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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.

2

Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses  

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Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Title Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Journal Energy and Buildings Start Page 616 Pagination 616-625 Date Published 08/2013 Abstract Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. Weanalyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalizedleakage (NL) as the metric. Weatherization assistance programs (WAPs) and residential energy efficiencyprograms contributed most of the data. We performed regression analyses to examine the relationshipbetween NL and various house characteristics. Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built, climate zone, floor area, house height, and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare energy efficiency rated homes. Foundation type and whether ducts are located outside or inside theconditioned space are also found to be useful parameters for predicting NL. We developed a regressionmodel that explains approximately 68% of the observed variability across US homes. Of these variablesconsidered, year built and climate zone are the two that have the largest influence on NL. The regressionmodel can be used to predict air leakage values for individual homes, and distributions for groups ofhomes, based on their characteristics. Using RECS 2009 data, the regression model predicts 90% of UShouses have NL between 0.22 and 1.95, with a median of 0.67.

3

Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / e n b u i l d Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses Wanyu R. Chan ∗ , Jeffrey Joh, Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 90R3058, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 4 March 2013 Accepted 16 July 2013 Keywords: Blower door Fan pressurization test Normalized leakage Air infiltration Building envelope airtightness a b s t r a c t Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. We analyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalized

4

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting the Air Leakage Meeting the Air Leakage Requirements of the 2012 IECC The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The newest edition of the International Energy Conservation Code ® (IECC) (2012) sets the bar higher for energy efficiency, and new air sealing requirements are one of the key new provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the new air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these new measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, Best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code (IRC) requirements are referenced throughout the guide.

5

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

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Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

6

Air-leakage control manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the ``how and why`` of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the ``Simple Caulk and Seal`` (SIMPLE{center_dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center_dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

Maloney, J. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Air-Leakage Control Manual.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the how and why'' of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the Simple Caulk and Seal'' (SIMPLE{center dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

Maloney, Jim; Washington State Energy Office; United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

9

AIR LEAKAGE OF NEWLY INSTALLED RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through Sash/Frame Cracks . Window Operation Types . . . . .Window Operation Types . . . . .Air Leakage of Installed Windows Scattergram of Field

Weidt, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Analysis of U.S. residential air leakage database  

SciTech Connect

The air leakage of a building envelope can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. More than 70,000 air leakage measurements have been compiled into a database. In addition to air leakage, the database includes other important characteristics of the dwellings tested, such as floor area, year built, and location. There are also data for some houses on the presence of heating ducts, and floor/basement construction type. The purpose of this work is to identify house characteristics that can be used to predict air leakage. We found that the distribution of leakage normalized with floor area of the house is roughly lognormal. Year built and floor area are the two most significant factors to consider when predicting air leakage: older and smaller houses tend to have higher normalized leakage areas compared to newer and larger ones. Results from multiple linear regression of normalized leakage with respect to these two factors are presented for three types of houses: low-income, energy-efficient, and conventional. We demonstrate a method of using the regression model in conjunction with housing characteristics published by the US Census Bureau to derive a distribution that describes the air leakage of the single-family detached housing stock. Comparison of our estimates with published datasets of air exchange rates suggests that the regression model generates accurate estimates of air leakage distribution.

Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Building Energy Code Resource Guide: Air Leakage Guide | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Guide Air Leakage Guide The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) sets the bar for energy efficiency, and air sealing requirements are one of the key provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code requirements are referenced throughout the guide. Publication Date: Friday, September 30, 2011 BECP_Buidling Energy Code Resource Guide Air Leakage

14

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of methods of sealing supply-air registers wereand sealing practices when leakage at connections to duct-mounted equipment is not considered. The measured air-

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Wanyu R. Chan, Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 August 2012 LBNL-5966E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

17

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ResidentialACMManual,Section 3.12.5Duct/AirHandlerResidentialACMManual,Section3.12.5Duct/Air HandlerleakageofairhandlersforthepurposesoftheACM. Based

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate and air leakage tests under reductive sealing for anfor subsequent sealing, the openings of air infiltrationreductive sealing between the reductions in measured air

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Title Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5552E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., and Max H. Sherman Conference Name 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st TightVent Conference: Towards Optimal Airtightness Performance Date Published 10/2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium. Keywords air leakage, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, infiltration Abstract Air leakage and other diagnostic measurements are being added to LBNL's Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB). We describe the sources of data that amount to more than 80,000 blower door measurements. We present summary statistics of selected parameters, such as floor area and year built. We compare the house characteristics of new additions to ResDB with prior data. Distributions of normalized leakage are computed for income-qualified homes that were weatherized, homes that were participants of various residential energy efficiency programs, and new constructions built between 2006 and 2011. Further work is underway to relate air leakage to house characteristics utilizing the full database for predictive modeling of air infiltration and to support studies of energy efficiency. Current status of ResDB can be found at http://resdb.lbl.gov/.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Title Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5966E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Date Published 08/2012 Keywords air infiltration, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, retrofit, weatherization Abstract LBNL Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB) contains blower door measurements and other diagnostic test results of homes in United States. Of these, approximately 134,000 single-family detached homes have sufficient information for the analysis of air leakage in relation to a number of housing characteristics. We performed regression analysis to consider the correlation between normalized leakage and a number of explanatory variables: IECC climate zone, floor area, height, year built, foundation type, duct location, and other characteristics. The regression model explains 68% of the observed variability in normalized leakage. ResDB also contains the before and after retrofit air leakage measurements of approximately 23,000 homes that participated in weatherization assistant programs (WAPs) or residential energy efficiency programs. The two types of programs achieve rather similar reductions in normalized leakage: 30% for WAPs and 20% for other energy programs.

22

Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities could be controlled closely. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and Energy Efficiency Ratio both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed one of the most detrimental effects of return air leakage on performance.

O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

24

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk,0.75 to 0.90; thus, heat conduction decreased the coolingby air leakage or heat conduction, because these ducts are

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: December 3, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Nance Matson Fans for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply duct pressure. The standard way to reset duct pressure is by controlling the most-open terminal damper to a nearly open position. Most systems can't measure terminal damper positions, so pressures are either not reset at all or use ad hoc resetting strategies that are configured sub-optimally. In this seminar I will describe a new method of determining the critical supply duct pressure for VAV systems.

27

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ductleakagetesting. ASHRAETransactions,June2008. ASHRAE,Atlanta,GA. LBNL62262. Walker,I.S. (Institute,Arlington,VA. ASHRAEStandard103. (2007).

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Analysis of U.S. residential air leakage database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installing air and vapor barriers, and sealing ducts.that will reduce air in?ltration such as sealing air leaks,

Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

easyairsealing .suchthattheefficacyofairsealingis determinedbytheinlet that prevents easy air sealing DeltaQ TheDeltaQtest

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA. CEC(2008b). ResidentialAlternativeCalculationStandardforAirHandlersinResidentialSpaceConditioningofStandardsOptionsforResidentialAirHandlerFans.

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured Airflows in a Multifamily Building," AirflowPerformance of Building Envelopes, Components, and Systems,APARTMENTS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Price, P.N. ; Shehabi,

Price, P.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

FREE AIR PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Indenter gages, Wiancko gages, and interferometer gages were used to measure air overpressure vs time at essentially ground level stations for both the surface (S) and undprground (U) atomic explosions. For the S Burst several instruments were placed on a line extending from an overpressure region of 13 psi to a region of less than one psi. The air measurements for the U Burst ranged from 32 to 2 psi. (D. L.G.)

Howard, W.J.; Jones, R.D.

1952-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to find suitable efficiency and leakage specifications for Energy Star duct systems and provide recommendations on duct insulation specifications. This analysis looks at a typical house, with a selection of duct locations, climates, duct insulation (R-value), and duct leakage. A set of calculations were performed with reduced capacity and airflow to look at the effect of variable capacity systems. This was done to address concerns regarding the increased efficiency of multi-capacity equipment due to good part load performance and how these efficiency gains may be offset by increased duct losses. The duct system efficiencies were calculated using the procedures in proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P ''Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems'' (ASHRAE 1999). This proposed ASHRAE Standard can be used to calculate duct efficiency for both design and seasonal weather conditions. In this report, the seasonal efficiencies are used for most of the analysis because they are the most appropriate for estimating energy consumption in buildings. The effects at peak conditions are examined for changing duct insulation in order to provide preliminary estimates of the potential responses to time of use pricing. The study was performed in two parts. The first part focused on duct leakage and the second part on duct insulation. The HVAC systems in the two parts share many attributes, however, they differ in detail and so are treated separately here. All the calculation results are summarized in tables in the Appendix, and specific results are given in the text.

Walker, Iain

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only to control the migration of vapor, if at all. Small amounts of water leakage/penetration, may cause mold growth or catastrophic corrosion in current roofs systems. In a recent paper by the authors the effect of exterior surface emissive and absorptive properties was found to have a significant effect on the moisture performance of a roof that had a leak. Depending on the surface characteristics, roof systems can be designed to effectively manage water penetration, but at an energy cost. In the roofs system examined previously, air leakage was not included. In the present study, the authors reinvestigated the effect of water penetration and the influence of air leakage on the hygrothermal performance of a few selected roofs. The drying potential of a groove ventilated roof is examined. The performance concept is based on the fact that warming up of air in the groove increases it's ability to transport moisture to the outside. Solar radiation raises the temperature of air in the grooves and on average, during a sunny summer day 0.5 L of water can be ventilated out of the roof per 1m width of the roof. In this paper, one climatic condition was investigated; a hot and humid Climate representative of Houston, TX. The specific questions that the paper addresses are: What are the vapor and liquid control dynamic involved in the moisture migration of a roof in Houston TX? and how does airflow influence the performance of a roof that is initially wet ? A state-of-the-art numerical model was used to address these issues. Results showed that the drying potential depends on the ventilation rates. The roof system with ventilation grooves dried out faster from the initially wet stage than the roof without the ventilation grooves. The total increase in heat loss of the roof was found to be between 0 - 5 % depending on the thickness of the insulation. The ventilation can cool down the temperature of the roof in the middle of a hot and sunny day thus reducing the heat load to the inside.

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

SciTech Connect

The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80'F (27.8'C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95'F (350C) all the way up to 120'F (48.9'C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from-36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effect of Refrigerant Charge, Duct Leakage, and Evaporator Air Flow on the High Temperature Performance of Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80F (27.8C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95F (35C) all the way up to 120F (48.9C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from -36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

SciTech Connect

Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Condenser In-Leakage Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser In-Leakage Guideline will assist engineers and chemists in identifying and locating air and water in-leakage leaks. It outlines the principles of operation of common condenser air-removal equipment. By keeping the air in-leakage within the capability of the air-removal equipment, condenser back pressure can be maintained. By keeping the water in-leakage as low as possible, condensate chemistry can be maintained.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Leakage and paralysis in ancilla-assisted qubit measurement: Consequences for topological error correction in superconducting architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although topological error-correcting codes offer a promising paradigm for fault-tolerant quantum computation, their robustness in the presence of leakage to non-computational states is unclear. Here we explore the signature and consequences of leakage errors on ancilla-assisted Pauli operator measurement in superconducting devices. We consider a realistic coupled-qutrit model and simulate the repeated measurement of a single Z operator. Typically, a data-qubit leakage event manifests itself by producing a "noisy" ancilla qubit that randomly reads 0 or 1 from cycle to cycle. Although the measurement operation is compromised, the presence of the leakage event is apparent and detectable. However, there is also the possibility of a less typical but more dangerous type of leakage event, where the ancilla becomes paralyzed, rendering it oblivious to data-qubit errors for many consecutive measurement cycles and compromising the fault-tolerance. Certain dynamical phases associated with the entangling gate determine which type of leakage event will occur in practice. Leakage errors occur in most qubit realizations and our model and results are relevant for many stabilizer-based error correction protocols.

Joydip Ghosh; Austin G. Fowler; John M. Martinis; Michael R. Geller

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply...

46

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measurements of Accelerator-Produced Leakage Neutron and Photon Transmission through Concrete  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimum shielding of the radiation from particle accelerators requires knowledge of the attenuation characteristics of the shielding material. The most common material for shielding this radiation is concrete, which can be made using various materials of different densities as aggregates. These different concrete mixes can have very different attenuation characteristics. Information about the attenuation of leakage photons and neutrons in ordinary and heavy concrete is, however, very limited. To increase our knowledge and understanding of the radiation attenuation in concrete of various compositions, we have performed measurements of the transmission of leakage radiation, photons and neutrons, from a Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator operating at maximum electron energies of 6 and 18 MeV. We also calculated, using Monte Carlo techniques, the leakage neutron spectra and its transmission through concrete. The results of these measurements and calculations extend the information currently available for designing shielding for medical electron accelerators. Photon transmission characteristics depend more on the manufacturer of the concrete than on the atomic composition. A possible cause for this effect is a non-uniform distribution of the high density aggregate, typically iron, in the concrete matrix. Errors in estimated transmission of photons can exceed a factor of three, depending on barrier thickness, if attenuation in high-density concrete is simply scaled from that of normal density concrete. We found that neutron transmission through the high-density concretes can be estimated most reasonably and conservatively by using the linear tenth-value layer of normal concrete if specific values of the tenth-value layer of the high-density concrete are not known. The reason for this is that the neutron transmission depends primarily on the hydrogen content of the concrete, which does not significantly depend on concrete density. Errors of factors of two to more than ten, depending on barrier thickness, in the estimated transmission of neutrons through high-density concrete can be made if the attenuation is scaled by density from normal concrete.

Nelson, Walter R

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ Speaker(s): Iain Walker Date: February 21, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Cynthia Tast Duct leakage has been identified as a major contributor to HVAC energy use and building infiltration, particularly in residences. In order to make good estimates of HVAC system energy performance, we need to know how much air leaks between the ducts and outside the building during system operation. Existing methods for determining duct leakage do not perform well due to experimental procedures that produce imprecise results or they require many assumptions to convert measurements into the desired leakage flows. The DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL to determine duct leakage flows by

49

InAir: sharing indoor air quality measurements and visualizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes inAir, a tool for sharing measurements and visualizations of indoor air quality within one's social network. Poor indoor air quality is difficult for humans to detect through sight and smell alone and can contribute to the development ... Keywords: air quality, domestic technology, environment, health, iphone, persuasive technology, sensors, sustainability

Sunyoung Kim; Eric Paulos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Insulating with ENERGY STAR. EPA, May 2008. http: www.energystar.govindex.cfm?cdiy.diyindex www.energystar.govindex.cfm?cdiy.diyindex EPA - 2008b. ENERGY STAR...

52

What are the requirements for duct leakage testing? | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements for duct leakage testing? requirements for duct leakage testing? Both the 2009 and 2012 IECC require duct tightness to be verified. Verification can take place via either a post-construction test or a rough-in test. For the post-construction test, leakage measurement must be made across the entire system, including the manufacturer's air handler enclosure, with all register boots taped or sealed at a test pressure of 0.1 inches w.g. (25 Pa). The 2009 IECC limits the leakage to outdoors to less than or equal to 8 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area or total leakage less than or equal to 12 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. The 2012 IECC only contains a requirement for total leakage of less than or equal to 4 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. For the rough-in test, leakage measurement is made across the system, with

53

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part 1 of this paper, the theoretical models, integrating the fan airflow, fan head, air leakage factors, are developed to analyze the impacts of the static pressure reset on both pressure dependent and pressure independent terminal boxes. In this part, a simulated air handling unit (AHU) system in Omaha NE is used to demonstrate the energy savings performance in one typical climate year. This AHU system has a static pressure reset system and two constant static pressure systems, one having pressure dependent terminal boxes and one having pressure independent terminal boxes. These simulated systems were compared mainly on the basis of fan power energy consumption and thermal energy consumption in totally a year. The example presents a good agreement with the theoretical model and simulation results. It was also shown that static pressure reset provides a promising and challenging way for the energy performance in VAV system.

Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As for a variable air volume (VAV) system, the air duct static pressure is a typical control variable maintained by modulating supply fan speed. The static pressure equals to the summation of the duct pressure loss downstream of the sensor to the terminal box and box inlet static pressure. Typically, the air duct static pressure is set as a constant set point based on the system design information and sensor location. However, under partial load conditions, the terminal box dampers have to be closed more since either required airflow is less than the design airflow which directly leads to much less pressure loss. Thus the static pressure set point should be reset lower in order to reduce fan power, avoid noise at terminal box dampers and box damper malfunction due to excessive pressure. Different static pressure reset schedules are reviewed and compared, considering the influence of outside air temperature on the building load, availability of the VAV box damper positions, the airflow ratio based static pressure reset has also applicable advantages over the existing constant static pressure set point and two typical reset methods. This paper present the theoretical models to express the impacts of static pressure reset on fan airflow, fan head, air leakage, fan power and thermal energy for both pressure independent and pressure dependent boxes. The impacts are also demonstrated using the parametric analysis and numerical results to show the benefits of the static pressure reset including reducing fan power, cooling energy and heating energy.

Liu, M.; Feng, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, L.; Zheng, K.; Pang, W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Brookhaven air infiltration measurement system (BNL/AIMS) description and application  

SciTech Connect

A unique capability to measure part-per-quadrillion concentrations of a family of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) is presented. Together with our unique PFT source and passive sampler, measurement of average air exchange and infiltration rate can be determined for periods as short as 12 hours. A more expensive programmable sampler can provide information on a frequency of as little as once per minute for each of its 23 sampling tubes. The principal of AIMS is based on the applicable steady-state assumption that the average concentration (e.g., in pL/L) of a tracer vapor in a chamber (i.e., a building or room) is equal to the emission rate of the tracer source (e.g., in pL/min) divided by the air leakage or infiltration rate (e.g., in L/min). Knowing the source rate and measuring the average concentration then provides a means to calculate the air leakage rate. Extending this technique to a multichamber concept, in which a different type of PFT source is deployed in each chamber of a building, allows the calculation of not only the infiltration rates in each chamber but also the air exchange rates between chambers as well. Since both the PFT source and the passive sampler, a miniature Capillary Adsorption Tube Sampler (CATS), are about the size of a cigarette, inexpensive, and reusable, the BNL/AIMS is a very cost-effective means (if not the only means) for determining these air exchange rates.

Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.; Cote, E.A.; Wieser, R.F.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

REVIEW OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

9747 9747 Review of Airflow Measurement Techniques Jennifer McWilliams Energy Performance of Buildings Group Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 December 1, 2002 Abstract Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: "Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?" This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and

57

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

59

Detecting Air Leaks | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detecting Air Leaks Detecting Air Leaks Detecting Air Leaks September 27, 2012 - 6:39pm Addthis For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test. For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test. You may already know where some air leakage occurs in your home, such as an under-the-door draft, but you'll need to find the less obvious gaps to properly air seal your home. For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test. A blower door test, which depressurizes a home, can

60

Design and implementation of an economic gas leakage detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas leakage is a major concern with residential, commercial premises and gas powered transportation vehicles. One of the preventive measures to avoid the danger associated with gas leakage is to install a gas leakage detector at vulnerable locations. ... Keywords: LPG, audio-visual alarm, gas leakage detection, leakage exposure limits, safety system

A. Mahalingam; R. T. Naayagi; N. E. Mastorakis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cylinder Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

62

Development of a Mathematical Air-Leakage Model from Measured Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate zonesbuilt, basement type, climate zone, etc. Geographical Datadata challenge was to assign climate zones (since we thought

McWilliams, Jennifer; Jung, Melanie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

TY JOUR T1 Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

house characteristics Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built climate zone floor area house height and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare...

64

Measurements of the Electrical Conductivities of Air over Hot Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the conduction current between two electrodes in air over recently boiled water have been interpreted by Carlon as indicating that the humidified air became highly conductive and that large numbers of ions were produced in the air ...

C. B. Moore; B. Vonnegut

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, air quality, domestic computing, health ACM Classification Keywords H.m. Information interfacesinAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos Human}@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Good indoor air quality is a vital part of human health. Poor indoor air quality can contribute

Paulos, Eric

66

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Title Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47308 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, J. Wempen, Duo Wang, Jennifer A. McWilliams, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Abstract Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard

67

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chamber, passive sampling, passive solar house, measurementhouse, we planed the distribution of fresh air, passivepassive perfluorocarbon tracer technique for determining air infiltration rates into houses

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Probe measurements of the ionization of air behind strong shocks  

SciTech Connect

Detailed measurements of the ionization of air behind strong shocks over a broad range of shocks velocities are reported. (AIP)

Gorelov, V.A.; Kil' dyushova, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Building Envelope Application: New and retrofit; Multi-family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All POTENTIAl BENEFITs Requires substantially fewer resources in the field-equipment, personnel, and time Does not require simultaneous access to multiple housing units-extremely difficult in occupied housing Provides a more appropriate assessment of envelope leakage and the potential energy benefits of air sealing than the commonly used total leakage test The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached hous-

70

PFT Air Infiltration Measurement Technique | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PFT Air Infiltration Measurement Technique PFT Air Infiltration Measurement Technique PFT Air Infiltration Measurement Technique April 2, 2012 - 3:11pm Addthis The Brookhaven National Laboratory developed the PFT (PerFluorocarbon tracer gas) technique to measure changes over time when determining a building's air-infiltration rate. The Brookhaven National Laboratory developed the PFT (PerFluorocarbon tracer gas) technique to measure changes over time when determining a building's air-infiltration rate. What does this mean for me? You can save 5%-30% on your energy bill by making upgrades following a home energy assessment. A professional energy auditor may use the PFT air infiltration measurement technique to find out where your home has air leaks, though a blower door test is more commonly used.

71

A Residential Duct Leakage Case Study on 'Good Cents' Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Good Cents program has been adopted by many cities across the United States and has encouraged builders to employ aggressive energy conservation building techniques in residential applications. The program is well established and has been recognized for the added value it brings to homeowners. The primary energy using system in a residence is the heating and cooling system and in the hot and humid Southeast Texas climate, cooling is the predominant mode of operation for the HVAC system. This makes the system particularly susceptible to degraded performance if there are leaks in the air distribution system. Nine Good Cents homes in the College Station, Texas area were chosen for a study to determine the extent of HVAC air distribution leakage in the HVAC system. It was found that all the homes had significant measured leakage for the return-air side of the system. Houses with vertical sheet-rock lined plenums had significantly higher rates of return air leakage than homes with ducted returns.

Bryant, J. A.; Perez, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

EFFECTS OF ENERGY CONSERVATION MEASURES ON AIR HYGIENE IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS: FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSERVATION r1EASURES ON AIR HYGIENE IN PUBLIC BUILDINGSConservation Measures on Air Hygiene in Public Buildings",CONSERVATION MEASURES ON AIR HYGIENE IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS:

Dimmick, R.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measuring UAS pilot responses to common air traffic clearances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a simulated ground control station, this study documents the methods for measuring the verbal response and execution time of unmanned aerial system (UAS) pilots to direct commands from air traffic controllers (ATCos). Although prior research has ... Keywords: air traffic management, measured response, unmanned aerial systems

Jason Ziccardi, Zach Roberts, Ryan O'Connor, Conrad Rorie, Gregory Morales, Vernol Battiste, Thomas Strybel, Dan Chiappe, Kim-Phuong L. Vu, Jay Shively

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Perfluorocarbon tracer method for air-infiltration measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring air infiltration rates suitable for use in rooms of homes and buildings comprises the steps of emitting perfluorocarbons in the room to be measured, sampling the air containing the emitted perfluorocarbons over a period of time, and analyzing the samples at a laboratory or other facility.

Dietz, R.N.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air leakage rate, then proposed buildings will be rewarded for sealingduct sealing even more cost-effective. Table 5. TRNSYS Air-

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stone Wallboard Paint Insulation Building Contents Heatingbuilding envelopes to reduce leakage and inf"ltration rates, improving insulation,

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Measured Impacts of Air Conditioner Condenser Shading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study has been conducted by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) to examine if space cooling energy savings can be achieved from shading of residential air conditioning (AC) condenser units. The investigation consisted of before-and-after experiments conducted on three homes over a two year period. A recent EPA study recommends shading of exterior AC condensers, using landscaping or other means, as a method to reduce space cooling energy use (Akbari et al., 1992).

Parker, D. S.; Barkaszi, S. F.; Sonne, J. K.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on the daily maximum temperatureLBNL-5330E Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Josh Bode, Michael J. Sullivan Freeman

79

Pilot workload in the air transport environment : measurement, theory, and the influence of air traffic control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operating environment of an air transport crew is characterized by multiple interrupting tasks, these tasks being composed of a mixture of purely physical control and purely mental planning processes. Measurement of ...

Katz, Jeffrey G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Air Temperature Measurement Errors in Naturally Ventilated Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sources of systematic errors are considered for estimating air temperature. The first source is ambiguity of the definition of the standardized measurement height over vegetated surfaces of varying heights. Without such a standardization, ...

Reina Nakamura; L. Mahrt

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Air pollution uncertainty exists in radon measurements  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses radon which is a colorless, odorless gas formed by the decay of radium and uranium that has been shown to cause lung cancer. Progress has been made in ensuring the accuracy of home radon measurements. According to this report, however, radon measurements are uncertain because the ability of the devices that measure radon and the companies analyzing the devices' readings varies and homeowners may not be following EPA's recommended testing procedures. Several possible causes for the uncertainty in radon measurements are cited.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia Partner World Bank Development Grant Facility (DGF), Asian Development Bank (ADB), the German Development Cooperation (GiZ), Energy Foundation, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Institute for Transport Policy Studies (ITPS), Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), United Nations Centre for Regional Development (UNCRD), Veolia Energy Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -TNA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

83

Shroud leakage flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses research on the leakage and rotordynamic characteristics of pocket damper seals (PDS) and see-through labyrinth seals, presents and evaluates models for labyrinth seal and PDS leakage and PDS force coefficients, and compares these seals to other annular gas seals. Low-pressure experimental results are used alongside previously-published high-pressure labyrinth and PDS data to evaluate the models. Effects of major seal design parameters; blade thickness, blade spacing, blade profile, and cavity depth; on seal leakage, as well as the effect of operating a seal in an off-center position, are examined through a series of non-rotating tests. Two reconfigurable seal designs were used, which enabled testing labyrinth seals and PDS with two to six blades. Leakage and pressure measurements were made with air as the working fluid on twenty-two seal configurations. Increasing seal blade thickness reduced leakage by the largest amount. Blade profile results were more equivocal, indicating that both profile and thickness affected leakage, but that the influence of one factor partially negated the influence of the other. Seal leakage increased with increased eccentricity at lower supply pressures, but that this effect was attenuated for higher pressure drops. While cavity depth effects were minor, reducing depths reduced leakage up to a point beyond which leakage increased, indicating that an optimum cavity depth existed. Changing blade spacing produced results almost as significant as those for blade thickness, showing that reducing spacing can detrimentally affect leakage to the point of negating the benefit of inserting additional blades. Tests to determine the effect of PDS partition walls showed that they reduce axial leakage. The pressure drop was found to be highest across the first blade of a seal for low pressure drops, but the pressure drop distribution became parabolic for high pressure drops with the largest drop across the last blade. Thirteen leakage equations made up of a base equations, a flow factor, and a kinetic energy carryover factor were examined. The importance of the carryover coefficient was made evident and a modified carryover coefficient is suggested. Existing fullypartitioned PDS models were expanded to accommodate seals of various geometries.

Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation is the second in a series of training modules addressing leakage in nuclear power plants. The first planned modules in the leakage reduction series include leakage reduction program management, bolted joints with flat gaskets, valve packing, threaded joints, compression fittings, mechanical seals, and miscellaneous bolting issues.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building  

SciTech Connect

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Dianne Griffiths April 30, 2013 Presentation Outline * Objectives * What we accomplished last year * What we plan to do this year Why do we do blower door testing? * Compliance to some standard * Identify opportunity for reducing energy use * Identify opportunity for improving IAQ * Measure implementation verification Total (or Solo) Leakage Test P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa Open windows, open doors, same test pressure across whole envelope. If pressure across envelope at any point is different from test pressure by less than 5 Pa, not neccessary. "Fully" Guarded Test P = 0 Pa P = 0 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 0 Pa Isolates exterior leakage What's the big deal? * How we measure depends on why we're

88

Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Indoor air quality measurements in energy efficient buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Efficient Buildings Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has designed and fabricated a mobile laboratory for research and development studies of ventilation requirements and energy utilization in residential and commercial buildings. The Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) Mobile Laboratory is used in studies of indoor air quality in buildings before and after energy conservation retrofits and in new buildings incorporating energy efficient designs. Indoor air quality measurements have been conducted in residential buildings and work in progress includes indoor air quality monitoring in schools, hospitals, and energy efficient residential buildings. The monitoring program includes measurement of CO, CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, NO, NO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, infiltration rate (tracer gas technique), and aerosol size distribution on a continuous basis. Total and respirable-fraction particulate samples are collected on membrane filter media for analysis by x-ray fluorescence (XRFA), photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), proton activation analysis (PAA), combustion, and wet-chemistry techniques for the determination of particulate elemental composition (S, N, C, etc.) and ionic species such as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/. Results of the initial phases of this program indicate that the concentrations of some gaseous and respirable particulate air pollutants in specific indoor environments exceed those levels commonly found in the outdoor urban air environment.

Hollowell, C.D.; Berk, J.V.; Traynor, G.W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Title Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3650E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Thomas E. McKone, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Start Page 92 Issue 2 Pagination 92-109 Date Published 04/2011 Keywords resave Abstract Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants were representative of concentrations in residences in the United States. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants are identified as contaminants of concern for chronic health effects in a large fraction of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on robustness of reported concentration data and fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3- butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM2.5. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM2.5, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO2.

91

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Title Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3525E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Max H. Sherman Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords airflow, building, duct, energy, energy performance of buildings group, fan, hvac, indoor environment department, other, power, retrofits, simulation, system Abstract This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology.A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10% upstream and 10% downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30% on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5% upstream and 2.5% downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that "ceiling regain" issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30%). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

92

Automatic Continuous Commissioning of Measurement Instruments in Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a robust strategy based on a condition-based adaptive statistical method for automatic commissioning of measurement instruments typically employed in air-handling units (AHU). The multivariate statistic method, principal component analysis (PCA), is adopted and modified to monitor the air handling process. Two PCA models are built corresponding to the heat balance and pressure-flow balance of the air-handling process. Sensor faults can be detected and isolated using the Q-statistic and the Q-contribution plot. The fault isolation ability against typical component faults is improved using knowledge-based analysis. A novel condition-based adaptive scheme is developed to update the PCA models with the operation conditions for continuous online application. A commissioning tool is developed to implement the strategy. Simulation tests and field tests in a building in Hong Kong were conducted to validate the automatic commissioning strategy for typical AHU. The integration of the tool with a building management system (BMS) and its application is demonstrated.

Xiao, F.; Wang, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Issue and Improvement Measure of Multi-split Air Conditioner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing problems of traditional air source variable refrigerant flow (VRF) air-conditioning system are analyzed. The disadvantages of traditional VRF air-conditioning system are described in detail: 1) its properties are seriously affected by outdoor ... Keywords: energy saving, simulation, variable refrigerant flow air conditioning, water loop

Sun Tingting; Ni Long; Yao Yang; Ma Zuiliang; Yi Lingli

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Air toxics being measured more accurately, controlled more effectively  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the directives of the Clean Air Act Amendments, Argonne National Laboratory is developing new or improved pollutant control technologies for industries that burn fossil fuels. This research continues Argonne`s traditional support for the US DOE Flue Gas Cleanup Program. Research is underway to measure process emissions and identify new and improved control measures. Argonne`s emission control research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. Whenever appropriate, the work has emphasized integrated or combined control systems as the best approach to technologies that offer low cost and good operating characteristics.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

96

Microsoft Word - Hult-GarageLeakage_9_19 (1)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"""! """! Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Erin L. Hult, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Phillip N. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2012 LBNL-5887E    Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

97

Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seals are basic mechanical devices commonly used in machinery to avoid undesired flow losses of working fluids. To understand the working of these seals specifically those placed between relatively moving parts is still one of the major engineering challenges for the scientific community. Particularly Annular seals are one of the most widely used in rotating machinery comprising turbines, compressors and pumps. They are mounted on the shaft that rotates within a stationary case. These seal designs make an impact on (i) machinery energy conversion efficiency and (ii) rotor dynamic stability due to the interaction between rotor and stator through fluid flow leakage. Among all annular seals straight through rectangular labyrinth seals are the most commonly used ones. Their designs have not changed much a lot since its inception by C.J. Parsons [1] back in 1901. These seals provide resistance to the fluid flow through tortuous path comprising of series of cavities and clearances. The sharp tooth converts the pressure energy to the kinetic which is dissipated through turbulence viscosity interaction in the cavity. To understand the accurate amount of leakage the flow is modeled using the discharge coefficient and for each tooth and the kinetic energy carry over coefficients. This research work is aimed at understanding the fluid flow though labyrinth seals with tooth mounted on the rotor. A matrix of fluid flow simulations has been carried out using commercially available CFD software Fluent where all parameters effecting the flow field has been studied to understand their effect on the coefficients defining the seal losses. Also the rotor surface speed has been used varied in a step by step manner to understand the fluid flow behavior in high speed turbo-machinery. The carry over coefficient is found to be the function of all the geometric elements defining the labyrinth tooth configuration. A relation between the flow parameters and the carry over coefficient has also been established. The discharge coefficient of the first tooth has been found to be lower and varying in a different manner as compared to a tooth from a multiple cavity seal. Its dependence upon flow parameters and dimensionless geometric constants has been established. The discharge coefficient of the first teeth is found to be increasing with increasing tooth width. Further the compressibility factor has been defined to incorporate the deviation of the performance of seals with compressible fluid to that with the incompressible flow. Its dependence upon pressure ratio and shaft speed has also been established. Using all the above the mentioned relations it would be easy decide upon the tooth configuration for a given rotating machinery or understand the behavior of the seal currently in use.

Chaudhary, Gaurav

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

99

CFD Simulation and Measurement Validation of Air Distribution at the Hunan International Exhibition Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hunan International Exhibition Center (HIEC) is a large space building. A stratified air-conditioning system on the second floor of the building has been adopted. Due to some problems with the air supply jet diffuser, CFD simulations were carried out to predict air distribution. Meanwhile, field measurement results were used to validate the CFD simulation results. A good agreement of simulated and test results was obtained. Based on simulation results, some analyses and suggestions are put forward to improve air distribution.

Deng, T.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, G.; Yuan, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of the neutron leakage from a dedicated intraoperative radiation therapy electron linear accelerator and a conventional linear accelerator for 9, 12, 15(16), and 18(20) MeV electron energies  

SciTech Connect

The issue of neutron leakage has recently been raised in connection with dedicated electron-only linear accelerators used for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In particular, concern has been expressed about the degree of neutron production at energies of 10 MeV and higher due to the need for additional, perhaps permanent, shielding in the room in which the device is operated. In particular, three mobile linear accelerators available commercially offer electron energies at or above the neutron threshold, one at 9 MeV, one at 10 MeV, and the third at 12 MeV. To investigate this problem, neutron leakage has been measured around the head of two types of electron accelerators at a distance of 1 m from the target at azimuthal angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg. The first is a dedicated electron-only (nonmobile) machine with electron energies of 6 (not used here), 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV and the second a conventional machine with electron energies of 6 (also not used here), 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV. Measurements were made using neutron bubble detectors and track-etch detectors. For electron beams from a conventional accelerator, the neutron leakage in the forward direction in Sv/Gy is 2.1x10{sup -5} at 12 MeV, 1.3x10{sup -4} at 16 MeV, and 4.2x10{sup -4} at 20 MeV, assuming a quality factor (RBE) of 10. For azimuthal angles >0 deg., the leakage is almost angle independent [2x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; (0.7-1.6)x10{sup -5} at 16 MeV, and (1.6-2.9)x10{sup -5} at 20 MeV]. For the electron-only machine, the neutron leakage was lower than for the conventional linac, but also independent of azimuthal angle for angles >0 deg. : ([0 deg. : 7.7x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; 3.0x10{sup -5} at 15 MeV; 1.0x10{sup -4} at 18 MeV]; [other angles: (2.6-5.9)x10{sup -7} at 12 MeV; (1.4-2.2)x10{sup -6} at 15 MeV; (2.7-4.7)x10{sup -6} at 18 MeV]). Using the upper limit of 6x10{sup -7} Sv/Gy at 12 MeV for the IORT machine for azimuthal angles >0 deg. and assuming a workload of 200 Gy/wk and an inverse square factor of 10, the neutron dose equivalent is calculated to be 0.012 mSv/wk. For the primary beam at 12 MeV (0 deg. ), the 10x higher dose would be compensated by the attenuation of a primary beam stopper in a mobile linear accelerator. These neutron radiation levels are below regulatory values (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 'Limitation of exposure to ionizing radiation', NCRP Report No. 116, NCRP Bethesda, MD, 1993)

Jaradat, Adnan K.; Biggs, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Air time : another measure of the quality of passenger service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposal of a new metric called "Air Time" and its various components, show the advantage of having a broader perspective of the travel process of airline passengers. Travel time is basically affected by three different ...

Blake Betancourt, Juan Jamie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications to local and state codes are seen as an appropriate strategy for the prevention of residential air distribution system leakage and its impacts. A model code element has been developed to assist this strategy. Recent field studies of Florida residences by Cummings, Tooley and Moyer have revealed a mean leakage of 11 percent for the air distribution systems of central, fan-force heating and air conditioning systems. Such leakage may cause an estimated 20 percent increase in energy consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues of air egress from closeable rooms are absent. The model duct construction element presented here contains all of the standards, definitions and code language needed to replace the current duct construction element of the local or state code. The content of this paper was used as a principal source for language adopted for the 1991 Florida Energy Efficiency Code For Building Construction. Addressed are the most appropriate standards required for the closure and sealing of metal duct, rigid fibrous glass duct, and nonmetallic flexible duct. Also addressed are (1) detailed requirements for the sealing of mechanical closets when they function as plenum chambers, (2) detailed requirements for the sealing of enclosed support platforms or air handlers and furnaces when they function as return duct, (3) detailed requirements for the sealing of uninhabitable cavities of the building structure, when they function as duct, and (4) detailed requirements for the egress of air from enclosed rooms which receive supply air. Where necessary, commentary is provided to explain the options available for implementing the model code provision as well as its ramifications. All provisions of this model code are compatible with the requirements, standards and guidelines contained in related documents published by the following organizations: the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc., the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air conditioning Engineers, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the Air Conditioning Contractors Of America, the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Gypsum Association.

Wemhoff, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Infrared Interferometric Measurements of the Near-Surface Air Temperature over the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiometric measurement of the marine air temperature using a Fourier transform infrared spectroradiometer is described. The measurements are taken by the Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) that has been deployed on ...

P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; J. A. Hanafin; B. J. Osborne

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Detection of gas leakage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-precision diode-laser-based temperature measurement for air refractive index compensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a laser-based system to measure the refractive index of air over a long path length. In optical distance measurements, it is essential to know the refractive index of air with high accuracy. Commonly, the refractive index of air is calculated from the properties of the ambient air using either Ciddor or Edlen equations, where the dominant uncertainty component is in most cases the air temperature. The method developed in this work utilizes direct absorption spectroscopy of oxygen to measure the average temperature of air and of water vapor to measure relative humidity. The method allows measurement of temperature and humidity over the same beam path as in optical distance measurement, providing spatially well-matching data. Indoor and outdoor measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. In particular, we demonstrate an effective compensation of the refractive index of air in an interferometric length measurement at a time-variant and spatially nonhomogeneous temperature over a long time period. Further, we were able to demonstrate 7 mK RMS noise over a 67 m path length using a 120 s sample time. To our knowledge, this is the best temperature precision reported for a spectroscopic temperature measurement.

Hieta, Tuomas; Merimaa, Mikko; Vainio, Markku; Seppae, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

SRAM leakage suppression by minimizing standby supply voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppressing the leakage current in memories is critical in low-power design. By reducing the standby supply voltage (VDD) to its limit, which is the Data Retention Voltage (DRV), leakage power can be substantially reduced. This paper explores how low DRV can be in a standard low leakage SRAM module and analyzes how DRV is affected by parameters such as process variations, chip temperature, and transistor sizing. An analytical model for DRV as a function of process and design parameters is presented, and forms the base for further design space explorations. This model is verified using simulations as well as measurements from a 4KB SRAM chip in a 0.13?m technology. It is demonstrated that an SRAM cell state can be preserved at sub-300mV standby V DD, with more than 90 % leakage power savings. 1.

Huifang Qin; Yu Cao; Dejan Markovic; Andrei Vladimirescu; Jan Rabaey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measure Guideline: Air Conditioner Diagnostics, Maintenance, and Replacement  

SciTech Connect

This guideline responds to the need for an efficient means of identifying, diagnosing, and repairing faults in air conditioning systems in existing homes that are undergoing energy upgrades. Inadequate airflow due to constricted ducts or undersized filters, improper refrigerant charge, and other system defects can be corrected at a fraction of the cost of equipment replacement and can yield significant savings. The guideline presents a two-step approach to diagnostics and repair.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-On-Grade Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This measure guideline describes covers two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

Dickson, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Computing leakage current distributions and determination of minimum leakage vectors for combinational designs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Analyzing circuit leakage and minimizing leakage during the standby mode of oper- ation of a circuit are important problems faced during contemporary circuit design. Analysis (more)

Gulati, Kanupriya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors  

SciTech Connect

In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improving Concentration Measures Used for Evaluating Air Quality Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unfortunate difficulty in model evaluation is that the concentration measure that most models predict, namely the ensemble mean concentration under the plume centerline (or at some location relative to the plume centerline), cannot be measured ...

Russell F. Lee; John S. Irwin

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology. A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10percent upstream and 10percent downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30percent on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5percent upstream and 2.5percent downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that ?ceiling regain? issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30percent). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

Wray, Craig; Sherman, Max

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Compiler Support for Reducing Leakage Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy. Our strategy is built upon a data-flow analysis that ...

W. Zhang; M. Kandemir; N. Vijaykrishnan; M. J. Irwin; V. De

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Use of Pressure Fluctuations on the Nose of an Aircraft for Measuring Air Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air-motion sensing technique is described for measurement of attack and sideslip angles and dynamicpressure. The sensing probe consists of an array of five pressure holes in the standard radome of a twin-jetresearch aircraft. Comparisons are ...

E. N. Brown; C. A. Friehe; D. H. Lenschow

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Airborne Measurements of Surface, Layer Turbulence over the Ocean during Cold Air Outbreaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra and cospectra made at the 50 m level above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks have been studied. The data cover nearshore areas of cloud streets or roll vortices. In the ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eueng-Nan Yeh

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Surface Air Temperature and Humidity from Intersatellite-Calibrated HIRS Measurements in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-latitude ocean surface air temperature and humidity derived from intersatellite-calibrated High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) measurements are examined. A neural network approach is used to develop retrieval algorithms. HIRS ...

Lei Shi; Ge Peng; John J. Bates

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An Airborne Laser Air Motion Sensing System. Part II: Design Criteria and Measurement Possibilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conically scanning Doppler lidar technique for measuring air motions from an aircraft is proposed in the companion paper (Keeler et al.). A theoretical analysis of this technique shows that, assuming isotropic turbulence, the technique is ...

Leif Kristensen; Donald H. Lenschow

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Characterization of an Air Pollution Episode Using Satellite Total Ozone Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented which demonstrates that measurements of total ozone from a space platform can be used to study a widespread air pollution episode over the southeastern United States. In particular the synoptic-scale distribution of ...

Jack Fishman; Fred M. Vukovich; Donald R. Cahoon; Mark C. Shipham

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A procedure is described to measure approximate real-world air conditioning fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high quality reference measurements. Here we show an experimental approach ...

R. Philipona; A. Kruchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

123

A Three-Aircraft Intercomparison of Two Types of Air Motion Measurement Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present procedures to evaluate air motion measurements on two or more aircraft by flying them in formation at a known lateral displacement. The analysis is applied to two formation flights involving three aircraftthe NCAR Electra, Sabreliner ...

D. H. Lenschow; E. R. Miller; R. B. Friesen

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high-quality reference measurements. This paper discusses an experimental ...

R. Philipona; A. Kruchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) development for air drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When downhole contact between the BHA and formation was optimum, as it was during rotation, high signal levels were experienced. Survey data acquired at the connections, when the BHA was totally at rest, is excellent. GEC intends modifying the system to optimize operations consistent with these disparate factors. A Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) of 89.9 hours appears reasonable from the data. It is not possible to infer an MTBF figure from this test. It is quite obvious, however, that the system reliability performance has been significantly improved since FT {number_sign}5 was performed almost two years earlier. Based on the above results, GEC concludes that it is certainly feasible to attain 100 hours MTBF, for the Model 27, in any and all situations, and hence to provide a reliable MWD for air-drilling.

Harrison, W.A.; Rubin, L.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

frequently without affecting customer comfort. A key issue for grid operations and electricity market settlement is how to accurately measure shorter-term (e.g., ten's of...

127

Dynamic leakage from laboratory safety hoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate hood leakage by measuring face velocity and turbulence during a volume generating process designed to simulate a hot process, defined here as any operation producing high temperature gases. A hot process has been recognized as a causal factor in the leakage of contaminants from laboratory fume hoods since 1950. A literature search reveals that during the last couple of decades only Johnson et al. reported a quantitative linear relationship between thermal loading and breathing zone trace gas concentrations using the ASHRAE 110-1995 method. Hot processes may well be the most common and least recognized of the operational factors able to cause fume hoods to leak. For hood performance testing, I conducted smoke tests and face velocity tests. Smoke tests were executed by means of smoke tubes and smoke matches as screening tools for hood leakage. Face velocity tests were conducted at 16 points arranged to represent equal areas of the hood face when the sash was fully opened. Face velocity data were indexed in time and space and used to estimate turbulence. By assuming corresponding samples were collected simultaneously, turbulence parameters were computed as both spatial and temporal averages of the velocity pressure. Turbulence is represented by the ratio of the standard deviation to average face velocity at each measurement point. Turbulence is generated by pressure differences occurring between the velocity pressure at the hood face and the volume generating rate that simulates a hot process. Through the average face velocity and turbulence measurements, I found that at a fixed exhaust flow, with a fixed injection volume flow, turbulence is stronger in the open sash position than in the reduced sash position. Further, turbulence associated with a volume generating process is more evident in the space-based data than in the time-based data. Face velocity at each point tends to decrease in a hood when the flow injected by a volume generating process increases. These data suggest that when a hood is operated with a volume generating process, leakage can be minimized by reducing the sash opening, by not positioning any object within six inches of the hood face, and by keeping face velocities stable.

Park, Ju-Myon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Leakage Mapping: A Systematic Methodology for Assessing the Side-Channel Information Leakage of Cryptographic Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generalized framework to evaluate the side-channel information leakage of symmetric block ciphers. The leakage mapping methodology enables the systematic and efficient identification and mitigation of problematic information leakages by ... Keywords: Differential power analysis, advanced encryption standard, block cipher, cryptanalysis, cryptography, encryption, hardware security, information leakage, physical-layer security, side-channel analysis

William E. Cobb; Rusty O. Baldwin; Eric D. Laspe

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A triple hot-wire system for indoor air flow measurements  

SciTech Connect

The application of a home made, triple hot-wire system in indoor air flow measurements is presented. Both the anemometer and sensor have been developed at Athens University with the aim to provide a reliable, research tool of reasonable cost, simple construction, and satisfactory performance. All three velocity components above a threshold of 10 cm s{sup {minus}1} can be measured. The system is also equipped with two thermometers for measuring the mean and fluctuating air temperature and for providing a means of temperature compensation of the hot wires` signal. After evaluation of the system in the laboratory, it was used in the measurement of the velocity profile of flows driven by the temperature difference between two internal zones. The implied accuracy of the method allows for its integration with measurements of air volume exchange rates between internal zones, as estimated by tracer gas techniques.

Papadopoulos, K.H.; Soilemes, A.T.; Helmis, C.G.; Santamouris, M.; Dascalaki, E. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Asimakopoulos, D.N. [Univ. of Athens (Greece)]|[National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment; Argiriou, A. [National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment - A laboratory measurement of the microwave emission from extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AMY experiment aims to measure the microwave bremsstrahlung radiation (MBR) emitted by air-showers secondary electrons accelerating in collisions with neutral molecules of the atmosphere. The measurements are performed using a beam of 510 MeV electrons at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories. The goal of the AMY experiment is to measure in laboratory conditions the yield and the spectrum of the GHz emission in the frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. The final purpose is to characterise the process to be used in a next generation detectors of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A description of the experimental setup and the first results are presented.

K. Louedec; J. Alvarez-Muiz; M. Blanco; M. Bohcov; B. Buonomo; G. Cataldi; M. R. Coluccia; P. Creti; I. De Mitri; C. Di Giulio; P. Facal San Luis; L. Foggetta; R. Gaor; D. Garcia-Fernandez; M. Iarlori; S. Le Coz; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. C. Mari?; D. Martello; G. Mazzitelli; M. Monasor; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; S. Petrera; P. Privitera; V. Rizi; G. Rodriguez Fernandez; F. Salamida; G. Salina; M. Settimo; P. Valente; J. R. Vazquez; V. Verzi; C. Williams

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Eddy-Correlation Measurements of Air-Sea Fluxes from a Discus Buoy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates that it is practical to measure turbulent air-sea fluxes from a discus buoy. It proposes a method to correct the measured wind flow, for velocities induced by angular and axial movements of the anemometer, allowing the ...

Franois Anctil; Mark A. Donelan; William M. Drennan; Hans C. Graber

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Model Based Sensor System for Temperature Measurement in R744 Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal is the development of a novel principle for the temperature acquisition of refrigerants in CO2 air conditioning systems. The new approach is based on measuring the temperature inside a pressure sensor, which is also needed in the system. On the basis of simulative investigations of different mounting conditions functional relations between measured and medium temperature will be derived.

Reitz, Sven; Schneider, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Understanding the effects of leakage in superconducting quantum error detection circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of quantum error detection and correction protocols assume that the population in a qubit does not leak outside of its computational subspace. For many existing approaches, however, the physical qubits do possess more than two energy levels and consequently are prone to such leakage events. Analyzing the effects of leakage is therefore essential to devise optimal protocols for quantum gates, measurement, and error correction. In this work, we present a detailed study of leakage in a two-qubit superconducting stabilizer measurement circuit. We simulate the repeated ancilla-assisted measurement of a single $\\sigma^z$ operator for a data qubit, record the outcome at the end of each measurement cycle, and explore the signature of leakage events in the obtained readout statistics. An analytic model is also developed that closely approximates the results of our numerical simulations. We find that leakage leads to destructive features in the quantum error detection scheme, making additional hardware and software protocols necessary.

Joydip Ghosh; Austin G. Fowler; John M. Martinis; Michael R. Geller

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Interferometeric Fibre Optic Signal Processing Based on Wavelet Transform for Subsea Gas Pipeline Leakage Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fiber-optic interferometric method for subsea gas pipeline leakage detection simulation test was conducted in underwater waveguide lab. The leakage signal with simultaneous phase variation is interferometrically measured based on Sagnac interferometer ... Keywords: Subsea pipe, Fiber optic, Interferometeric phase, Null frequency, Wavelet transform

Qiang Wang; Xiaowei Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Detonation cell size measurements and predictions in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at elevated temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present research reports on the effect of initial mixture temperature on the experimentally measured detonation cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Experimental and theoretical research related to combustion phenomena in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures has been ongoing for many years. However, detonation cell size data currently exists or hydrogen-air-steam mixtures up to a temperature of only 400K. Sever accident scenarios have been identified for light water reactors (LWRs) where hydrogen-air mixture temperatures in excess of 400K could be generated within containment. The experiments in this report focus on extending the cell size data base for initial mixture temperatures in excess of 400K. The experiments were carried out in a 10-cm inner-diameter, 6.1-m long heated detonation tube with a maximum operating temperature of 700K and spatial temperature uniformity of {plus_minus}14K. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air initial gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K--650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside-diameter test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent by hydrogen at 300K down to about 9 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese translation of the Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to improve furnace energy efficiency. Fuel-fired furnaces discharge combustion products through a stack or a chimney. Hot furnace gases are less dense and more buoyant than ambient air, so they rise, creating a differential pressure between the top and the bottom of the furnace. This differential, known as thermal head, is the source of a natural draft or negative pressure in furnaces and boilers. A well-designed furnace (or boiler) is built to avoid air leakage into the furnace or leakage of flue gases from the furnace to the ambient. However, with time, most furnaces develop cracks or openings around doors, joints, and hearth seals. These openings (leaks) usually appear small compared with the overall dimensions of the furnace, so they are often ignored. The negative pressure created by the natural draft (or use of an induced-draft fan) in a furnace draws cold air through the openings (leaks) and into the furnace. The cold air becomes heated to the furnace exhaust gas temperature and then exits through the flue system, wasting valuable fuel. It might also cause excessive oxidation of metals or other materials in the furnaces. The heat loss due to cold air leakage resulting from the natural draft can be estimated if you know four major parameters: (1) The furnace or flue gas temperature; (2) The vertical distance H between the opening (leak) and the point where the exhaust gases leave the furnace and its flue system (if the leak is along a vertical surface, H will be an average value); (3) The area of the leak, in square inches; and (4) The amount of operating time the furnace spends at negative pressure. Secondary parameters that affect the amount of air leakage include these: (1) The furnace firing rate; (2) The flue gas velocity through the stack or the stack cross-section area; (3) The burner operating conditions (e.g., excess air, combustion air temperature, and so on). For furnaces or boilers using an induced-draft (ID) fan, the furnace negative pressure depends on the fan performance and frictional losses between the fan inlet and the point of air leakage. In most cases, it would be necessary to measure or estimate negative pressure at the opening. The amount of air leakage, the heat lost in flue gases, and their effects on increased furnace or boiler fuel consumption can be calculated by using the equations and graphs given in Industrial Furnaces (see W. Trinks et al., below). Note that the actual heat input required to compensate for the heat loss in flue gases due to air leakage would be greater than the heat contained in the air leakage because of the effect of available heat in the furnace. For a high-temperature furnace that is not maintained properly, the fuel consumption increase due to air leakage can be as high as 10% of the fuel input.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Title Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5330E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bode, Josh, Michael J. Sullivan, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 120 Date Published 01/2012 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords consortium for electric reliability technology solutions (certs), electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Several recent demonstrations and pilots have shown that air conditioner (AC) electric loads can be controlled during the summer cooling season to provide ancillary services and improve the stability and reliability of the electricity grid. A key issue for integration of air conditioner load control into grid operations is how to accurately measure shorter-term (e.g., ten's of minutes to a couple of hours) demand reductions from AC load curtailments for operations and settlement. This report presents a framework for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction measurements. It also compares the accuracy of various alternatives for measuring AC reductions - including methods that rely on regression analysis, load matching and control groups - using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. A practical approach is recommended for settlement that relies on set of tables, updated annually, with pre-calculated load reduction estimates. The tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on the daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day and simplify the settlement process.

139

AirSea Heat Flux Measurements from Nearly Neutrally Buoyant Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of neutrally buoyant, high-drag floats to measure the airsea heat flux from within the turbulent oceanic boundary layer is investigated using float data from four different winter and fall float deployments. Two flux estimates can be ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis System for Measurement of CO2 Mixing Ratios in Flask Air Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for measuring the concentration of CO2 in flask air samples from the NOAA/CMDL worldwide flask sampling network is described. Up to 180 samples per day can he analyzed using a nondispersive infrared CO2 analyzer. All data acquisition and ...

Kirk W. Thoning; Thomas J. Conway; Ni Zhang; Duane Kitzis

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measurements of Momentum and Heat Transfer across the AirSea Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study makes direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the mixed layer in order to close heat and momentum budgets across the airsea interface and to assess the ability of rigid-boundary turbulence models to predict mean vertical gradients ...

Gregory P. Gerbi; John H. Trowbridge; James B. Edson; Albert J. Plueddemann; Eugene A. Terray; Janet J. Fredericks

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Inertial-Dissipation Air-Sea Flux Measurements: A Prototype System Using Realtime Spectral Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype system for the measurement and computation of airsea fluxes in realtime was tested in the Humidity Exchange Over the Sea (HEXOS) main experiment, HEXMAX. The system used a sonic anemometer/thermometer for wind speed, surface stress ...

C. W. Fairall; J. B. Edson; S. E. Larsen; P. G. Mestayer

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

Eberhart, Craig

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Quantifying information leakage in process calculi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on simple information-theoretic concepts, we study two quantitative models of information leakage in the pi-calculus. The first model presupposes an attacker with an essentially unlimited computational power. The resulting notion of absolute ... Keywords: Information leakage, Information theory, Process calculi, Secrecy

Michele Boreale

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification ofgeologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

To detect and quantify subtle surface CO2 leakage signals, we present a strategy that combines measurements of CO2 fluxes or concentrations in the near-surface environment with an algorithm that enhances temporally- and spatially-correlated leakage signals while suppressing random background noise. The algorithm consists of a filter that highlights spatial coherence in the leakage signal, and temporal stacking (averaging) that reduces noise from temporally uncorrelated background fluxes/concentrations. We assess the performance of our strategy using synthetic data sets in which the surface leakage signal is either specified directly or calculated using flow and transport simulations of leakage source geometries one might expect to be present at sequestration sites. We estimate the number of measurements required to detect a potential CO2 leakage signal of given magnitude and area. Results show that given a rigorous field-sampling program, subtle CO2 leakage may be detected using the algorithm; however, leakage of very limited spatial extent or exceedingly small magnitude may be difficult to detect with a reasonable set of monitoring resources.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

ACT sup 2 project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building's performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building's performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

ACT{sup 2} project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building`s performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building`s performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the DeltaQ duct Leakage Test. ASHRAE Transactions (inof a new Duct Leakage Test: DeltaQ. LBNL 47308. Walker, I,Uncertainties in the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Minimizing and exploiting leakage in VLSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power consumption of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integrated) circuits has been growing at an alarmingly rapid rate. This increase in power consumption, coupled with the increasing demand for portable/hand-held electronics, has made power consumption a dominant concern in the design of VLSI circuits today. Traditionally dynamic (switching) power has dominated the total power consumption of VLSI circuits. However, due to process scaling trends, leakage power has now become a major component of the total power consumption in VLSI circuits. This dissertation explores techniques to reduce leakage, as well as techniques to exploit leakage currents through the use of sub-threshold circuits. This dissertation consists of two studies. In the first study, techniques to reduce leakage are presented. These include a low leakage ASIC design methodology that uses high VT sleep transistors selectively, a methodology that combines input vector control and circuit modification, and a scheme to find the optimum reverse body bias voltage to minimize leakage. As the minimum feature size of VLSI fabrication processes continues to shrink with each successive process generation (along with the value of supply voltage and therefore the threshold voltage of the devices), leakage currents increase exponentially. Leakage currents are hence seen as a necessary evil in traditional VLSI design methodologies. We present an approach to turn this problem into an opportunity. In the second study in this dissertation, we attempt to exploit leakage currents to perform computation. We use sub-threshold digital circuits and come up with ways to get around some of the pitfalls associated with sub-threshold circuit design. These include a technique that uses body biasing adaptively to compensate for Process, Voltage and Temperature (PVT) variations, a design approach that uses asynchronous micro-pipelined Network of Programmable Logic Arrays (NPLAs) to help improve the throughput of sub-threshold designs, and a method to find the optimum supply voltage that minimizes energy consumption in a circuit.

Jayakumar, Nikhil

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use  

SciTech Connect

The air-conditioning (A/C) compressor load significantly impacts the fuel economy of conventional vehicles and the fuel use/range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) vehicle performance analysis shows the operation of the air conditioner reduces the charge depletion range of a 40-mile range PHEV from 18% to 30% in a worst case hot environment. Designing for air conditioning electrical loads impacts PHEV and electric vehicle (EV) energy storage system size and cost. While automobile manufacturers have climate control procedures to assess A/C performance, and the U.S. EPA has the SCO3 drive cycle to measure indirect A/C emissions, there is no automotive industry consensus on a vehicle level A/C fuel use test procedure. With increasing attention on A/C fuel use due to increased regulatory activities and the development of PHEVs and EVs, a test procedure is needed to accurately assess the impact of climate control loads. A vehicle thermal soak period is recommended, with solar lamps that meet the SCO3 requirements or an alternative heating method such as portable electric heaters. After soaking, the vehicle is operated over repeated drive cycles or at a constant speed until steady-state cabin air temperature is attained. With this method, the cooldown and steady-state A/C fuel use are measured. This method can be run at either different ambient temperatures to provide data for the GREEN-MAC-LCCP model temperature bins or at a single representative ambient temperature. Vehicles with automatic climate systems are allowed to control as designed, while vehicles with manual climate systems are adjusted to approximate expected climate control settings. An A/C off test is also run for all drive profiles. This procedure measures approximate real-world A/C fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies.

Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Leakage from sub-national climate initiatives ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers leakage from sub-national climate policies using Californias capand-trade program as a representative example. Our analysis is built on a global model of economic activity and energy systems that identifies 15 US regions and 15 regions in the rest of the world. As Californias cap-and-trade policy requires electricity importers to surrender emissions allowances, leakage depends on the ability of out-of-state generators to reconfigure transmission to reduce the carbon intensity of electricity supplied to California. If exporters can dispatch carbon-free electricity to California and carbon-intensive electricity is rerouted to other markets, leakage is 47 % of the decrease in emissions in California. If exporters are unable to adjust the carbon intensity of electricity supplied to California, as imported electricity is relatively carbon intensive, there is negative leakage to regions supplying electricity to California and the aggregate leakage rate is 5%. We also observe negative leakage to some regions due to changes in fossil fuel prices and that the impact of the trading of emissions permits between California and the EU depends on the ability of out-of-state generators to reconfigure electricity supply.

Justin Caron; Sebastian Rausch; Niven Winchester

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Measure Guideline: Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks. The purpose of this document is to provide the outline of the overview and process of insulating and air sealing walls so that home retrofit professionals can identify approaches to air sealing and insulation measures.

Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program: An Overview P. A. Crowley Environmental Sciences Division U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction for leased UA V operation over the next year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the existing Gnat 750-45, with its 7-8 km ceiling, as well as the planned FY93 demonstration of two 20 km capable UA Vs-the Perseus- B and the Raptor. Thus the funding of some initial flights and the availability of leased UAVs will enable us to start up the ARM-UAV program. Additional funding will be required to continue this program. Interim Science Team This paper and the one that follows describe the start-up

156

Atmospheric Profiles at the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their Relevance to Air Shower Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focussing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; D. Gora; P. Homola; H. Klages; J. Pekala; M. Risse; M. Unger; B. Wilczynska; H. Wilczynski; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab and Bernd Jhneab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab Exchange, Heat flux, Digital Image Processing, Surface Renewal 1. INTRODUCTION Thermographic techniques-water heat exchange. A driving force in air sea interactions is the net sea surface heat flux. It is a vital

Garbe, Christoph S.

159

Characterization of dielectric barrier discharge in air applying current measurement, numerical simulation and emission spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air is characterized applying current measurement, numerical simulation and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). For OES, a non-calibrated spectrometer is used. This diagnostic method is applicable when cross-sectional area of the active plasma volume and current density can be determined. The nitrogen emission in the spectral range of 380 nm- 406 nm is used for OES diagnostics. Electric field in the active plasma volume is determined applying the measured spectrum, well-known Frank-Condon factors for nitrogen transitions and numerically- simulated electron distribution functions. The measured electric current density is used for determination of electron density in plasma. Using the determined plasma parameters, the dissociation rate of nitrogen and oxygen in active plasma volume are calculated, which can be used by simulation of the chemical kinetics.

Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Awakowicz, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Measure Guideline: Implementing a Plenum Truss for a Compact Air Distribution System  

SciTech Connect

This Measure Guideline presents the steps to implement a compact duct system inside an attic bulkhead (plenum truss) of a one-story, slab-on-grade (SOG) home. In a compact duct design, ductwork runs are reduced in length to yield a smaller and more compact duct system. Less energy will be lost through ductwork if the ducts are contained within the thermal enclosure of the house. These measures are intended for the production builder working to meet the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) requirements and keep the ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house. This measure of bringing the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment and ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house is appropriate for the builder wishing to avoid cathedralizing the insulation in the attic space (i.e., locating it at the underside of the roof deck rather than along the attic floor) or adding dropped soffits.

Burdick, A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vapor barrier. Active solar heating Sealed combustion woodbarrier. heating systems possible including active solar.

Grimsrud, D.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Figure 1: Climate Zones Defined by Building Sciencecoefficient for each climate zone (-) Floor area divided bycoefficients for the four climate zones, NL cz , represent

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Areas for Air Leakage | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Referenced: 2006 IECC 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S....

164

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inResidentialSpaceConditioning Systems. Canadianin residential space conditioning systems. Keywords:in residential space conditioning systems. This standard

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008?004?CMF. CaliforniaEnergy Commission,Sacramento,2008?002?CMF. CaliforniaEnergyCommission, Sacramento,wassupportedbytheCaliforniaEnergyCommission Public

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar heating Sealed combustion wood stove. 174 m floorheating system; sealed combustion wood stove back-up. 197 m

Grimsrud, D.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active solar heating Sealed combustion wood stove. 174 mradiant heating system; sealed combustion wood stove back-One story wood frame construction. floor furnace heating. m

Grimsrud, D.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Measurement of Wind Waves and Wave-Coherent Air Pressures on the Open Sea from a Moving SWATH Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation on a Small Waterline Area Twin Hull (SWATH) vessel of a complete system for measuring the directional distribution of wind waves and the concomitant fluctuations of air pressure and wind speed immediately above them ...

Mark A. Donelan; Fred W. Dobson; Hans C. Graber; Niels Madsen; Cyril McCormick

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Measured concentrations of radioactive particles in air in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrations of radioactive particles (U-238, Th-230, Ra-226, and Pb-210) in air were measured in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill, Bluewater, New Mexico. Airborne particles were collected at three stations for about two-thirds of a year using a continuous collection method at a sampling rate of 10 L/min, and also were measured in monthly composites collected periodically at four stations using high volume air samplers at a sampling rate of 1400 L/min. The ratios of concentrations of each radionuclide to the concentrations of U-238 indicate that the concentrations of the radionuclides are influenced principally by the proximity of the major sources of emission and the direction of the wind. In all cases, the concentration of Pb-210 exceeded that of U-238. The ratio of Pb-210/U-238 was 12.3 and 13.3 for stations dominated by the emissions from the tailings and ore pads, but was only 1.6 for the station dominated by the yellowcake stack emission. The ratio of the radionuclide concentrations measured by the two methods of sample collection was between 0.8 and 1.2 for uranium, radium, and lead at station 104, but was 0.28 to 1.7 for thorium, radium, and lead at stations 101 and 102. The average concentrations calculated from the measurements made in this study suggest that releases from the Anaconda mill were made well within the existing limits of the maximum permissible concentrations for inhalation exposure of the general public.

Momeni, M H; Kisieleski, W E

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Tor HTTP usage and information leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the web browsing behaviour of Tor users. By collecting HTTP requests we show which websites are of interest to Tor users and we determined an upper bound on how vulnerable Tor users are to sophisticated de-anonymization attacks: up ... Keywords: information leakage, privacy, tor

Markus Huber; Martin Mulazzani; Edgar Weippl

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Side-Channel leakage across borders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More and more embedded devices store sensitive information that is protected by means of cryptography. The confidentiality of this data is threatened by information leakage via side channels like the power consumption or the electromagnetic radiation. ... Keywords: I/O pin, microcontroller, optocoupler, power analysis, serial interface

Jrn-Marc Schmidt; Thomas Plos; Mario Kirschbaum; Michael Hutter; Marcel Medwed; Christoph Herbst

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Amplitude calibration of a digital radio antenna array for measuring cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio pulses are emitted during the development of air showers, where air showers are generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere. These nanosecond short pulses are presently investigated by various experiments for the purpose of using them as a new detection technique for cosmic particles. For an array of 30 digital radio antennas (LOPES experiment) an absolute amplitude calibration of the radio antennas including the full electronic chain of the data acquisition system is performed, in order to estimate absolute values of the electric field strength for these short radio pulses. This is mandatory, because the measured radio signals in the MHz frequency range have to be compared with theoretical estimates and with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations to reconstruct features of the primary cosmic particle. A commercial reference radio emitter is used to estimate frequency dependent correction factors for each single antenna of the radio antenna array. The expected received power is related to the power recorded by the full electronic chain. Systematic uncertainties due to different environmental conditions and the described calibration procedure are of order 20%.

S. Nehls; A. Hakenjos; M. J. Arts; J. Bluemer; H. Bozdog; W. A. van Cappellen; H. Falcke; A. Haungs; A. Horneffer; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; O. Kroemer

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling of cryogen leakage through composite laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryogenic composites ?nd critical application in the manufacture of fuel tanks for reusable launch vehicles due to signi?cant reduction in overall structural weight of the tank. These fuel tanks contain pressurized cryogen such as hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Exposure to varying temperatures and mechanical loads resulting from ?ight cycle, containment of pressurized cryogen causes thermo-mechanical loading of the composite. The thermo-mechanical loading cycles combined with anisotropy of the composite and mismatch in the thermal and mechanical properties of ?bers and matrix lead to transverse matrix cracks (TMC) in each ply. TMC in adjacent plies intersect in localized regions at ply interfaces called crack junctions, which open up due to delamination on application of thermo-mechanical load. TMC and crack junctions usually form a network of leakage paths that assists leakage of cryogen through the composite. In this study, the volumetric ?ow rate of cryogen leaking through a damaged cross-ply composite with ?ve plies is determined by estimating the effective conductance of the leakage paths. For a given damage state and applied load, crack junction and TMC openings are obtained by ?nite element analysis. A computational ?uid dynamics model is ?rst used to estimate the effective conductance of a leakage path to hydrogen leakage and then a simplified analytical model is used to compute the effective conductance from individual conductances of each crack junction and TMC through a series-parallel combination. A single phase ?ow model is considered for the numerical analysis of hydrogen ?ow through TMC and crack junctions. The simulations are carried out using a commercial computational ?uid dynamics software, FLUENT. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the dependence of leak rate of hydrogen on the irregularities of the TMC geometry and TMC, crack junction openings. The simpli?ed model predictions of the effective conductance for the ?ve ply composite show good comparison with numerical simulations.

Peddiraju, Naga Venkata Satya Pravin Kumar

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

330E 330E Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Josh Bode, Michael Sullivan, Joseph H. Eto January 2012 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

177

Radiative Heating Errors in Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements Made from Buoys*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiative heating errors in buoy-mounted, naturally ventilated air temperature sensors are examined. Data from sensors with multiplate radiation shields and collocated, fan-aspirated air temperature sensors from three buoy deployments ...

Steven P. Anderson; Mark F. Baumgartner

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Leakage and Seepage in the Near-Surface Environment: An Integrated Approach to Monitoring and Detection  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring and detection of leakage and seepage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the near-surface environment is needed to ensure the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration. Large leakage fluxes, e.g., through leaking wells, will be easier to detect and monitor than slow and diffuse leakage and seepage. The challenge of detecting slow leakage and seepage is discerning a leakage or seepage signal from within the natural background variations in CO{sub 2} concentration and flux that are controlled by a variety of coupled processes in soil. Although there are no direct examples of leaking geologic carbon sequestration sites on which to base a proposed verification approach, we have been guided by our prior simulation studies of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage, which showed that large CO{sub 2} concentrations can develop in the shallow subsurface even for relatively small CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. A variety of monitoring technologies exists for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration and flux, but there is a gap between instrument performance and the detection of a leakage or seepage signal from within large natural background variability. We propose an integrated approach to monitoring and verification. The first part of our proposed approach is to characterize and understand the natural ecosystem before CO{sub 2} injection occurs so that future anomalies can be recognized. Measurements of natural CO{sub 2} fluxes using accumulation chamber (AC) and eddy correlation (EC) approaches, soil CO{sub 2} concentration profiles with depth, and carbon isotope compositions of CO{sub 2} are needed to characterize the natural state of the system prior to CO{sub 2} injection. From this information, modeling needs to be carried out to enhance understanding of carbon sources and sinks so that anomalies can be recognized and subject to closer scrutiny as potential leakage or seepage signals. Long-term monitoring using AC, EC, and soil-gas analyses along with ecosystem and flow and transport modeling should continue after CO{sub 2} injection. The integrated use of multiple measurements and modeling offers a promising approach to discerning and quantifying a small CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal from within the expected background variability.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurements of soot, OH, and PAH concentrations in turbulent ethylene/air jet flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results from an investigation of soot formation in turbulent, non-premixed, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/air jet flames. Tests were conducted using a H{sub 2}-piloted burner with fuel issuing from a 2.18 mm i.d. tube into quiescent ambient air. A range of test conditions was studied using the initial jet velocity (16.2-94.1 m/s) as a parameter. Fuel-jet Reynolds numbers ranged from 4000 to 23,200. Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) was employed to determine soot volume fractions, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to measure relative hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations. Extensive information on the structure of the soot and OH fields was obtained from two-dimensional imaging experiments. Quantitative measurements were obtained by employing the LII and LIF techniques independently. Imaging results for soot, OH, and PAH show the existence of three soot formation/oxidation regions: a rapid soot growth region, in which OH and soot particles lie in distinctly different radial locations; a mixing-dominated region controlled by large-scale motion; and a soot-oxidation region in which the OH and soot fields overlap spatially, resulting in the rapid oxidation of soot particles. Detailed quantitative analyzes of soot volume fractions and OH and soot zone thicknesses were performed along with the temperature measurement using the N{sub 2}-CARS system. Measurements of OH and soot zone thicknesses show that the soot zone thickness increases linearly with axial distance in the soot formation region, whereas the OH zone thickness is nearly constant in this region. The OH zone thickness then rapidly increases with downstream distance and approximately doubles in the soot-oxidation region. Probability density functions also were obtained for soot volume fractions and OH concentrations. These probability density functions clearly define the spatial relationships among the OH, PAH concentrations, the soot formation, and oxidation processes. (author)

Lee, Seong-Young [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Turns, Stephen R.; Santoro, Robert J. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Thermal-induced leakage power optimization by redundant resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, at early design stages, leakage power is associated with the number of transistors in a design. Hence, intuitively an implementation with minimum resource usage would be best for low leakage. Such an allocation would generally be followed ...

Min Ni; Seda Ogrenci Memik

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

182

An Investigation of Alternative Methods for Measuring Static Pressure of Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project was created to address an important issue currently faced by test facilities measuring static pressure for air-conditioning and heat pumps. Specifically, ASHRAE Standard 37, the industry standard for test setup, requires an outlet duct of a certain length, based on the unit outlet geometry, and this ducting added to the unit height may result in a test apparatus height that exceeds psychometric test room dimensions. This project attempted to alter the outlet duct in a way that reduces the test apparatus height while maintaining the reliability of the ASHRAE Standard 37 testing setup. The investigation was done in two scenarios, the first, which altered the direction of the flow after the unit with an elbow and measured static pressure downstream of the elbow, and the second which inserted a passive resistive piece in the flow to decrease the required distance between the unit and the static pressure measurement. Three air handling units were used in Scenario 1 and Scenario 2 testing, with the two smallest units additionally being tested in Scenario 1 with an over-sized duct. The scenario tests were required to be within 5% power and 2.5% airflow of a baseline test following ASHRAE Standard 37. he results for Scenario 1 have shown that ASHRAE Standard 37 can be modified to reduce testing height restrictions by using a square elbow with turning vanes, provided it is oriented in a specific way in relation to the blower. Furthermore, additional Scenario 1 testing on the over-sized outlet duct shows that possibilities exist for using a single over-sized duct to successfully meet ASHRAE Standard 37 testing conditions when testing a variety of units. Finally, the results of Scenario 2 have shown that the height constraints of the outlet duct can be reduced by installing a passive resistive device consisting of a mesh at the outlet; however, this approach applies only to those units with the heat exchanger located downstream of the blower. As a result of specific issues or problems that were encountered during the project that were beyond the scope, eleven case studies were presented and recommended for future work.

Wheeler, Grant Benson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Carbon Leakage in General and Partial Equilibrium August 7, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Leakage in General and Partial Equilibrium Larry Karp August 7, 2012 Abstract The general of leakage, and the magnitude of border tax adjustments (BTAs) needed to offset it. A BTA based on carbon intensity in countries without carbon constraints is an export subsidy and creates negative leakage

Kammen, Daniel M.

184

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Recanati, Catherine

185

A sink-n-hoist framework for leakage power reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power leakage constitutes an increasing fraction of the total power consumption in modern semiconductor technologies. Recent research efforts have tried to integrate architecture and compiler solutions to employ power-gating mechanisms to reduce leakage ... Keywords: balanced scheduling, compilers for low power, data-flow analysis, leakage power reduction, power-gating mechanisms

Yi-Ping You; Chung-Wen Huang; Jenq Kuen Lee

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Detonation cell size measurements in H/sub 2/-air-H/sub 2/O mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conclusions of this study are: (1) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures at 20/sup 0/C and a total pressure of 101 kPa, detonations have been achieved between 13.5% and 70% H/sub 2/ mole fraction. This compositional range is wider than the detonability limits previously reported for smaller tubes. (2) The addition of CO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/-air mixtures greatly reduces the detonability of the mixture. (3) For a given initial temperature, air density and equivalence ratio, the addition of steam to a H/sub 2/-Air mixture greatly decreases the detonability of the mixture. (4) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, detonation of H/sub 2/-air mixtures with up to 30% steam have been recorded. (5) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures, the detonability increases with increasing initial temperature at constant density. Consequently, the diluent effect of the addition of steam to a fixed volume of an H/sub 2/-air mixture in reducing detonability is partially offset if there is a concomitant temperature increase. (6) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, a 13.0% H/sub 2/-air mixture has been detonated. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Shepherd, J.E.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Geostock's containment method reduces underground storage leakage  

SciTech Connect

Geostock's hydraulic containment method of safely containing liquid hydrocarbons in unlined underground storage caverns, so that there is no danger of leakage into the surrounding ground makes use of the surrounding ground water, whose static head is kept higher than the pressure of the stored product. For leakage prevention, the static head must be larger than the potential of the stored product plus a safety margin. The safety margin involves a shape factor, dependent on the size and shape of the cavity (examples are given), and a factor which allows for unforeseen conditions. The depth required for the ground water to possess a sufficiently large static head depends on the type and pressure of the stored product, the hydrogeological environment, and the geometry of the facility. Geostock has used the hydraulic containment method in a domestic heating oil facility at May sur Orne, Fr., and also in three propane storage facilities in France.

Not Available

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Coping with qubit leakage in topological codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many physical systems considered promising qubit candidates are not, in fact, two-level systems. Such systems can leak out of the preferred computational states, leading to errors on any qubits that interact with leaked qubits. Without specific methods of dealing with leakage, long-lived leakage can lead to time-correlated errors. We study the impact of such time-correlated errors on topological quantum error correction codes, which are considered highly practical codes, using the repetition code as a representative case study. We show that, under physically reasonable assumptions, a threshold error rate still exists, however performance is significantly degraded. We then describe simple additional quantum circuitry that, when included in the error detection cycle, restores performance to acceptable levels.

Austin G. Fowler

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners  

SciTech Connect

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Home test kit for duct leakage  

SciTech Connect

An inexpensive device whose purpose is to test for duct leakage in the home is described. This device is intended for use by homeowners and others untrained in the art of duct testing. While not as accurate as testing done by professionals, it should be able to give the homeowners enough information to justify a decision whether or not to call on professional assistance for further testing and possible remediation of their duct systems. The device has been reduced to practice.

Andrews, J.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy Consumption Measuring and Diagnostic Analysis of Air-conditioning Water System in a Hotel Building in Harbin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces an air-conditioning water system in a hotel building in Harbin, finishes its air-conditioning energy consumption measurement in summer conditions, and presents an estimation index of performance of chiller, pump and motor. By means of testing data analysis, it is indicated that several problems such as unsuitable operation schedule of the chiller, low COP, irrational matching of pump and motor, unbalanced conditions of chilled water flow, and low working stability and efficiency ratio of the pump are existent. The paper presents suggestions for improvement with relevance based on the induction and analysis of system fault found in measurements.

Zhao, T.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

1 The Implications of Alternative Biofuel Policies on Carbon Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how leakage differs, depending on the biofuel policy and market conditions. Carbon leakage is shown to have two components: a market leakage effect and an emissions savings effect. We also distinguish domestic and international leakage and show how omitting the former like the IPCC does can bias leakage estimates. International leakage is always positive, but domestic leakage can be negative. The magnitude of market leakage depends on the domestic and foreign gasoline supply and fuel demand elasticities, and on consumption and production shares of world oil markets for the country introducing the biofuel policy. Being a small country in world oil markets does not automatically imply that leakage is 100 percent or above that of a large country. We show leakage due to a tax credit is always greater than that of a mandate, while the combination of a mandate and subsidy generates greater leakage than a mandate alone. In general, one gallon of ethanol is found to replace only 0.35 gallons of gasoline not one gallon as assumed by life-cycle accounting. For the United States, this translates into one (gasoline-equivalent) gallon of ethanol emitting 1.13 times more carbon than a gallon of gasoline if indirect land use change (iLUC) is not included in the estimated emissions savings effect and 1.43 times more when iLUC is included.

Dusan Drabik; Harry De Gorter; David R. Just; Dusan Drabik; Harry De Gorter; David R. Just

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

STEPA Temperature Profiler for Measuring the Oceanic Thermal Boundary Layer at the OceanAir Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast measuring system has been designed and built to determine the oceanic thermal microstructure at the oceanair interface. The system consists of a profiler sonde, which amends through the uppermost few meters of the ocean with a time of ...

Theodor C. Mammen; Nikolaus von Bosse

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Measurement of genotoxic air pollutant exposures in street vendors and school children in and near Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

The effects of air pollution on human health are a great concern, particularly in big cities with severe traffic problems such as Bangkok, Thailand. In this study, exposure to genotoxic compounds in ambient air was studied by analysis of particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene through direct measurement of concentrations in air as well as through the use of different biomarkers of exposure: urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) for PAHs and urinary t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA) for benzene. The study was conducted in various susceptible groups of the population with different occupations in 5 traffic-congested areas of Bangkok, as well as in primary school children. The level of total PAHs on the main roads at various sites ranged from 7.10 to 83.04 ng/m{sup 3}, while benzene levels ranged from 16.35 to 49.25 ppb. In contrast, ambient levels in nearby temples, the control sites, ranged from 1.67 to 3.04 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 10.16 to 16.25 ppb benzene. Street vendors selling clothes were exposed to 16.07 {+-} 1.64 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 21.97 {+-} 1.50 ppb benzene, levels higher than in monks and nuns residing in nearby temples (5.34 {+-} 0.65 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs and 13.69 {+-} 0.77 ppb benzene). Grilled-meat vendors in the same area were exposed to both total PAHs and benzene at even higher levels, possibly due to additional formation of PAHs during the grilling of meat (34.27 {+-} 7.02 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 27.49 {+-} 2.72 ppb benzene). At the end of the workday, urinary 1-OHP levels in street vendors (0.12 and 0.15 {mu}mol/mol creatinine in clothes and grilled-meat vendors, respectively) were significantly higher than in controls (0.04 {mu}mol/mol creatinine; P < 0.01). Afternoon urinary t,t-MA levels in both groups of street vendors (0.12 mg/g creatinine) were also significantly higher than in controls (0.08 mg/g creatinine; P < 0.05). School children from two schools in Bangkok were exposed to total PAHs and benzene at levels of 6.70 {+-} 0.47 ng/m{sup 3} and 4.71 {+-} 0.25 ppb, respectively, higher than those to which children living outside the city were exposed (1.25 {+-} 0.24 ng/m{sup 3} total PAHs; 2.10 {+-} 0.16 ppb benzene). At the end of the school day, levels of urinary 1-OHP and t,t-MA were significantly higher (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) in Bangkok school children (0.23 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.27 mg/g creatinine, respectively) than in school children from outside Bangkok (0.10 {mu}mol/mol creatinine and 0.08 mg/g creatinine, respectively)

Ruchirawat, Mathuros [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand) and Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)]. E-mail: mathuros@tubtim.cri.or.th; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Settachan, Daam [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Tuntaviroon, Jantamas [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Buthbumrung, Nantaporn [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Sharma, Suman [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand)

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fault detection methods for vapor-compression air conditioners using electrical measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) This method was experimentally tested and validated on a commercially available air handler and duct system. In the second class of faults studied, liquid refrigerant, rather than vapor, enters the cylinder of a ...

Laughman, Christopher Reed.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sensor and Electronic Biases/Errors in Air Temperature Measurements in Common Weather Station Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biases of four commonly used air temperature sensors are examined and detailed. Each temperature transducer consists of three components: temperature sensing elements, signal conditioning circuitry, and corresponding analog-to-digital ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Measurement of /sup 85/Kr concentrations in air using a cryogenic sampling technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to detect moderate concentrations (down to approximately 370 Bq/m/sup 3/ under actual field conditions) of /sup 85/Kr in air has been developed. This method employs a cryogenic sampler for collection of the air sample of interest and a Ge(Li) spectroscopy system to determine the concentration of /sup 85/Kr by detection of the 514-keV gamma photon. Data from experiments are presented.

Owens, M.E.; Berven, B.A.; Perdue, P.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Analysis of air-temperature measurements from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the ambient air resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) just after the hydrogen burn in the TMI-2 Reactor Building is examined. The performance of the sensors is compared with physical models of the sensor/ambient air system. With one exception, the RTD data appear to be valid for the period examined. Based on the data, the hydrogen burn ended considerably before the first data points were recorded.

Fryer, M.O.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Canted Current Sheet Mass Leakage and its Impact on Pulsed Plasma Thruster Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of the leakage of the current sheet in a parallel plate pulsed electromagnetic accelerator plate pulsed electromagnetic accelerator. The total impulse of the discharge, including the momentum, and J.W. Berkery. Measurements of current sheet canting in a pulsed electromagnetic accelerator

Choueiri, Edgar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

inexpensive, portable, and can be installed by inexpensive, portable, and can be installed by home occupants, making them a good solution for supplemental cooling, for installing air conditioning in homes that lack ductwork, and for renters. As a result, 7.5 million window air conditioners are purchased each year in the United States-more than all other home cooling equipment combined. However, a window air conditioner is required to meet only modest minimum efficiency standards, and its typical installation in a window causes air leakage, which significantly reduces the equipment's performance. To measure the impact these products have on home energy use, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) studied the performance of one 10-year-old and three new window air conditioners in a range of

202

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an inexpensive, portable form of spot cooling, an inexpensive, portable form of spot cooling, making them a good solution for supplemental cooling, for air conditioning in homes that lack ductwork, and for renters. As a result, 7.5 million window air conditioners are purchased each year in the United States-more than all other home cooling equipment combined. However, window air conditioners have low minimum efficiency standards, and their installation typically results in air leakage, which significantly reduces the equipment's performance. To measure the impact these products have on home energy use, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) studied the performance of one 10-year-old and three new window air conditioners in a range of climates and conditions at NREL's Advanced Heating, Ventilation, and

203

A New Approach to Mass Measurements of UHECR: Horizontal Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of Horizontal Showers induced by cosmic rays is discussed in detail. A new approach to the calculation of the muon component in horizontal air showers induced by protons, heavier nuclei or photons is presented which allows a simple analytical evaluation of the muon density profiles at ground level. The results of the first application of these results to horizontal air showers detected at the Haverah Park Array by the recently started {\\sl Leeds-Santiago collaboration}, leading to important restrictions on composition at ultra high energies, are reported.

Enrique Zas

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

Errors of Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements in a Spatial Observation Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spatial network of 25 air temperature sensors was deployed over an area of 3.5 km 3.5 km of agricultural land, aiming to calculate the sensible heat flux by spatial averaging instead of temporal averaging. Since temperature sensors in ...

Matthias Mauder; R. L. Desjardins; Zhiling Gao; Ronald van Haarlem

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

On the Measurement of the Transfer of Gases across the AirSea Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An outline is given of the procedure for obtaining the gas transfer across the airsea interface when the heat flux from the water to the surface is known. An essential assumption is similarity between the fluxes of heat and other scalar ...

Joost A. Businger

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Test and evaluation of the Argonne BPAC10 Series air chamber calorimeter designed for 20 minute measurements  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the final report on DOE-OSS Task ANLE88002 Fast Air Chamber Calorimetry.'' The task objective was to design, construct, and test an isothermal air chamber calorimeter for plutonium assay of bulk samples that would meet the following requirements for sample power measurement: average sample measurement time less than 20 minutes. Measurement of samples with power output up to 10 W. Precision of better than 1% RSD for sample power greater than 1 W. Precision better than 0.010 watt SD, for sample power less than 1 W. This report gives a description of the calorimeter hardware and software and discusses the test results. The instrument operating procedure, included as an appendix, gives examples of typical input/output and explains the menu driven software. Sample measurement time of less than 20 minutes was attained by pre-equilibration of the samples in low cost precision preheaters and by prediction of equilibrium measurements. Tests at the TA55 Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, on typical samples, indicates that the instrument meets all the measurement requirements.

Perry, R.B.; Fiarman, S.; Jung, E.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Cremers, T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Bohn, M.S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Circuit and microarchitectural techniques for reducing cache leakage power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-chip caches represent a sizable fraction of the total power consumption of microprocessors. As feature sizes shrink, the dominant component of this power consumption will be leakage. However, during a fixed period of time, the activity in a data cache ... Keywords: L1 caches, dynamic voltage scaling, low power, subthreshold leakage power

Nam Sung Kim; Krisztian Flautner; David Blaauw; Trevor Mudge

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Experimental assessment of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected to simulated seismic loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safety concern for the proposed Special Nuclear Materials Laboratory (SNML) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was air leakage from the facility if it were to experience a design basis earthquake event. To address this concern, a study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This report describes a prototype experiment developed and performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. A shear wall test structure was fabricated with standard 4000-psi concrete mix. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient pressure decay. As long as the structure exhibited linear load displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked). 17 figs., 8 tabs.

Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sensitivity of Forced Air Distribution System Efficiency to Climate, Duct Location, Air Leakage and Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................ 10 Part One Input data for ASHRAE 152P Calculations .......................................................................... 11 Table 1 Temperatures from ASHRAE 152P Second public review draft................................. 11 Table 2 Humidity Conditions from ASHRAE 152P Second public review draft..................... 11

213

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locations: Attic Attic with a radiant barrier (ductsbelow radiant barrier) Uninsulated Crawlspace vented) with cool roof/radiant barrier temperature reduction

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Measuring the benefits of air quality improvements: a hedonic salary approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates the compensating variation associated with nonmarginal changes in air quality using a hedonic salary model and 1970 data collected for a national sample of university professors. Recent advances in the theory of hedonic prices are utilized in constructing the theoretical model and formulating a procedure for generating empirical estimates. Lower bound estimates of the compensating variation associated with a one standard deviation increase in total suspended particulates (27.6 mgs/cu. meter/24 hours) were $419 for full professors, $234 for associate professors, and $209 for assistant professors in 1970. These results were not sensitive to the specification of the hedonic salary equations.

Bayless, M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measurement of Air Exchange in Interconnected Underground Structures for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (Con Edison) has about 250,000 structures in its system. Of these, 70,000 are manholes and 180,000 are service boxes, which are the object on average of about 1400 events per year. Vented manhole covers have perforations that allow air exchange between the interior of a manhole and the ambient atmosphere. The amount of venting affects the exchange of gases between underground structures and thus the potential for rapid pressure buildup and explosions. This re...

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeled and measured effects of compressor downsizing in an existing air conditioner/heat pump in the cooling mode  

SciTech Connect

It is not uncommon to find oversized central air conditioners in residences. HVAC contractors sometimes oversize central air conditioners for one reason or another--some to the point that they may be 100% larger than needed to meet the load. Retrofit measures done to improve house envelope and distribution system efficiency also contribute to HVAC oversizing, as they reduce house heating and cooling loads. Proper sizing of an air conditioner or heat pump allows more efficient operation and provides a more comfortable environment than a highly oversized unit. Another factor that lowers operating efficiency is an improper refrigerant charge. Field inspections have revealed that about half of the units checked were not properly charged. An option available to homeowners with oversized air conditioners is to replace the existing compressor with a smaller, more efficient compressor, rather than purchasing a new, smaller unit. Such a retrofit may be economically justified, especially during a compressor failure, provided the oversizing of the existing unit is not too great. A used, 15-year old, single-package heat pump with a capillary tube expansion device on the indoor coil was purchased and tested in a set of environmental chambers to determine its cooling performance at various conditions. The system was also modeled to estimate its existing performance, and that with two different types of retrofitted state-of-the-art (SOA) efficient compressors with about 30% less capacity than the original compressor. This reduced the overall system cooling capacity by about 25%. Modeling estimated that the retrofit would increase system EER at 95 F by 30%, SEER by 34%, and reduce power demand by 39% compared to the existing unit. Reduced cycling losses account for the higher increase in SEER.

Levins, W.P.; Rice, C.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

High Temperature Leakage Performance of a Hybrid Brush Seal Compared to a Standard Brush Seal and a Labyrinth Seal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adequate sealing in turbomachinery reduces secondary leakage and results in more efficient and stable systems. Labyrinth seals are most common, although brush seals are popular in specialized applications. The Hybrid Brush Seal (HBS) is a novel design that adds to the bristle brush matrix a number of cantilever pads that rest on the rotor surface. Upon shaft rotation the pads lift due to the generation of a hydrodynamic gas film while the brushes effectively seal an upstream pressure. Hence the HBS has no wear and no local thermal distortion effects. Measurements of leakage versus pressure differential are obtained in a three-teeth labyrinth, a conventional brush seal, and a hybrid brush seal for operation at high temperature (300C), with shaft surface speeds to 27 m/s, and at supply pressures to 3.5 bar. Flow measurements are presented in terms of a flow factor to remove dependency on the air temperature and supply pressure. The measurements demonstrate the HBS leaks less (~61%) than a standard brush seal and is significantly better (~38%) than a similarly sized labyrinth seal. Predictions of flow through a labyrinth seal predict well at supply pressures under 1.7 bar but overpredict by as much as 25% at high supply pressures. A porous medium fluid flow model predicts the flow through the HBS and brush seal. The model for the HBS and brush seal underpredicts the flow rate at low supply pressures but match well at high supply pressures. Measurements of the drag torque of the test seals show the HBS has a larger torque when pressurized compared to the brush seal and labyrinth seal. This indicates that the HBS experiences a larger degree of blow-down due to the pads decreasing the clearance. The mechanical parameters of the brush seal and HBS are found based upon the flexibility function from impact load tests. A combined structural and dry friction damping model represent well the measured flexibility. An equivalent damping is found based upon the energy dissipation. Based upon the damping ratio, the HBS has twice of the viscous damping as the brush seal at a supply pressure of 2.0 bar.

Ashton, Zachary

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The United States' Next Generation of Atmospheric Composition and Coastal Ecosystem Measurements: NASA's Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission was recommended by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Earth Science Decadal Survey to measure tropospheric trace gases and aerosols and coastal ocean phytoplankton, water quality, ...

J. Fishman; L. T. Iraci; J. Al-Saadi; K. Chance; F. Chavez; M. Chin; P. Coble; C. Davis; P. M. DiGiacomo; D. Edwards; A. Eldering; J. Goes; J. Herman; C. Hu; D. J. Jacob; C. Jordan; S. R. Kawa; R. Key; X. Liu; S. Lohrenz; A. Mannino; V. Natraj; D. Neil; J. Neu; M. Newchurch; K. Pickering; J. Salisbury; H. Sosik; A. Subramaniam; M. Tzortziou; J. Wang; M. Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

imap: Indirect measurement of air pollution with cellphones. PerCOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractIn this paper, we introduce the cellphonebased indirect sensing problem. While participatory sensing aims at monitoring of a phenomenon by deploying a dense set of sensors carried by individuals, our indirect sensing problem aims at inferring the manifestations of a sparsely monitored phenomenon on the individuals. The main advantage of the indirect sensing method is that, by making use of existing exposure modeling and estimation methods, it provides a more feasible alternative to direct sensing. Collection of time-location logs using the cellphones plays a major role in our indirect sensing method, while direct sensing at the cellphones is unneeded. We focus on the air pollutant exposure estimation problem as an application of the indirect sensing technique and propose a web-based framework, iMAP, for addressing this problem. I.

Murat Demirbas; Carole Rudra; Atri Rudra; Murat Ali Bayir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Field Evaluation of Nanofilm Detectors for Measuring Acidic Particles in Indoor and Outdoor Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

independent and unbiased research organization to provide high quality, impartial, and relevant science on the health effects of emissions from motor vehicles, fuels, and other environmental sources. All results are provided to industry and government sponsors, other key decisionmakers, the scientific community, and the public. HEI funds research on all major pollutants, including air toxics, diesel exhaust, nitrogen oxides, ozone, and particulate matter. The Institute periodically engages in special review and evaluation of key questions in science that are highly relevant to the regulatory process. To date, HEI has supported more than 220 projects at institutions in North America, Europe, and Asia and has published over 160 Research Reports and Special Reports. Typically, HEI receives half of its core funds from the US Environmental Protection Agency and half from 28

E F F E Cts; Beverly S Cohen; Maire Sa Heikkinen; Yair Hazi; Hai Gao; Paul Peters

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measured Breakdown Voltage and Leakage Current of Line Worker Boots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worker safety is every electric power company's number one priority. Denergized line maintenance is an important task to ensure reliable operation of a transmission line. The grounding installed during this operation must be designed to shunt any unforeseen fault current and prevent electric shock and any associated consequences. The research described in this report describes electrical characteristics of work shoes, which comprise an important part of a model for minimizing hazardous outcomes.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

Abraham, J.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stored Co 2 and Methane Leakage riSk aSSeSSMent and Monitoring tooL deveLopMent: Co 2 Capture projeCt phaSe 2 Background Unmineable coal seams at depths beyond conventional...

224

Agulhas Leakage Predominantly Responds to the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agulhas Current plays a crucial role in the thermohaline circulation through its leakage into the South Atlantic Ocean. Under both past and present climates, the trade winds and westerlies could have the ability to modulate the amount of ...

Jonathan V. Durgadoo; Benjamin R. Loveday; Chris J. C. Reason; Pierrick Penven; Arne Biastoch

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Agulhas Leakage Predominantly Responds to the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agulhas Current plays a crucial role in the thermohaline circulation through its leakage into the South Atlantic. Under both past and present climates, the trade winds and westerlies could have the ability to modulate the amount of Indian-...

Jonathan V. Durgadoo; Benjamin R. Loveday; Chris J. C. Reason; Pierrick Penven; Arne Biastoch

226

A New Portable Instrument for Continuous Measurement of Formaldehyde in Ambient Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for ...

W. Junkermann; J. M. Burger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Measurements of the Air Temperature Profile near the Ground by Two Laser Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two neon-helium gas lasers were used for temperatures profile measurements near the ground. The experiment was carried out during the cold season (when absolute humidity is small on the asphalt pavement) to be free from humidity effects. The ...

Takehisa Yokoi

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) on board the NASA DC-8 measured high-resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NASA African Monsoon ...

Syed Ismail; Richard A. Ferrare; Edward V. Browell; Gao Chen; Bruce Anderson; Susan A. Kooi; Anthony Notari; Carolyn F. Butler; Sharon Burton; Marta Fenn; Jason P. Dunion; Gerry Heymsfield; T. N. Krishnamurti; Mrinal K. Biswas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Determination of Longwave Heat Flux at the Air-Sea Interface Using Measurements from Buoy Platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for pyrgeometer operation is utilized for determining downwelling longwave radiation. Errors in downwelling longwave radiation measurements are due to differences in pyrgeometer body and dome temperatures compared to that of the ...

T. D. Dickey; D. V. Manov; R. A. Weller; D. A. Siegel

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Cluster Analysis of Hourly Wind Measurements to Reveal Synoptic Regimes Affecting Air Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clustering algorithm is developed to study hourly, ground-level wind measurements obtained from a network of monitoring stations positioned throughout the San Francisco Bay Area of California. A statistical model based on principal components ...

Scott Beaver; Ahmet Palazoglu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Measurement of Clear-Air Gradients and Turbulence Properties with Radar Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment comparing balloon and profiler observations was carried out to evaluate the capability of Doppler radar wind profilers to remotely measure useful meteorological quantities other than wind. The site chosen was in Southern California ...

E. E. Gossard; D. E. Wolfe; K. P. Moran; R. A. Paulus; K. D. Anderson; L. T. Rogers

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The accuracy of miniature bead thermistors in the measurement of upper air temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A laboratory study was made of the errors of miniature bead thermistors of 5, 10, and 15 mils nominal diameter when used for the measurement of atmospheric temperature. Although the study was primarily concerned with the ...

Thompson, Donald C. (Donald Charles), 1933-

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Large Flange and Casing Leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experience has shown that as flange size increases, the likelihood for leakage increases. The reasons for this phenomenon are not clear. Some factors that have been suggested involve a more difficult design process, degradation in gasket performance, and the increased difficulty of the assembly process. Plant leakage has been the subject of several Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports including Assembling Bolted Connections Using Sheet Gaskets (1000922) and Assembling Bolted Connections Using...

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of CdZn Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms. Surface effects are important in the performance of CdZnTe room-temperature radiation detectors used as spectrometers since the dark current is often dominated by surface leakage. A process using high-kinetic-energy, neutral oxygen atoms (.about.3 eV) to treat the surface of CdZnTe detectors at or near ambient temperatures is described. Improvements in detector performance include significantly reduced leakage current which results in lower detector noise and greater energy resolution for radiation measurements of gamma- and X-rays, thereby increasing the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements of radionuclides having complex gamma-ray spectra, including special nuclear materials.

Hoffbauer, Mark A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prettyman, Thomas H. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Comparing LOPES measurements of air-shower radio emission with REAS 3.11 and CoREAS simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic ray air showers emit radio pulses at MHz frequencies, which can be measured with radio antenna arrays - like LOPES at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. To improve the understanding of the radio emission, we test theoretical descriptions with measured data. The observables used for these tests are the absolute amplitude of the radio signal, and the shape of the radio lateral distribution. We compare lateral distributions of more than 500 LOPES events with two recent and public Monte Carlo simulation codes, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS (v 1.0). The absolute radio amplitudes predicted by REAS 3.11 are in good agreement with the LOPES measurements. The amplitudes predicted by CoREAS are lower by a factor of two, and marginally compatible with the LOPES measurements within the systematic scale uncertainties. In contrast to any previous versions of REAS, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS now reproduce the shape of the measured lateral distributions correctly. This reflects a remarkable progress compared to the si...

Apel, W D; Bhren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blmer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hrandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krmer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschlger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rhle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schrder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Airborne Measurements of Air Mass from O2 A-Band Absorption Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne experiments to assess the feasibility of remote sensing surface pressure from a space platform are described. The data are high-resolution spectra in the O2 A band (759771 nm) of sunlight reflected from the sea surface, measured by a ...

D. M. OBrien; R. M. Mitchell; S. A. English; G. A. Da Costa

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Eddy covariance mapping and quantification of surface CO2 leakage fluxes  

SciTech Connect

We present eddy covariance measurements of net CO{sub 2} flux (F{sub c}) made during a controlled release of CO{sub 2} (0.3 t d{sup -1} from 9 July to 7 August 2008) from a horizontal well {approx}100 m in length and {approx}2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, MT. We isolated fluxes arising from the release (F{sub cr}) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from F{sub c}. A least-squares inversion of 611 F{sub cr} and corresponding modeled footprint functions recovered the location, length, and magnitude of the surface CO{sub 2} flux leakage signal, although high wavenumber details of the signal were poorly resolved. The estimated total surface CO{sub 2} leakage rate (0.32 t d{sup ?1}) was within 7% of the release rate.

Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis of leakage magnetic problems in shell-form power transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principles of minimized magnetic energy and voltage equilibrium have been combined with the finite element method to solve the leakage magnetic field problems coupled with an unknown ampere-turn distribution in the shell-form power transformer. Based on the leakage magnetic field calculated, the eddy current and circulating current losses in the coils are further computed. The calculated results are consistent with measured values for a model of a shell-form transformer. Above principles are applied to the windings design of a 50MVA three-phase prototype shell-form power transformer. The calculated results show that the largest circulating current in strands of the low-voltage coils near two ends of each phase winding is greatly reduced to 11% from 98% of the rated current in each strand by placing the copper-shielding on these ends.

Cui Xiang; Yuan Jinsha [North China Electric Power Univ., Baoding, Hebei (China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Zhang Guoqiang; Zhang Yuanlu; Hu Qifan [Baoding Tian Wei Group Co., Ltd., Baoding, Hebei (China). Div. of Large Power Transformer

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Leakage Current Reduction Techniques for 7T SRAM Cell in 45 nm Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the impact of gate leakage on 7T static random access memory (SRAM) is described and three techniques for reducing gate leakage currents and sub threshold leakage currents are examined. In first technique, the supply voltage is decreased. ... Keywords: CMOS, Gate leakage current, SRAM, Stand-by power, Sub threshold current, Voltage level switch

Shyam Akashe, Sanjay Sharma

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Research on Crude Oil Pipeline Leakage Detection and Location Based on Information Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the pipeline leakage detection and location, what we need to know is whether the pipe is leaky and where the leakage point is. In addition, we are very concerned about the extent of leakage, false alarm rate and missing alarm rate. Both correlation ... Keywords: information fusion, fuzzy variable weight, correlation analysis, sequential probability ratio test, leakage detection and location

Zhao Jiang; Hao Chongqing; Zhao Yingbao; Wang Yanying

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Leakage Current and Pollutant Properties of Porcelain Insulators from the Geothermal Area*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This manuscript presents the experimental results of a new-clean and seven geothermal naturally polluted outdoor porcelain insulators. These insulators were tested in a hermetically sealed chamber, where their leakage currents and applied voltages were measured with a storage digital oscilloscope. The measured data could be recorded oscilloscope and transferred to a computer, saved in softcopy forms. FFT was used to analyze the leakage current waveforms, and correlation coefficient matrix and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to analyze the relation among parameters. It was also carried out EDAX tests of insulator adhered pollutant. The results indicated that the power factors and leakage current amplitudes closed to humidity, the phase angle closed to THD, and temperature opposited the humidity. The ratios of insulator impedance on the high and low humidity were ranged from 0.8696 until 0.1343. The small insulator impedance ratios were rearched on the first and seventh withdrawals, i.e. 0.1363 and 0.1343 respectively. On these insulators, THD ratios on the same conditions were 0.3739 and 0.4598 respectively. These phenomena were caused by dry season, which amount of pollutant stuck on the insulator surfaces significantly. On the high humidity, the minimum phase angles ranged between 66.8 and 25.7 degrees. Sulfur chemical element was found in medium composition on the pollutant.

Ngapuli Irmea Sinisuka; Maman Abdurahman Djauhari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Measurement of the proton-air cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}=57$ TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505 {+-} 22(stat){sub -36}{sup +28}(syst)] mb is found.

Collaboration, Auger

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

Wolfe, Christopher E. (Schenectady, NY); Dinc, Osman S. (Troy, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat S. (Schenectady, NY); Correia, Victor H. (New Lebanon, NY); Aksit, Mahmut F. (Troy, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Valve Packing Performance Improvement: Sealing Technology and Plant Leakage Reduction Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Valve Packing Performance Improvement" is the seventh in a series of training modules addressing leakage at nuclear power plants. The first six modules in this series address: o Leakage management programs o Assembling bolted joints with spiral-wound gaskets o Preload requirements for bolted joints with spiral-wound gaskets o Lube oil system leakage mitigation o Leakage reduction from threaded joints o Leakage reduction from bolted joints with sheet gaskets

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

248

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

249

Method and apparatus for container leakage testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for use in one-hundred percent leak testing of food containers used in conjunction with a tracer gas. The apparatus includes a shell with entrance and exit air locks to create a controlled atmosphere through which a series of containers is conveyed by a conveyor belt. The pressure in the shell is kept lower than the pressure in the containers and the atmosphere is made to flow with the containers so that a tracer gas placed in the packages before sealing them will leak more readily, but the leaked tracer gas will remain associated with the leaking package as it moves through the shell. The leaks are detected with a sniffer probe in fluid communication with a gas chromatograph. The gas chromatograph issues a signal when it detects a leak to an ejector that will eject the leaking container from the conveyor. The system is timed so that the series of containers can move continuously into and out of the shell, past the probe and the ejector, without stopping, yet each package is tested for leaks and removed if leaking.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for duct leakage was done in 155 homes. Tracer gas tests found that infiltration rates were three times greater when the air handler was operating than when it was off. Infiltration averaged 0.85 air changes per hour (ach) with the air handler (AH) operating continuously and 0.29 ach with the AH off. Return leaks were found to average 10.3% of AH total flow. House airtightness, in 90 of these homes, determined by blower door testing, averaged 12.58 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACHSO). When the duct registers were sealed, ACHSO decreased to 11.04, indicating that 12.2% of the house leaks were in the duct system. Duct leaks have a dramatic impact upon peak electrical demand. Based on theoretical analysis, a fifteen percent return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation capacity.

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A FIELD ASSESSMENT OF THE USE OF BOREHOLE PRESSURE TRANSIENTS TO MEASURE THE PERMEABILITY OF FRACTURED ROCK MASSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problem of air leakage, mechanically sealing packers shouldair leaking into the test and observation cavities could be eliminated by using a mechanically sealing

Forster, C.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Study of the Effect of Molecular and Aerosol Conditions in the Atmosphere on Air Fluorescence Measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perform calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by cosmic rays of above 10^18 eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group of monitoring instruments to record atmospheric conditions across the detector site, an area exceeding 3,000 km^2. The atmospheric data are used extensively in the reconstruction of air showers, and are particularly important for the correct determination of shower energies and the depths of shower maxima. This paper contains a summary of the molecular and aerosol conditions measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory since the start of regular operations in 2004, and includes a discussion of the impact of these measurements on air shower reconstructions. Between 10^18 and 10^20 eV, the systematic uncertainties due to all atmospheric effects increase from 4% to 8% in measurements of shower energy, and 4 g/cm^2 to 8 g/cm^...

,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Leakage resilient strong key-insulated signatures in public channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key-insulation aims at minimizing (i.e., compartmentalizing) the damage of users from key exposures, and traditionally requires a private channel of communication between a user and a semi-trusted party called a helper to refresh the private keys. The ... Keywords: continual key leakage, key-insulation, public channel, signatures

Le Trieu Phong; Shin'ichiro Matsuo; Moti Yung

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Colorimetric Detection of Formaldehyde: A Sensor for Air Quality Measurements and a Pollution-Warning Kit for Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new chemical sensors for the detection of formaldehyde, a ubiquitous and carcinogenic indoor air pollutant is described. These sensors are based on the use of nanoporous matrices acting as sponge to trap the targeted pollutant and ... Keywords: Formaldehyde, colorimetric detection, chemical sensor, indoor air, nanoporous matrices, sol-gel

S. Mariano; W. Wang; G. Brunelle; Y. Bigay; T. H. Tran-Thi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A hybrid source apportionment model integrating measured data and air quality model results - article no. D07301  

SciTech Connect

The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility (BRAVO) study was an intensive air quality study designed to understand the causes of haze in Big Bend National Park. Daily speciated fine aerosols were measured from July through October 1999 at 37 sites located mostly in Texas. In support of BRAVO, two chemical transport models (CTMs) were used to apportion particulate sulfate at Big Bend and other sites in Texas to sources in the eastern and western United States, Texas, Mexico, and the Carbon I and II coal-fired power plants, located 225 km southeast of Big Bend in Mexico. Analysis of the CTM source attribution results and comparison to results from receptor models revealed systematic biases. To reduce the multiplicative biases, a hybrid source apportionment model, based on inverse modeling, was developed that adjusted the initial CTM source contributions so the modeled sulfate concentrations optimally fit the measured data, resulting in refined daily source contributions. The method was tested using synthetic data and successfully reduced source attribution biases. The refined sulfate source attribution results reduced the initial eastern U.S. contribution to Big Bend, averaged over the BRAVO study period, from about 40% to about 30%, while Mexico's contribution increased from 24 - 32% about 40%. The contribution from the Carbon facility increased from similar to 14% to over 20%. The increase in Mexico's contribution is consistent with more recent SO{sub 2} emissions estimates that indicate that the BRAVO Mexican SO{sub 2} emissions were underestimated. Source attribution results for other monitoring sites in west Texas were similar to results at Big Bend.

Schichtel, B.A.; Malm, W.C.; Gebhart, K.A.; Barna, M.G.; Knipping, E.M. [Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Gated-Vdd: a circuit technique to reduce leakage in deep-submicron cache memories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep-submicron CMOS designs have resulted in large leakage energy dissipation in microprocessors. While SRAM cells in on-chip cache memories always contribute to this leakage, there is a large variability in active cell usage both within ...

Michael Powell; Se-Hyun Yang; Babak Falsafi; Kaushik Roy; T. N. Vijaykumar

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Analysis of Mesoscale Airflow Patterns in the South-Central Coast Air Basin during the SCCCAMP 1985 Intensive Measurement Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the mesoscale airflow patterns in the south-central coast air basin (SCCAB) was performed using data collected during the 1985 South-Central Coast Cooperative Aerometric Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP). Airflow within the SCCAB is ...

Sharon G. Douglas; Robert C. Kessler

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Estimating Regional Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes above Prairie Cropland from Surface and Upper-Air Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-air budget methods can be used to estimate the surface sensible and latent heat flux densities on a regional scale. This study assesses the application of radiosonde-based budget methods above homogeneous cropland. Serial daytime soundings ...

Alan G. Barr; G. S. Strong

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Efficient tail estimation for massive correlated log-normal sums: with applications in statistical leakage analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing approaches to statistical leakage analysis focus only on calculating the mean and variance of the total leakage. In practice, however, what concerns most is the tail behavior of the sum distribution, as it tells that to what extent the design ... Keywords: comonotonicity, fast correlation transform, statistical leakage analysis, tail behavior

Mingzhi Gao; Zuochang Ye; Yan Wang; Zhiping Yu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Detailed placement for leakage reduction using systematic through-pitch variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel detailed placement technique that accounts for systematic through-pitch variations to reduce leakage. Leakage depends nearly exponentially on linewidth (gate length), and even small variations in linewidth introduce large variability ... Keywords: aCLV, detailed placement, leakage, lithography, through-pitch

Andrew B. Kahng; Swamy Muddu; Puneet Sharma

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine  

SciTech Connect

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Aksit, Mahmut Faruk (Troy, NY); Farrell, Thomas Raymond (Simpsonville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Isokinetic air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isokinetic air sampler includes a filter, a holder for the filter, an air pump for drawing air through the filter at a fixed, predetermined rate, an inlet assembly for the sampler having an inlet opening therein of a size such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained at a particular wind speed, a closure for the inlet opening and means for simultaneously opening the closure and turning on the air pump when the wind speed is such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained. A system incorporating a plurality of such samplers provided with air pumps set to draw air through the filter at the same fixed, predetermined rate and having different inlet opening sizes for use at different wind speeds is included within the ambit of the present invention as is a method of sampling air to measure airborne concentrations of particulate pollutants as a function of wind speed.

Sehmel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Test versus predictions for rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of a convergent-tapered, honeycomb-stator/smooth-rotor annular gas seal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results for measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for a convergent-tapered honeycomb seal (CTHC). The test seals had a diameter of 114.968 mm (4.5263 in) at the entrance, and a diameter of 114.709 mm (4.5161 in) at the exit. The honeycomb cell depth was 3.175 mm (0.125 in), and the cell width was 0.79 mm (0.0311 in). Measurements are reported with air as the test fluid at three different speeds: 10,200, 15,200, and 20,200 rpm; with a supply pressure of 69 bar (1,000 psi), with exit-to-inlet pressure ratios from 20% to 50%, and using two rotors that are 114.3 mm (4.500 in) and 114.5 mm (4.508 in) respectively; this enables the same seals to be tested under two different conditions. The q factor, which is just a simple way to quantify taper is defined as the taperangle seal parameter and is calculated using the inlet and exit radial clearance. Two taper-angles parameters were calculated; q = 0.24 for the 114.3 mm (4.500 in) rotor, and q = 0.386 for the 114.5 mm (4.508 in) rotor. The q = 0.24 condition was compared to a constant clearance honeycomb seal (CCHC q = 0) because both sets of data were taken with the same rotor diameter. The direct stiffness, effective stiffness, and direct damping coefficients were larger for q = 0.24. The CTHC q = 0.24 eliminates the direct negative static stiffness obtained with CCHC ( q = 0). The cross-coupled stiffness and damping also were larger for q = 0.24, especially at low frequencies. Effective damping is one of the best indicators in determining the stability of a roughened stator annular gas seal. The frequency at which it changes sign is called the cross-over frequency. In applications, this frequency needs to be lower than the rotorsystems first natural frequency. Otherwise, the seal will be highly destabilizing instead of highly stabilizing. The magnitude of effective damping and the cross-over frequency also increases with q for all frequencies. Constant clearance honeycomb seals have less leakage than convergenttapered honeycomb seals. CTHC ( q = 0.24), has approximately 20 percent more leakage than CCHC ( q = 0). The experimental results for rotordynamic characteristics and leakage were compared to theoretical predictions by the two-control-volume developed by Kleynhans and Childs. All rotordynamic coefficients were reasonably predicted for all cases. The model does a better job predicting the cross-coupled stiffness and damping coefficients rather than the direct stiffness and damping coefficients. Also, the two-control-volume model predicts the dynamic characteristics of CCHC ( q = 0) better, and does not predict well the effective stiffness and damping for CTHC q = 0.386.

Van Der Velde Alvarez, Daniel Eduardo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advancing weatherization performance: Measured results from the North Carolina field test of an advanced measure selection technique  

SciTech Connect

The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced residential energy conservation measure selection technique was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and energy savings achieved. One-hundred twenty low-income, single-family households served by three different weatherization agencies participated in the field test which was conducted between June 1989 and August 1991. Average heating energy savings were 33% for weatherizations based on the new technique and 23% for Retro-Tech-based weatherizations. Weatherizations based on the new technique achieved 43% more heating energy savings, cost around 10% less at two weatherization agencies and considerably more at the third, and were near equivalent in labor requirements. Major findings from the study include: (1) the advanced audit will install some measures in near identical quantities as Retro-Tech-based weatherizations and others in dramatically different quantities, (2) the advanced audit can significantly increase heating energy savings, (3) blower-door-directed air sealing can more than double the air leakage reductions achieved from standard air sealing techniques, (4) North Carolina low-income houses have much higher average leakage rates than similar New York houses but can be sealed as well or better, and (5) using the advanced audit will not increase weatherization costs and may actually lower costs for most weatherization agencies.

Sharp, T.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Air Exchange Rates in New Energy-Efficient Manufactured Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the 1989-1990 heating season, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for the Bonneville Power Administration, measured the ventilation characteristics of 139 newly constructed energy-efficient manufactured homes and a control sample of 35 newer manufactured homes. A standard door fan pressurization technique was used to estimate shell leakiness, and a passive perfluorocarbon tracer technique was used to estimate overall air exchange rates. A measurement of the designated whole-house exhaust system flow rate was taken as well as an occupant and structure survey. The energy-efficient manufactured homes have very low air exchange rates, significantly lower than either existing manufactured homes or site-built homes. The standard deviation of the effective leakage area for this sample of homes is small (25% to 30% of the mean), indicating that the leakiness of manufactured housing stock can be confidently characterized by the mean value. There is some indication of increased ventilation due to the energy-efficient whole-house ventilation specification, but not directly related to the operation of the wholehouse system. The mechanical systems as installed and operated do not provide the intended ventilation; consequently indoor air quality could possibly be adversely impacted and moisture/condensation in the living space is a potential problem.

Hadley, D. L.; Bailey, S. A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

272

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

273

Advanced Duct Sealing Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sealing. The air leakage after initial sealing was usuallythe air leakage before and after sealing is therefore theair flow measurements of the connections before and after initial sealing.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K {+-} 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the {open_quotes}diaphragmless{close_quotes} acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel`dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

An Improved Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Improved Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Large-scale geological storage of CO2 is likely to bring CO2 plumes into contact with a large number of existing wellbores. Wellbores that no longer provide proper zonal isolation establish a primary pathway for a buoyant CO2-rich phase to escape from the intended storage formation. The hazard of CO2 leakage along these pathways will depend on the rate of leakage. Thus a useful component of a risk assessment framework is a model of CO2 leakage. Predicting the flux of CO2 along a leaking wellbore requires a model of fluid properties and of transport along the leakage

276

Measurement of air toxic emissions from a coal-fired boiler equipped with a tangentially-fired low NOx combustion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of measurements of chemical emissions from a coal-burning, tangentially-fired, utility boiler equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a low NOx firing system. The tests were conducted in response to Title III of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which lists 189 chemicals to be evaluated as {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} The project was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the US Department of Energy under an existing Innovative Clean Coal Technology Cooperative Agreement managed by Southern Company Services. Field chemical emissions monitoring was conducted in two phases: a baseline {open_quotes}pre-low NOx burner{close_quotes} condition in September 1991 and in the LNCFS Level III low NOx firing condition in January 1992. In addition to stack emissions measurements of both organic and inorganic chemicals, plant material balance evaluations were performed to determine the efficiency of the hot-side ESP at controlling emissions of air toxics and to determine the fate of the target chemicals in various plant process streams.

Dismukes, E.B. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Clarkson, R.J.; Hardman, R.R. [Southern Company Services, Birmingham, AL (United States); Elia, G.G. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns  

SciTech Connect

To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Reduced leakage in epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} films following oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition method. The prepared films were characterized using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, ferroelectric loop tracer, and leakage current measurements before and after oxygen plasma treatment. The leakage current of the films, a crucial parameter in device applications, is observed to be reduced by two orders of magnitude with oxygen plasma treatment at room temperature. P-E hysteresis loops were observed in oxygen plasma treated BFO films. The observed results indicate the usefulness of oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment (RF 13.56 MHz), which is an effective and low temperature processing technique, in such lossy ferroelectric thin films.

Kothari, Deepti [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Upadhyay, Sanjay K.; Raghavendra Reddy, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Jariwala, C.; Raole, P. M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Delta Q method of testing the air leakage of ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Walker, I.S.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database V.2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roughly mapped to 19 climate zones [3] by state-line. The1 shows that most of the climate zones are represented inv2011) ResDB organized by climate zones. Many climate zones

Sherman, Wanyu R Chan, Max H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database Wanyu R. Chan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· CRADA with SEPRADYNE: $300K · Non-Proliferation: $250K · Pu Vitrification System: $80K · Space Power Vitrification System - Hg Recuperation from the Copper Industry: CRADA - Uranium Conversion Process: Non-Proliferation

282

Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cloud Layers, Particle Identification, and Rain-Rate Profiles from ZRVf Measurements by Clear-Air Doppler Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Networks of radars that point almost vertically and continuously measure the vertical profile of the horizontal wind will, in the future, be operated at many locations around the world. Although such radars are designed to measure the Doppler-...

E. E. Gossard; R. G. Strauch; D. C. Welsh; S. Y. Matrosov

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Technology Scaling Behavior of Optimum Reverse Body Bias for Standby Leakage Power Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that, there is an optimum reverse body bias, unique to any technology generation, that minimizes the standby leakage power consumption of an IC design implemented in that technology. We also show: (1) the optimum reverse body bias value reduces by-2X per technology generation, and (2) the maximum achievable leakage power reduction by reverse body biasing diminishes by-4X per generation under constant field technology scaling scenario. Optimum point occurs as a result of reduction in subthreshold leakage and an increase in junction band-to-hand tunneling leakage with applied reverse bias. Therefore, new junction engineering techniques to reduce the hulk band-to-hand tunneling leakage current component across the junction are needed to preserve the effectiveness of reverse body biasing for standby leakage control in future technologies. 1.

Ali Keshavarzi; Siva Narendra; Shekhar Borkar; Charles Hawkind; Kaushik Roy; Vivek De

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

LLOYD, E.R.

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Banked scratch-pad memory management for reducing leakage energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy for on-chip scratch-pad memories (SPMs). The idea is to divide SPM into banks and use compiler-guided data layout optimization and data migration to maximize SPM bank idleness, thereby increasing the chances of placing banks into low-power (low-leakage) state.

M. J. Irwin; G. Chen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Sealing Technology and Plant Leakage Reduction (ICSTPLR-99)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining plant reliability, availability, and material condition represents not only a core challenge to successful plant management and operation, but also a key to economic success. A critical factor that can strongly influence relative success in these areas is the ability to minimize plant process piping system leakage, leakage events, and the resulting related issues. Plant piping system leakage conservatively costs each process industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually in lost profits as...

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Condition monitoring of internal leakage in modern water hydraulic cylinders using acoustic emission.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research aims to develop a sensitive method for condition monitoring of internal leakage in a modem water hydraulic cylinder by means of acoustic emission (more)

Chen, Ping.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Methodology for Standby Leakage Power Reduction in Nanometer-Scale CMOS Circuits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In nanometer-scale CMOS technology, leakage power has become a major component of the total power dissipation due to the downscaling of threshold voltage and gate (more)

Chun, Jae Woong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Correlation of turbulent burning velocities of ethanol-air, measured in a fan-stirred bomb up to 1.2 MPa  

SciTech Connect

The turbulent burning velocity is defined by the mass rate of burning and this also requires that the associated flame surface area should be defined. Previous measurements of the radial distribution of the mean reaction progress variable in turbulent explosion flames provide a basis for definitions of such surface areas for turbulent burning velocities. These inter-relationships. in general, are different from those for burner flames. Burning velocities are presented for a spherical flame surface, at which the mass of unburned gas inside it is equal to the mass of burned gas outside it. These can readily be transformed to burning velocities based on other surfaces. The measurements of the turbulent burning velocities presented are the mean from five different explosions, all under the same conditions. These cover a wide range of equivalence ratios, pressures and rms turbulent velocities for ethanol-air mixtures. Two techniques are employed, one based on measurements of high speed schlieren images, the other on pressure transducer measurements. There is good agreement between turbulent burning velocities measured by the two techniques. All the measurement are generalised in plots of burning velocity normalised by the effective unburned gas rms velocity as a function of the Karlovitz stretch factor for different strain rate Markstein numbers. For a given value of this stretch factor a decrease in Markstein number increases the normalised burning velocity. Comparisons are made with the findings of other workers. (author)

Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Mansour, M.S. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluation of beta partical densitometry for determination of self-absorption factors in gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity measurements on air particulate filter samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpha and beta particles emitted from radioactive material collected on an air filter may be significantly attenuated by the mass (thickness) of collected dust. In this study, we determined the mass or thickness of the simulated dust deposit by measurement of the attenuation of beta particles from an external radioactive source as the particles pass through the filter-dust combination. This measured attenuation should be empirically related to demonstrated counting efficiency. A graph of mass density vs. fraction of beta source transmitted was developed. This graph provides factors which will correct for selfabsorption losses in the filter during the counting procedure. This experimental procedure could favorably affect the cost and effort required to accurately monitor airborne radioactivity releases from nuclear facilities.

Breida, Margaret A

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Statistical Parameters of the Air Turbulent Boundary Layer over Steep Water Waves Measured by the PIV Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbulent airflow with a centerline velocity of 4 m s?1 above 2.5-Hz mechanically generated gravity waves of different amplitudes has been studied in experiments using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Direct measurements of the ...

Yu. Troitskaya; D. Sergeev; O. Ermakova; G. Balandina

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

297

NAREL (National Air and Standard Environmental Laboratory) standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using diffusion barrier charcoal canisters  

SciTech Connect

Radon monitoring procedures for the National Air and Radiation Environment Laboratory (NAREL) are described. Radon is detected by sorption to activated charcoal, followed by detection of gamma ray emissions from the radon decay products lead-214 (295 KeV and 392 KeV) and bismuth-214 (609 KeV). The activated charcoal is held in an 8 ounce metal can, under a polyethylene diffusion barrier and a stainless steel screen, 30--50% open. The polyethylene barrier reduces water absorption by the charcoal, and improves integration over the exposure period. The proper use of the container is described, as is the counting system and calibration of the detecting system. Fabrication of reference standards and background canisters is described. Equations and sample calculations to determine radon concentrations are given. All terms in the equation are defined, and all calibration factors are calculated. The minimal detectable amounts of radon as a function of detector exposure time are calculated. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Gray, D.J.; Windham, S.T.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

An optimal leakage detection strategy for underground pipelines using magnetic induction-based sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is difficult to detect small leakages in underground pipelines with high accuracy and low-energy cost due to the inaccessible underground environments. To this end, the Magnetic Induction (MI)-based wireless sensor network for underground pipeline ... Keywords: deployment and activation of sensors, energy consumption, estimation accuracy, leakage detection and localization, underground pipelines

Xin Tan, Zhi Sun

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modelling well leakage in multilayer aquifer systems using the extended finite element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended finite element method (XFEM) is applied to the problem of predicting the steady-state leakage from layered sedimentary aquifer systems perforated by abandoned wells. Multi-aquifer systems are modelled using a quasi-three-dimensional model ... Keywords: Extended finite element method, GFEM, Generalised finite element method, Leakage, Multi-aquifer systems, XFEM

Robert Gracie; James R. Craig

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Air Sealing for New Home Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for New Home Construction for New Home Construction Air Sealing for New Home Construction May 2, 2012 - 6:09pm Addthis Air Sealing for New Home Construction What does this mean for me? Air sealing your house properly during construction will save you energy and money. Ideally, air-sealing techniques are tailored to your site and climate zone. How does it work? Workers will seal all the paths that air can leak in and out of your new home during construction. This process requires care and attention to detail, and it's best to hire professionals with experience building energy-efficient homes. Minimizing air movement in and out of a house is key to building an energy-efficient home. Controlling air leakage is also critical to moisture control. It's always best to use techniques and materials identified as best

302

CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preexisting wells and well bores are high-permeability pathways through the crust, and as such present zones of elevated risk to CO2 storage projects. Although current well closure and abandonment technology appears sufficient to contain CO2 at most sites, individual wells may suffer from a variety of factors that limit their integrity, including improper cementation, improper plugging, overpressure, corrosion, and other failure conditions. As a whole, wells in the US can be subdivided into three categories: wells that are not plugged, wells plugged before 1952, and those plugged after 1952 (when the American Petroleum Institute standardized plugging procedure and cement composition). After use, wells may be plugged and abandoned, with the liability of leakage remaining with the parent company. However, in some cases wells are orphaned and have no current parent company, leaving liability with the state. Current regulatory frameworks for well completion, plugging, and abandonment may not suffice in accounting for the most likely features, events and processes that affect well integrity after initial CO2 injection. Keywords:

S. Taku Ide; S. Julio Friedmann; Howard J. Herzog

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Air Kerma - High Energy Xray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as high energy megavoltage x rays with peak voltages of at least 5 MV. Currently, air-kerma measurements at these high energies are not ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mitigating the risk of information leakage in a two-level supply chain through optimal supplier selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information leakage in supply chains is drawing more and more attention in supply chain management. Unlike existing research, which usually focuses on the effect of information leakage on the supply chain's material and information flow, this paper aims ... Keywords: Inference, Information leakage, Information sharing, Optimal supplier selection, Risk mitigation

Da Yong Zhang; Xinlin Cao; Lingyu Wang; Yong Zeng

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor Aravind Kailas Dept.brunelli@disi.unitn.it Abstract--The modeling of energy storage devices such as supercapacitors for wireless sensor networks

Ingram, Mary Ann

306

Physical-aware simulated annealing optimization of gate leakage in nanoscale datapath circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For CMOS technologies below 65nm, gate oxide direct tunneling current is a major component of the total power dissipation. This paper presents a simulated annealing based algorithm for the gate leakage current reduction by simultaneous scheduling, allocation ...

Saraju P. Mohanty; Ramakrishna Velagapudi; Elias Kougianos

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of the leakage behavior of pressure-unseating equipment hatches and drywell heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a recent research program to investigate the leakage behavior of pressure unseating equipment hatches. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted under various conditions to determine the pressure and temperature at which leakage through unseating equipment hatches would occur. A simple analytical model is presented that provides a good estimate of the leakage onset pressure for these tests. Because of the similarity in the sealing mechanism between unseating equipment hatches and drywell heads, the results of this program also provide insight into the leakage behavior of drywell heads. The research activities described herein are a part of the Containment Integrity Programs, which are managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 16 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Parks, M.B.; Walther, H.P.; Lambert, L.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Impact of Agulhas Leakage on the Atlantic Overturning Circulation in the CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of Agulhas leakage variability on the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is investigated. In this model an advective connection exists that ...

Wilbert Weijer; Erik van Sebille

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Adaptive noise cancellation schemes for magnetic flux leakage signals obtained from gas pipeline inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nondestructive evaluation of the gas pipeline system is most commonly performed using magnetic flux leakage (MFL) techniques. A major segment of this network employs seamless pipes. The data obtained From MFL inspection of seamless pipes is contaminated ...

M. Afzal; R. Polikar; L. Udpa; S. Udpa

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Winter Morning Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of temperature measurements, which may be applied to inference of winter temperatures in data-sparse areas, are presented. The morning air temperatures during three winters were measured at 80 places in a 10 km 30 km area along the ...

A. Hogan; M. Ferrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratorycountries where biomass and kerosene combustion is common.to smoke from biomass fuel combustion increases the severity

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Position Algorithm for Solar Radiation Applications. Tech.approximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Communityinto 30-minute bins. Solar radiation, air temperature,

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Development of iteration strategies for a practical implementation of a higher order transverse leakage approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transverse integrated nodal diffusion methods currently represent the standard in full core neutronic simulation. The primary shortcoming in this approach is the utilization of the quadratic transverse leakage approximation. This approach, although proven to work well for typical LWR problems, is not consistent with the formulation of nodal methods and can cause accuracy and convergence problems. In previous work, an improved, consistent quadratic leakage approximation was formulated, which derived from the class of higher order nodal methods developed some years ago. In this paper a number of iteration schemes are developed around this consistent quadratic leakage approximation which yield accurate node average results in much improved calculational times. The developed consistent leakage approximation is extended in this work via a number of numerical schemes, the most promising of which results from utilizing the consistent leakage approximation as a correction method to the standard quadratic leakage approximation. Numerical results are demonstrated on a set of benchmark problems, such as the 3D IAEA LWR and MOX C5 problems. (authors)

Prinsloo, R. H.; Tomasevic, D. I. [Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Commercial Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code requires openings in the building envelope to be sealed to prevent air leakage into and out of the space, including an air barrier at insulation installations. Publication Date: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 cn_commercial_air_barrier_requirements_for_insulated_ceilings.pdf Document Details Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: Code Notes Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 17:25

319

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comparison between predicted duct effectiveness from proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and measured field data for residential forced air cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Forced Air Systems in Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P.ASHRAE Transactions, 104(1B), 1360-1375. Walker I, ShermanDuct Effectiveness from Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and

Siegel, Jeffrey A.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Study of Air Quality in the Southeastern HamptonNorfolkVirginia Beach Region with Airborne Lidar Measurements and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of air quality was performed using a compact, aircraft aerosol lidar designed in the Science Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. ...

Jasper Lewis; Russell De Young; D. Allen Chu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Data Quality Evaluation of Hazardous Air Pollutants Measurements for the US Environmental Protection Agency's Electric Utility Steam Generating Units Information Collection Request  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an Information Collection Request (ICR) to owners of fossil fuel-fired, electric steam generating units. Part III of the ICR required that almost 500 selected power plant stacks be tested for emissions of four groups of substances classified as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act: acid gases and hydrogen cyanide; metals; volatile and semivolatile organics; and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlori...

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

323

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12/2011 12/2011 Air Monitoring Groundwater Monitoring Surface Water Monitoring A continuously operating air monitoring network was in place from 1986 through 2000 for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to measure levels of gamma radiation, radioactive dust particles, radon gas, and asbestos. With remediation of contaminated materials essentially complete and measurements indistinguishable from background, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ceased perimeter and offsite air monitoring as of December 31, 2000. Groundwater has been routinely monitored at the site since 1986. Separate groundwater monitoring programs were established for the Chemical Plant and Quarry sites because of geographic separation and differences in the hydrogeologic features that influence

324

List of Compressed air Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Efficiency Incentive Program (Texas) Local Grant Program Texas Commercial Ceiling Fan Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building Compressed air...

325

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Lehua Pan,of CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: A Case Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-61463 Assessment Of Carbon LeakageIn Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: A Case Study In Jambithrough implementation of carbon sink projects can increase

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Application of Body Biasing and Supply Voltage Scaling Techniques for Leakage Reduction and Performance Improvements of CMOS Circuits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The efficiency of body biasing technique is evaluated in 90-nm process technology for regular and low threshold voltage devices. A new leakage monitor circuit for (more)

Devasthali, Vinayak Sudhakar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

329

A rugged continuous air monitor for sampling radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new rugged continuous air monitor (CAM) for sampling radionuclide has been developed. The sampler was designed for analyzing aerosols from occupied environments of laboratories and samples extracted from stacks and ducts. Experiments were conducted to characterize the collection efficiency of the aerosol sampler system and to characterize the uniformity of particulate deposition on the filter surface as affected by variations in particle size and sampler flow rates. An experimental parametric analysis was conducted to determine the best internal geometric flow configuration, in order to achieve optimum aerosol collection. The results showed that at a flow rate of 56.6 L/min, 90% of 10 []m aerodynamic diameter (AD) aerosol particles penetrated through the sampler. The 10% loss was attributed to particle impaction at the location where the aerosol stream is turned from the vertical direction and then enters a 4 mm gap between a sampler filter and a planar detector, both of which are horizontally oriented. The cut point for the sampler was 20 []m AD. Uniformity of aerosol collection on the filter, as characterized by the coefficient of variation of the areal density deposits, was less than 10% for 10 []m AD aerosol particles. The sampler sealing integrity with respect to air leaks was tested by placing the sampler in a pressurized container and operating the sampler with the pressure in the container higher than that in the sampler for in-leakage, and with the pressure in the container less than that in the sampler for out-leakage. The pressure inside the container did not exceed 10 inches of water. For in-leakage tests, sulfur hexafluoride (SF?) was diluted with air and released into the container, external to the sampler. The ratio of the SF? concentration in the sampler to the SF? concentration in the container was calculated to characterize the integrity of the sampler system. For pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, the in-leakage was 0.03% and 0.02%, respectively. The same procedure was repeated for out-leakage except that the diluted SF? was released into the sampler. The leakage results for this procedure were 0.04% and 0.02% for pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, respectively.

Martinez, Joseph Thaddeus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Air Temperature Model Evaluation in the North Mediterranean Belt Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of air temperature models, using hourly and daily air temperature measurements in 34 different stations in the north Mediterranean belt, is presented. Four air temperature models were used to estimate hourly and daily ...

Julia Bilbao; Argimiro H. de Miguel; Harry D. Kambezidis

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Field measurement & verification of residential duct leakage methods and CFD analysis of HVAC mixing box.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research work in this thesis is subdivided to providing the initial results of the experimental work followed by simulation work at the end. The (more)

Vadlamani, Uday

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1 , S. Julio Cambridge MA 02139 Abstract Preexisting wells and well bores are high-permeability pathways through the crust, and as such present zones of elevated risk to CO2 storage projects. Although current well closure

334

Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of harvested energy. Thanks to these energy managements, we achieve efficient energy usage and maximize. Software energy managements for WSNs are typically realized by exploiting this feature and thus the goal by aggregation of the capacitor leakage characteristics and energy shortage risk. Table 1. Energy usage in long

Tentzeris, Manos

335

Dual-K Versus Dual-T Technique for Gate Leakage Reduction: A Comparative Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of aggressive technology scaling, gate leakage (gate oxide direct tunneling) has become a major component of total power dissipation. Use of dielectrics of higher permittivity (Dual-K) or use of silicon dioxide of higher thicknesses (Dual-T ...

Saraju P. Mohanty; Ramakrishna Velagapudi; Elias Kougianos

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films Moon-Ho Jo behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films for intermetal dielectric applications was investigated in a metal­insulator­semiconductor structure. SiO2 aerogel films with porosities of 70% exhibited Poole­Frenkel conduction both before

Jo, Moon-Ho

337

Leakage Power Optimization Techniques for Ultra Deep Sub-Micron Multi-Level Caches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-chip L1 and L2 caches represent a sizeable fraction of the totalpower consumption of microprocessors. In deep sub-micron technology,the subthreshold leakage power is becoming the dominantfraction of the total power consumption of those caches. In ...

Nam Sung Kim; David Blaauw; Trevor Mudge

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Statistical Analysis of Steady State Leakage Currents in Nano-CMOS Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical Analysis of Steady State Leakage Currents in Nano-CMOS Devices Jawar Singh, Jimson, UK. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, USA. jawar also propose a statistical model to characterize nano-scale CMOS device characteristics such as dynamic

Mohanty, Saraju P.

339

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Monitor for detecting nuclear waste leakage in a subsurface repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remote fiber fluorimetric portion of the program is slightly ahead of schedule and proceeding well technically. Proof of principle has been demonstrated over a 0.2 km path length using an organic tracer material. Performance and design calculations have been made for the fiber optic components of the system. Optimized fibers have been ordered and special jigs and optical couplings are presently being fabricated. Progress on the high-sensitivity analyzer using coprecipitation techniques has proceeded well ahead of schedule with technical results far above expectations. Preliminary measurements in the UO/sub 2//sup 2 +//CaF/sub 2/ detection system has proved sensitivities well beyond the natural background limit. While further improvement of sensitivity (to 10/sup -15/ g) already is planned, emphasis will now be placed on locating and dealing with possible interferences and on determining how to improve and optimize quantitative accuracy. In addition, simplication of the sample preparation procedure and downscaling to use very small (< 1 ml) groundwater samples is planned. In the longer time frame, work on maximum chemical speciation and the possibility of isotopic speciation will be undertaken. Once the coprecipitation procedures, instrumentation, and spectroscopy have been fully refined for uranium, then the process will be repeated for plutonium and perhaps americium and thorium.

Klainer, S.; Hirschfeld, T.; Bowman, H.; Milanovich, F.; Perry, D.; Johnson, D.

1980-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Energy efficiency and air regulation | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA boiler rules New EPA regulations for industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers encourage energy efficiency measures to help reduce hazardous air pollutants. Energy...

343

Regulations for Air Quality (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Regulation establishes emission standards for particulates and gases, emission opacity standards, standards of air quality and control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the emission of...

344

Effects of operating damage of labyrinth seal on seal leakage and wheelspace hot gas ingress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The labyrinth seal is widely used in turbomachinery to minimize or control leakage between areas of different pressure. The present investigation numerically explored the effect of damage and wear of the labyrinth seal on the turbomachinery flow and temperature fields. Specifically, this work investigated: (1) the effect of rubgroove downstream wall angle on seal leakage, (2) the effect of tooth bending damage on the leakage, (3) the effect of tooth "????mushrooming"??? damage on seal leakage, and (4) the effect of rub-groove axial position and wall angle on gas turbine ingress heating. To facilitate grid generation, an unstructured grid generator named OpenCFD was also developed. The grid generator is written in C++ and generates hybrid grids consisting primarily of Cartesian cells. This investigation of labyrinth seal damage and wear was conducted using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) to simulate the flows. The high- Reynolds k - Model and the standard wall function were used to model the turbulence. STAR-CD was used to solve the equations, and the grids were generated using the new code OpenCFD. It was found that the damage and wear of the labyrinth seal have a significant effect on the leakage and temperature field, as well as on the flow pattern. The leakage increases significantly faster than the operating clearance increase from the wear. Further, the specific seal configuration resulting from the damage and wear was found to be important. For example, for pure-bending cases, it was found that the bending curvature and the percentage of tooth length that is bent are important, and that the mushroom radius and tooth bending are important for the mushrooming damage cases. When an abradable labyrinth seal was applied to a very large gas turbine wheelspace cavity, it was found that the rub-groove axial position, and to a smaller degree, rub-groove wall angle, alter the magnitude and distribution of the fluid temperature.

Xu, Jinming

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Air Resources Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (ARB or Board) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider adoption of the Proposed Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) to Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions from Composite Wood Products. The proposed ATCM would reduce the publics current exposure to formaldehyde by reducing emissions from hardwood plywood (HWPW), particleboard (PB) and medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels. The ATCM would also apply to finished goods made with these materials.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

347

Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

Camilli, Richard

348

Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In CarbonMitigation Forestry Projects  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing acceptance that the environmentalbenefits of forests extend beyond traditional ecological benefits andinclude the mitigation of climate change. Interest in forestry mitigationactivities has led to the inclusion of forestry practices at the projectlevel in international agreements. Climate change activities place newdemands on participating institutions to set baselines, establishadditionality, determine leakage, ensure permanence, and monitor andverify a project's greenhouse gas benefits. These issues are common toboth forestry and other types of mitigation projects. They demandempirical evidence to establish conditions under which such projects canprovide sustained long term global benefits. This Special Issue reportson papers that experiment with a range of approaches based on empiricalevidence for the setting of baselines and estimation of leakage inprojects in developing Asia and Latin America.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Aerothermal Effects of Interfacial Leakage and Film Cooling Schemes with Endwall and Leading Edge Contouring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerothermal Effects of Interfacial Aerothermal Effects of Interfacial Leakage and Film Cooling Schemes with Endwall and Leading Edge Contouring T.W. Simon and R. J. Goldstein Principal Investigators SCIES Project U/02-01-SR096/DOE PR DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manger, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/2002, 36 months) $459,007 Total Contract Value ($430,619 DOE) Gas Turbine Technology Needs and Project Objectives * Improved performance and reliability - More effective cooling of turbine first stage passage * Improve schemes for injection of endwall coolant * Realize cooling benefits of leakage flows * Understand effects of component misalignment - Reduced secondary flows * Improve with endwall axial contouring and airfoil/endwall fillets

350

Method of detecting leakage of reactor core components of liquid metal cooled fast reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting the failure of a sealed non-fueled core component of a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor having an inert cover gas. A gas mixture is incorporated in the component which includes Xenon-124; under neutron irradiation, Xenon-124 is converted to radioactive Xenon-125. The cover gas is scanned by a radiation detector. The occurrence of 188 Kev gamma radiation and/or other identifying gamma radiation-energy level indicates the presence of Xenon-125 and therefore leakage of a component. Similarly, Xe-126, which transmutes to Xe-127 and Kr-84, which produces Kr-85.sup.m can be used for detection of leakage. Different components are charged with mixtures including different ratios of isotopes other than Xenon-124. On detection of the identifying radiation, the cover gas is subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis to locate the leaking component.

Holt, Fred E. (Richland, WA); Cash, Robert J. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

Thermos, Anthony Constantine (Greer, SC); Rahal, Fadi Elias (Easley, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Leakage-Aware Reallocation for Periodic Real-Time Tasks on Multicore Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an increasingly important issue to reduce the energy consumption of computing systems. In this paper, we consider partition based energy-aware scheduling of periodic real-time tasks on multicore processors. The scheduling exploits dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) and core sleep scheduling to reduce both dynamic and leakage energy consumption. If the overhead of core state switching is non-negligible, however, the performance of this scheduling strategy in terms of energy efficiency might degrade. To achieve further energy saving, we extend the static task scheduling with run-time task reallocation. The basic idea is to aggregate idle time among cores so that as many cores as possible could be put into sleep in a way that the overall energy consumption is reduced. Simulation results show that the proposed approach results in up to 20% energy saving over traditional leakage-aware DVS.

Huang, Hongtao; Wang, Jijie; Lei, Siyu; Wu, Guowei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Internal leakage detection for feedwater heaters in power plants using neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As interest in safety and performance of power plants becomes more serious and wide-ranging, the significance of research on turbine cycles has attracted more attention. This paper particularly focuses on thermal performance analysis under the conditions ... Keywords: CBM, COP, DCA, DP, Diagnosis, FWBP, FWH, FWP, Feedwater heater, HP FWH, HP TBN, Internal leakage, LP FWH, LP TBN, Neural network, PEPSE, SG, TD, TTD, Thermal performance, Turbine cycle, VWO

Gyunyoung Heo; Song Kyu Lee

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EPRI Products Can Help Utilities with Leakage Issues for Diesel Generators and Other Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This notification is intended to make members aware of several EPRI products that help prevent problems with fluid leakage on diesel generators and other plant systems to improve component reliability. These reports are focused on fluid joints, and solutions to help plant personnel better maintain systems and reduce component failures due to leaks and increase overall station reliability. This information contained in this update could be useful to members of your organization responsible for the mainten...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An evaluation of the leakage potential of a personnel airlock subject to severe accident loads  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of the performance of light water reactor containment buildings subject to severe accident loads must include the consideration of leakage between the sealing surfaces of penetrations. As part of its work on containment integrity for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), Sandia National Laboratories is developing test validated methods for predicting leakage from mechanical penetrations. The primary emphasis has been on large diameter operable penetrations, such as equipment hatches, personnel airlocks, and drywell heads. Several studies conducted for the USNRC have identified leakage from personnel airlocks as a potentially significant failure mode of containment buildings subject to severe accident loads, including Barnes et al. (1984) and Shackelford et al. (1985). Barnes et al (1984) conducted finite element analyses to predict separation of the sealing surfaces on the door and bulkhead, but they did not consider elevated temperature effects and they did not take credit for the performance of the seal material in calculating leak areas. To the author's knowledge, personnel airlock designs with flat bulkhead/door assemblies and seals have never been tested under severe accident conditions, i.e., elevated temperatures and pressure. This paper will describe preliminary analyses and plans for testing a full-size personnel airlock.

Clauss, D.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

1995-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers Title Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4951E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Coles, Henry C., Tae Won Han, Phillip N. Price, Ashok J. Gadgil, and William F. Tschudi Date Published 03/2011 Abstract There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: "closed" and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percentage of the recirculation air is "make-up" air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both "closed" and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups:

360

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to model dense gas dispersion of CO 2 leakage. Themodified to simulate dense gas dispersion appropriate for CO3. Passive vs. dense gas dispersion The behavior of dense

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Use of additional fission sources or scattering sources to model inward axial leakages in fast-reactor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, bucklings are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. If the net leakage for a given energy group is outward (positive), the buckling is positive, and buckling methods work well. However, if the new leakage for a given energy group is inward (negative), the buckling is negative and can lead to numerical instabilities (oscillations in the iterative flux calculation). This report discusses two equivalent nonbuckling methods to model inward leakages. One method (the chi/sub g/ method) models these incoming neutrons by additional fission sources. The other method (the ..sigma../sub s/(1 ..-->.. g) method) models them by increased downscatter sources. The derivation of the two methods is shown, and the flux spectra obtained by their use are compared with those obtained from two-dimensional (RZ) calculations.

Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Air pollution  

SciTech Connect

This book reports that homeowners do not have adequate assurance that companies have demonstrated a minimum level of competency in measuring radon and that the test results provided to them have some degree of accuracy. This is because the voluntary nature of the RMP program allows firms to market devices that have not been tested or that failed the test. In addition, the RMP program does not require measurement companies to implement quality assurance programs. GAO believes that two changes in the RMP program that would increase homeowners' assurance are requiring measurement firms to pass the RMP program before marketing their devices, and requiring radon measurement firms to demonstrate the existence of adequate quality assurance programs as a condition for participating in the RMP program.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Review and Assessment of Air Quality Management Activities in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many air quality studies indicate that ozone, fine particulates, and haze are interrelated and often regional in extent. Emission management strategies to mitigate these pollutants are likely to involve regional control measures. This report summarizes recent air quality studies in the State of Texas to support the development of integrated air quality management strategies to meet new air quality standards.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 A portable airborne scanning lidar system for ocean and3.4.5 Lidar and imagery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Figure 2.7: Repeat lidar measurements over the runway of the

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Feasibility of air capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing CO2 from air, referred to as Air Capture, is being proposed as a viable climate change mitigation technology. The two major benefits of air capture, reported in literature, are that it allows us to reduce the ...

Ranjan, Manya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Primary zone air proportioner  

SciTech Connect

An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

Cleary, Edward N. G. (San Diego, CA)

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Air Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the Department of Environmental Management and the Air Pollution Control Board, which are tasked with the prevention, abatement, and control of air pollution by all...

369

Development of an automated methodology for calibration of simplified air-side HVAC system models and estimation of potential savings from retrofit/commissioning measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation provides one methodology to determine potential energy savings of buildings with limited information. This methodology is based upon the simplified energy analysis procedure of HVAC systems and the control of the comfort conditions. Numerically, the algorithm is a tailored exhaustive search over all the independent variables that are commonly controlled for a specific type of HVAC system. The potential energy savings methodology has been applied in several buildings that have been retrofitted and/or commissioned previously. Results from the determined savings for the Zachry building at Texas A&M after being commissioned show a close agreement to the calculated potential energy savings (about 85%). Differences are mainly attributed to the use of simplified models. Due to the restriction of limited information about the building characteristics and operational control, the potential energy savings method requires the determination of parameters that characterize its thermal performance. Thus, a calibrated building is needed. A general procedure has been developed to carry out automated calibration of building energy use simulations. The methodology has been tested successfully on building simulations based on the simplified energy analysis procedure. The automated calibration is the minimization of the RMSE of the energy use over daily conditions. The minimization procedure is fulfilled with a non-canonical optimization algorithm, the Simulated Annealing, which mimics the Statistical Thermodynamic performance of the annealing process. That is to say, starting at a specified temperature the algorithm searches variable-space states that are steadier, while heuristically, by the Boltzmann distribution, the local minima is avoided. The process is repeated at a new lower temperature that is determined by a specific schedule until the global minimum is found. This methodology was applied to the most common air-handler units producing excellent results for ideal cases or for samples modified with a 1% white noise.

Baltazar Cervantes, Juan Carlos

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Partial CO2 Column-Averaged Dry-Air Mixing Ratio from Measurements by Coherent 2-?m Differential Absorption and Wind Lidar with Laser Frequency Offset Locking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coherent 2-?m differential absorption and wind lidar (Co2DiaWiL) with a 2-?m single-frequency Q-switched laser with laser frequency offset locking was used for long-range CO2 measurement. The frequency stabilization of the single-frequency ? on ...

Shoken Ishii; Kohei Mizutani; Philippe Baron; Hironori Iwai; Ryoko Oda; Toshikazu Itabe; Hirotake Fukuoka; Takayoshi Ishikawa; Mizuki Koyama; Tomoaki Tanaka; Isamu Morino; Osamu Uchino; Atsushi Sato; Kazuhiro Asai

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

373

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 110{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 110{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage and energy efficiency viewpoint. Our numerical approach and energy analysis will next be applied in designing and evaluating the performance of a planned full-scale pilot test of the proposed underground CAES concept.

Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

On Deriving Vertical Air Motions from Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for deriving vertical air motions from cloud radar Doppler spectrum measurements is introduced. The method is applicable to cloud volumes containing small particles, in this case liquid droplets, which are assumed to trace vertical air ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Pavlos Kollias; Michael Poellot; Edwin Eloranta

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

378

Hot Air Stratification of Ceiling Air Supply in a Large Space Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of different states of air supply and airflow patterns on temperature gradient distribution are calculated and analyzed with the help of FFSV3.0 software, using the LB models and LES and RANS methods. An experimental study with upper supply and upper return air flow was performed in normal airflow room. The results were compared with numerical simulation results and were found to agree well. Information on delaminating laws, and measurements of the relationship of delaminating heights and air supply temperature and velocity is also presented. According to the simulation results, a formula that avoids hot air delaminating in ceiling air supply is derived, which can guide engineering design.

Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Liu, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Air Heating Solar air heating systems use air as the working fluid for absorbing and transferring solar energy. Solar air collectors (devices to heat air...

380

Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model documentation is designed to assist State and local governments in pursuing wind energy purchases as a control measure under regional air quality plans. It is intended to support efforts to draft State Implementation Plans (SIPs), including wind energy purchases, to ensure compliance with the standard for ground-level ozone established under the Clean Air Act.

Not Available

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.  

SciTech Connect

We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Effectiveness of the ASOS, MMTS, Gill, and CRS Air Temperature Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Periodic upgrades of air temperature measurement systems in surface weather station networks cause data discontinuities. From a climatological viewpoint, it is necessary to evaluate the air temperature data discontinuities when air temperature ...

K. G. Hubbard; X. Lin; E. A. Walter-Shea

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Accurate Radiometric Measurement of the Atmospheric Longwave Flux at theSea Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The errors in pyrgeometer measurements of the atmospheric longwave flux at the sea surface due to differential heating of the sensor dome relative to the body and to shortwave leakage through the dome are evaluated. Contrary to the findings of ...

Robin W. Pascal; Simon A. Josey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DETERMINATION OF MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE LEAKAGE FROM THE HRT PROCESS STEAM SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Calculations were made to determine the radiation hazard to HRT personnel as a result of leakage to the atmosphere from the process steam system in the event of a heat exchanger tube rupture. These calculations show that with the present four-minute delay before dumping approximately 1020 lb of fuel solution may be transferred to the steam system. The radiation hazard from fission products in the atomosphere will be negligble if the steam killer blower is operating. If this blower is not operatin. a natural convection loop will be set up in the steam killer which will have a condensing capacity of 4 lb/min of steam at atmospheric pressure. In this latter case. the inhalation hazard will be negligible when the leak rate through the steam stop valves is less than 4lb/ min. (auth)

Gift, E.H.

1959-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

386

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

387

China Ga Air Compressor, China Ga Air Compressor Products ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China Ga Air Compressor, China Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Manufacturers Directory - Source a Large Selection of Ga Air Compressor Products at ...

388

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

389

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers, Screw Type Ac Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor, Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers & Suppliers Directory - Find here Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Traders, ...

390

Air Conditioning and lungs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Conditioning and lungs Name: freeman Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: What affect does air conditioning have upon the lungs of the...

391

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be quickly detected using pressure monitoring outside the concrete lining.

Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

1486 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 8, AUGUST 2006 Modeling and Analysis of Loading Effect on Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, AUGUST 2006 Modeling and Analysis of Loading Effect on Leakage of Nanoscaled Bulk-CMOS Logic Circuits geometry and the doping profile) and at the circuit level (through the node voltages). Due to the circuit. In this paper, the effect of loading on a leakage of a circuit is analyzed for the first time. The authors have

Bhunia, Swarup

393

Air Pollution- Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010,...

394

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared to k- factors in CIBSE and ASHRAE data as well asto those given in the CIBSE guide, and these were lower thanwith data published in the CIBSE Guide and ASHRAE Handbook.

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Thin Air Breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Air Breathing Thin Air Breathing Name: Amy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why is it hard to breathe in thin air? What health dangers do mountain climbers face at high altitudes? Replies: Among the obvious dangers of losing ones footing, the oxygen available in the air is considerable less at higher altitudes. If I recall correctly, 21% of the atmosphere at standard temperature and pressure at sea level is composed of oxygen. This is less at higher altitudes. One can lose consciousness and even die in an oxygen deficient environment with changes from oxygen content to lower than 19.5%. This can unfortunate effect can occur within minutes. Dr. Myron The air is not really thin at high altitudes. The problem is that air pressure is lower. As altitude increases, air pressure decreases. In order for your lungs to fill with air, the air pressure in your lungs has to be less than the pressure of the air outside your lungs. Air moves from areas of higher pressure to lower pressure. As your diaphragm (the muscle that separates your chest cavity from your abdominal cavity) moves downward, the size of your chest cavity increases. This decreases the pressure in your chest and air flows in. When the diaphragm is up, it puts pressure on the chest cavity and the pressure in the lungs is greater than outside the lungs. Air flows out. This is an example of Boyle's Law. The movement of the diaphragm is controlled by the brainstem. Anyway-the reason that it is harder for some people to breathe at higher altitudes is that the air pressure differences aren't as great between the inside of the lungs and outside.

396

Optical resonant nanoprobes for the measurements of biomolecular interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.5. Measured spectral peaks for air, oil and water and2.5. Measured spectral peaks for air, oil and water andpeaks for three samples: air, water, and silicon oil. An

Zlatanovic, Sanja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Modeling Ambient Air Quality In The Detroit-Windsor Airshed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial variability of airborne contaminants in an international airshed was investigated using geostatistics and air dispersion modeling. Analyses were conducted on contaminant species measured (more)

Molaroni, Shannon Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geomechanical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Leakage and Cap Rock Remediation  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} sequestration into porous and permeable brine filled aquifers is seen as one of the most likely near-term solutions for reducing greenhouse gases. Safely storing injected CO{sub 2}, which is less dense than water, requires trapping the CO{sub 2} under an impermeable rock which would act as a seal. One of the concerns with CO{sub 2} sequestration is the generation of new fractures or reactivation of existing fractures and faults caused by CO{sub 2} injection into the sealing formation. Mitigation strategies must be developed to remediate potentially leaking faults or fractures. This project evaluated potential storage scenarios in the state of Missouri and developed coupled reservoir and geomechanic simulations to identify storage potential and leakage risks. Further, several injectable materials used to seal discontinuities were evaluated under subsurface conditions. The four sealant materials investigated were paraffin wax, silica based gel, polymer based gel, and micro-cement, which all significantly reduced the fracture permeability. However, the micro-cement was the most effective sealing agent and the only sealant able to withstand the large differential pressure caused by CO{sub 2} or brine injection and create a strong seal to prevent further fracturing.

Nygaard, Runar; Bai, Baojun; Eckert, Andreas

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Indoor Air Quality Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CONTAM has been used at NIST to study the indoor air quality impacts of HVAC systems in single-family residential buildings, ventilation in large ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Air Resources Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (the Board or ARB) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider amendments to the Verifkztion

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Air Resources Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (the Board or ARB) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider amendments to the Verification

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

404

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages SubjectContent Area: ScienceChemistry, Environment - Air Pollution Target Audience: High school chemistry...

405

Forced air fireplace furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of heating system for buildings including a fireplace with an open front hearth for burning firewood, a chimney extending from the upper portion of the hearth, a metal firebox being open in the front and closed on the sides and back, a plenum chamber within and surrounding the sides and back of the metal firebox and the chimney lower portion, a horizontal heat distribution chamber positioned in the building attic and communicating at one end with the plenum chamber is described. An air distribution duct connects to the other end of the air distributing chamber, the duct extending to discharge heated air to a place in the building remote from the fireplace. A fan is placed in the horizontal air distributing chamber, and a return air duct extends from selected place in the building and communicates with the plenum chamber lower portion so that the fan draws air through the return air duct, through the plenum chamber around the firebox where the air is heated, through the horizontal distribution chamber, and out through the distribution duct for circulation of the heated air within the building.

Bruce, R.W.; Gorman, R.E.

1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Movements in air conditioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Movements in Air Conditioning is a collection of poems that explores the obstacles inherent in creating a new sense of home in a country that (more)

Hitt, Robert D. (Robert David)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Adsorption air conditioner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar powered air conditioner using the adsorption process is constructed with its components in a nested cylindrical array for compactness and ease of operation.

Rousseau, Jean L. I. (Redondo Beach, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Room Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Superefficient Room Air Conditioners year month keywords appliance energy efficiency energy efficiency incentives Market Transformation standards url https isswprod lbl gov...

409

Air Pollution Controls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions regulations for hazardous and non-hazardous...

410

An Airborne Laser Air Motion Sensing System. Part I: Concept and Preliminary Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of air motion relative to an aircraft by a conically scanned optical Doppler technique has advantages over measurements with conventional gust probes for many applications. Advantages of the laser air motion sensing technique ...

R. J. Keeler; R. J. Serafin; R. L. Schwiesow; D. H. Lenschow; J. M. Vaughan; A. A. Woodfield

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Effect of Reduced Evaporator Air Flow on the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under reduced evaporator air flow. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 three-ton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice expansion device. Results are presented here for a series of tests in which the evaporator air flow was reduced from 25 to 90% below what is normally recommended for this air conditioner. At present, very little information is available which quantifies the performance of a residential cooling system operating under degraded conditions such as reduced evaporator air flow. Degraded performance measurements can provide information which could help electric utilities evaluate the potential impact of system-wide maintenance programs.

Palani, M.; O'Neal, D.; Haberl, J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Analysis of a rate-adaptive reconciliation protocol and the effect of the leakage on the secret key rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum key distribution performs the trick of growing a secret key in two distant places connected by a quantum channel. The main reason is that the legitimate users can bound the information gathered by the eavesdropper. In practical systems, whether because of finite resources or external conditions, the quantum channel is subject to fluctuations. A rate adaptive information reconciliation protocol, that adapts to the changes in the communication channel, is then required to minimize the leakage of information in the classical postprocessing. We consider here the leakage of a rate-adaptive information reconciliation protocol. The length of the exchanged messages is larger than that of an optimal protocol; however, we prove that the min-entropy reduction is limited. The simulation results, both on the asymptotic and in the finite-length regime, show that this protocol allows to increase the amount of distillable secret key.

David Elkouss; Jesus Martinez-Mateo; Vicente Martin

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotordynamic coefficients of a gas labyrinth seal are assumed to be frequency independent. However, this assumption loses its validity as rotor surface velocity approaches Mach 1. The solution procedure of 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer which assumes frequency independent force coefficients is modified to allow for calculating frequency dependent force coefficients. A comparative study of the impact of using frequency-dependent model and the original frequency-independent model on stability analysis is made. The results indicate that frequency dependency of force coefficients should be accounted for in stability analysis as rotor surface velocity approaches a significant fraction of Mach number. The bulk flow rotordynamic analysis model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to investigate the impact of leakage-flow models on predictions. A number of leakage models are incorporated in the one-control volume model, and a comparative study is made. Kinetic energy carryover factor of a leakage equation is one of the dominant factors in seal cross-force generation. A leakage equation based on a model proposed by Gamal which uses Hodkinson?s kinetic energy carryover factor is found to improve predictions of direct damping and cross-coupled stiffness. A test case is implemented to study the impact of variation of seal axial radial clearance on stability characteristics. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer and subsequent bulk flow models are based on the assumption of isothermal flow across the labyrinth seal. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to include energy equation, and the flow process is assumed to be adiabatic. However, predicted cross-coupled stiffness and direct damping coefficients using the new model do not compare well with the experimental results by Picardo as compared to the isothermal model. The impact of using real gas properties on static and rotordynamic characteristics of the seal is studied.

Thorat, Manish R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Recirculating electric air filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

Bergman, Werner (Pleasanton, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Portable oven air circulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

Jorgensen, Jorgen A. (Bloomington, MN); Nygren, Donald W. (Minneapolis, MN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Compressed Air Audits using AIRMaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air compressors are a significant industrial energy user and therefore a prime target for industrial energy audits. The project goal was to develop a software tool, AIRMaster, and supporting methodology for performing compressed air system audits. Seven field audits were conducted to refine the software and methodology as well as assess the savings potential of six common Operation and Maintenance measures. Audit results yielded significant savings with short payback periods. Total estimated savings for the project were 4,056,000 kWh or 49.2% of annual compressor energy for a cost savings of $152,000. Total implementation costs were $94,700 for a project payback period of 0.6 years. Capital benefits of delaying or avoiding the cost of a new compressor might double the energy benefits if a new compressor is being considered. The methodology proved to be a simple and effective audit tool.

Wheeler, G. M.; McGill, R. D.; Bessey, E. G.; Vischer, K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.  

SciTech Connect

The Certification Framework (CF) is a simple risk assessment approach for evaluating CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. In the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project assessed here, five wells at Krechba produce natural gas from the Carboniferous C10.2 reservoir with 1.7-2% CO{sub 2} that is delivered to the Krechba gas processing plant, which also receives high-CO{sub 2} natural gas ({approx}10% by mole fraction) from additional deeper gas reservoirs and fields to the south. The gas processing plant strips CO{sub 2} from the natural gas that is then injected through three long horizontal wells into the water leg of the Carboniferous gas reservoir at a depth of approximately 1,800 m. This injection process has been going on successfully since 2004. The stored CO{sub 2} has been monitored over the last five years by a Joint Industry Project (JIP) - a collaboration of BP, Sonatrach, and Statoil with co-funding from US DOE and EU DG Research. Over the years the JIP has carried out extensive analyses of the Krechba system including two risk assessment efforts, one before injection started, and one carried out by URS Corporation in September 2008. The long history of injection at Krechba, and the accompanying characterization, modeling, and performance data provide a unique opportunity to test and evaluate risk assessment approaches. We apply the CF to the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project at two different stages in the state of knowledge of the project: (1) at the pre-injection stage, using data available just prior to injection around mid-2004; and (2) after four years of injection (September 2008) to be comparable to the other risk assessments. The main risk drivers for the project are CO{sub 2} leakage into potable groundwater and into the natural gas cap. Both well leakage and fault/fracture leakage are likely under some conditions, but overall the risk is low due to ongoing mitigation and monitoring activities. Results of the application of the CF during these different state-of-knowledge periods show that the assessment of likelihood of various leakage scenarios increased as more information became available, while assessment of impact stayed the same. Ongoing mitigation, modeling, and monitoring of the injection process is recommended.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Jordan, P.D.; Nicot, J.-P.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Bryant, S.L.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effect of nitrogen incorporation on improvement of leakage properties in high-k HfO{sub 2} capacitors treated by N{sub 2}-plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nitrogen incorporation into the HfO{sub 2} films with an EOT (equivalent oxide thickness) of 9 A was performed by N{sub 2}-plasma to improve the electrical properties. The dielectric properties and a leakage current characteristics of the capacitors were investigated as a function of plasma power and plasma treatment temperature. The dielectric constant of the capacitors is not influenced by nitrogen incorporation. The N{sub 2}-plasma treatment at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits the most effective influence on improvement of the leakage current characteristics. Leakage current density of the capacitors treated at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits a half order of magnitude lower than that without plasma treatment. Nitrogen incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} films possesses the intrinsic effect that drastically reduce the electron leakage current through HfO{sub 2} dielectrics by deactivating the V{sub O} (oxygen vacancy) related gap states.

Seong, Nak-Jin; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Yeom, Seung-Jin; Woo, Hyun-Kyung; Kil, Deok-Sin; Roh, Jae-Sung; Sohn, Hyun-Chul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami-ri Bubal-eub Icheon-si Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The design evaluation of inductive power-transformer for personal rapid transit by measuring impedance  

SciTech Connect

The contact-less inductive power transformer (IPT) uses the principle of electromagnetic induction. The concept of the IPT for vehicles such as the personal rapid transit (PRT) system is proposed and some suggestions for power collector design of IPT to improve power transfer performance are presented in this paper. The aim of this paper is to recommend the concept of IPT for vehicles such as the PRT system and also to present some propositions for the power collector design of the IPT, which is to improve the power transfer performance. Generally, there are diverse methods to evaluate transfer performance of the traditional transformers. Although the principle of IPT is similar to that of the general transformer, it is impossible to apply the methods directly because of large air gap. The system must be compensated by resonant circuit due to the large air gap. Consequently, it is difficult to apply numerical formulas to the magnetic design of IPT systems. This paper investigates the magnetic design of a PRT system using three-dimensional magnetic modeling and measurements of the pick-up coupling coefficient and its impedances. In addition, how the use of Litz wire and leakage inductance is related will be observed through experiment and simulation.

Han, Kyung-Hee [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electricity and Signaling, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang, Kyonggi 437-050 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Song [Department of Electricity and Signaling, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang, Kyonggi 437-050 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Soo-Hyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Historical Atmospheric Transmission Changes and Changes in Midwestern Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of haze, smoke, dust, and visibility in the midwest available from 1901 to 1980 reveal sizable temporal fluctuations. These appear useful as surrogates of air pollutants not measured before 1950. Their historical record reflects both ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Light Extinction by Aerosols during Summer Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to utilize satellite measurements of optical thickness over land for estimating aerosol properties during air pollution episodes the optical thickness was measured from the surface and investigated. Aerosol optical thicknesses have been ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Imagine Homes of San Antonio, Texas, worked Imagine Homes of San Antonio, Texas, worked with Building America team partner IBACOS to improve the continuity of the air barrier along the thermal enclosure by using spray foam insulation in the walls and attic. Building America research teams effectively demonstrated the importance of thermal bypass air barriers, which led to their inclusion in ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 specifications in 2006 and then to inclusion in the 2009 IECC. This is a great example of effective research driving a complete market transformation process for a critical high-performance home innovation. Air sealing of the home's thermal enclosure has been required by the energy code for many years. However, in years past, the provisions were somewhat vague and only required that critical areas of potential air leakage (e.g., joints,

425

Coordination of energy and air quality management  

SciTech Connect

The project had two goals: first, to demonstrate industrial firms can improve plant energy efficiency as air pollution emissions are reduced; second, to demonstrate that both Seattle City Light and PSAPCA could more effectively accomplish their individual objectives through mutual cooperation, even though the two agencies have very different missions. The cooperative efforts promised benefits for all the parties involved. Seattle City Light hoped that PSAPCA`s knowledge of the likely developments in air pollution controls would help the utility better target energy conservation opportunities among its industrial customers. PSAPCA hoped that the financial assistance offer by Seattle City Light through its conservation programs would make industry less resistant to PSAPCA enforcement of new air pollution control regulations. Finally, individual industrial firms could mitigate some of the cost of meeting the new air pollution control standards. The results of the project were mixed. CEAM did demonstrate that industrial plants can improve energy efficiency as they reduce air pollution emissions, but the relationship between air pollution reduction and energy consumption is complicated; and the project was less successful in meeting its second goal. The project design did not include a measure by which results could be compared against what the two agencies would have accomplished had they not collaborated. Moreover, the project could have benefited substantially from a more complete implementation plan and the production of data quantifying the energy conservation potential resulting from the development of more stringent air pollution control regulations for each of Seattle`s major industries.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

427

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEEP Air Management Department Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division; Bureau of Air Management Address 79 Elm Street Place...

428

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Air Shower Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro [Centro de Tecnologias de Informacion y Comunicaciones, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima (Peru); Araya, Ignacio J. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Knapp, Johannes [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Air heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

Primeau, John J. (19800 Seminole Rd., Euclid, OH 44117)

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Feature - Lithium-air Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develop Lithium-Air Battery Li-air Li-air batteries hold the promise of increasing the energy density of Li-ion batteries by as much as five to 10 times. But that potential will...

432

Study of Air Infiltration Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of heat recovery on the energy impact of air infiltration, and the systematic error due to the steady-state method were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Two methodologies suitable for measurement of the overall heat loss factors in full-size houses have been developed and validated. Dynamic measurements of Infiltration Heat Exchange effectiveness (IHEE), which expresses the air infiltration heat recovery as a fraction of the classical value of air infiltration energy consumption, showed that results from earlier steady-state measurements can be approximately applied to dynamic conditions when solar radiation is not present. However, this study has shown for the first time that IHEE is strongly dependent on air flow direction due to the impacts of air flow on the recovery or rejection of solar radiation energy. IHEE values greater than one and less than zero have been measured. These values are impossible in the absence of solar radiation. The results highlight the necessity of considering the air infiltration heat recovery and improving the current design methods for calculating the heating and cooling loads in buildings. The experimental and theoretical investigation show that steady-state methodology can: *be used without systematic error in the case of constant air flow *result in IHEE prediction error in a range of 1% to 8% when one-way dynamic air f1ow is present *cause significantly larger error when balanced dynamic air flow is present. The SSP (Single input and Single output data Pair) method can identify UAo of an enclosure using short term measurement data, typically a few hours long. It has overcome most of the typical problems in UA0 identification, such as errors due to thermal storage, ground heat transfer, inter-correlated multi-inputs, and solar radiation. The STAM (Short Term Average Method) has also been developed which makes it possible for the first time to determine both the UA and the solar aperture precisely under outdoor conditions from a two-day or a three-day test. These methods were developed and used to measure heat loss factors needed to determine IHEE values in this study.

Liu, Mingsheng

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Air Carrier Flight Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air carriers operate under a system of prioritized goals including safety, customer service (on-time departures and arrivals) and operating economics. The flight operations department is responsible for the safe and ...

Midkif, Alan H.

434

AIR RESOURCES BOARD Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared with the assistance and support from other agencies, divisions and offices of the Air Resources Board, and private firms. Staff would especially like to thank the following individuals for their assistance in developing this proposed pathway:

Green Wastes; Green Wastes; Richard Corey; Deputy Executive Officer; Cynthia Marvin Chief; Michael Waugh Chief; Kamal Ahuja; Brian Helmowski; Wes Ingram; Ray Asregadoo (arb; Juliet Bohn (hwma; Richard Boyd (arb; Alicia Chakrabarthy (ebmud; Steven Cliff (arb; Kevin Dickison (ebmud; Jacques Franco (calrecycle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Breathing zone air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

Tobin, John (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Legacy Management Weldon Spring Site Air and Water Monitoring 32008 This fact sheet provides information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S....

437

Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have an air economizer cycle for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. During the economizer cycle, the outside air and return air dampers are modulated to seek mixing air temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55F for space humidity control. Actually the dehumidification is not necessary when outside air dew point is less than 55F. Meanwhile the space may have less cooling load due to envelope heat loss and/or occupant schedule. These provide an opportunity to use higher supply air temperature to reduce or eliminate mechanical cooling and terminal box reheat. On the other hand the higher supply air temperature will require higher air flow as well as higher fan power. Therefore the supply air temperature has to be optimized to minimize the combined energy for fan, cooling and heating energy. In this paper a simple energy consumption model is established for AHU systems during the economizer and then a optimal supply air temperature control is developed to minimize the total cost of the mechanical cooling and the fan motor power. This paper presents AHU system energy modeling, supply air temperature optimization, and simulated energy savings.

Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Air Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air Quality Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAirQuality&oldid612070" Category: NEPA Resources...

439

The Measured Energy Impact of Infiltration in an Outdoor Test Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy consumption calculation of house envelopes assumes that conduction heat loss is independent on air infiltration heat loss, and that energy consumption is the sum of these losses. Anderlind [1985], Liu [1987], and Claridge et at. [1989] showed this method can overestimate energy consumption substantially under steady-state conditions. Bailly [1987] and Anderson [1987] reported much smaller house energy consumption when the air flow was organized by mechanical systems. However, none of these studies quantified energy loss reduction under a variety of outdoor weather conditions. The energy performance was investigated in an outdoor test cell with different leakage configurations and air flow rates under both infiltration and exfiltration. It was found that the energy consumption was not only dependent on air flow rate, temperature differences, and solar radiation, but also on the air flow direction and the air leakage configuration. Infiltration could lead to a much lower heating energy consumption than that of exfiltration, and exfiltration could lead to a much lower cooling energy consumption than that of infiltration. The air infiltration energy consumption of a leaky house could be 9 times as high as that of a tight house even when the air flow rate was the same for both houses.

Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchangers Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) radial air bearing heat exchangers. Rotary air bearing heat exchanger technology simultaneously solves four long standing problems of conventional "fan-plus-finned-heat-sink" heat exchangers. Project Description This project seeks to design, fabricate, and test successive generations of prototype radial air bearing heat exchanger devices based on lessons learned and further insights into device optimization, computational fluid dynamic studies for parametric optimization and determination of scaling laws, and laboratory measurement of flow field and heat transfer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air leakage measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

442

Simulation of CO2 Sequestration at Rock Spring Uplift, Wyoming: Heterogeneity and Uncertainties in Storage Capacity, Injectivity and Leakage  

SciTech Connect

Many geological, geochemical, geomechanical and hydrogeological factors control CO{sub 2} storage in subsurface. Among them heterogeneity in saline aquifer can seriously influence design of injection wells, CO{sub 2} injection rate, CO{sub 2} plume migration, storage capacity, and potential leakage and risk assessment. This study applies indicator geostatistics, transition probability and Markov chain model at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming generating facies-based heterogeneous fields for porosity and permeability in target saline aquifer (Pennsylvanian Weber sandstone) and surrounding rocks (Phosphoria, Madison and cap-rock Chugwater). A multiphase flow simulator FEHM is then used to model injection of CO{sub 2} into the target saline aquifer involving field-scale heterogeneity. The results reveal that (1) CO{sub 2} injection rates in different injection wells significantly change with local permeability distributions; (2) brine production rates in different pumping wells are also significantly impacted by the spatial heterogeneity in permeability; (3) liquid pressure evolution during and after CO{sub 2} injection in saline aquifer varies greatly for different realizations of random permeability fields, and this has potential important effects on hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock, reactivation of pre-existing faults and the integrity of the cap-rock; (4) CO{sub 2} storage capacity estimate for Rock Springs Uplift is 6614 {+-} 256 Mt at 95% confidence interval, which is about 36% of previous estimate based on homogeneous and isotropic storage formation; (5) density profiles show that the density of injected CO{sub 2} below 3 km is close to that of the ambient brine with given geothermal gradient and brine concentration, which indicates CO{sub 2} plume can sink to the deep before reaching thermal equilibrium with brine. Finally, we present uncertainty analysis of CO{sub 2} leakage into overlying formations due to heterogeneity in both the target saline aquifer and surrounding formations. This uncertainty in leakage will be used to feed into risk assessment modeling.

Deng, Hailin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiao, Zunsheng [Wyoming State Geological Survey; Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Surdam, Ronald C. [Wyoming State Geological Survey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools We recently undertook a survey and critical review of the published literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, particularly those in the state of California. The survey's objectives included identifying the most commonly reported building-related health symptoms involving schools, and assembling and evaluating existing measurement data on key indoor air pollutants most likely to be related to these symptoms. The review also summarizes existing measurements of ventilation rates in schools and information on the causes of IAQ and health problems in schools. Most of the literature we reviewed (more than 450 articles and reports) dealt with complaint or problem schools. Among the papers were

444

ARM - Campaign Instrument - rad-air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsrad-air govInstrumentsrad-air Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Airborne Radiometers (RAD-AIR) Instrument Categories Radiometric, Airborne Observations Campaigns Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) [ Download Data ] North Slope Alaska, 2008.04.01 - 2008.04.30 Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant.