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Sample records for air pollution connecticut

  1. Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and...

  2. Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable...

  3. Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for hazardous air...

  4. Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savings Category Fuel Cells Photovoltaics Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection For the...

  5. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

  6. Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards....

  7. Air Pollution Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jeffrey

    ATS 555 Air Pollution Spring 2010 T Th 11:00 ­ 12:15, NESB 101 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis an understanding of types and sources of air pollution. 2. Examine concentrations of air pollutants and their effects on health and welfare. Review regulations governing air pollution. 3. Examine the meteorological

  8. Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion Practical Air Pollution Dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncrieff, John B.

    Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion 1 of 5 Practical ­ Air Pollution Dispersion in the lectures how such models can be used to explain observed concentrations of air pollutants in an area and to test `what-if' scenarios for pollution control and reduction. You will use the Gaussian Plume Model

  9. on man, nature & air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2008-01-01

    on man, nature & air pollution About three decades ago, itand episodes of air pollution the following summer. Wetthe increase in air pollution. This hypothesis generated

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulholland, James A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Emergency Department Visits Kristi Busico ambient air pollutants and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the roles of the physicochemical components the relation between ambient air pollution and cardiovascular conditions using ambient air quality data

  11. Pollution on the Federal Lands I: Air Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    818-19. FEDERAL LANDS AIR POLLUTION I. Interstate PollutionKay M. Crider, Interstate Air Pollution: Over A Decade ofKramer, Transboundary Air Pollution and the Clean Air Act:

  12. Air Pollution & Health in Rapidly Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucher, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Review: Air Pollution & Health in Rapidly DevelopingFrank Murray (Eds. ). Air Pollution & Health in Rapidlyand researchers alike, Air Pollution & Health provides a

  13. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Union of Air Pollution Prevention Associations,The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976, GeometAnnual Meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association,

  14. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ext. 6782 Combustion -Generated Indoor Air Pollution Craigcontrol of air pollution from indoor combustion sources. Ifocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namely

  15. Air Pollution Socio-Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Traffic Air Pollution and Socio-Economic Status Gregory C Pratt PhD Kristie Ellickson PhD #12 · Relationships #12;Living near traffic increases exposure to air pollution and is associated with adverse health exposed to traffic and air pollution. They are also more vulnerable and have an increased risk of adverse

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulholland, James A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution and Respiratory Emergency Department Visits Jennifer L. Peel pollution and respiratory outcomes. More refined assessment has been limited by study size and available air quality data. Methods: Measurements of 5 pollutants (particulate matter PM10 , ozone, nitrogen dioxide NO2

  17. Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naihua Duan

    2011-01-01

    human exposure to air pollution." SIMS Technical Report No.human exposure to air pollution." Environment International.Annual Meeting of the A i r Pollution Control Association,

  18. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometNovakov, T. : Formation of Pollution Particulate NitrogenGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.

  19. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

  20. on man, nature & air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2008-01-01

    fossil-fuel combustion, are the source of air pollution. Thepollution episodes is clearly associated with areas of high fossil-fuel combustion and

  1. Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to several on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

  2. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.W. Traynor Introduction Air pollution research has focused

  3. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    of indoor combustion-generated air pollution in residen-LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D.L,BL-5918 COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION C. D.

  4. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore »and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  5. Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits Forms and Air Pollutant Emission Notices (APENs) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. Air Pollution 7.1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    CHAPTER 7 Air Pollution 7.1 INTRODUCTION 7.2 OVERVIEW OF EMISSIONS 7.3 THE CLEAN AIR ACT 7.4 THE POLLUTANT STANDARDS INDEX 7.5 CRITERIA POLLUTANTS 7.6 TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS 7.7 AIR POLLUTION IN THE WORLD'S MEGACITIES 7.8 MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS 7.9 STATIONARY SOURCES 7.10 AIR POLLUTION AND METEOROLOGY 7

  7. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  8. Air Pollutant Data for Linking Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollutant Data for Linking Studies New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services #12;New Jersey Close-up View View from Space #12;Air Pollutant/Health Linking Studies in New Jersey · CDC 03074 pollutants and asthma hospitalization #12;Asthma and Hazardous Air Pollutants · Study A ­ All 566

  9. Air Pollution (Illinois) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Illinois Environmental Protection Agency This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and...

  10. China's international trade and air pollution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    boundary transport of air pollution (31) must confront theTransport of Asian air pollution to North America. Geophys2010) Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution 2010 Executive

  11. Air pollution and childhood respiratory allergies in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, JD; Akinbami, LJ; Woodruff, TJ

    2008-01-01

    GG. 2006. Ambient air pollution and asthma exacerbations inallergic symptoms and air pollution among a nationwideincreases in indices of air pollution have been found to

  12. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Air Act, and Industrial Pollution Professor Alice Kaswan* I.a. Existing Air Pollution. . b. Do Climate Policieson Cli- mate Change, Pollution, and the Clean Air Act." I

  13. Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arkansas Air Pollution Control code is adopted pursuant to Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101). ) By authority of the same State...

  14. Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naihua Duan

    2011-01-01

    in air pollution risk assessment and management. With thepollution." In: Total Exposure Assessment Methodology: A New Horizon, 166-195, Air and Waste Management

  15. Air Pollution, ATS555 Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Air Pollution, ATS555 Colorado State University Fall 2014 Mondays and Wednesdays @ 4:00 ­ 5:30 Room://ramct.colostate.edu/) Textbooks: Air Pollution: Its Origin and Control, 3rd Edition, by Wark, Warner and Davis, Addison Wesley. Specific objectives include: 1. Develop an understanding of types and sources of air pollution. 2. Examine

  16. Scottish Air Pollution and Health Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scottish Air Pollution and Health Workshop Session 4 Joint Research Policy Needs and Interactions needs and how can we work together effectively on these to reduce the adverse effects of air pollution together effectively on these to reduce the adverse effects of air pollution in Scotland. Modelling

  17. 3, 35433588, 2003 3-D air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 3, 3543­3588, 2003 3-D air pollution modelling L. M. Frohn et al. Title Page Abstract hemispheric nested air pollution model L. M. Frohn, J. H. Christensen, J. Brandt, C. Geels, and K. M. Hansen 2003 Correspondence to: L. M. Frohn (lmf@dmu.dk) 3543 #12;ACPD 3, 3543­3588, 2003 3-D air pollution

  18. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress. The evidence suggests that air pollution aerosols that are incorporated in orographic clouds slow down cloud

  19. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with the enjoyment of life and property. The criteria for determining compliance is listed in the regulations, and is based on other air pollution and ambient air standards...

  20. Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result, or materials. Before 1200 AD · Air pollution results from wood burning, tanning, decaying trash, smelting with carbon PbO + C -> Pb + CO Pollutants Produced: CO, SO2 ·Hong, et al., Greenland ice evidence

  1. AT 560 (2 Credits) Air Pollution Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT 560 (2 Credits) Air Pollution Measurement Spring 2013 Instructor: Jeff Collett, 491 Resolution and Student Conduct Services." #12;ATS 560 - Air Pollution Measurement Spring 2013 Schedule Useful in experimental air quality monitoring and re- search. 2. Become familiar with the process of designing, proposing

  2. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    be- tween combustion and co-pollutant pollution). 63. SeeINDUSTRIAL POLLUTION EPA regulations reduce combustioncombustion technology, and the presence and nature of air pollution

  3. Air Pollution Controls | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Natural Resources Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions...

  4. Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes...

  5. Air Pollution Control (Indiana) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    unnecessary requirements and to verify compliance with applicable state and federal air pollution laws and regulations. OAQ is comprised of five branches, each with specific...

  6. Effects of air pollution on vascular thrombosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabor, Caroline Mary

    2011-07-05

    Increases in air pollution, especially the particulate component, are associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, possibly through increases in thrombogenic mechanisms. The research presented in this thesis ...

  7. General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the air pollution rules to secure and maintain levels of air quality that are consistent with the...

  8. Air Pollution - Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ontario Ministry of the Environment The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces...

  9. Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of Air Pollution Robert W. Haley, M.D. Professor of Medicine Director, Division of Epidemiology University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, Texas ? Texas Medical Association has adopted resolutions on clean air: ? 2007... of how to maintain energy efficiency while reducing air pollution. ? Supported legislation based on the findings. The Medical Professor Increasingly Concerned ? Asthma ? Emphysema ? Heart Attacks ? Stunted lung development ? Brain damage...

  10. Effect modification by residential traffic-related air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    with application to air pollution exposures. Stat Med. 2005;G, Segala C, et al. Air pollution, asthma attacks, andWilkins Asthma and Air Pollution 38. Brauer M. How much, how

  11. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    H. N. ; Braga, A. L. F. , Air pollution from biomass burningY. , Increased estimates of air-pollution emissions from10. Tsao, C. -C. , Air pollution emissions from biofuels

  12. Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a statewide air pollution control program, to promulgate regulations related to air pollution control,...

  13. Effect modification by residential traffic-related air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    A. Case-crossover analysis of air pollution health effects:Lumley T. Case-crossover analyses of air pollution exposure

  14. Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and...

  15. Effects of Air Pollution Control on Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    Urban air pollution and climate are closely connected due to shared generating processes (e.g., combustion) for emissions of the driving gases and aerosols. They are also connected because the atmospheric lifecycles of ...

  16. Health Damages from Air Pollution in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matus, Kira

    In China, elevated levels of urban air pollution result in substantial adverse health impacts for its large and rapidly growing urban population. An expanded version of the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA), ...

  17. Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide end-use energy efficiency, or avoid methane emissions...

  18. Air pollution and asthma severity in adults Rage Estelle 1 *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Air pollution and asthma severity in adults Rage Estelle 1 * , Siroux Val rieé 2 , K nzliü Nino 3 4 that exposure to air pollution affects asthma, but the effect of air pollution on asthma severity has not been outdoor concentrations of air pollution. Methods Asthma severity over the last 12 months was assessed

  19. Measuring air pollution using a mobile, bicycle-based platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measuring air pollution using a mobile, bicycle-based platform Steve Hankey University-walkability Physical activity Air pollution 2 #12;Approach: Mobile, bicycle-based sampling Air pollution measurements;Results: Exposure by mode 11 #12;Next steps: Land-use regression model Air pollution measurements LUR

  20. On the Costs of Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Kenneth A.; Kazimi, Camilla

    1995-01-01

    Costs of Air Pollution fromMotor Vehicles By Kenneth A.we have found, motor vehicle pollution sterns best addressedCosts of Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles K A Small and C°

  1. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    and combustion has significant impacts on air pollution [8-combustion can also have significant impacts on air pollution [pollution estimation was developed by a spatially explicit approach with synthesized information of fuel loading, combustion

  2. Electric & Gas Conservation Programs Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund Programs for Commercial & Industrial Customers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sermakekian, E.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation Programs Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund Programs for Commercial & Industrial Customers Presented by: CL&P?s Conservation and Load Management Department 2 ? Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund (CEEF) was created... in 1998 by CT State Legislature ? Energy efficiency is a valuable resource for Connecticut, it: ? Reduces air pollutants and greenhouse gases ? Creates monetary savings for customers ? Reduces need for more energy generation ? Creates jobs ? Money...

  3. Air Pollution Control Board (Virginia) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quality The Air Division in the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Air Pollution Control Board work together to control present and future sources of air...

  4. Local air pollutants threaten Lake Tahoe’s clarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    AS (eds. ). Effects of Air Pollution on Western Forests.Air Waste Management Assoc, Transactions Ser No 16, p 279-and support. (California Air Resources Board) for their

  5. Ability of Catalytic Converters to Reduce Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    NOx - 1 Ability of Catalytic Converters to Reduce Air Pollution MEASUREMENT OF SELECTED AIR Air Pollution MEASUREMENT OF SELECTED AIR POLLUTANTS IN CAR EXHAUST INTRODUCTION Automobile engines of gasoline (hydrocarbons, CxHy) in air: CxHy + O2 CO2 + H2O + heat (1) When there is the correct balance

  6. Review: Clearing the Air: The Health and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China Mun S. Ho andEconomic Damages of Air Pollution in China. Cambridge, MA:the assessment of air pollution and its health and economic

  7. Short Communication Proceedings: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short Communication Proceedings: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change on Forest Ecosystems Pollution Effects on Forest Ecosystems "Forests under Anthropogenic Pressure ­ Effects of Air Pollution or ground-level ozone (O3) is still the phytotoxic air pollutant of major interest. Challenging issues

  8. Measuring Bicyclists' Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Measuring Bicyclists' Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Alex Bigazzi PSU Transportation doses 4.Health effects 4Urban Bicyclists' Pollution Uptake #12;Bicyclists' Exposure to Air Pollution 5 reduce exposure risks for bikers? Urban transportation system Bicyclists' uptake of air pollution #12

  9. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial PollutionCONSIDERATIONS IN CLIMATE POLICY . A.pollutant Considerations into Climate Policy 1.

  10. Air pollution kills. So what? Air quality engineering to improve public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    9/14/12 1 Air pollution kills. So what? Air quality engineering to improve public health;9/14/12 2 Air Quality Engineering H Air Quality Engineering H #12;9/14/12 3 Really? Air pollution running out of coffins and florists were running out of flowers. -- BBC #12;9/14/12 4 Air pollution

  11. AIR LECTURES HANDOUT 3 P Rhines 21 Feb 03 AIR: THE SMALL (AIR POLLUTION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AIR LECTURES HANDOUT 3 P Rhines 21 Feb 03 AIR: THE SMALL (AIR POLLUTION) SMOG ­ cold London fog. Mega cities Roughly 50% of world population lives in cities, 25% along coasts Asia: 2000 population: motor vehicles 600,000 in 1980 increased to 4M in 1997 90% are 2 stroke engines...high pollution Table

  12. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, andZ. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, andAir Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and

  13. Investigating the association between birth weight and complementary air pollution metrics: a cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent, Olivier; Wu, Jun; Li, Lianfa; Chung, Judith; Bartell, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration on Air Pollution and Pregnancy Outcomes:Wilhelm M: Ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes:for traffic-related air pollution in an adverse pregnancy

  14. Identifying Traffic-Related Air Pollution Hotspots in the Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    for imporvemetns in air pollution models. Atmospheric2010). Traffic-related air pollution: A critical review offor vehicle-related air pollution exposure in minority and

  15. Investigating the association between birth weight and complementary air pollution metrics: a cohort study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent, Olivier; Wu, Jun; Li, Lianfa; Chung, Judith; Bartell, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration on Air Pollution and Pregnancy Outcomes:Wilhelm M: Ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes:for traffic-related air pollution in an adverse pregnancy

  16. Where the Sky Is the Right Color: Scale and Air Pollution in the Big Bend Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donez, Francisco Juan

    2010-01-01

    Politics of Transboundary Air Pollution. Lawrence, Kansas:W. Stationary Source Air Pollution Law. Washington, D. C. :Public Understandings of Air Pollution: The ‘Localisation’

  17. Childhood Cancer and Traffic-Related Air Pollution Exposure in Pregnancy and Early Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    al. 2008) or sophisticated air pollution modeling strategiestraffic-related air pollution expo- sures in relation toassocia- tions between air pollution and cancer are not

  18. The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    Victor E. (1990). "Air Pollution and Fatal Lung Disease inEffects of Photochemical Oxidant Air Pollution in Exercisinget alo (1992). "Air Pollution and Respiratory Symptoms in

  19. Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and mor- tality in Losin studies linking chronic air pollution exposure to health2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects with

  20. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science,Canada Jacobson, Mark Z. Air Pollution and Global Warming:His timely book, Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,

  1. Personal and Ambient Air Pollution is Associated with Increased Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Children with Asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    indoor, and community air pollution research. Environ Healthin pediatric asthmatics and air pollution: differences inwith peak particulate air pollution and effect modification

  2. Agricultural burning monitored for air pollutants in Imperial County; exposure reduction recommendations developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnly, Martha; Naik-Patel, Kinnery; Wall, Stephen; Quintana, Penelope J. E.; Pon, Diamon; Wagner, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    et al. 1977). Local Air Pollution management and air qualityPollution Control District [APCD]. 2010. Smoke ManagementSmoke management. Currently, CARB County Air Pollution

  3. Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes is to prevent the excessive buildup of air pollutants during air pollution episodes, thus...

  4. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  5. Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    structures, installed or acquired for the primary purpose of controlling or disposing of air pollution that if released would render the air harmful or inimical to the public...

  6. Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through...

  7. Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air...

  8. Air Pollution Control Permit to Construct and Permit to Operate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation The Air Pollution Control Division of the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation...

  9. iMAP: Indirect Measurement of Air Pollution with Cellphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    iMAP: Indirect Measurement of Air Pollution with Cellphones Murat Demirbas Computer Sci. & Eng at the cellphones is unneeded. We focus on the air pollutant exposure estimation problem as an application applications of the indirect sensing problem. To keep our discussion concrete, we focus on the air pollutant

  10. An Emerging Triad: Air Pollution, Beetles, and Wildfire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Emerging Triad: Air Pollution, Beetles, and Wildfire Tree Signals and Beetle Outbreaks Pacific stressed by drought and air pollution may attract bark beetles, which overwhelm the trees' defense of trees across the West. Environmental stresses like prolonged drought and increased air pollution

  11. Observed relationships of ozone air pollution with temperature and emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stehr, Jeffrey

    Observed relationships of ozone air pollution with temperature and emissions Bryan J. Bloomer,1, and R. R. Dickerson (2009), Observed relationships of ozone air pollution with temperature and emissions decreased by 43% for the time period 1995 to 2002 compared with 2003 to 2006 as a result of air pollution

  12. Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales Ruth Doherty, Massimo Vieno, Ian Mac) EMEP2009 (less complex) Observations Modelling regional air pollution #12;Nested regions: 50 to 5 to 1 km2 O3 concentration (ppb) NO2 concentration (µg m-3) #12;Modelling Urban air pollution Regional

  13. Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted concentration of relevant Benefit Analysis The sanitary benefits brought about by air pollution improvement as a result of climate by a collateral reduction of air pollutant emissions, hence a lower cost of AQ legislation. Modelling Framework

  14. Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health: Preliminary results and testing a methodology with hospitals for the study of air pollution impact on specific deceases (old people admitted in emergency morbidity data and pollutants concentrations at the regional/urban scale Health and air quality in France

  15. ENV 6105 Page 1 of 6 Fall 2011 Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    ENV 6105 Page 1 of 6 Fall 2011 Syllabus Air Pollution ENV 6105.901 (ref# 90504) Fall 2011 Course Description: A study of air pollution. Emphasis is given to principles underlying our understanding of ambient air pollution, its sources, its effects, and mechanisms for its management. Credit Hours and Work

  16. Hierarchical Bayesian models for space-time air pollution data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    Hierarchical Bayesian models for space-time air pollution data Sujit K. Sahu June 14, 2011 sets have led to a step change in the analysis of space-time air pollution data. Accurate predictions-time air pollution data and illustrate the benefits of modeling with a real data example on monitoring

  17. REVIEW Open Access Climate change, air pollution and extreme events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Open Access Climate change, air pollution and extreme events leading to increasing dramatically during the past few decades not only in industrialized countries. Urban air pollution from motor be explained only in changes occurred in the environment. Despite some differences in the air pollution profile

  18. IMMEDIATE COMMUNICATION Air pollution impairs cognition, provokes depressive-like

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randy J.

    IMMEDIATE COMMUNICATION Air pollution impairs cognition, provokes depressive-like behaviors Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Particulate matter air pollution is a pervasive the effects of prolonged exposure to air pollution are well characterized with respect to pulmonary

  19. Proceedings of 10th International Symposium "Transport and Air Pollution"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings of 10th International Symposium "Transport and Air Pollution" September 17-19, 2001 ­ Boulder, Colorado USA Air pollution mapping over a city ­ virtual stations and morphological indicators Surveillance et l'tude de la Pollution atmosphrique en Alsace), Schiltigheim, FRANCE Abstract Air quality

  20. Urban Form and Air Pollution in US Urban Areas!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Urban Form and Air Pollution in US Urban Areas! Center for Transportation Studies Research of Minnesota Grant No. 0853467 #12;Air Pollution Impacts on Health 2 EPA, 2010 Ozone PM2.5 PM10 Lead Nitrogen #12;Purpose and Research Questions 4 Purpose: Explore relationship between air pollution and urban

  1. SOLVING VERTICAL TRANSPORT AND CHEMISTRY IN AIR POLLUTION MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botchev, Mike

    SOLVING VERTICAL TRANSPORT AND CHEMISTRY IN AIR POLLUTION MODELS P.J.F. BERKVENS #3; , M.A. BOTCHEV; transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we

  2. VALMET-A valley air pollution model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1983-09-01

    Following a thorough analysis of meteorological data obtained from deep valleys of western Colorado, a modular air-pollution model has been developed to simulate the transport and diffusion of pollutants released from an elevated point source in a well-defined mountain valley during the nighttime and morning transition periods. This initial version of the model, named VALMET, operates on a valley cross section at an arbitrary distance down-valley from a continuous point source. The model has been constructed to include parameterizations of the major physical processes that act to disperse pollution during these time periods. The model has not been fully evaluated. Further testing, evaluations, and development of the model are needed. Priorities for further development and testing are provided.

  3. European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to the Eastern Mediterranean during between PT modes and air pollution episodes over the East Mediterranean (5-9) led us to adopt the same months aerosols collected in Israel are highly polluted by metals (EFNi ) 120, EFCu ) 320, EFZn ) 30

  4. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  5. Development of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor for Air Pollution Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor for Air Pollution Control Eunsung Kan, Marc A. Deshusses: 10.1002/bit.10767 Abstract: A new type of bioreactor for air pollution con- trol has been developed. The new process relies on an organic-phase emulsion and actively growing pollutant- degrading

  6. Application to Air Pollution 5.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckman, Nancy E.

    Chapter 5 Application to Air Pollution Data 5.1 Introduction Ambient ozone pollution in urban areas a space­time model to analyze ground­level ozone data. 77 #12; In this thesis, we are interested while the air is being carried by winds, secondary pollutants are generally more widespread than primary

  7. Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions, 2nd ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Review: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science,Jacobson, Mark Z. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History,and hazards related to pollution, Professor Mark Z. Jacobson

  8. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    and GHG-generating industrial processes. Id. at ES-I5, 2-21.the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution Professor Aliceto implement CLIMATE CHANGE & INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION Part IV

  9. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, & Infant Mortality in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Using the most comprehensive data file ever compiled on air pollution, water pollution, environmental regulations, and infant mortality from a developing country, the paper examines the effectiveness of India’s environmental ...

  10. Unequal State Air Pollution: Adopting and Adapting to State Clean Air Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, Derek John

    2015-05-31

    context can limit its ability to regulate air pollution. These factors contribute to the unequal protection of air quality across the United States....

  11. Synoptic weather patterns and modification of the association between air pollution and human mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Synoptic weather patterns and modification of the association between air pollution and human pollution and mortality, an examination of air pollution and human mortality associations (ecologic) using hybrid spatial synoptic classification procedures was conducted. Concentrations of air pollutants

  12. Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution emergencies, rules for open burning and incineration of commercial and...

  13. Air Pollution Control Rules (West Virginia) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Environmental Protection The listed rules were enacted as directed by the Air Pollution Control Act. Together, these rules guide the monitoring, permitting and...

  14. Air Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Protection The purpose of this law is to provide for a coordinated statewide program of air pollution prevention, abatement and control; to facilitate cooperation across...

  15. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollutionentitled "Perspectives on Climate Change, Pollution, and theQuality Co-benefits into Climate Change Policymaking, lOP

  16. Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution, affects nearly 15 million people in the United States, one-third of them

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution as a greater understanding of the types of air pollutants that cause the most harm. Seminal findings, supporting a proposed update to existing air quality standards. Air pollutant ozone causes childhood asthma

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AIR POLLUTION DYNAMICS DUE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    spots. ­ Global weather patterns effected. ­ CO2 and other pollutant emissions contributing to globalNUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AIR POLLUTION DYNAMICS DUE TO POINT SOURCE EMISSIONS FROM AN INDUSTRIAL, and ultimately effects the global climate balance. · About 60% of emissions from point sources · Major pollutants

  18. Country Report Impact of growing urbanization and air pollution on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    discussion is presented here of the degradation in air quality in major cities, the source of the pollutants5 Country Report Impact of growing urbanization and air pollution on the regional climate over. censusindia.net/, Fig. 1). The population growth has been mainly centered around cities due pri- marily

  19. Air Pollution XVI 247 Emissions of Nitrogen Dioxide from Modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Air Pollution XVI 247 Emissions of Nitrogen Dioxide from Modern Diesel Vehicles G.A. Bishop and D in NO2 and ozone in a number of cities in Europe. For instance, he shows a very strong correlation;Air Pollution XVI 248 The DPF is an extremely effective means to achieve particle reduction goals

  20. Association between Local Traffic-Generated Air Pollution and Preeclampsia and Preterm Delivery in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jun; Ren, Cizao; Delfino, Ralph J; Chung, Judith; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

    2009-01-01

    been associated with air pollution in only two recent U.S.indoor, and community air pollution research. Environ Healthvariation of outdoor air pollution. Atmos Environ 42( 33):

  1. Air Pollution and Mortality in 20 U.S. Cities Particulate Air Pollution and Mortality in 20 U.S. Cities: 1987-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    Air Pollution and Mortality in 20 U.S. Cities 1 Particulate Air Pollution and Mortality in 20 U Word Count: 3032 #12;Air Pollution and Mortality in 20 U.S. Cities 2 Abstract Background: Time-series analyses have linked contemporary levels of air pollution, particularly particles, to daily mortality

  2. About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health indoor and outdoor air pollution. CDC's asthma program focuses on three main activities: (1) tracking public health agencies. For example, CDC staff are currently studying the effect of outdoor air pollution

  3. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 2 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution highway running in a north-south direction has a traffic volume (TV) of 1000 vehicles/hr traveling in both directions (average of 500 each way). The CO emission factor (EF) for traffic is estimated to be 60 g/vehicle

  4. Short-term effects of air pollution: a panel study of blood markers in patients with chronic pulmonary disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Short-term effects of air pollution: a panel study of bloodindicates that ambient air pollution is associated withto daily changes in air pollution in Erfurt, Germany. 12

  5. Mitochondrial Genetic Background Modifies the Relationship between Traffic-Related Air Pollution Exposure and Systemic Biomarkers of Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    N, Vaziri ND (2011) Air pollution and circulating biomarkersParticulate matter air pollution and cardiovascular disease:to fine particulate air pollution. Circulation 114: 2443–

  6. Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    to traffic-related air pollution and the risk of coronaryof particulate air pollution. Environ Health Perspect 2001,between ambient air pollution and daily mortality among

  7. Particulate Air Pollution, Ambulatory Heart Rate Variability, and Cardiac Arrhythmia in Retirement Community Residents with Coronary Artery Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartell, Scott M.; Longhurst, John; Tjoa, Thomas; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2013-01-01

    with traffic and air pollution in patients with coronary2009. A panel study of air pollution in subjects with heartcardia triggered by air pollution in patients with coronary

  8. Particulate air pollution, ambulatory heart rate variability, and cardiac arrhythmia in retirement community residents with coronary artery disease.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartell, Scott M; Longhurst, John; Tjoa, Thomas; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J

    2013-01-01

    with traffic and air pollution in patients with coronary2009. A panel study of air pollution in subjects with heartcardia triggered by air pollution in patients with coronary

  9. Pollution Control in a Manufacturing System Stochastic Models for Analysis and Control of Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosavi, Abhijit

    Pollution Control in a Manufacturing System Stochastic Models for Analysis and Control of Air Pollution in a Manufacturing System Jan, 1, 2005 Technical Report SOPTL-05-01 Missouri University of Science models that can be used for controlling pollution in a manufacturing system. The models are developed

  10. Air-pollutant emissions from kerosene space heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leaderer, B.P.

    1982-12-10

    Air pollutant emissions from portable convective and radiant kerosene space heaters were measured in an environmental chamber. Emission factors for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen depletion are presented. The data suggest that the use of such heaters in residences can result in exposures to air pollutants in excess of ambient air quality standards and in some cases in excess of occupational health standards.

  11. University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut Regional: Avery Point, Greater Hartford, Stamford #12;Financial Report For the Year Ended June 30, 2010 #12;#12;University of Connecticut June 30, 2010 Message from the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Founded in 1881, the University of Connecticut

  12. Diminished Defenses In Children May Lead To Increased Susceptibility To Inflammatory Effects of Air Pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Erina May

    2012-01-01

    et al. , Outdoor air pollution and uncontrolled asthma in142-7. Schwartz, J. , Air pollution and children's health.OEHHA), O.o.E.H.H.A. Air Pollution and Children's Health.

  13. Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Wheeze in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Wheeze in Asthmaticdaily changes in ambient air pollution. Our data suggest the2004. The effect of air pollution on lung development from

  14. Air Pollution and Defensive Expenditures: Evidence from Particulate-Filtering Facemasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Quan; Zhang, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    behavior and urban air pollution. ” Land Economics 73:340–S.T. Holgate. 2002. “Air pollution and health. ” The lancetsustained exposure to air pollution on life expectancy from

  15. Air Pollution and Infant Health: What Can We Learn From California's Recent Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Janet; Neidell, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Bobak, M. AOutdoor Air Pollution, Low Birth weight, andAThe Impact of Air Pollution on Infant Mortality: EvidenceRelation to Weather and Air Pollution in Christchurch, New

  16. The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark; McCubbin, Donald; Kim, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution. UCD-ITS-RR-96-3 (by Ozone Air Pollution from Motor-Vehicles. UCD- ITS-RR-96-by ozone air pollution from motor vehicles J. J. Murphy†?,

  17. Ambient air pollution exposure and full-term birth weight in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Jesdale, Bill M; Sadd, James L; Pastor , Manuel

    2010-01-01

    P-M, Howel D: Particulate air pollution and fetal health. Aindustrial city with high air pollution levels. Arch EnvironJ, Christiani D: Is air pollution a risk factor for low

  18. Climate Policy Design: Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Urban Air Pollution Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Climate Policy Design: Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Urban Air Pollution Policy Design: Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Urban Air Pollution Constraints by Marcus. The third case examines the benefits of increased policy coordination between air pollution constraints

  19. A Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khedo, Kavi K; Mungur, Avinash; Mauritius, University of; Mauritius,; 10.5121/ijwmn.2010.2203

    2010-01-01

    Sensor networks are currently an active research area mainly due to the potential of their applications. In this paper we investigate the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) for air pollution monitoring in Mauritius. With the fast growing industrial activities on the island, the problem of air pollution is becoming a major concern for the health of the population. We proposed an innovative system named Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System (WAPMS) to monitor air pollution in Mauritius through the use of wireless sensors deployed in huge numbers around the island. The proposed system makes use of an Air Quality Index (AQI) which is presently not available in Mauritius. In order to improve the efficiency of WAPMS, we have designed and implemented a new data aggregation algorithm named Recursive Converging Quartiles (RCQ). The algorithm is used to merge data to eliminate duplicates, filter out invalid readings and summarise them into a simpler form which significantly reduce the amount of dat...

  20. Session 3: Past, current and future exposure to air pollutants and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session 3: Past, current and future exposure to air pollutants and its effects Chris Dibben, Tom measurements and model to evaluate spatial and temporal trends in air pollution exposure and resulting health Pollution legislation Price shocks #12;Air pollution trends-current Why are we interested in air pollution

  1. The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

    1996-01-01

    without motor-vehicle related pollution. This diagram is forBY OZONE AIR POLLUTION FROM MOTOR VEHICLES Report #12 in thePOLLUTION FROM MOTOR VEHICLES

  2. The Cost of Reduced Visibility Due to Particulate Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; McCubbin, Donald R.; Kim, Jin

    1996-01-01

    of all anthropogenic TSP pollution, and of motor-vehicle TSPPARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION FROM MOTOR VEHICLES Report #13 inPOLLUTION FROM MOTOR VEHICLES

  3. Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    assessing air pollution exposure within cities as a priorityof air pollution exposure within cities or the associ- atedpollution levels are spatially autocorrelated within cities, and

  4. Characterization of ambient air pollution for stochastic health models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batterman, S.A.

    1981-08-01

    This research is an analysis of various measures of ambient air pollution useful in cross-sectional epidemiological investigations and rick assessments. The Chestnut Ridge area health effects investigation, which includes a cross-sectional study of respiratory symptoms in young children, is used as a case study. Four large coal-fired electric generating power plants are the dominant pollution sources in this area of western Pennsylvania. The air pollution data base includes four years of sulfur dioxide and five years of total suspended particulate concentrations at seventeen monitors. Some 70 different characterizations of pollution are constructed and tested. These include pollutant concentrations at various percentiles and averaging times, exceedence measures which show the amount of time a specified threshold concentration is exceeded, and several dosage measures which transform non-linear dose-response relationships onto pollutant concentrations.

  5. Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Regulations A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and...

  6. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

  7. Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Protection Agency Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one...

  8. Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    requirements, by rule or regulation, as may be necessary to prevent, abate or control air pollution. Such requirements may be for the state as a whole or may vary from area to...

  9. An air pollution trajectory model for Southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Tamera Ann

    1996-01-01

    al. 1994). A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model was optimized to examine the southeast Texas coastal region for high ozone development. Verification of the optinuzed air pollution model was performed by a case study for a day with high ozone...

  10. Air Pollution Health Effects: Toward an Integrated Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Trent.

    Scientists and policy makers have become increasingly aware of the need to jointly study climate change and air pollution because of the interactions among policy measures and in the atmospheric chemistry that creates the ...

  11. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    sectional or intra-urban analysis of air pollution healthan epidemiologic analysis of air pollution health effects,

  12. VALMET: a valley air pollution model. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1985-04-01

    An air quality model is described for predicting air pollution concentrations in deep mountain valleys arising from nocturnal down-valley transport and diffusion of an elevated pollutant plume, and the fumigation of the plume on the valley floor and sidewalls after sunrise. Included is a technical description of the model, a discussion of the model's applications, the required model inputs, sample calculations and model outputs, and a full listing of the FORTRAN computer program. 55 refs., 27 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. The Role of Sea Spray in Cleansing Air Pollution over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    , urban air pollution, and desert dust (1), all of which act to suppress precip- itation (2 in small trade-wind clouds over the Indian Ocean showed that the average droplet con- centration in clouds was recently simulated by Khain et al. (7) using a spectral-microphysics cloud model. The amount of pollution

  14. Influence of air pollution on extrinsic childhood asthma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berciano, F.A.; Dominguez, J.; Alvarez, F.V.

    1989-02-01

    A crossed comparative study was done with 248 extrinsic asthmatic children living either in polluted or non-polluted areas (mean emission per year of sedimentary material greater than or less than 300 mg/m2/day, respectively) to establish the influence of air pollution on childhood extrinsic asthma. The mean number of wheezing crises per year was significantly higher for the children living in polluted areas (10.4 versus 7.69). In addition, incidence of severe asthma (types II, III, and IV) in children living in polluted areas was markedly increased whereas the slight form of asthma (type I) was more frequent in children living in non-polluted areas. No correlation, however, between the wheezing episodes and levels of atmospheric contaminants (fumes and SO/sub 2/) was detected when a group of 84 extrinsic asthmatic children living in polluted areas was studied longitudinally for a year. The data indicate that air pollution, as an isolated agent, plays a transient role in the appearance of wheezing episodes in subjects with extrinsic asthma. Results also suggest that the air pollution may potentiate wheezing episodes via alternative mechanisms.

  15. Environmental Health Perspectives volume 119 | number 8 | August 2011 1123 Predicting air pollution concentrations at reso-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    air pollution concentrations at reso- lutions capable of capturing local-scale pollut- ant gradients of approaches may be used to model air pollution over large areas, includ- ing interpolation of fixed use for producing local- scale pollution estimates. Interpolation of fixed-site air pollution

  16. Modelling air pollution abatement in deep street canyons by means of air scrubbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Giovanni, Marina; Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Salisburgo, Cesare Dari; Giammaria, Franco; Monaco, Alessio; Spanto, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Deep street canyons are characterized by weak ventilation and recirculation of air. In such environment, the exposure to particulate matter and other air pollutants is enhanced, with a consequent worsening of both safety and health. The main solution adopted by the international community is aimed at the reduction of the emissions. In this theoretical study, we test a new solution: the removal of air pollutants close to their sources by a network of Air Pollution Abatement (APA) devices. The APA technology depletes gaseous and particulate air pollutants by a portable and low-consuming scrubbing system, that mimics the processes of wet and dry deposition. We estimate the potential pollutant abatement efficacy of a single absorber by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The presence of the scrubber effectively creates an additional sink at the bottom of the canyon, accelerating its cleaning process by up to 70%, when an almost perfect scrubber (90% efficiency) is simulated. The efficacy of absorber is not...

  17. Energy Consumption and Air Pollutant Emissions Barnard College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Energy Consumption and Air Pollutant Emissions Barnard College 2005 - 2010 *Total campus square(MBtu) based on electricity, light fuel oil, and natural gas. Barnard's CO2 Emissions 2005 to 2010 (lbs/ft2/ft2 ) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 #12;2 Energy Consumption and Air

  18. HARVESTING -RESISTANT ESTIMATES OF AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON Scott L. Zeger, Francesca Dominici, and Jonathan Samet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    1 HARVESTING - RESISTANT ESTIMATES OF AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON MORTALITY Scott L. Zeger, Francesca models, air pollution. #12;4 The acute effects on morbidity and mortality of extreme episodes of particulate air pollution have been well documented by the 1952 London fog and other air pollution disasters

  19. Health damages from air pollution in China Kira Matus a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to its environment, including air pollution, the availability of clean water, and desertification. Issues

  20. The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    Costs of Air Pollution Motor Vehicles." Journal of TransportPARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION FROMMOTOR-VEHICLES IN THE LOSbound estimate of motor-vehicle pollution damages is quite a

  1. Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

  2. Air Pollution Control (Michigan) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    an annual report from a commercial, industrial, or governmental source of emission of an air contaminant if, in the judgment of the Department, information on the quantity and...

  3. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

  4. Ris-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION Jørn Roed Abstract. Beryllium-7 the pollution episode and airing shortly after is also investigated. Earlier relevant literature is reviewed descriptors; AEROSOLS; AIR FILTERS; AIR POLLUTION; AIR QUALITY; BUILDINGS; CONTAMINATION; DEPOSITION

  5. Geography 5 Lab 6: Automobile Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involving the many primary pollutants. Although emissions from an individual car are generally low, you will be estimating the annual average emissions produced by an average car at UCLA. To (very. In 2000, nationwide, personal vehicles (trucks, cars, and SUV's) were responsible for approximately 31

  6. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

  7. Air Pollution Issues of the 1990's 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Congress is currently debating various options for a new clean air bill. Whatever the outcome, significant social and economic changes are sure to result. Texas will be affected to one degree or another. These effects must be considered...

  8. Air pollution study of Laredo Customs Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welling, Vidyadhar Yeshwant

    1972-01-01

    was found between these results. This gives credence to the results obtained on the proposed ventilation system. The report discusses in length various vent1lation systems and their effects. It proposes the installation of an east-to-west forced air... CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. REFERENCES. ' VITA. Page V1 13 21 33 49 77 83 85 LIST OF TABLES Table l Comparative Sampling Results. 2 Fan Effect. 3 Existing Forced Air System Effect Page 39 45 4 Velocity Distribution Outside and Inside...

  9. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant....

  10. Adequate Numerical Solution of Air Pollution Problems by positive Difference Schemes on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrhardt, Matthias

    Adequate Numerical Solution of Air Pollution Problems by positive Difference Schemes on unbounded In this work we deal with the numerical solution of some problems of air pollution. Since the problems) pollution. The efficiency and accuracy of our method is illustrated by an example. Key words: air pollution

  11. Adequate Numerical Solution of Air Pollution Problems by positive Di#erence Schemes on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrhardt, Matthias

    Adequate Numerical Solution of Air Pollution Problems by positive Di#erence Schemes on unbounded In this work we deal with the numerical solution of some problems of air pollution. Since the problems) pollution. The e#ciency and accuracy of our method is illustrated by an example. Key words: air pollution

  12. Dissemination and Presentation of High Resolution Air Pollution Data from Mobile Sensor Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    Dissemination and Presentation of High Resolution Air Pollution Data from Mobile Sensor Nodes method of air pollution monitoring in the United States includes sampling airborne pollutants hourly. Since pollution is highly location de- pendent, there is insufficient data to accurately evaluate air

  13. Longitudinal Analysis of Short term Bronchiolitis Air Pollution Association using Semi Parametric Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesbah, Mounir

    1 Longitudinal Analysis of Short term Bronchiolitis Air Pollution Association using Semi Parametric of ambient air pollution on infant bronchiolitis hospital consultations. Infant bronchiolitis is a frequent pollution, semi parametric models. 1.1 Introduction Time-series studies of air pollution and health

  14. Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: Contribution of erosion particles from fine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commentary Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: Contribution pollution Santiago Erosion Sedimentation a b s t r a c t Air pollution in Santiago is a serious problem for a couple of days, followed by extreme levels of air pollution. Current regulations focus mostly on PM10

  15. ATOC 3500/CHEM 3151 Air Pollution Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    ), comprising 0.93% of air. The sum of these 3 is 99.96% (if we first remove the water ­ we call this "dry (O3) The thermosphere is warm due to absorption of high energy light (Xray, Gamma Ray, shortwave injure plants and animals #12;Mixing Ratios The most interesting and chemically important molecules

  16. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savings Category Fuel Cells Photovoltaics Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These...

  17. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savings Category Fuel Cells Photovoltaics Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Any...

  18. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations may apply to reciprocating...

  19. The Impact of Global Warming and Air Pollution on Patient Visits in the Emergency Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derlet, Robert W

    2001-01-01

    Review The Impact sf Global Warming and 1 Air pollution onair pollution problems and global warming will effect thesites in the human body. Global Warming Global warming goes

  20. Impacts of Climate Policy on Urban Air Pollution: Implications for Policy Design for Integrating Air-quality Co-benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Climate Policy on Urban Air Pollution: Implications for Policy Design for Integrating, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 Impacts of Climate Policy on Urban Air Pollution: Implications climate change and urban air pollution and imply that opportunities exist to simultaneously deal

  1. Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using Positive and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using July 15, 1999 #12;Abstract Much of the evidence for health e ects of particulate air pollution has come standards for ambient air pollutants to protect the public from adverse e ects. Much of the evidence for air

  2. New Problems for an Old Design: Time-Series Analyses of Air Pollution and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    New Problems for an Old Design: Time-Series Analyses of Air Pollution and Health Jonathan M. Samet1 of particulate air pollution on the same or recent days (1;2). Studies of similar time-series design of morbidity for adverse effects of particulate air pollution on the public's health. The daily time-series studies of air

  3. AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    study of recent works related to the health of the Anacostia River as well as government policies: The Importance of Population Susceptibility for Air Pollution Risk Assessment, Association of Particulate Matter and its estuaries. Literature survey revealed that considerable work has been done on the definition

  4. Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Air Pollution Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lite; Hou, Qinzhi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve the problem of the two-dimensional air pollution model. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is called the semidiscrete formulation. We show the existence and uniqueness of the ODE system and provide the error estimates for the numerical error.

  5. Minimum cost air pollution control for cotton gins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flannigan, Steven Shawnacy

    1997-01-01

    cotton, seed and gin trash. Particulate matter (PM) less than 10 (EPA9 1987) and 2.5 micrometers (EPA, 1997), referred to as PMIO and PM2.5 are criteria pollutants with corresponding National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Some cotton gins...

  6. International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1Sth International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2 Determination of VOC components in the exhaust of light vehicles fuelled with different biofuels F. Gazier 1,4*, A. De/bende 1 of the emissions shows changes with the composition of the biofuel in the levels of hydrocarbons, aromatic

  7. Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone Heather L. Papinchak1 , E for their species effectiveness in reducing ozone concentrations in a simulated indoor environment. Continuously supply system were used to simulate an indoor environment in which ozone concentrations could be measured

  8. Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

  9. A machine learning model of Manhattan air pollution at high spatial resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeler, Rachel H. (Rachel Heiden)

    2014-01-01

    A machine-learning model was created to predict air pollution at high spatial resolution in Manhattan, New York using taxi trip data. Urban air pollution increases morbidity and mortality through respiratory and cardiovascular ...

  10. The diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico Kumar

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the most comprehensive study to date of the diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal -- a bowl-shaped mountain valley of two million people with a growing air pollution ...

  11. Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control are applicable to any stationary source that has the potential to emit any federally regulated air pollutant. The...

  12. Air pollution exposure during critical time periods in gestation and alterations in cord blood lymphocyte distribution: a cohort of livebirths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    as: Herr et al. : Air pollution exposure during criticalJ, Bobak M: Ambient air pollution and pregnancy outcomes: aSaxon A, Diaz-Sanchez D: Air pollution and allergy: you are

  13. Perinatal Risk Factors and Autism in Los Angeles County: The Role of Air Pollution, Maternal Race/Ethnicity and Nativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becerra, Tracy Ann

    2013-01-01

    traffic-related air pollution in Los Angeles using aRitz B, Wilhelm M, Zhao Y. Air Pollution and Infant Death inHuman Health From Air Pollution. Epidemiology. 2010 Mar;21(

  14. Sources and contents of air pollution affecting term low birth weight in Los Angeles County, California, 2001-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    of traf?c-related air pollution impacts on birth outcomes.Sources and contents of air pollution affecting term lowexposure to particulate air pollution and term birth weight:

  15. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    and Hodis, H.N. Ambient air pollution and atherosclerosis inP.B. Health effects of air pollution. Journal of Allergy andof health-related air pollution standards. Annual Review of

  16. Identifying Contributions of On-road Motor Vehicles to Urban Air Pollution Using Travel Demand Model Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua; Bai, Song; Ogden, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution. University ofon-road motor vehicles to urban air pollution, using travelon-road motor vehicles to urban air pollution using travel

  17. Assessment of China's virtual air pollution transport embodied in trade by using a consumption-based emission inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    helps mitigate global air pollution, P. Natl. Acad. Sci.international trade and air pollution in the United States,of China’s virtual air pollution transport embodied in trade

  18. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment No. 1, Air Pollution Meteorology Part 1 of 2 1. Geostrophic Flow: Should horizontal winds turn clockwise or counter diagram of press, coriolis and drag accelerations for air parcel between isobars). 2. Hydrostatic Balance

  19. Timevarying coe#cient models for the analysis of air pollution and health outcome data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    Time­varying coe#cient models for the analysis of air pollution and health outcome data Duncan Lee and Gavin Shaddick Abstract In this paper, a time­varying coe#cient model is developed for air pollution and mortality data, which allows for an interaction between the e#ect of air pollution and time. Such temporal e

  20. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv SESSION 1: Air Pollution/Climate Change Effects on Plants: General Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Paul Miller, Raleigh Guthrey, Susan Schilling, and John Carroll SESSION II: Air Pollution Status

  1. Secondary organic aerosol formation from anthropogenic air pollution: Rapid and higher than expected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from anthropogenic air pollution: Rapid and higher than (2006), Secondary organic aerosol formation from anthropogenic air pollution: Rapid and higher than expected, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L17811, doi:10.1029/ 2006GL026899. [2] Anthropogenic air pollution poses

  2. Bayesian latent variable modelling in studies of air pollution and health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    Bayesian latent variable modelling in studies of air pollution and health Duncan Lee, Gavin://www.bath.ac.uk/math-sci/BICS #12;Bayesian latent variable modelling in studies of air pollution and health. Duncan Lee (1), Gavin to air pollution on respiratory mortality in the elderly (aged 65 and above) in London, England, between

  3. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems; 1996 February 5, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 332 p. The purpose of the International Symposium on Air Pollution

  4. Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan with historically high air pollution levels. This work tests whether persistent spatial patterns of metrics of chronic exposure to air pollutants are associated with the observed patterns of cancer incidence rates

  5. September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and ecological consequences. The U.S. spends tens of billions of dollars each year to reduce air pollution in order to protect public? Air quality is determined by the quantities and types of gaseous and particle pollutants found

  6. Separation between Cloud-Seeding and Air-Pollution Effects AMIR GIVATI AND DANIEL ROSENFELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Separation between Cloud-Seeding and Air-Pollution Effects AMIR GIVATI AND DANIEL ROSENFELD by urban and industrial air pollution recently has been documented and quantified. Here it is shown of precipitation suppression by air pollution and enhancement by glaciogenic cloud seeding. Time series based

  7. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. High

  8. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  9. First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over;Severe smog episodes over China in January 2013 received worldwide at- tention. This air pollution. The largest sources of air pollutants in China are coal combustion and motor vehicle exhausts [He et al., 2002

  10. A synthesis of the Air Pollution Over the Paris Region (ESQUIF) field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    A synthesis of the Air Pollution Over the Paris Region (ESQUIF) field campaign Robert Vautard,1 the Paris area during the Air Pollution Over the Paris Region (ESQUIF) project. From 1998 to 2000, 12, aircraft measurements Citation: Vautard, R., et al., A synthesis of the Air Pollution Over the Paris Region

  11. Flexible Two-Level Parallel Implementations of a Large Air Pollution Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostromsky, Tzvetan

    Flexible Two-Level Parallel Implementations of a Large Air Pollution Model Tzvetan Ostromsky1, Frederiksborgvej 399 P. O. Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. zz@dmu.dk Abstract. Large scale air pollution models of such an air pollution model becomes in many cases a huge computational problem, a challenging task

  12. Monte Carlo Adaptive Technique for Sensitivity Analysis of a Large-scale Air Pollution Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    Monte Carlo Adaptive Technique for Sensitivity Analysis of a Large-scale Air Pollution Model Ivan of input parameters contribution into output variability of a large- scale air pollution model]. This model simulates the transport of air pollutants and has been developed by Dr. Z. Zlatev and his

  13. 20.18 Optimization Problems in Air Pollution Modeling Ivan Dimov, and Zahari Zlatev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    20.18 Optimization Problems in Air Pollution Modeling Ivan Dimov, and Zahari Zlatev ABSTRACT. The appearance of optimization problems in the field of air pollution modeling and their importance arising in air pollution modeling will be considered. We shall present a review of some approaches

  14. New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health, Co- benefits of Carbon Standards: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing-by-state changes in harmful air pollution, it is the first study to quantify and map the co-benefits of power plant

  15. A Specific Multi-channel Photon-Counting Unit for Air-Pollution Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athens, University of

    A Specific Multi-channel Photon-Counting Unit for Air-Pollution Measurement Papageorgas P.1.g. confocal microscopy), air pollution optical measurements, laser sounding of the atmosphere for the in situ quantitative monitoring of up to five air pollutants simultaneously and one calibration channel

  16. COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES IN THE NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF LARGE AIR POLLUTION MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostromsky, Tzvetan

    COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES IN THE NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF LARGE AIR POLLUTION MODELS I. DIMOV , K. GEORGIEVy, TZ. OSTROMSKY , R. J. VAN DER PASz, AND Z. ZLATEVx Abstract. The air pollution, and especially the reduction of the air pollution to some acceptable levels, is an important environmental problem, which

  17. Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution ALEXANDER Y. BIGAZZI- clists may experience increased inhalation of traffic-related air pollutants. Bicyclists have two to five regarding urban bicyclists' intake and uptake of traffic-related air pollution and to identify key knowledge

  18. Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    1 Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Alexander Y of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Abstract Bicycling as a mode of transportation is enjoying a boost in many while bicycling, bicyclists may experience increased inhalation of traffic-related air pollutants

  19. Edinburgh Research Explorer Global association of air pollution and heart failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Global association of air pollution and heart failure Citation & Mills, NL 2013, 'Global association of air pollution and heart failure: a systematic review and meta-6736(13)60898-3 1 Global association of air pollution and heart failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis Anoop

  20. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of California's Local Air Pollution Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    15 An Assessment of the Effectiveness of California's Local Air Pollution Controls on Agricultural Sources C.-Y. Cynthia Lin University of California at Davis USA 1. Introduction Air pollution has been [1]. Negative effects of air pollution have been extensively documented, and include impairment

  1. IMPROVED SEMI-PARAMETRIC TIME SERIES MODELS OF AIR POLLUTION AND MORTALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    IMPROVED SEMI-PARAMETRIC TIME SERIES MODELS OF AIR POLLUTION AND MORTALITY Francesca Dominici series analyses of air pollution and health attracted the attention of the scientific community, policy makers, the press, and the diverse stakeholders con- cerned with air pollution. As the Environmental

  2. Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    1 Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences S in time-series studies 1 11/11/99 Keywords: measurement error, air pollution, time series, exposure of air pollution and health. Because measurement error may have substantial implications for interpreting

  3. Synoptic weather typing applied to air pollution mortality among the elderly in 10 Canadian cities$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Synoptic weather typing applied to air pollution mortality among the elderly in 10 Canadian cities 2013 Accepted 12 August 2013 Keywords: Air pollutants Acute health effects Relative mortality risk (large-scale weather systems) affect ambient levels of air pollution, as well as the relationship between

  4. Modelling the e#ects of air pollution on health using Bayesian Dynamic Generalised Linear Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    (2004)). Large multi­city studies such as `Air pollution and health: a European approach' (APHEA across a number of US and European cities. Short­term e#ects of air pollution on health are estimatedModelling the e#ects of air pollution on health using Bayesian Dynamic Generalised Linear Models

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR ANALYSIS AND FORECAST OF AIR POLLUTION (APPLICATION TO SANTIAGO DE CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertossi, Leopoldo

    Chile and other cities in Chile, air pollution is a dramatic problem. An Environmental InformationENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR ANALYSIS AND FORECAST OF AIR POLLUTION (APPLICATION planning. Using a model-based EIS for air pollution it is possible (i) to study complex source

  6. Evaluating Ozone Air Pollution Effects on Pines in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating Ozone Air Pollution Effects on Pines in the Western United States United States. Evaluating ozone air pollution effects on pines in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW­GTR­155. Historical and technical background is provided about ozone air pollution effects on ponderosa (Pinus

  7. Air pollution and asthma control in the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Air pollution and asthma control in the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment Cedex, France Tel: +33 (0)1 45 59 50 12 Fax: +33 (0)1 45 59 51 69 Key words: air pollution, asthma;1 Abstract Background: The associations between exposure to air pollution and asthma control are not well

  8. A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botchev, Mike

    A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution Modeling + M on the one hand and its e#ciency on the other hand. For example, in air pollution modeling, AMF has been factorization, large sparse linear systems, sti# ODEs, method of lines, Rosenbrock methods, air pollution

  9. A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botchev, Mike

    A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution Modeling M on the one hand and its efficiency on the other hand. For example, in air pollution modeling, AMF has been factorization, large sparse linear systems, stiff ODEs, method of lines, Rosenbrock methods, air pollution

  10. Health damages from air pollution in China Kira Matus a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health damages from air pollution in China Kira Matus a,1 , Kyung-Min Nam b,1, *, Noelle E. Selin c to its environment, including air pollution, the availability of clean water, and desertification. Issues in negative health outcomes, such as contaminated water and high levels of air pollution, also incur real

  11. Air pollution sources apportionment in a French urban site Marie Chavent*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Air pollution sources apportionment in a French urban site Marie Chavent* , Hervé Guégan preoccupation for human health. In order to achieve this purpose, air pollution sources have to be accurately sources of fine particulate emission. Key-words: air pollution data, Principal Component Analysis (PCA

  12. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Effects of Air Pollution on Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weathers, Kathleen C.

    THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Effects of Air Pollution on Ecosystems change, and invasive species as prime threats to biodiversity conservation. Although air pollution. In this synthesis, the state of scientific knowledge on the effects of air pollution on plants and animals

  13. Air Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System) Andrew Keller and emissions regulations for aircraft at major airports. The proposed Air Pollution Accountability regulatory authorities in making their decisions. (Abstract) Keywords-air pollution; aviation; data mining I

  14. The impact of large scale biomass production on ozone air pollution in Joost B. Beltman a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    The impact of large scale biomass production on ozone air pollution in Europe Joost B. Beltman by up to 25% and 40%. Air pollution mitigation strategies should consider land use management. a r t i Poplar a b s t r a c t Tropospheric ozone contributes to the removal of air pollutants from

  15. A method of building an aggregated indicator of air-pollution impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A method of building an aggregated indicator of air-pollution impacts Thierry GOGER, Robert JOUMARD intend to build a global environmental impact indicator of air pollution to assess transport-generated air pollution, while simultaneously conserving the value of the environmental impact of each type

  16. Actes INRETS n92 233 12th International Symposium "Transport and Air Pollution" / 12e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Actes INRETS n°92 233 12th International Symposium "Transport and Air Pollution" / 12e Colloque international "Transports et pollution de l'air", Avignon, 16 -18 June / juin 2003 proceedings / actes, n°92, tome / Vol. 1, Inrets ed., Arcueil, France, 2003, p. 233-240 Les enjeux de la pollution de l'air des

  17. An evaluation of European air pollution regulations for particulate matter monitored from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    An evaluation of European air pollution regulations for particulate matter monitored from, stationarity. Abstract Statistical methods are needed for evaluating many aspects of air pollution regu particulate matter (PM) is an important air pollutant for which regu- lations have been issued recently

  18. Look both ways: IE's Sarav Arunachalam models air pollution near roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    Look both ways: IE's Sarav Arunachalam models air pollution near roadways IE Research Associate and depletion of air pollution within the first 550 yards downwind of the roadway and look at exposure patterns for sensitive populations within that region. By modeling pollutant dispersion by air movement, scientists can

  19. International Conference 'Transport and Air Pollution' 2008, Graz EMISSION FACTOR MODELLING FOR LIGHT VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - 16th International Conference 'Transport and Air Pollution' 2008, Graz EMISSION FACTOR in Europe: The European MEET (Methodologies for Estimating air pollutant Emissions from Transport) project. Transport and Air Pollution, Graz : Austria (2008)" #12;- 2 - 16th International Conference 'Transport

  20. The Diurnal Cycle of Air Pollution In the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Diurnal Cycle of Air Pollution In the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal by Arnico K. Panday A OF AIR POLLUTION IN THE KATHMANDU VALLEY, NEPAL by Arnico K. Panday Submitted to the Department of Earth study to date of the diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal ­ a bowl

  1. Connecticut Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary California Connecticut Florida Maine Maryland Massachusetts Missouri New Hampshire New for Network Implementation Academic Partners for Excellence Tulane University University of California, Berkeley University of Pittsburgh University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey University of Medicine

  2. Classification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification of indoor air pollution determinant factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of indoor air pollution determinant factors Jean-Baptiste Masson1,2 * , Gérard Govaert2 , Corinne Mandin1 representing different types of indoor air pollution. We restrain to the 20 variables corresponding to indoorClassification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification

  3. Abatement of Air Pollution: Permit to Construct and Operate Stationary Sources (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Permits are required for the construction or major modification of a stationary source or emission unit. Some exemptions apply. These regulations describe permit requirements, authorized activities...

  4. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

  5. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any source that serves an electricity generator with a nameplate capacity equal to or greater than 25 MWe is considered a CO2 budget source for the purpose of these regulations. This section lists...

  6. Abatement of Air Pollution: Source Monitoring, Record Keeping, and Reporting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment that either combusts coal in any amount, or enough gaseous, liquid, or solid fuels to meet the heat and emissions standards defined in these regulations, must be operated with an Opacity...

  7. InMAP: a new model for air pollution interventions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-10-29

    Mechanistic air pollution models are essential tools in air quality management. Widespread use of such models is hindered, however, by the extensive expertise or computational resources needed to run most models. Here, we present InMAP (Intervention Model for Air Pollution), which offers an alternative to comprehensive air quality models for estimating the air pollution health impacts of emission reductions and other potential interventions. InMAP estimates annual-average changes in primary and secondary fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations – the air pollution outcome generally causing the largest monetized health damages – attributable to annual changes in precursor emissions. InMAP leverages pre-processed physical andmore »chemical information from the output of a state-of-the-science chemical transport model (WRF-Chem) within an Eulerian modeling framework, to perform simulations that are several orders of magnitude less computationally intensive than comprehensive model simulations. InMAP uses a variable resolution grid that focuses on human exposures by employing higher spatial resolution in urban areas and lower spatial resolution in rural and remote locations and in the upper atmosphere; and by directly calculating steady-state, annual average concentrations. In comparisons run here, InMAP recreates WRF-Chem predictions of changes in total PM2.5 concentrations with population-weighted mean fractional error (MFE) and bias (MFB) R2 ~ 0.99. Among individual PM2.5 species, the best predictive performance is for primary PM2.5 (MFE: 16 %; MFB: 13 %) and the worst predictive performance is for particulate nitrate (MFE: 119 %; MFB: 106 %). Potential uses of InMAP include studying exposure, health, and environmental justice impacts of potential shifts in emissions for annual-average PM2.5. Features planned for future model releases include a larger spatial domain, more temporal information, and the ability to predict ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations. The InMAP model source code and input data are freely available online.« less

  8. The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    1 The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia J. Lelieveld1-range transport of air pollution from South and Southeast Asia towards the Indian Ocean during the dry monsoon season in January-March 1999. Surprisingly high pollution levels were observed over the entire northern

  9. Midweek increase in U.S. summer rain and storm heights suggests air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Midweek increase in U.S. summer rain and storm heights suggests air pollution invigorates air pollution suppresses cloud-drop coalescence and early rainout during the growth of thunderstorms explained by the difference in composition of aerosol pollution at that time. This ``weekend effect'' may

  10. Air Pollution Impacts in the Mixed Conifer Forests of Southern California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts in the Mixed Conifer Forests of Southern California1 Patrick J. Temple, Andrzej Bytnerowicz, Mark E. Fenn, and Mark A. Poth2 Abstract Air pollution, principally in the form.) and Jeffrey (P. jeffreyi Grev. and Balf.) pines on the western side of the pollution deposition gradient

  11. Parallel Implementation of a Large-Scale 3-D Air Pollution Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostromsky, Tzvetan

    Parallel Implementation of a Large-Scale 3-D Air Pollution Model Tzvetan Ostromsky1 and Zahari-4000 Roskilde, Denmark, zz@dmu.dk; http://www.dmu.dk/AtmosphericEnvironment Abstract. Air pollution component of the environment, where the pollutants can be transported over very long distances. Therefore

  12. Bigazzi, Figliozzi, and Clifton 1 Motorists' Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution:1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Bigazzi, Figliozzi, and Clifton 1 1 Motorists' Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution:1 Modeling to traffic-related pollution. Large peak-period trip exposures are5 primarily the result of increased pollutants (3), which progressively degrade urban20 air quality (4). Because of coincident vehicle and human

  13. Cattle Feedlot Waste Management Practices -For Water and Air Pollution Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Cattle Feedlot Waste Management Practices - For Water and Air Pollution Control John M. Sweeten* Water Pollution and Wastewater Management This bulletin outlines some of the basic regulatory in the potential for both water and air pollution. To prevent potential problems from developinginto real problems

  14. Statistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Statistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter Lawrence H which provides the Center's primary funding. #12;1 STATISTICAL ISSUES IN THE STUDY OF AIR POLLUTION.S. cities. This and other scientific and policy information formed the basis on which the U.S. Environmental

  15. Element composition and mineralogical characterisation of air pollution control residue from UK energy-from-waste facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Element composition and mineralogical characterisation of air pollution control residue from UKE) Air pollution control residue (APC) Waste characterisation a b s t r a c t Air pollution control (APC://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). 1. Introduction 1.1. Background Air pollution control (APC) residues from energy

  16. Environmental Health Perspectives volume 119 | number 10 | October 2011 1351 Air pollution problems can be traced to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    centuries. Systematic efforts to control air pollution and concurrently pro tect public health commenced; Vallero 2008). Although national assessments of air pollution trends are available [e.g., U of air pollution in New Jersey as a case study. In this com mentary we focus on how air pollution has

  17. Mathematical modeling of air pollution emissions and dispersion near intersections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelli, James Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Administration (PHWA) RFP No. DTPB61-80-8-00340 under Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) Project So. 2-8-81-541 and is intended to provide an improved perspective in the analysis of highway air pollution hot spots. The study was directed toward... of the free-flowing traffic. Since the dispersion nomographs were derived for a receptor height of 1. 8 metres (5. 9 ft), additional nomographs are presented relating roadway/receptor separa- tion and actual receptor height to a height correction factor, z...

  18. Hawaii Air Pollution Control Permits Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts:Ohio: EnergyMinnesota:Havre de Grace,Air Pollution

  19. Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits Forms and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation,Energy InformationAir Pollutant

  20. Modeling air pollution in the Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    The Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) is a set of interactive computer models for integrated assessment of the Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. TAF is designed to execute in minutes on a personal computer, thereby making it feasible for a researcher or policy analyst to examine quickly the effects of alternate modeling assumptions or policy scenarios. Because the development of TAF involves researchers in many different disciplines, TAF has been given a modular structure. In most cases, the modules contain reduced-form models that are based on more complete models exercised off-line. The structure of TAF as of December 1996 is shown. Both the Atmospheric Pathways Module produce estimates for regional air pollution variables.

  1. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1998-06-01

    Each potential source of Nevada Test Site (NTS) emissions was characterized by one of the following methods: (1) monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at the NTS; (2) a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclide are released to the environment; (3) the measurement of tritiated water (as HTO or T{sub 2}O) concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. The emissions for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) reporting are listed. They are very conservative and are used in Section 3 to calculate the EDE to the maximally exposed individual offsite. Offsite environmental surveillance data, where available, are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  2. Evaluation of air pollutant emission reduction strategies in the context of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Evaluation of air pollutant emission reduction strategies in the context of climate change Bertrand is a key issue to understand how climate change affects air pollution The global climate fields issued from changes is expected to have a significant impact on air quality. The main meteorological parameters

  3. Creation of the model and implementation of the simulation of dispersion of air pollution in urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargiela, Andrzej

    Creation of the model and implementation of the simulation of dispersion of air pollution in urban..............................................................................................................1 1.2. Types of models of dispersion of air pollution was creation of the mathematical model and application of the simulation of dispersion of vehicular air

  4. Ship emissions and air pollution in Present situation and future scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ship emissions and air pollution in Denmark Present situation and future scenarios Helge Rørdam.10 RESULTS: SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION 56 3 SHIP EMISSION INVENTORIES FOR AIR POLLUTION MODELLING 61 3-SP" INVENTORY 67 3.5 "AIS-2011" INVENTORY 68 3.6 "AIS-2020" INVENTORY 69 3.7 SUMMARY OF DIFFERENCES 70 4 AIR

  5. Connecticut Why Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    The New Connecticut PR-1 Why Change? Why Now? Connecticut's PR-1 was last updated in 1995. Over.D. Associate Research Professor Director, Connecticut Transportation Safety Research Center Connecticut Transportation Institute University of Connecticut 270 Middle Turnpike, Unit 5202 Storrs, CT 06269 860-486-8426 e

  6. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, and Infant Mortality in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Using the most comprehensive data file ever compiled on air pollution, water pollution, and environmental regulations from a developing country, the paper examines the effectiveness of India’s environmental regulations. ...

  7. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, and Infant Mortality in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    Using the most comprehensive data file ever compiled on air pollution, water pollution, environmental regulations, and infant mortality from a developing country, the paper examines the effectiveness of India’s environmental ...

  8. Environmental impact of alternative fuel on Tehran air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebtekar, T. [Univ. of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). College of Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Seventy percent of the air pollution in the city of Tehran stems from mobile sources, and in comparison with other major cities of the world, Iran`s capital experiences one of the most polluted metropolitan areas. There exists a surplus of liquid petroleum gas (LPG) in the Persian Gulf and Iranian market, in addition, Iran possesses the second largest reservoir of natural gas in the world. These alternative energy resources create a favorable potential fuel for city of Tehran. Experiments carried out in Tehran indicate that in converting the taxis from gasoline to a dual fuel (LPG/gasoline) car or to a dual fuel natural gas vehicle (NGV) reduce all major pollutants (CO, HC, NOX, Pb) substantially. Following the author`s recommendation, the number of LPG dispensing units in gas stations are increasing and the number of dual fuel taxis amount to several thousands in the metropolitan area. The conversion of diesel buses in the Tehran Public Transportation Corporation to natural gas (NGV) has been recommended by the author and vast experimental works are underway at the present time.

  9. Lower Rio Grande Valley transboundary air pollution project (TAPP). Project report 1996--1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerjee, S.; Shadwick, D.S.; Dean, K.E.; Carmichael, L.Y.; Bowser, J.J.

    1999-04-01

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley Transboundary Air Pollution Project (TAPP) was a US-Mexico Border XXI project to find out if air pollutants were moving across the border from Mexico into the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and to see what levels of air pollutants were present. Ambient measurements and meteorology were collected data for a year (March 1996-March 1997) at three fixed sites in and near Brownsville, Texas very close to the US-Mexico border on a continuous and 24-h internal basis. Overall levels of air pollution were similar to or lower than other areas in Texas and elsewhere. Based on wind sector analyses, transport of air pollution across the border did not appear to adversely impact air quality on the US side of the Valley. Southeasterly winds from the Gulf of Mexico were largely responsible for the clean air conditions.

  10. Census Snapshot: Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    CONNECTICUT Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow Clifford J.raising children in Connecticut. We compare same-sex “sex married couples in Connecticut. 1 APRIL 2008 In many

  11. Participating University of Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Participating Schools University of Connecticut Trinity College Yale University University of Bridgeport Southern Connecticut State University Participating Corporations United Technologies Research Coherent-DEOS JDS-Uniphase C-Cor ASML Jetek, LLC Connecticut Symposium on Microelectronics

  12. Acute cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution: components, vascular mechanisms and protecting the public 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langrish, Jeremy Patrick

    2012-11-30

    Exposure to air pollution, particularly fine and ultrafine particulate matter derived from combustion sources, has been consistently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent controlled exposure ...

  13. Clean Air and Environmental Quality Volume 40 No.2. May 2006 43 POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AEROSOLS ON PRECIPITATION IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Clean Air and Environmental Quality Volume 40 No.2. May 2006 43 POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AEROSOLS ON PRECIPITATION IN AUSTRALIA Potential impacts of air pollution aerosols on precipitation that anthropogenic air pollution downwind of urban and industrial developments affects clouds microphysics

  14. Co-benefits of Carbon Standards Part 1: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    Co-benefits of Carbon Standards Part 1: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for existing power plants would decrease emissions of co-pollutants that contribute to local and regional air pollution standard would improve air quality and decrease the deposition of harmful pollutants. It is well

  15. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:05 to 10:55

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:05 to 10:55 ES of tropospheric air pollution. Reference Books: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, From Air Pollution To Climate. Jacob, Princeton University Press, 1999. Atmospheric Pollution, History, Science, and Regulation, M. Z

  16. Measuring Welfare Loss Caused by Air Pollution in Europe: A CGE Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    To evaluate the socio-economic impacts of air pollution, we develop an integrated approach based on computable general equilibrium (CGE). Applying our approach to Europe shows that even there, where air quality is relatively ...

  17. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01

    renewable energy, and efficiency, they would have substantial co-pollutant benefits.co-pollutant benefits. 90 Certain renewable or energyrenewable energy, then a much more demanding GHG reduction goal could be set, with significant co-pollutant benefits.

  18. Time-to-Event Analysis of Fine Particle Air Pollution and Preterm Birth: Results from North Carolina, 2001-2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Brian J.

    1 Time-to-Event Analysis of Fine Particle Air Pollution and Preterm Birth: Results from North.chang@duke.edu #12;3 Abstract Exposures to air pollution during pregnancy have been suggested as risk factors good air quality. Key words: air pollution, particulate matter, preterm birth, survival analysis Word

  19. The King's College London HEI project Health, Environment and Reducing air pollution in London, combating cardio-respiratory illness,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    The King's College London HEI project ­ Health, Environment and Innovation Reducing air pollution & partners London suffers with the worst air pollution in the UK and some of poorest in Europe. Poor air of monitors to detect changes in London's air pollution levels. Having won the contract to operate the LEZ

  20. 2012-13 Princeton Global Scholar Dr. Tong Zhu is a world leading researcher on the impact of air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of air pollution on public health, the mechanisms of atmospheric chemistry. His research spans the study research projects, he has led large international projects related to air pollution science, health impacts. Zhu led a team that formulated air pollution measures to improve air quality for the 2008 Beijing

  1. Abatement of Air Pollution: The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Nitrogen Oxides (Nox) Ozone Season Trading Program (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations may apply to fossil-fuel fired emission units, and describe nitrogen emission allocations that owners of such units must meet. The regulations also contain provisions for...

  2. Air Pollution and Mortality: Estimating Regional and National DoseResponse Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    Air Pollution and Mortality: Estimating Regional and National Dose­Response Relationships Francesca pollution and mortality for the 88 largest U.S. cities for the period 1987­1994, to estimate relative rates the dependence of relative mortality rates on mean pollution levels, demographic variables, reliability

  3. Mobile Air Pollution Monitoring Network W. Hedgecock, P. Vlgyesi, A. Ledeczi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    Mobile Air Pollution Monitoring Network W. Hedgecock, P. Völgyesi, A. Ledeczi, X. Koutsoukos, and A- resolution realtime pollution data at any location within the coverage area. We have prototyped sensors exposure to a given pollutant. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.4 [Information Systems Applications

  4. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Effects of Air Pollution on Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Effects of Air Pollution on Ecosystems change, and invasive species as prime threats to biodiversity conservation. Although air pollution is an acknowledged widespread problem, it is rarely considered in conser- vation planning or management

  5. Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution ALEXANDER Y. BIGAZZI- clists may experience increased inhalation of traffic-related air pollutants. Bicyclists have two to five times higher respiration rates than travelers in motorized vehicles and this difference increases

  6. Automobile air pollution: Automotive fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of fuels and fuel additives for the reduction of automotive air pollution. Alternative fuels discussed include gasohol, methane, natural gas, and hydrogen. Improvements to gasoline and its properties which affect air pollution are considered, as well as lead and other fuel additives. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Air Pollution Effects on Giant Sequoia Ecosystems1 P. R. Miller N. E. Grulke2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Effects on Giant Sequoia Ecosystems1 P. R. Miller N. E. Grulke2 K.W. Stolte3 Abstract season increased the light compensation point, lowered CO, exchange rate at light saturation concentrations did not yield visible injury or any detectable changes in photosynthetic rates. Air pollution

  8. Economic and policy implications of urban air pollution in the United States, 1970 to 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Trent, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) over time as pollution levels change. Using these new models, we valued the economic benefit of reduced air pollution due to the Clean Air Act regulations to be over $7 trillion from 1970 to 2000, or 2.1% of aggregate ...

  9. Trace Elements in Tree Rings: Evidence of Recent and Historical Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baes, Fred

    Trace Elements in Tree Rings: Evidence of Recent and Historical Air Pollution C. F. Baes III and S and Historical Air Pollution Abstract. Annual growth rinks from short-leaf pine trees in the Great Smoky years, a period when regional fossil fuel combustion emissions increased about 200 percent. Metals

  10. Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we need them most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we inferences of air pollution suppressing precipitation lead us to investigate historical climate records of precipitation in locations that are dominated by clouds that are most susceptible to the detrimental impacts

  11. Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas. 1: Particulate air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess human mortality. The regression model proposed by Oezkaynak and Thurston, which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for population change, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included din the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model, and between TS and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened. Scatter plots and quintile analyses suggested a TSP threshold for COPD mortality at around 65 ug/m{sup 3} (annual average). SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Mn, PM{sup 15}, and PM{sub 2.5} were not significantly associated with mortality using the new models.

  12. Guilford, Connecticut -- The Guildford Green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomer, Nona

    1994-01-01

    New England: Guilford, Connecticut," Yankee Magazine (MayTown Planning in Colonial Connecticut (New Haven, CT: Yaleof Guilford, Connecticut (Guilford, CT: Guilford

  13. Air quality impacts and benefits under U.S. policy for air pollution, climate change, and clean energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saari, R. K. (Rebecca Kaarina)

    2015-01-01

    Policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions can also reduce outdoor levels of air pollutants that harm human health by targeting the same emissions sources. However, the design and scale of these policies can affect the ...

  14. The Association Between Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Children's Health Outcomes in the San Joaquin Valley of California: An Example of Causal Inference Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padula, Amy Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Health effects of air pollution." J Allergy Clin Immunolof mortality to air pollution in Seoul, South Korea."et al. (2003). "Exposure to air pollution during different

  15. Connecticut v. AEP" (2( )")821 :Connecticut v. AEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wintner, Shuly

    " : : Connecticut v. AEP" (2( )")821 : :Connecticut v. AEP . . . 8. 8 " , . , , " -2.2% . - , , . , . , .1 , " " ". 1 Connecticut v. American Elec. Power Co., Inc., 406 F.Supp.2d 265 #12; " : : Connecticut v. AEP" (2( )")821 921

  16. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acutekerosene fuel combustion Indoor air pollution from biomasscombustion emits naphthalene [44, 46, 83, 84] and formaldehyde [42, 45, 85]. In the indoor air pollution

  17. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation’s site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale “background levels” or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved “critical receptor” stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

  18. Energy Solutions to Air Pollution and Climate Change in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, M.Z.; Dvorak, M.; Archer, C.L.; Hoste, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Wind, solar, hydro, and geothermal power can be combined for baseload or load-matching power supply, particularly in combination with plug-in electric vehicles. California and the U.S. have significant wind resources. California's offshore resources were quantified. Interconnecting wind farms can convert about 1/3 of intermittent power to power with the same reliability as a coal-fired power plant. Wind-battery electric vehicles could reduce U.S. CO2 by 25.5%; solar-battery electric vehicles can reduce it by 23.4%. Corn-ethanol vehicles cannot practically reduce CO2 in the U.S. by more than 0.07-0.2%. Battery electric and hydrogen-fuel cell vehicles powered by renewable sources will eliminate 10,000-20,000 U.S. air pollution deaths each year. Ethanol vehicles will increase the death rate or cause no change. Wind turbines require 30 times less land than corn ethanol and 20 times less land than cellulosic ethanol for the same power.

  19. 1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    2000-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  20. 1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    1999-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  1. Aerosol analysis for the regional air pollution study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaklevic, J.M.; Gatti, R.C.; Goulding, F.S.; Loo, B.W.; Thompson, A.C.

    1980-05-01

    The design and operation of an aerosol sampling and analysis program implemented during the 1975 to 1977 St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study is described. A network of ten samplers were operated at selected sites in the St. Louis area and the total mass and elemental composition of the collected particulates were determined. Sampling periods of 2 to 24 hours were employed. The samplers were capable of collecting aerosol particles in two distinct size ranges corresponding to fine (< 2.4 ..mu..m diameter) and coarse (> 2.4 ..mu..m diameter) particles. This unique feature allowed the separation of the particulate samples into two distinct fractions with differing chemical origins and health effects. The analysis methods were also newly developed for use in the St. Louis RAPS study. Total particulate mass was measured by a beta-particle attenuation method in which a precision of +- 5 ..mu..m/cm/sup 2/ could be obtained in a one minute measurement time. Elemental compositions of the samples were determined using an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence method in which detectable limits of 5 ng/cm/sup 2/ or less were routinely achieved for elements ranging in atomic number from Al to Pb. The advantages of these analytical methods over more conventional techniques arise from the ability to automate the measurements. During the course of the two year study, a total of more than 35,000 individual samples were processed and a total of 28 concentrations measured for each sample.

  2. Acute Respiratory Health Effects in Asthmatic and Nonasthmatic Children Associated with Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Mark E.

    -Term Exposure to Air Pollutants Author(s): Lisa Kan, Barry Wiggs, Mark Irwin, Irene Yee Source: The CanadianMemorandumof Intenton TransboundaryAir Pollution(1983). Impactassessment-Work Group I. Final Report,Section 4, pp. 1. Environ.Health Perspect.,63, 39-44. Whittemore,A.S., and Korn,E.L. (1980). Asthmaand air pollution

  3. Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations are critical for human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Accurate recognition of air pollutants and estimation of their concentrations Exposure to air pollutions has a serious effect on the health of humans and has become the leading cause of relevant gases. However, because there are several air pollutants that need to be monitored simultaneously

  4. Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion, 2001, Ed. Z. Boybeyi, WIT Publications, Southampton, UK, Advances in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424. Chapter 9 Numerical modeling of gas deposition and bi- directional surface­atmosphere exchanges in mesoscale air pollution systems Devdutta S. Niyogi & Sethu Raman North to develop deposition flux estimates in air pollution models. An interesting scenario also develops when

  5. The Influence of Local Winds on the Spatial Distribution of Air Pollutants in an Alpine Valley Acknowledgements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    The Influence of Local Winds on the Spatial Distribution of Air Pollutants in an Alpine Valley January 2006: (a) time series of various meteorological and air-pollution parameters (see axes labels (ABL) of the Inn Valley, Austria, during episodes of high air pollution (Fig. 1a). A dataset

  6. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation 65 (2004) 557577 Parallel runs of a large air pollution model on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Mathematics and Computers in Simulation 65 (2004) 557­577 Parallel runs of a large air pollution 20 January 2004; accepted 21 January 2004 Abstract Large-scale air pollution models can successfully. The mathematical description of a large-scale air pollution model will be discussed in this paper. The principles

  7. Inferring Air Pollution by Sniffing Social Media Shike Mei, Han Li, Jing Fan, Xiaojin Zhu and Charles R. Dyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Charles R.

    Inferring Air Pollution by Sniffing Social Media Shike Mei, Han Li, Jing Fan, Xiaojin Zhu issue of air pollution in China and elsewhere in the world is to monitor it. While more physical prediction performance of our approach. I. INTRODUCTION Air pollution is a significant issue in China

  8. Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

  9. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 58 (2003) 333338 Study of air pollutants in Hong Kong using energy dispersive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Applied Radiation and Isotopes 58 (2003) 333­338 Study of air pollutants in Hong Kong using energy were located within the area defined by vehicular emissions. As such, the main air pollutant monitoring site also fell into this same identified area, so the main air pollutant could also be vehicular

  10. Linking Preterm Birth and Air Pollution in Harris County, Texas Joshua Warren, Montserrat Fuentes, Amy Herring, and Peter Langlois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidian, Marie

    significant associations between air pollution and mortality were estimated in multiple cities throughoutLinking Preterm Birth and Air Pollution in Harris County, Texas Joshua Warren, Montserrat Fuentes, Amy Herring, and Peter Langlois September 24, 2010 Abstract Exposure to high levels of air pollution

  11. Health Impacts from Urban Air Pollution in China: The Burden to the Economy and the Benefits of Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Impacts from Urban Air Pollution in China: The Burden to the Economy and the Benefits and Policy Program #12;2 #12;Health Impacts from Urban Air Pollution in China: The Burden to the Economy, elevated levels of urban air pollution result in significant adverse health impacts for its large

  12. H.N. Knudsen, P. Wargocki and J. Vondruskova (2006) "Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    quality of air polluted by building materials ­ a summary of reported data", Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Vol. 1, 57-62. #12;#12;Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted existing data on how varying ventilation rates affect the perceived quality of air polluted by building

  13. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH COST.....................................................................................12 #12;University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center Human Stem Cell that is ineligible for federal support. The University of Connecticut and the University of Connecticut Health Center

  14. An integrated assessment of air pollutant abatement opportunities in a computable general equilibrium framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission reduction policies are desirable to reduce smog, tropospheric concentrations of ozone precursors, acid rain, and other adverse effects on human health, the environment, ...

  15. Technology and policy options for reducing industrial air pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijay, Samudra, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    Technology plays an important role in dealing with air pollution and other environmental problems faced by developing and developed societies. This research examines if technological solutions alone, such as end-of-pipe ...

  16. 5 CCR 1001-5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 CCR 1001-5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution Control Emission Notice Requirements Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico K.

    During the dry season of 2004–2005 we carried out field measurements of air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, a bowl-shaped urban basin in the Himalayan foothills of Nepal. We measured the trace ...

  18. Engineering analysis and economic impacts of air pollution abatement strategies for cotton gins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaiyer, Anantharaman

    1997-01-01

    additional air pollution abatement strategies using combinations of cyclones, rotary drum filters, and baffle type pre-separators have been defined. Procedures to estimate costs of equipment and emission factors for various abatement equipment are described...

  19. Air quality during the 2008 Beijing Olympics: secondary pollutants and regional impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    air pollutant emissions of coal-fired power plants in China:advanced NO x control in coal- fired power plants and to acontrol of emissions in coal- fired power plants, CO from

  20. Effects of combustion derived air pollution on vascular and fibrinolytic function in man 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Nicholas Linton

    2009-01-01

    Observational studies have consistently demonstrated associations between exposure to air pollution and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. These associations are strongest for fine particulate matter (PM), of which particulates from...

  1. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: 2. Modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico K.

    After completing a 9-month field experiment studying air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, we set up the mesoscale meteorological model MM5 to simulate the Kathmandu Valley's meteorology with a ...

  2. The Association Between Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Children's Health Outcomes in the San Joaquin Valley of California: An Example of Causal Inference Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padula, Amy Michelle

    2010-01-01

    al. (2005). "Spatial analysis of air pollution and mortality2005). "A time-series analysis of air pollution and preterm

  3. Evidence of recovery of Juniperus virginiana trees from sulfur pollution after the Clean Air Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nippert, Jesse

    Evidence of recovery of Juniperus virginiana trees from sulfur pollution after the Clean Air Act decades of acidic pollution. Acid deposition over much of the 20th century reduced stomatal conductance and temporal gradients in natural systems. For over a century, the combustion of fossil fuels resulted

  4. Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala Lisa pollution in rural areas of developing countries. It is estimated that about half (53%) of all households in the poor countries of Latin American use biofuels (wood, dung and/or crop residues) to cook. Combustion by

  5. Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

  6. Air cleaners for indoor-air-pollution control (Chapter 10). Book chapter, Feb 89-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, A.S.; Ramanathan, K.; Hanley, J.T.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter describes an experimental study to evaluate performance characteristics of currently available controls for indoor air pollutants, including both particles and gases. The study evaluated the particle-size-dependent collection efficiency of seven commercially available devices for particulate control: a common furnace filter, four industrial filters, and two electronic air cleaners (EACs). The furnance filter had negligible effect on particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 micrometer. The industrial filters, with ASHRAE ratings of 95, 85, 65, and 40% showed minimum efficiency at about 0.1 micrometer, which was substantially less than the ASHRAE efficiency. One EAC, essentially a furnance filter with a high-voltage electrode, reached a maximum efficiency of 30% at low flowrates (7 cu m/min); however, it had a negligible effect at higher flowrates. The other EAC, similar to an industrial ESP, showed efficiencies of 80-90% over the entire size range at low to moderate flowrates. At the highest flowrate, a minimum efficiency was detected at 0.35 micrometer. The study also evaluated the suitability of commerically available carbon-based sorbents (wood, coal, and coconut) for removing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane).

  7. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Power Plants and Other Large Stationary Sources of Air Pollution (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to fossil-fuel fired stationary sources which serve a generator with a nameplate capacity of 15 MW or more, or fossil-fuel fired boilers or indirect heat exchangers with a...

  8. PRINCIPLES OF AIR POLLUTION (11:375:421; 06257) 10:55 -12:15 PM Tuesday, Friday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetriani, Costantino

    1 PRINCIPLES OF AIR POLLUTION (11:375:421; 06257) 10:55 -12:15 PM Tuesday, Friday Hickman Hall, Rm and environmental effects, research, control, and regulation of air pollution The course follows the analysis pollutants LEARNING GOALS The learning goals for the Environmental Science major are posted on our website

  9. Towards an Emissions Trading Scheme for Air Pollutants in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duflo, Esther

    Emissions trading schemes have great potential to lower pollution while minimizing compliance costs for firms in many areas now subject to traditional command-and-control regulation. This paper connects experience with ...

  10. Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously information suggest that ethanol is neither clean nor has it been shown that it can slow global warming in the U.S. It will also divert resources from the primary practical solutions to global warming and air

  11. Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

  12. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

  13. ForPeerReview Traffic Congestion and Air Pollution Exposure for Motorists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    and dispersion models. The intent is to isolate and compare the influences of congested traffic characteristics), and to a lesser extent through increased concentrations (exposure intensity). The effects of varying wind can increase the emissions rates of air pollutants from motor vehicles, degrading urban air quality

  14. HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects A Report to the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects 1 #12;2 A Report to the US Centers Tracking of Air Pollution Effects January 15-16, 2008 #12;HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution ........................................................................................................................................... 13 AN INCREMENTAL APPROACH TO PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING OF AIR POLLUTION

  15. Kids 4 Clean Air | Pollution | Climate | Recycling What can you do

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    to be produced and so less coal, oil and gas will have to be burnt in power stations, which means less airKids 4 Clean Air | Pollution | Climate | Recycling What can you do: There are many things we can do to encourage them to share http://www.clean-air-kids.org.uk/doingyourbit.html (1 of 3) [8/1/07 2:50:10 PM] #12

  16. Traffic-related air pollution exposures and changes in heart rate variability in Mexico City: A panel study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Kyra Naumoff

    Abstract Background While air pollution exposures have been linked to cardiovascular outcomes, the contribution from acute gas and particle traffic-related pollutants remains unclear. Using a panel study design with repeated ...

  17. Flat Lining: Connecticut's Disappearing Economic Growth The Connecticut Economic Outlook: June 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    Flat Lining: Connecticut's Disappearing Economic Growth The Connecticut Economic Outlook: June 2015 William E. Waite, Managing Director, Semnia LLC Connecticut

  18. 66 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-155. 1996. Quality Assurance, Training, and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto Air Resources Board. 1990 data: summary of 1990 air quality data-- gaseous and particulate pollutants. Annual summary. Technical guidance for new air pollution sources. Natural Resources Report NPS/NRAQD/NPR­93/09. Denver, CO: Air

  19. Block Tensor Decomposition for Source Apportionment of Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopke, Philip K; Li, Na; Navasca, Carmeliza

    2011-01-01

    The ambient particulate chemical composition data with three particle diameter sizes (2.5mmair sample data. In particular, we use the Block Term Decomposition (BTD) in rank-(L;L;1) form to identify nine pollution sources (Fe+Zn, Sulfur with Dust, Road Dust, two types of Metal Works, Road Salt, Local Sulfate, and Homogeneous and Cloud Sulfate).

  20. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1 - Visible Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour...

  1. Linking local air pollution to global chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Monika.; Wang, Chien.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    We have incorporated a reduced-form urban air chemistry model in MIT's 2D-LO coupled chemistry-climate model. The computationally efficient reduced-form urban model is derived from the California Institute of Technology-Carnegie ...

  2. San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    startup and average, excluding startup and NOx shutdown), (Selective catalytic shutdown), (Selective catalytic reduction, or equal) reduction, or equal) VOC 2.0 ppmv @ 15 % 02 1.5 ppmv @ 15% 02 Air inlet

  3. Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact...

  4. Literature Review of Air Pollution Control Biofilters and Biotrickling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growing concern about the potential toxicity and car- cinogenicity of these VOCs. This is reflected; Regulations XIV Toxic Air Contaminants) that aim at reducing toxic VOC emissions from industrial sources

  5. Air pollutant interactions with vegetation: research needs in data acquisition and interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, S.E.; McLauglin, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this discussion is to consider problems involved in the acquisition, interpretation, and application of data collected in studies of air pollutant interactions with the terrestrial environment. Emphasis will be placed on a critical evaluation of current deficiencies and future research needs by addressing the following questions: (1) which pollutants are either sufficiently toxic, pervasive, or persistent to warrant the expense of monitoring and effects research; (2) what are the interactions of multiple pollutants during deposition and how do these influence toxicity; (3) how de we collect, report, and interpret deposition and air quality data to ensure its maximum utility in assessment of potential regional environmental effects; (4) what processes do we study, and how are they measured to most efficiently describe the relationship between air quality dose and ultimate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems; and (5) how do we integrate site-specific studies into regional estimates of present and potential environmental degradation (or benefit).

  6. conf. International Society of Exposure Analysis, Stresa, Italy, 21-25 Sept. 2003 The stakes of air pollution in the transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of air pollution in the transport sector Robert JOUMARD French National Institute for Transport@inrets.fr Abstract The main pollutants are listed for today and the future according to the progression of air of public concern regarding air pollution and environment. These pollutants are headed by carbon dioxide

  7. Air Pollution with Heavy Metals and Radionuclides in Slovakia Studied by the Moss Biomonitoring Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florek, M; Mankovska, B; Oprea, K; Pavlov, S S; Steinnes, E; Sykora, I

    2001-01-01

    Applying the moss biomonitoring technique to air pollution studies in Slovakia, heavy metals, rare-earth elements, actinides (U and Th) were determined in 86 moss samples from the European moss survey 2000 by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis at the IBR-2 reactor (Dubna). Such elements as In, Cu, Cd, Hg and Pb were determined by AAS in the Forest Research Institute, Zvolen (Slovakia). The results of measurement of the natural radionuclides ^{210}Pb, ^{7}Be, ^{137}Cs and ^{40}K in 11 samples of moss are also reported. A comparison with the results from moss surveys 1991 and 1995 revealed previously unknown tendencies of air pollution in the examined areas.

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT STORRS CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT STORRS CAMPUS FREIGHT DELIVERY CENTRAL STORES Disclaimer for Freight Delivery of Large Items Your signature below authorizes the University of Connecticut (UConn) to accept

  9. Recovery Act State Memos Connecticut

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Cities. These Clean Cities coalitions support efforts to facilitate the adoption of alternate fuels and petroleum-reducing technologies in Connecticut. Connecticut is also...

  10. Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Christopher P.; Ducati, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    and Photobiology A.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry Christopher P. Ireland* and Caterina Ducati Department of Materials... such as deodorizers or floor cleaners, removal of these is a key priority, particularly as many VOCs are known to be mutagenic or carcinogenic [11]. Whilst air purification techniques such as filtration via activated carbon [12] or thermal advanced oxidation processes...

  11. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2011-06-01

    This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Technical Services

    2007-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

  13. Effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children: a cross-sectional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spinaci, S.; Arossa, W.; Bugiani, M.; Natale, P.; Bucca, C.; de Candussio, G.

    1985-09-01

    To investigate the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children, a subject of some controversy, a comparative study was undertaken of 2,385 school children who lived in central urban, peripheral urban, and suburban areas. Daily monitoring of sulfur dioxide and total suspended particle concentrations in all areas showed that pollutant concentrations in central and peripheral urban areas were above commonly accepted safety levels for respiratory health, while concentrations in the suburban area were within acceptable limits. A questionnaire administered to each mother assessed environmental exposure to pollutants in the household, the occurrence of respiratory symptoms as well as lung diseases as diagnosed by a physician, and general information. Children were interviewed about smoking habits and any acute respiratory symptoms. Children also performed standard lung function tests. Results showed that children from both urban areas had lessened pulmonary function and a higher prevalence of bronchial secretion with common colds than did those from the suburban area. These differences persisted after corrections for exposure to indoor pollutants, active or passive smoking, socioeconomic status, and sex. Parental cigarette smoking was related to a fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and an increased incidence of acute respiratory illnesses and chronic cough in children. Although boys had higher lung volumes and lower air flow, regression analysis showed no significant influence of the interactions sex-geographic area and sex-smoking on lung function. It was concluded that air pollution has a significant effect on the respiratory health of children.

  14. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of school children exposed to ambient air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yoon Shin; Ko, Ung Ring

    1996-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the health effect of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of Korean school children between 7 and 10 years of age during November 1995-January 1996. A standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered and spirometry was performed to examine pulmonary function of 121 children in an urban polluted area, Seoul, and of 119 children in non-polluted area, Sokcho, respectively. There was significant difference in the level of pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume in second (FEV{sub 1.0}) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] between exposed groups to polluted area and non-polluted area. Parental smoking was significantly related to respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, and the level of pulmonary function. The observed changes in FEV{sub 1.0} and FVC seemed to relate to home cooking fuel, not to respiratory symptoms. The additional longitudinal work that carefully monitors ambient and indoor air pollution and health effects data should be conducted to confirm these results.

  15. Inferring Air Pollution by Sniffing Social Media Shike Mei, Han Li, Jing Fan, Xiaojin Zhu and Charles R. Dyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiaojin "Jerry"

    Inferring Air Pollution by Sniffing Social Media Shike Mei, Han Li, Jing Fan, Xiaojin Zhu issue of air pollution in China and elsewhere in the world is to monitor it. While more physical monitoring stations are built, current coverage is limited to large cities with most other places under

  16. Air pollution, precipitation chemistry and forest health in the Retezat Mountains,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air pollution, precipitation chemistry and forest health in the Retezat Mountains, Southern Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA, USA b Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest, Romania c Forest Research and Management Institute, Simeria, Romania d USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain

  17. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed economy in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We

  18. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed Pacific Islands in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We develop

  19. Dioxin/furans and Air Pollution Control Dioxins and furans are chlorinated compounds produced during all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Dioxin/furans and Air Pollution Control Dioxins and furans are chlorinated compounds produced baghouse. As a result of the new controls, the dioxin/furan emissions of WTE plants in the U (28 million tons of MSW combusted) emit less than six grams TEQ dioxins per year. In comparison

  20. Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Modelling to Deliver More Accurate and Instantaneous Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Modelling to Deliver More Accurate and Instantaneous Air Pollution concentrations in the atmosphere. Many urban and suburban areas have high levels of ozone concentrations, but many ru- ral areas also have high ozone levels as winds carry emissions hundreds of miles from

  1. Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau J. D. Crounse1 , P. F. De@caltech.edu) Supplementary Material The following figures are MODIS satellite images of Mexico City region during the month more fires on average then TERRA. This supports the idea that fires generally flare up in the afternoon

  2. Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational requirements for facilities that may contribute to air emissions. General air quality standards and standards for...

  3. Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

  4. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants submittal -- 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Black, S.C.

    1997-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing. Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in 1996 were releases from the following: evaporation of tritiated water from containment ponds that receive drainage from E tunnel and from wells used for site characterization studies; onsite radioanalytical laboratories; the Area 5 RWMS facility; and diffuse sources of tritium and resuspension of plutonium. Section 1 describes these sources on the NTS. Section 2 tabulates the air emissions data for the NTS. These data are used to calculate the effective dose equivalents to offsite residents. Appendices describe the methods used to determine the emissions from the sources listed.

  5. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.'' Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  6. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Grossman

    2005-06-01

    The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

  7. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

    1999-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  8. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  9. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

  10. 105USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Nitrogenous (N) air pollutant concentrations and surface deposition of nitrate (NO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    105USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Nitrogenous (N) air pollutant results of a study that monitored concentrations of gaseous and particulate N air pollutants; measured was presented at the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest Ecosystems

  11. 259USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Air Pollution and Forest Health Studies along a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    259USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Air Pollution and Forest Health Studies of Indus- trial Areas, Kossutha 6, 40-833 Katowice, Poland. Abstract Air pollution, bulk deposition dioxide (SO2 ) air pollution acting directly or indirectly has been one of the major causes for poor

  12. Boundary Layer Structure in the Inn Valley during High Air Pollution (INNAP) Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (IMGI), University of Innsbruck, Austria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Boundary Layer Structure in the Inn Valley during High Air Pollution (INNAP) 1 Institute sources, may be affected by air pollution since slope winds are able to transport pollutants even above project INNAP. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS In general, the three-dimensional distribution of air

  13. Visual Analysis of the Air Pollution Problem in Hong Kong Huamin Qu, Member, IEEE, Wing-Yi Chan, Anbang Xu, Student Member, IEEE, Kai-Lun Chung,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yunhao

    Visual Analysis of the Air Pollution Problem in Hong Kong Huamin Qu, Member, IEEE, Wing-Yi Chan with S-shape axis, and weighted complete graphs. Our system was used to analyze the air pollution problem system, parallel coordinates, air pollution, visual analytics. ! 1 INTRODUCTION The rapid deterioration

  14. Climatic isotope signals in tree rings masked by air pollution: A case study conducted along the Mont Blanc Tunnel access road (Western Alps, Italy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climatic isotope signals in tree rings masked by air pollution: A case study conducted along, Switzerland h i g h l i g h t s air pollution on the climatic signal recorded in the d13 C chronologies. Air pollution loads strongly influence the photosynthetic process.

  15. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10

  16. BEAULANT, Anne-Lise, PERRON, Gilles, KLEINPETER, Joseph, WEBER, Christiane, RANCHIN, Thierry, and WALD, Lucien. Adding virtual measuring stations to a network for urban air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , and WALD, Lucien. Adding virtual measuring stations to a network for urban air pollution mapping TO A NETWORK FOR URBAN AIR POLLUTION MAPPING A. L. Beaulant1* , G. Perron2 , J. Kleinpeter2 , C. Weber3 , T the population in order to reduce health impact caused by air pollution. European policies in this domain request

  17. Rules to Cut Carbon Emissions Also Reduce Other Air Pollutants A first-of-its-kind study released today by scientists at Syracuse and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Rules to Cut Carbon Emissions Also Reduce Other Air Pollutants A first-of-its-kind study released emissions from power plants would provide an added bonus--reductions in other air pollutants that can make in power plant emissions of four other harmful air pollutants: fine particulate matter, nitrogen oxides

  18. Next Generation Connecticut & Other Capital Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Next Generation Connecticut & Other Capital Projects Planning, Architectural & Engineering Services September 18, 2014 #12;Agenda Project Updates · Next Generation Connecticut · Master Plan · Projects OF CONNECTICUT | CAMPUS MASTER PLAN SEPT. 12, 2014 7 #12;Master Planning Principles UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

  19. University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    University of Connecticut School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry University of Connecticut Health Center, John Dempsey Hospital, Farmington CT University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, UHP Outpatient Clinic, West Hartford CT University of Connecticut School

  20. Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE,...

  1. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2012-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  2. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2012 INL Report for Radionuclides (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2013-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2014-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, “Protection of the Environment,” Part 61, “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,” Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.” The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  4. Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega Cities Sundar A. Christopher 1; J.Wang1; P. Gupta 1; M.A. Box2; and G.P. Box2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution, consistent, and cost-effective way for monitoring air pollution. Using Terra/Aqua data, we demonstrate (PM2.5) is an important tool for evaluating air quality. However, PM2.5 has larger spatiotemporal

  5. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  6. Connecticut New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary Connecticut Maine Maryland Montana Nevada New Hampshire New Mexico Oregon Pennsylvania Utah CITIES: Houston, TX New York City, NY Washington, D.C. Planning & Capacity Building Activities California Illinois Massachusetts Missouri New York Washington Wisconsin Infrastructure Enhancement & Data Linkage

  7. Majors Available Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Technology Sustainable Agriculture Wildlife Ecology Zoology New Hampshire Bioengineering ConstructionMajors Available Connecticut Bioengineering Electrical Engineering Technology Forest Operations, Bioproducts and Bioenergy Forestry Marine Science New Media Pulp and Paper Technology* Surveying Engineering

  8. Daily air pollution effects on children's respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vedal, S.; Schenker, M.B.; Munoz, A.; Samet, J.M.; Batterman, S.; Speizer, F.E.

    1987-06-01

    To identify acute respiratory health effects associated with air pollution due to coal combustion, a subgroup of elementary school-aged children was selected from a large cross-sectional study and followed daily for eight months. Children were selected to obtain three equal-sized groups: one without respiratory symptoms, one with symptoms of persistent wheeze, and one with cough or phlegm production but without persistent wheeze. Parents completed a daily diary of symptoms from which illness constellations of upper respiratory illness (URI) and lower respiratory illness (LRI) and the symptom of wheeze were derived. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured daily for nine consecutive weeks during the eight-month study period. Maximum hourly concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and coefficient of haze for each 24-hour period, as well as minimum hourly temperature, were correlated with daily URI, LRI, wheeze, and PEFR using multiple regression models adjusting for illness occurrence or level of PEFR on the immediately preceding day. Respiratory illness on the preceding day was the most important predictor of current illness. A drop in temperature was associated with increased URI and LRI but not with increased wheeze or with a decrease in level of PEFR. No air pollutant was strongly associated with respiratory illness or with level of PEFR, either in the group of children as a whole, or in either of the symptomatic subgroups; the pollutant concentrations observed, however, were uniformly lower than current ambient air quality standards.

  9. Evidence on the impact of Sustained Exposure to Air Pollution on Life Expectancy from China's Huai River Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuyu

    2013-10-18

    This paper's findings suggest that an arbitrary Chinese policy that greatly increases total suspended particulates (TSP) air pollution is causing the 500 million residents of Northern China to lose more than 2.5 billion ...

  10. The economics of pollution permit banking in the context of Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schennach, Susanne M.

    1998-01-01

    Tradable pollution permits are the basis of a new market-based approach to environmental control. The Acid Rain Program, established under Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and aimed at drastically reducing ...

  11. Health impacts from urban air pollution in China : the burden to the economy and the benefits of policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matus, Kira J. (Kira Jen)

    2005-01-01

    In China, elevated levels of urban air pollution result in significant adverse health impacts for its large and rapidly growing urban population. An expanded version of the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA), ...

  12. CASANZ Conference Linking Air Pollution, Science, Policy and Management -Newcastle, NSW Australia 23-27 Nov 2003 Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    CASANZ Conference ­ Linking Air Pollution, Science, Policy and Management - Newcastle, NSW related to ventilation rate changes. Keywords: Chicken, Ventilation, Air Quality, Poultry. 1. Introduction about the industry's impact on local and regional air quality. Quantitative estimates are also required

  13. Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2014 This report covers data for 2012 and was prepared under contract for the State of Connecticut Workers' Compensation Commission, John A. Mastropietro, Chairman, as part of the Occupational Disease Surveillance Program, operated in cooperation with the Connecticut

  14. The University of Connecticut Foundation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    The University of Connecticut Foundation, Incorporated Consolidated Financial Statements June 30, 2014 and 2013 #12;The University of Connecticut Foundation, Incorporated Index June 30, 2014 and 2013 of The University of Connecticut Foundation, Incorporated: We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial

  15. Savannah River Site radionuclide air emissions annual report for national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, I.K.

    1993-12-31

    The radiological air emission sources at the SRS have been divided into three categories, Point, Grouped and Non-Point, for this report. Point sources, analyzed individually, are listed with a listing of the control devices, and the control device efficiency. The sources listed have been grouped together either for security reasons or where individual samples are composited for analytical purposes. For grouped sources the listed control devices may not be on all sources within a group. Point sources that did not have continuous effluent monitoring/sampling in 1993 are noted. The emissions from these sources was determined from Health Protection smear data, facility radionuclide content or other calculational methods, including process knowledge, utilizing existing analytical data. This report also contain sections on facility descriptions, dose assessment, and supplemental information.

  16. The effects of air pollution regulations on the US refining industry. Task 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Numerous air pollution regulations affecting petroleum refineries recently have been promulgated, have been proposed, or are under consideration at the federal, state, and local level. As shown in Figure ES-1, all of these environmental regulations are intended to take effect over the relatively short time period from 1989 through 1995. In the aggregate these regulatory activities have significant implications for the US refining industry and the Nation, including: Major investment requirements; changes in industry profitability; potential closure of some refineries; and potential changes in crude oil or product import dependence. At issue is whether the cumulative effect of these regulations could so adversely affect the US refining industry that US national security would be affected. In addition to the regulations outlined in Figure ES-1, President Bush recently presented a major new plan to improve the nation`s air quality. The aspects of the President`s plan that could strongly affect US refineries are summarized below.

  17. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and ``excess`` human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all ``non-external`` causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM{sub 15}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub 4}{sup =}, for 63{sup 4} locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  18. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess'' human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external'' causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO[sub 4][sup =], Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM[sub 15], PM[sub 2.5] and SO[sub 4][sup =], for 63[sup 4] locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  19. International Union of Air Pollution Prevention and Environmental Protection Associations (IUAPPA) Symposium and Korean Society for Atmospheric Environment (KOSAE) Symposium, 12th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    International Union of Air Pollution Prevention and Environmental Protection Associations (IUAPPA enhancing benefits of a multi- disciplinary, multi-scale, multi-sensor approach of air pollution. hal) Symposium and Korean Society for Atmospheric Environment (KOSAE) Symposium, 12th World Clean Air

  20. GUARANTEED ADMISSION AGREEMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    1 GUARANTEED ADMISSION AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES, COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES, AND SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND THE CONNECTICUT to the State of Connecticut and to students within the state, the University of Connecticut and the Connecticut

  1. Daily diaries of respiratory symptoms and air pollution: Methodological issues and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J. ); Wypij, D.; Dockery D.; Ware, J.; Spengler, J.; Ferris, B. Jr. ); Zeger, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Daily diaries of respiratory symptoms are a powerful technique for detecting acute effects of air pollution exposure. While conceptually simple, these diary studies can be difficult to analyze. The daily symptom rates are highly correlated, even after adjustment for covariates, and this lack of independence must be considered in the analysis. Possible approaches include the use of incidence instead of prevalence rates and autoregressive models. Heterogeneity among subjects also induces dependencies in the data. These can be addressed by stratification and by two-stage models such as those developed by Korn and Whittemore. These approaches have been applied to two data sets: a cohort of school children participating in the Harvard Six Cities Study and a cohort of student nurses in Los Angeles. Both data sets provide evidence of autocorrelation and heterogeneity. Controlling for autocorrelation corrects the precision estimates, and because diary data are usually positively autocorrelated, this leads to larger variance estimates. Controlling for heterogeneity among subjects appears to increase the effect sizes for air pollution exposure. Preliminary results indicate associations between sulfur dioxide and cough incidence in children and between nitrogen dioxide and phlegm incidence in student nurses.

  2. Anti-air pollution & energy conservation system for automobiles using leaded or unleaded gasoline, diesel or alternate fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bose, Ranendra K. (14346 Jacob La., Centreville, VA 20120-3305)

    2002-06-04

    Exhaust gases from an internal combustion engine operating with leaded or unleaded gasoline or diesel or natural gas, are used for energizing a high-speed gas turbine. The convoluting gas discharge causes a first separation stage by stratifying of heavier and lighter exhaust gas components that exit from the turbine in opposite directions, the heavier components having a second stratifying separation in a vortex tube to separate combustible pollutants from non-combustible components. The non-combustible components exit a vortex tube open end to atmosphere. The lighter combustible, pollutants effected in the first separation are bubbled through a sodium hydroxide solution for dissolving the nitric oxide, formaldehyde impurities in this gas stream before being piped to the engine air intake for re-combustion, thereby reducing the engine's exhaust pollution and improving its fuel economy. The combustible, heavier pollutants from the second separation stage are piped to air filter assemblies. This gas stream convoluting at a high-speed through the top stator-vanes of the air filters, centrifugally separates the coalescent water, aldehydes, nitrogen dioxides, sulfates, sulfur, lead particles which collect at the bottom of the bowl, wherein it is periodically released to the roadway. Whereas, the heavier hydrocarbon, carbon particles are piped through the air filter's porous element to the engine air intake for re-combustion, further reducing the engine's exhaust pollution and improving its fuel economy.

  3. University of Connecticut Information Technology Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    University of Connecticut Information Technology Security Incident Response Plan #12;- i - Revision management issue for all organizations, including the University of Connecticut. Furthermore, as more or framework within which University of Connecticut incident handlers can work to ensure a complete

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE Summer Fellowship Program Application The University of Connecticut Health Center Office of Student Affairs Farmington Connecticut 06030-1905 Deadline for application: March 15th #12;College Undergraduate

  5. THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT WATERBURY CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    1 THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT WATERBURY CAMPUS ACADEMIC PLAN Submitted February 2007 Revised. Mission Statement The University of Connecticut's Waterbury campus promotes the personal growth programs available at the University of Connecticut. The Waterbury regional campus is committed

  6. Pollution atmosphrique et climat / Air Quality and Climate Change A. Colette (1), L. Roul (1), B. Bessagnet (1), S. Schucht (1), S. Szopa (2), R. Vautard (2), L. Menut (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Pollution atmosphérique et climat / Air Quality and Climate Change A. Colette (1), L. Rouïl (1 greenhouse gases) and air pollutants, we can provide a quantitative view into the possible future air quality Pollution Atmosphérique, numéro spécial « Climat » Mot Clés : Pollution Atmosphérique, Changement Climatique

  7. University of Connecticut Women's Studies Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    University of Connecticut Women's Studies Program College of Liberal Arts and Sciences An Equal Opportunity Employer 354 Mansfield Road Unit Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2181 Telephone: (860) 486

  8. Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization Efforts Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization Efforts June 18, 2014 - 10:49am...

  9. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  10. Air pollution and morbidity: a further analysis of the Los Angeles student nurses data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J.; Hasselblad, V.; Pitcher, H.

    1988-02-01

    Hammer et al. analyzed daily diary reports of headache, eye irritation, cough, and chest discomfort in a study of Los Angeles student nurses, and found a statistically significant association between these symptoms and daily maximum one-hour oxidant concentrations at a nearby air quality monitor. Our analysis examines the student nurse data for the possible significance of other pollutants. We used new model specifications designed to account for the probabilistic nature of the outcome variables, and to allow for complications arising from the time series aspects of the data. We replicated the finding of a significant relationship between oxidants and coughing and eye irritation, and also found that; carbon monoxide was significantly related to headache symptoms; nitrogen dioxide was significantly related to eye irritation; and sulfur dioxide was significantly related to chest discomfort.

  11. The Contribution of Motor Vehicles and Other Sources to Ambient Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

    1996-01-01

    general, but not to motor-vehicle pollution specifically. Wedue to all motor vehicle pollution, such as we make here,of eliminating motor-vehicle pollution. For example, the

  12. The Association Between Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution During Pregnancy and Children's Health Outcomes in the San Joaquin Valley of California: An Example of Causal Inference Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padula, Amy Michelle

    2010-01-01

    whether air pollution causes asthma, though short-termair pollution causes asthma, forcing an association betweenpollution causes both preterm delivery and asthma (B). It is

  13. Applicability issues and compliance strategies for the proposed oil and gas industry hazardous air pollutant standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, N.; Winborn, K.A.; Grygar, W.W. II

    1999-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has targeted oil and natural gas transmission and storage facilities located across the United States for regulation under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) program (proposed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63 [40 CFR 63], Subparts HH and HHH). The proposed NESHAP were published in the February 6, 1998 Federal Register and are expected to be promulgated in May 1999. These rules are intended to reduce Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) emitted from oil and gas facilities. It is expected that these rules will require more than 400 major sources and more than 500 non-major sources (also referred to as area sources) to meet maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards defined in the NESHAP. The rules would regulate HAP emission from glycol dehydration units, storage vessels and various fugitive leak sources. This technical paper addresses the applicability issues and compliance strategies related to the proposed NESHAP. The applicability criteria for both rules differ from those promulgated for other source categories under 40 CFR 63. For example, individual unit throughput and/or HAP emission thresholds may exempt specific units from the MACT standards in the NESHAP. The proposed Subpart HH would apply not only to major sources, but also to triethylene glycol (TEC) dehydration units at area sources located in urban areas. For both proposed NESHAP all 199 HAP must be considered for the major source determinations, but only 15 specific HAP are targeted for control under the proposed standards. An overview of the HAP control requirements, exemption criteria, as well as initial and continued compliance determination strategies are presented. Several industry examples are included to assist industry develop compliance strategies.

  14. Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Lotte; Buczynska, Anna; Walgraeve, Christophe; Delcloo, Andy; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester ; Van Grieken, Rene; Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman; De Backer, Hugo; Nemery, Benoit; Nawrot, Tim S.; Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek

    2012-08-15

    An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

  15. Passive smoking, air pollution, and acute respiratory symptoms in a diary study of student nurses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J.; Zeger, S. )

    1990-01-01

    A cohort of approximately 100 student nurses in Los Angeles was recruited for a diary study of the acute effects of air pollution. Smoking histories and presence of asthma and other allergies were determined by questionnaire. Diaries were completed daily and collected weekly for as long as 3 yr. Air pollution was measured at a monitoring location within 2.5 miles of the school. Incidence and duration of a symptom were modeled separately. Pack-years of cigarettes were predictive of the number of episodes of coughing (p less than 0.0001) and of bringing up phlegm (p less than 0.0001). Current smoking, rather than cumulative smoking, was a better predictor of the duration of a phlegm episode (p less than 0.0001). Controlling for personal smoking, a smoking roommate increased the risk of an episode of phlegm (odds ratio (OR) = 1.41, p less than 0.001), but not of cough. Excluding asthmatics (who may be medicated), increased the odds ratio for passive smoking to 1.76 (p less than 0.0001). In logistic regression models controlling for temperature and serial correlation between days, an increase of 1 SD in carbon monoxide exposure (6.5 ppm) was associated with increased risk of headache (OR = 1.09, p less than 0.001), photochemical oxidants (7.4 pphm) were associated with increased risk of chest discomfort (OR = 1.17, p less than 0.001) and eye irritation (OR = 1.20 p less than 0.001), and nitrogen dioxide (9.1 pphm) was associated with increased risk of phlegm (OR = 1.08 p less than 0.01), sore throats (OR = 1.26, p less than 0.001), and eye irritation (OR = 1.16, p less than 0.001).

  16. Connecticut's Landscape:p Past, Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelly, David Kiernan

    Connecticut's Landscape:p Past, Present and Future #12;Connecticut: 20 000 Years Before PresentConnecticut: 20,000 Years Before Present Glacial Maximum #12;Connecticut: 20 000 Years Before PresentConnecticut;Glacial Advance and Retreat #12;The Return of Life to Connecticut #12;The Return of Life to Connecticut

  17. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Air Pollution from Agricultural Operations Research Triangle Park, NC October 12-15, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Air Pollution from Agricultural Operations between the two measurement methods (P=0.33). KEYWORDS - Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs), Air quality INTRODUCTION Ammonia (NH3) is the primary aerial pollutant in poultry production houses, resulting from

  18. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Air Pollution from Agricultural Operations Research Triangle Park, NC October 12-15, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Air Pollution from Agricultural Operations INTRODUCTION Livestock confinement buildings are sources of atmospheric pollutants, such as ammonia (NH3. Among the air contaminants produced in poultry buildings, NH3 has been recognized as a major aerial

  19. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs and coal smoke contain a large number of pollutants and known health haz- ards, including particulate- cyclic organic matter, including carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene (5­9). Exposure to indoor air

  20. Investigations of Ozone and Particulate Matter Air Pollution in the Northeast C.R. Philbrick, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Baxter Water Treatment Plant began on 15 June 1999 and the site was fully operational from 28 June to 19Investigations of Ozone and Particulate Matter Air Pollution in the Northeast C.R. Philbrick, Dept a significant pollution event, during which substantial increases in both ozone (concentration 125 ppb) and air

  1. Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube-Oil-Consumption Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    are strongly related to NOx emissions, and in order to reach extremely low emission levels, reduction1 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube of the consumed lube-oil. Significant reductions in particulate emission rate could be obtained by controlling

  2. The King's College London HEI project Health, Environment and Reducing air pollution in London, combating cardio-respiratory illness,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    the problem Transport for London (TfL) was tasked to develop plans to reduce harmful traffic emissions. Given. The work has had a direct impact on the design of road transport policy in London and maximisesThe King's College London HEI project ­ Health, Environment and Innovation Reducing air pollution

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2011-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  4. WHAT CONNECTICUT COULD FACE Bracing for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Energy Foundation and the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. We gratefully acknowledge the comments and all staff at Connecticut Fund for the Environment (CFE), Madeline Weil (New Haven Community Clean Air Initiative), Haider Taha (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), and Jim Marston, Eric Haxthausen, and Tim

  5. Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Overview The West Haven (Connecticut) Campus of the...

  6. Connecticut Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary of Reported Data Connecticut Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Connecticut. Connecticut Summary of Reported...

  7. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

    2008-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

  8. Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: Exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian Rural Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, B.R.; Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Jones, L.; Kearney, J.; Franklin, C.A. )

    1994-08-01

    This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities in areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV[sub 1.0]), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF[sub 25-75]), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V[sub 50]max). After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P < 0.01) mean decrements of 1.7% in FVC and 1.3% in FEV[sub 1.0] compared with Saskatchewan children, after adjusting for age, sex, weight, standing height, parental smoking, and gas cooking. There were no statistically significant regional differences in the pulmonary flow parameters (P > 0.05). 54 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  9. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2014-06-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  10. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2013-06-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2012, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 0.5% to a maximum of 11.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  11. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2012-06-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  12. School of Engineering, University of Connecticut www.engr.uconn.edu Summer 2005 Connecticut Global Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    School of Engineering, University of Connecticut www.engr.uconn.edu Summer 2005 Connecticut Global Connecticut citizens. The numbers speak volumes: in just six years, the School of Engineering has increased

  13. University of Connecticut, Office of the Registrar, Transcript Request Form Transcript Request Form -University of Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    University of Connecticut, Office of the Registrar, Transcript Request Form Transcript Request Form - University of Connecticut Office of the Registrar, Unit 4077T, Storrs, CT 06269-4077T Forms of Connecticut under other names, please indicate them here

  14. Indoor air pollution from portable kerosene-fired space heaters. [Effects of wick height and fuel consumption rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Dillworth, J.F.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-02-01

    Indoor use of unvented combustion appliances is known to cause an increase in indoor air pollutant levels. Laboratory tests were conducted on radiant and convective portable kerosene-fired space heaters to identify the pollutants they emit and to determine their emission rates. Laboratory-derived CO and NO/sub 2/ emission rates from unvented portable kerosense-fired space heaters are summarized and the effect of wick height and fuel consumption rate on CO and NO/sub 2/ emissions is given. Pollutant concentration profiles resulting from the use of kerosene heaters in a 27m/sup 3/ environmental chamber and a 240m/sup 3/ house are presented. When such heaters are operated for one hour in a 27m/sup 3/ chamber with 0.4 air changes per hour, the resultant CO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above the U.S. occupational standard, and NO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above California's short-term outdoor standard. Further data on parameters such as heater usage patterns and air exchange rates are needed to determine the actual pollutant exposure that kerosene heater users experience.

  15. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28

    DBS Energy Inc. (“DBS”) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  16. Source attribution of air pollution by spatial scale separation using high spatial density networks of low cost air quality sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimann, I.; Bright, V. B.; McLeod, M. W.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A. M.; Stewart, G. B.; Jones, R. L.

    2015-04-25

    the influence of larger-scale meteo- rological events on tropospheric pollution. Because of its long lifetime, CO generally is a useful indicator of local pollutant emis- sions. CO is the main (70%) loss mechanism for the hydroxyl radical, OH, (Novelli et al...

  17. A study of hazardous air pollutants at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCD Program is a joint effort between government and industry to develop a new generation of coal utilization processes. In 1986, the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power (AEP), was awarded cofunding through the CCT program for the Tidd Pressure Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC) Demonstration Plant located in Brilliant, Ohio. The Tidd PFBC unit began operation in 1990 and was later selected as a test site for an advanced particle filtration (APF) system designed for hot gas particulate removal. The APF system was sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) through their Hot Gas Cleanup Research and Development Program. A complementary goal of the DOE CCT and METC R&D programs has always been to demonstrate the environmental acceptability of these emerging technologies. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) have focused that commitment toward evaluating the fate of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with advanced coal-based and hot gas cleanup technologies. Radian Corporation was contacted by AEP to perform this assessment of HAPs at the Tidd PFBC demonstration plant. The objective of this study is to assess the major input, process, and emission streams at Plant Tidd for the HAPs identified in Title III of the CAAA. Four flue gas stream locations were tested: ESP inlet, ESP outlet, APF inlet, and APF outlet. Other process streams sampled were raw coal, coal paste, sorbent, bed ash, cyclone ash, individual ESP hopper ash, APF ash, and service water. Samples were analyzed for trace elements, minor and major elements, anions, volatile organic compounds, dioxin/furan compounds, ammonia, cyanide, formaldehyde, and semivolatile organic compounds. The particle size distribution in the ESP inlet and outlet gas streams and collected ash from individual ESP hoppers was also determined.

  18. State air pollution permit program under subchapter 5 of the Clean Air Act as of August 8, 1995. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 imposed the requirement for a comprehensive set of state air pollution permit programs on a nationwide basis for the first time. Prior to the passage of this law, there were about thirty-five state permit programs, and they were not subject to Federal supervision. During the debate in the House of Representives it was stated that the purpose of the permit program was to clarify and make more enforceable a source`s pollution control requirements. In addition, the Congress wanted to encourage public involvement in the process so that interested citizens will be able to review and help enforce a source`s obligations under the Act.

  19. Two-stroke scooters are a dominant source of air pollution in many cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platt, S. M.; El Haddad, I.; Pieber, S. M.; Huang, R.-J.; Zardini, A. A.; Clairotte, M.; Suarez-Bertoa, R.; Barmet, P.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Wolf, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Fuller, S. J.; Kalberer, M.; Chirico, R.; Dommen, J.; Astorga, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Marchand, N.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-05-13

    and trucks, particularly diesel vehicles, are thought to be the main vehicular pollution sources. This needs re-thinking, as we show that elevated particulate matter levels can be a consequence of ‘asymmetric pollution’ from two-stroke scooters, vehicles...

  20. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

    2009-06-30

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  1. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciucci, John

    2010-06-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NTS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected, then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2009, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.69 mrem/yr, well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NTS, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000044 mrem/yr, 230,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of ozone formation and transport for a Central California air pollution episode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ling; Tonse, Shaheen; Cohan, Daniel S.; Mao, Xiaoling; Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2009-05-15

    CMAQ-HDDM is used to determine spatial and temporal variations in ozone limiting reagents and local vs upwind source contributions for an air pollution episode in Central California. We developed a first- and second- order sensitivity analysis approach with the Decoupled Direct Method to examine spatial and temporal variations of ozone-limiting reagents and the importance of local vs upwind emission sources in the San Joaquin Valley of central California for a five-day ozone episode (29th July-3rd Aug, 2000). Despite considerable spatial variations, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission reductions are overall more effective than volatile organic compound (VOC) control for attaining the 8-hr ozone standard in this region for this episode, in contrast to the VOC control that works better for attaining the prior 1-hr ozone standard. Inter-basin source contributions of NO{sub x} emissions are limited to the northern part of the SJV, while anthropogenic VOC (AVOC) emissions, especially those emitted at night, influence ozone formation in the SJV further downwind. Among model input parameters studied here, uncertainties in emissions of NO{sub x} and AVOC, and the rate coefficient of the OH + NO{sub 2} termination reaction, have the greatest effect on first-order ozone responses to changes in NO{sub x} emissions. Uncertainties in biogenic VOC emissions only have a modest effect because they are generally not collocated with anthropogenic sources in this region.

  3. Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5922_1646830,001500250000000... 1 of 2 3/10/2006 7:45 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http 1 Front » Story Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit HT Correspondent Kanpur, March that coal based thermal power plants are the main source for air pollution. The fact came to the fore during

  4. WALD, Lucien, BASLY, Ludovic, and BALEYNAUD, JeanMichel. Satellite data for the air pollution mapping. In: Proceedings of the 18th EARSeL Symposium on Operational Remote Sensing for Sustainable Development, Enschede, Netherlands, 1114 May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WALD, Lucien, BASLY, Ludovic, and BALEYNAUD, JeanMichel. Satellite data for the air pollution, Rotterdam, ISBN 9058090299, p. 133139 Satellite data for the air pollution mapping L. Wald, L. Basly Groupe of air pollution are reached. Medical studies tend to demonstrate that breathing diseases may be linked

  5. Numerical Modeling of Eastern Connecticut's Visual Resources1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Modeling of Eastern Connecticut's Visual Resources1 Daniel L. Civco 2/ l Submitted Conservation, The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut. / Abstract: A numerical model capable of accurately predicting the preference for landscape photographs of selected points in eastern Connecticut

  6. A Green Cleaning Program for Connecticut Facilities Legislation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    A Green Cleaning Program for Connecticut Facilities Legislation Connecticut law requires state antimicrobial products are not currently regulated under this law. Purchasing Connecticut's Department the "Environmentally Preferrable Purchasing (EPP) Program." Connecticut DAS currently has contracts with vendors

  7. Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

  8. University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine Application for Admission of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine

  9. Strategies and Technologies for Improving Air Quality Around Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammad Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    urbanair/ 2. Lewtas, J. Air pollution combustion emissions:Lewtas. Air pollution combustion emissions: Characterization

  10. Filtration technology for the control of solid hazardous air pollutants in paint booth operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolle, M.

    1997-12-31

    In October of 1996, the EPA released the draft Aerospace NESHAP regulation that targets hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from aerospace manufacturing and rework operations. One of the key provisions focuses on the control of inorganic HAPs released from application operations involving hexavalent chromium based primers. The NESHAP regulation mandates that coating facilities which release inorganic HAPS meet specific particulate emission control efficiencies or requirements, and further specifies different control requirements for new and existing facilities. The provisions pertaining to inorganic HAP emissions from coating operations were developed through the efforts of many individuals from the industrial, military, manufacturing, and regulatory sectors, and were the subject of intense discussion that spanned a period of years. Throughout this process, a topic of major debate was the development of dry filter particulate control efficiency requirements that would achieve an appropriate level of emission control, and could reasonably met by manufacturers and filter suppliers alike. The control requirements that are the topic of this paper mandate specific collection efficiencies for various particle size ranges. Recent studies on particle size characteristics of overspray generated by hexavalent chrome primer applications indicate that the NESHAP standard may not achieve the level of emission control that was initially intended. This paper presents the results of a detailed, third party analysis that focuses on the actual control efficiencies for chromate-based priming operations that will be achieved by the new standard. Following a general filtration efficiency discussion, an overview of the procedure employed to evaluate the overall efficiencies that will be achieved by NESHAP compliant filters is provided. The data upon which the evaluation was derived are presented.

  11. Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    J. D. Crounse et al. : Biomass burning pollution overChemistry and Physics Biomass burning and urban airprimary anthropogenic and biomass burning organic aerosols

  12. Evaluation of innovative volatile organic compound and hazardous air-pollutant-control technologies for U. S. Air Force paint spray booths. Final report, Aug 88-Aug 89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritts, D.H.; Garretson, C.; Hyde, C.; Lorelli, J.; Wolbach, C.D.

    1990-10-01

    Significant quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants are released into the atmosphere during USAF maintenance operations. Painting operations conducted in paint spray booths are major sources of these pollutants. Solvent based epoxy primers and solvent-based polyurethane coatings are typically used by the Air Force for painting aircraft and associated equipment. Solvents used in these paints include methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, lacquer thinner, and other solvents involved in painting and component cleaning. In this report, carbon paper adsorption/catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) were evaluated as control technologies to destroy VOC emissions from paint spray booths. Simultaneous testing of pilot-scale units was performed to evaluate the technical performance of both technologies. Results showed that each technology maintained greater than 99 percent Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DREs). Particulate emissions from both pilot-scale units were less than 0.08 grains/dry standard cubic foot. Emissions of the criteria pollutants--sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide--were also below general regulatory standards for incinerators. Economic evaluations were based on a compilation of manufacturer-supplied data and energy consuption data gathered during the pilot scale testing. CPACM and FBCI technologies are less expensive than standard VOC control technologies when net present costs for a 15-year equipment life are compared.

  13. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

  14. Actuarial Science Program University of Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    !"""!" " " Actuarial Science Program at the University of Connecticut #12;- 2 - What is an actuary of Connecticut Actuarial Science Program began in 1976 with the creation of two new courses ­ Theory of Interest

  15. ASSISTANT DEANS Connecticut Children's Medical Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 12 ASSISTANT DEANS Connecticut Children's Medical Center Dr. Andrea Benin, Assistant Dean@stranciscare.org 860-714-5967 The Hospital of Central Connecticut Dr. Steven Hanks, Vice President Med. Affairs

  16. University of Connecticut Department of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    University of Connecticut Department of Chemistry NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REUREU@uconn.edu Fax: (860) 486-2981 Mail: REU Site Coordinator Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut

  17. University of Connecticut Office of Travel Services,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    University of Connecticut Office of Travel Services, Accounts Payable Department New Central Warehouse Building, 3 North Hillside Road, Unit 6220 Storrs, CT 06269-6220 The University of Connecticut

  18. CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT ·RIVER .SHAD BY REYNOLD A. FREDIN FISHERY effort, and tagging data which was used t.o estimate the size of the shad runs in the Connecticut River. effect on the" size of the runs entering the river," Investigation of the Connecticut River shad fishery

  19. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Office of Undergraduate Admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Office of Undergraduate Admissions Special Program in Dental Medicine. The University of Connecticut does not require that you sign such a waiver as a condition for admission or award of Connecticut Office of Undergraduate Admissions 2131 Hillside Road, Unit-3088 Storrs, CT 06269-3088 Please

  20. State of Connecticut Single Audit Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    State of Connecticut Single Audit Report For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2014 AUDITORS OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS JOHN C. GERAGOSIAN ROBERT M. WARD #12;STATE OF CONNECTICUT Single Audit Report For the Year Ended ..................................................................................................1 State of Connecticut Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Office of Undergraduate Admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Office of Undergraduate Admissions Special Program in Law Recommendation persons making such recommendations on her or his behalf. The University of Connecticut does not require of recommendation along with the completed form to: Special Program in Law University of Connecticut Office

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MERIT PLAN Revised and Approved by the Merit with the By-Laws of the University of Connecticut and with the traditional rights and privileges of faculty to intimidate, or otherwise constrain academic freedoms expressed in By-Laws of the University of Connecticut

  3. Final version 11 April 1997 Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, David

    Final version 11 April 1997 Connecticut Juror Selection East Hartford Hartford West Hartford Avon, and the whole of Section 7 and Appendix B need major revision. Report to the Connecticut Public Defender The questionnaire data 12 3 Measures of disparity 17 4 The JIS data 19 5 Federal data 26 6 Connecticut population

  4. THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UConn Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UConn Health 2013 ANNUAL CAMPUS SECURITY & SAFETY REPORT Published and graduates of the Connecticut Police Officer Standards and Training Academy. In addition, each officer undergoes required annual in- service training, well above the minimum requirements mandated by Connecticut

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Office of Undergraduate Admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Office of Undergraduate Admissions Special Program in Medicine. The University of Connecticut does not require that you sign such a waiver as a condition for admission or award of Connecticut Office of Undergraduate Admissions 2131 Hillside Road, Unit-3088 Storrs, CT 06269-3088 Please

  6. Commendations The University of Connecticut Police

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Commendations The University of Connecticut Police Department expects a very high level of a department uniform medal. Complaints The University of Connecticut Police Department policy is to emphasize declaration may be a violation of the law. The University of Connecticut Police Department welcomes

  7. A Connecticut jury array challenge David Pollard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, David

    A Connecticut jury array challenge by David Pollard Yale University david.pollard@yale.edu http a detailed statistical study of the system used for summon- sing jurors to serve in the State of Connecticut's Superior Courts. The study was made at the request of the Connecticut Public Defender's Office, to provide

  8. Practical ways to abate air and water pollution worldwide including a unique way to significantly curb global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snell, J.R.

    1998-07-01

    This paper points out that in the next 50 years it will largely be the developing countries of the world which will continue to industrialize rapidly and hence pollute the water and air of not only their countries but that this pollution is becoming global (80% of the World's population.) From the author's 25 years of consulting experience in the developing countries, their greatest need is to have available to them low cost, innovative processes for pollution abatement will be neglected and the whole world will suffer immensely. The paper discusses in some detail the type of innovative low cost methods which have successfully been used in the categories of wastewater and solid wastes and names 6 other categories where many others exist. All these innovative methods need to be discovered, listed, and tested for quality and dependability, and then made widely available. Large Environmental Engineering Universities and International Consulting Engineering firms need to be organized to undertake these important tasks. The paper also points out the connection between Global Warming and the Solid waste industry and shows how it can be controlled inexpensively by employing a new, unique, and rapid method of converting municipal refuse into methane and then using that to make electricity. Information given in this paper could lead to a vast reduction in future pollution, with the resulting better global health and at the same time save trillions of dollars.

  9. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27- Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe...

  10. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  11. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,” (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  12. Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, J F; Young, J C

    1980-09-01

    Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

  13. Computed tomography and optical remote sensing: Development for the study of indoor air pollutant transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis investigates the mixing and dispersion of indoor air pollutants under a variety of conditions using standard experimental methods. It also extensively tests and improves a novel technique for measuring contaminant concentrations that has the potential for more rapid, non-intrusive measurements with higher spatial resolution than previously possible. Experiments conducted in a sealed room support the hypothesis that the mixing time of an instantaneously released tracer gas is inversely proportional to the cube root of the mechanical power transferred to the room air. One table-top and several room-scale experiments are performed to test the concept of employing optical remote sensing (ORS) and computed tomography (CT) to measure steady-state gas concentrations in a horizontal plane. Various remote sensing instruments, scanning geometries and reconstruction algorithms are employed. Reconstructed concentration distributions based on existing iterative CT techniques contain a high degree of unrealistic spatial variability and do not agree well with simultaneously gathered point-sample data.

  14. Air pollution forecasting by coupled atmosphere-fire model WRF and SFIRE with WRF-Chem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochanski, Adam K; Mandel, Jan; Clements, Craig B

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution regulations have emerged as a dominant obstacle to prescribed burns. Thus, forecasting the pollution caused by wildland fires has acquired high importance. WRF and SFIRE model wildland fire spread in a two-way interaction with the atmosphere. The surface heat flux from the fire causes strong updrafts, which in turn change the winds and affect the fire spread. Fire emissions, estimated from the burning organic matter, are inserted in every time step into WRF-Chem tracers at the lowest atmospheric layer. The buoyancy caused by the fire then naturally simulates plume dynamics, and the chemical transport in WRF-Chem provides a forecast of the pollution spread. We discuss the choice of wood burning models and compatible chemical transport models in WRF-Chem, and demonstrate the results on case studies.

  15. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17061721 Evaluating impacts of air pollution in China on public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    2006-01-01

    the implementation of best available emission control technology (BACT) and advanced coal gasification technologies of additional pollution controls and particularly from the use of advanced coal gasification technology. Without-of-pipe environmental controls (BACT) and advanced coal gasification technologies (ACGT). This comparative health

  16. Pb Isotopes as an Indicator of the Asian Contribution to Particulate Air Pollution in Urban California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Stephanie A.; Christensen, John N.; Brown, Shaun T.; Vancuren, Richard A.; Cliff, Steven S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-10-25

    During the last two decades, expanding industrial activity in east Asia has led to increased production of airborne pollutants that can be transported to North America. Previous efforts to detect this trans-Pacific pollution have relied upon remote sensing and remote sample locations. We tested whether Pb isotope ratios in airborne particles can be used to directly evaluate the Asian contribution to airborne particles of anthropogenic origin in western North America, using a time series of samples from a pair of sites upwind and downwind of the San Francisco Bay Area. Our results for airborne Pb at these sites indicate a median value of 29 Asian origin, based on mixing relations between distinct regional sample groups. This trans-Pacific Pb is present in small quantities but serves as a tracer for airborne particles within the growing Asian industrial plume. We then applied this analysis to archived samples from urban sites in central California. Taken together, our results suggest that the analysis of Pb isotopes can reveal the distribution of airborne particles affected by Asian industrial pollution at urban sites in northern California. Under suitable circumstances, this analysis can improve understanding of the global transport of pollution, independent of transport models.

  17. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

  18. Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddington, C L

    Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

  19. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    #12;1 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR CLEAN ENERGY ENGINEERING...................................................... 24 CONNECTICUT Energy Engineering (C2E2). The installation was funded by a federal stimulus grant from Connecticut

  20. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    #12;1 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT 2007-08 TABLE OF CONTENTS Center for Advanced Technology.................................. 217 Connecticut Global Fuel Cell Center......................................................219 Connecticut Transportation Institute...................................................... 223

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    #12;1 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009 (amended 6 Center for Advanced Technology.................................. 208 Connecticut Global Fuel Cell Center......................................................210 Connecticut Transportation Institute...................................................... 215

  2. Market Transformation in Connecticut: Integrating Home Performance Into Existing Trades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Market Transformation in Connecticut: Integrating Home Performance Into Existing Trades, Evolving to Whole Home Success, Session 2: Sustainable Business Models presentation. Provides an overview of Connecticut's various home energy programs, the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, and contractor involvement.

  3. Poetry Inspired by Mathematics: a Brief Journey through History Department of Mathematics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    of Mathematics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA Correspondence details: Sarah Glaz E-3009 University of Connecticut Storrs, CT 06269-3009 (Received XX February 2011; final version received

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results This...

  5. Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful downpayment on the nation's energy...

  6. BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER FINANCE CORPORATION June 30, 2014. REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF LEASES: CONNECTICUT CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER* HARVEY AND LEWIS OPTICIANS

  7. Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score Program Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score Program May 19, 2015 - 5:21pm Addthis Connecticut...

  8. Clean Cities: Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities Coalition The Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and...

  9. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models Presented by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc. at the...

  10. Statement on Plagiarism 1 University of Connecticut Freshman English Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    Statement on Plagiarism 1 University of Connecticut Freshman English Program Statement on Plagiarism KEY TERMS AT A GLANCE Academic Misconduct: The University of Connecticut Division of Student

  11. Clean Cities: Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Coalition The Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders...

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    #12;1 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS...................................................... 244 CONNECTICUT TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE......................................................250

  13. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    #12;1 UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING ANNUAL REPORT 2010-2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS CENTER FOR CLEAN ENERGY ENGINEERING...................................................... 252 CONNECTICUT

  14. Probe into Gaseous Pollution and Assessment of Air Quality Benefit under Sector Dependent Emission Control Strategies over Megacities in Yangtze River Delta, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xinyi; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, G.; Zhou, Ying

    2013-11-01

    On February 29th 2012, China published its new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (CH-NAAQS) aiming at revising the standards and measurements for both gaseous pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), and also particle pollutants including PM10 and PM2.5. In order to understand the air pollution status regarding this new standard, the integrated MM5/CMAQ modeling system was applied over Yangtze River Delta (YRD) within this study to examine the criteria gaseous pollutants listed in the new CH-NAAQS. Sensitivity simulations were also conducted to assess the responses of gaseous pollutants under 8 different sector-dependent emission reduction scenarios in order to evaluate the potential control strategies. 2006 was selected as the simulation year in order to review the air quality condition at the beginning of China’s 11th Five-Year-Plan (FYP, from 2006 to 2010), and also compared with air quality status in 2010 as the end of 11th FYP to probe into the effectiveness of the national emission control efforts. Base case simulation showed distinct seasonal variation for gaseous pollutants: SO2, and NO2 were found to have higher surface concentrations in winter while O3 was found to have higher concentrations in spring and summer than other seasons. According to the analyses focused on 3 megacities within YRD, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Hangzhou, we found different air quality conditions among the cities: NO2 was the primary pollutant that having the largest number of days exceeding the CH-NAAQS daily standard (80 ?g/m3) in Shanghai (59 days) and Nanjing (27 days); SO2 was the primary pollutant with maximum number of days exceeding daily air quality standard (150 ?g/m3) in Hangzhou (28 days), while O3 exceeding the daily maximum 8-hour standard (160 ?g/m3) for relatively fewer days in all the three cities (9 days in Shanghai, 14 days in Nanjing, and 11 days in Hangzhou). Simulation results from predefined potential applicable emission control scenarios suggested significant air quality improvements from emission reduction: 90% of SO2 emission removed from power plant in YRD would be able to reduce more than 85% of SO2 pollution, 85% NOx emission reduction from power plant would reduce more than 60% of NO2 pollution, in terms of reducing the number of days exceeding daily air quality standard. NOx emission reduction from transportation and industry were also found to effectively reduce NO2 pollution but less efficient than emission control from power plants. We also found that multi-pollutants emission control including both NOx and VOC would be a better strategy than independent NOx control over YRD which is China’s 12th Five-Year-Plan (from 2011 to 2015), because O3 pollution would be increased as a side effect of NOx control and counteract NO2 pollution reduction benefit.

  15. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  17. Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Several energy-efficient improvements made to a senior care center in New Milford, Connecticut, are helping residents live healthier and more comfortable lifestyles. The upgrade...

  18. Southbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4814847, -73.2131693 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  19. Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution. University ofon-road motor vehicles to urban air pollution using travelurban air pollution, zero emission vehicle (ZEV) mandates

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut) All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated...