humidity issues.

Tiax Llc

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

DOE/EA-1674: Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Refrigerated Bottled or Canned Beverage Vending Machines (August 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Refrigerated Bottled or Canned Beverage Vending Machines August 2009 16-i CHAPTER 16. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS TABLE OF CONTENTS 16.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 16-1 16.2 AIR EMISSIONS ANALYSIS......................................................................................... 16-1 16.2.1 Air Emissions Descriptions................................................................................ 16-1 16.2.2 Air Quality Regulation....................................................................................... 16-3 16.2.3 Analytical Methods for Air Emissions

450

NIST Global Standards Information Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MENA Quality Infrastructure Stakeholders Meeting Jun 21-22, 2010 ( Amman, JORDAN ) Event Organizer: NIST & Jordan Institution of Standards & ...

451

The Impact of Codes, Regulations, and Standards on Split-Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and Under  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes a framework for understanding the technology and regulation of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps 65,000 Btu/hr and under. The reporting framework is structured so that it can be added to in the future. This study is broken into six chapters:The basic components, refrigeration cycle, operation, and efficiency ratings of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps are covered for background information.Equipment efficiency ...

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Standards Committee American National Standards Institute Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Standards Committee American National Standards Institute Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration

McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AssessingIndoorAirQuality,ASHRAETrans. 97(2),pp896?IndoorAirQuality ASHRAETrans. pp93?101Vol. 111(I)Energy Characteristics, ASHRAE Transactions,Vol.103(

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Status of Revisions to ASHRAE Standard 62  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62- 1989 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor air Quality", adopted in 1989, is widely used by HVAC engineers to determine ventilation rates for various occupancies. This standard has also been cited in court to help demonstrate compliance with state-of the- art indoor environmental design. In August 1996, ASHRAE released for public review Standard 62-1989R, the highly controversial proposed revisions to the Standard 62- 1989. Over 8,000 comments were received on the proposed revision. Due to the significant number of concerns expressed by ASHRAE members as well as others, ASHRAE withdrew the proposed new standard and placed the current standard in "continuous maintenance." As part of the continuous maintenance process ASHRAE is transforming the current Standard 62- 1989 from a design standard to code ready document. Furthermore, two code documents will be produced4ne for low-rise residential buildings and another for other types of occupancy. Finally, two new documents, a user's manual and an IAQ guideline, will be written concurrent with the code documents. The guideline document is intended to provide state-of-the-art guidance to designers while good IAQ practices not appropriate for codification will be incorporated into the guideline. It is likely that many of the provision in Standard 62-1989R will survive in some manner in one or more of the new documents to be produced. This paper will detail some of the more significant changes that were proposed in Standard 62-1989R and review the current state of standard development.

Gallo, F. M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457