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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services Singleton Park Swansea to Air Department: Estates and Facilities Site: All Author: Ambreen Jahangir Approved by: Mark Durdin PURPOSE: To minimise emissions and discharges to air from boilers, fume cupboards, air conditioning

Harman, Neal.A.

2

Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purpose of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act make the state Title V permitting program (Permit Regulations for the Construction and/or...

3

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi) Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

4

Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

These shall not be subject to regulation unless, as of July 1, 2011 the Green House Gas emissions are at a stationary source emitting or potentially emitting 100,000 tons per...

5

Air Permit Compliance for Hanford Waste Retrieval Operations Involving Multi-Unit Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1970, approximately 38,000 suspect-transuranic and transuranic waste containers have been placed in retrievable storage on the Hanford Site in the 200 Areas burial grounds. Hanford's Waste Retrieval Project is retrieving these buried containers and processing them for safe storage and disposition. Container retrieval activities require an air emissions permit to account for potential emissions of radionuclides. The air permit covers the excavation activities as well as activities associated with assaying containers and installing filters in the retrieved transuranic containers lacking proper venting devices. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is required to track radioactive emissions resulting from the retrieval activities. Air, soil, and debris media contribute to the emissions and enabling assumptions allow for calculation of emissions. Each of these activities is limited to an allowed annual emission (per calendar year) and contributes to the overall total emissions allowed for waste retrieval operations. Tracking these emissions is required to ensure a permit exceedance does not occur. A tracking tool was developed to calculate potential emissions in real time sense. Logic evaluations are established within the tracking system to compare real time data against license limits to ensure values are not exceeded for either an individual activity or the total limit. Data input are based on field survey and workplace air monitoring activities. This tracking tool is used monthly and quarterly to verify compliance to the license limits. Use of this tool has allowed Fluor Hanford, Inc. to successfully retrieve a significant number of containers in a safe manner without any exceedance of emission limits. (authors)

Faulk, D.E.; Simmons, F.M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Characterization of air emissions and residual ash from open burning of electronic wastes during simulated rudimentary recycling operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air emissions and residual ash samples were collected and analyzed during experiments of open, uncontrolled combustion of electronic waste (e-waste), simulating practices associated with rudimentary e-waste recyc...

Brian K. Gullett; William P. Linak…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Emissions Annual Reports for DOE Sites,” memo tooffices providing guidance for report preparation (March 22,470E-2012 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by

Wahl, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:Environmental Protection Agency, National Emission Standardsfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radionuclide Air Emission Report May 21, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment, Safety, and Health Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2006 (in compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Site Name: Ernest Orlando

15

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to severalAir Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

Wechsler, Risa H.

18

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory.

Stirrup, T.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy ... The Environmental Protection Agency has expanded its old "bubble policy" into a wider-ranging, supposedly more effective, emissions trading program designed to speed up attainment of national air quality standards and save money. ... It also authorizes states to adopt generic emissions trading rules and extend these to all ... ...

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Operability and Emissions from a Medium-Duty Fleet Operating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Operability and Emissions from a Medium-Duty Fleet Operating with GTL Fuel and Catalyzed DPFs Operability and Emissions from a Medium-Duty Fleet Operating with GTL Fuel and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

22

An experimental study on combustion processes and nox emission characteristics of the air-staged burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion processes and emission characteristics in air-staged burner...5H5N) is used to investigate the fuel NOX emission characteristics. Experiments are carried out for a wide range of operating condition...

Kook-Young Ahn; Han-Seok Kim; Eun-Seong Cho; Jin-Hyuk Ahn…

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

24

Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of numerous Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) building investigations conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute have shown that building Operation and Maintenance (O&M) is a very common source of IAQ problems. This paper presents...

Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

Enneking, J. C.

26

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

29

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation by Erica Bickford A dissertation rights reserved. #12;Abstract Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford.S. transportation is the largest source of national nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and the third largest source

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution emission...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutant emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollutant emission...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air toxics emission...

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - air traffic emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air traffic emission...

34

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

JOHNSON, R.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reduction of Emission Variance by Intelligent Air Path Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This poster describes an air path control concept, which minimizes NOx and PM emission variance while having the ability to run reliably with many different sensor configurations.

37

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of Public Health and Environment of the construction of a new source of pollution. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Air Pollutant Emission Notice &...

38

Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On-Road Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Road Emissions Estimates of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrocarbons for School and Transit Buses Report No. FHWY/NC/97Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 2 1.2 Emission Regulations 2 1.3 Emissions Contributions of "Non

Frey, H. Christopher

39

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides (2014)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, “Protection of the Environment,” Part 61, “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,” Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.” The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considerations, implementation plans, and an initial evaluation of solar energy systems' potential air quality in state implementation plans for air quality improvement. · Analyze the potential effects of largescaleAir Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average “all modes” failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

43

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

44

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contaminants (Mississippi) Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contaminants (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Air Emission Regulation for the Prevention, Abatement and Control of

45

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2010, LBNL Report number LBNL-470E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2010 2010 Average Windat DOE Facilities, Final Report, Eastern Research Group,470E-2010 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic emissions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... report permit renewal July 31 National Emissions Standards for...

47

Market-based approach for improving ship air emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study considered how appropriate different market-based approaches are for the reduction of ship air emissions, particularly CO2. Furthermore, the study also considered which types of market-based tools may be available ...

Donatelli, Matthew (Matthew Alfred)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

EIA - AEO2010 - Updated State air emissions regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Updated State air emissions regulations Updated State air emissions regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Updated State air emissions regulations Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast States that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their CO2 emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 mega-watts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted [30]. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009. Each participating State was provided a CO2 budget consisting of a history-based baseline with a cushion for emissions growth, so that meeting the cap is expected to be relatively easy initially and become more stringent in subsequent years. The requirements are expected to cover 95 percent of CO2 emissions from the region's electric power sector. Overall, the RGGI States as a whole must maintain covered emissions at a level of 188 million tons CO2 for the next 4 years, after which a mandatory 2.5-percent annual decrease in CO2 emissions through 2018 is expected to reduce the total for covered CO2 emissions in the RGGI States to 10 percent below the initial calculated bud-get. Although each State was given its own emissions budget, allowances are auctioned at a uniform price across the entire region.

49

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cleaning Products and Air Fresheners: Emissions and Resulting Concentrations of Glycol Ethers and Terpenoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with realistic air-exchange and product usage rates, theand total rate of air freshener product volatilization (26, 589-597. Cleaning Product and Air Freshener Emissions (

Singer, Brett C.; Destaillat, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff, William W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radiofrequency conical emission from femtosecond filaments in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the broadband conical emission associated with filaments in air extends down to the radiofrequency region. This rf emission which originates from the longitudinal oscillation of charged ions formed during filamentation is strongly enhanced by the presence of a longitudinal static electric field.

Forestier, B.; Houard, A.; Durand, M.; Andre, Y. B.; Prade, B.; Mysyrowicz, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Dauvignac, J.-Y.; Perret, F.; Pichot, Ch. [Laboratoire d'Electronique, Antennes et Telecommunications, CNRS UMR 6071, Universite Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pellet, M. [Ministere de la Defense, F-00457 Armees (France)

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Achieving Acceptable Air Quality: Some Reflections on Controlling Vehicle Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of CO and HCs. Diesel particulate emissions...v) in-use fuel is not as clean...reduce gasoline engine ex-haust emissions...in (i) basic engine improvements...improved air and fuel distribution...reduced oil consumption; tighter tol-erances on engine design and manufacture...

J. G. Calvert; J. B. Heywood; R. F. Sawyer; J. H. Seinfeld

1993-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery packs allow vehicles to travel longer distance on electric power instead of gasoline may (1) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when powered by electricity instead of gasoline emissions relative to HEVs, depending on electricity source. Plug-in vehicles with large battery packs

Michalek, Jeremy J.

54

Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim (Sequim). This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.” The EDE to the Sequim MEI due to routine operations in 2013 was 5E-05 mrem (5E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2013. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: South Coast Air Quality Management District

56

Method and apparatus for reducing cold-phase emissions by utilizing oxygen-enriched intake air  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen-enriched air intake control system for an internal combustion engine includes air directing apparatus to control the air flow into the intake of the engine. During normal operation of the engine, ambient air flowing from an air filter of the engine flows through the air directing apparatus into the intake of the engine. In order to decrease the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions that tend to be produced by the engine during a short period of time after the engine is started, the air directing apparatus diverts for a short period of time following the start up of the engine at least a portion of the ambient air from the air filter through a secondary path. The secondary path includes a selectively permeable membrane through which the diverted portion of the ambient air flows. The selectively permeable membrane separates nitrogen and oxygen from the diverted air so that oxygen enriched air containing from about 23% to 25% oxygen by volume is supplied to the intake of the engine.

Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Stork, Kevin C. (Chicago, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

Szpunar, C.B.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

INFLUENCE OF DESIGN AND OPERATING CONDITIONS ON UNDERFLOOR AIR DISTRIBUTION (UFAD) SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Design Guide. Atlanta:to design and operate underfloor air distribution (UFAD)DESIGN AND OPERATING CONDITIONS ON UNDERFLOOR AIR DISTRIBUTION (

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-13-07-01 STATEWIDE AIR EMISSIONS CALCULATIONS FROM WIND AND OTHER RENEWABLES SUMMARY REPORT A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality For the Period September 2012 – July 2013 Jeff Haberl... report, “Statewide Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables,” as required by the 79th Legislature. This work has been performed through a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC). In this work the ESL is required...

Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Bahman, Yazdani; Claridge, David; Mao, Chunliu; Sandeep, Kota

62

Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

63

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

64

Development of Optimization Tool for Air Conditioning System Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Outside air temperature and the absolute air humidity are predicted by the Auto-regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model [1],[2]. The solar radiation on a horizontal surface... of the error margin Energy Consumption (set value A) Energy Consumption (set value B) ESL-IC-08-10-55 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 J VAV unit is also operated under...

Sumiyoshi, D.; Akashi, Y.

65

Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Air Operating Program are adopted in accordance with the provisions of Part UU of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act, Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101, and will be referred to in this description as "program", "regulations" and "regulation No. 26". The regulations are intended to meet the requirements of title of

66

QA procedures and emissions from nonstandard sources in AQUIS, a PC-based emission inventory and air permit manager  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS) is a database management system that operates under dBASE IV. It runs on an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) with MS DOS 5.0 or later, 4 megabytes of memory, and 30 megabytes of disk space. AQUIS calculates emissions for both traditional and toxic pollutants and reports emissions in user-defined formats. The system was originally designed for use at 7 facilities of the Air Force Materiel Command, and now more than 50 facilities use it. Within the last two years, the system has been used in support of Title V permit applications at Department of Defense facilities. Growth in the user community, changes and additions to reference emission factor data, and changing regulatory requirements have demanded additions and enhancements to the system. These changes have ranged from adding or updating an emission factor to restructuring databases and adding new capabilities. Quality assurance (QA) procedures have been developed to ensure that emission calculations are correct even when databases are reconfigured and major changes in calculation procedures are implemented. This paper describes these QA and updating procedures. Some user facilities include light industrial operations associated with aircraft maintenance. These facilities have operations such as fiberglass and composite layup and plating operations for which standard emission factors are not available or are inadequate. In addition, generally applied procedures such as material balances may need special treatment to work in an automated environment, for example, in the use of oils and greases and when materials such as polyurethane paints react chemically during application. Some techniques used in these situations are highlighted here. To provide a framework for the main discussions, this paper begins with a description of AQUIS.

Smith, A.E.; Tschanz, J.; Monarch, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Control of air pollution emissions from municipal waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The November 1990 Clear Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) directed EPA to establish municipal waste combustor (MWC) emissions limits for particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, dioxins, dibenzofurans, cadmium, lead, and mercury. Revised MWC air pollution regulations were subsequently proposed by EPA on September 20, 1994, and promulgated on December 19, 1995. The MWC emission limits were based on the application of maximum achievable control technology (MACT). This paper provides a brief overview of MWC technologies, a summary of EPA`s revised air pollution rules for MWCs, a review of current knowledge concerning formation and control of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and a discussion of the behavior and control of mercury in MWC flue gases. 56 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Kolgroe, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.; Licata, A. [Licata Energy and Environmental Consultants, Inc., Yonkers, NY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this research, a process was developed to determine distances from emitting sources to where the estimated concentrations were less than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). These distances are a function of emission rates and meteorological...

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reducing Emissions in Plant Flaring Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lowering emissions and maximizing production. Saving energy and reducing emissions are the internal requirements for every division of this major corporation. To achieve the public goals the company set, they issued a five year plan called Methods on Energy...

Duck, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Weapon Scheduling Method for Cooperative Air-Defense Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By defining the weapon scheduling plan and weapon combat action, the mathematical formulation of weapon scheduling problem for cooperative air-defense operation ... the basis of discussing the primary constraints...

Liang Yu; Changfeng Xing…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Coordinated dynamic planning for air and space operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planners of military air and space operations in a battlefield environment seek to allocate resources against targets in a way that best achieves the objectives of the commander. In future conflicts, the presence of new ...

Wroten, Matthew Christian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Upgraded recovery boiler meets low air emissions standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the fall of 1990, the Boise Cascade mill in International Falls, MN, carried out a millwide modernization project. One critical element of the project was the upgrade of their recovery boiler. As a result of the recovery boiler upgrade, the mill was required to obtain a prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) air permit. A best available control technology (BACT) assessment was performed as a requirement of the PSD regulations. Ultimately, a number of more stringent air pollution emission limits were established for the boiler, and a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) was purchased and installed to report daily results to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This paper describes efforts to achieve increased firing capacity in the mill's recovery boiler while meeting more severe air emissions regulations. The authors will show that each of the emissions limits, including CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], TRS, and opacity, are met by the upgraded boiler, while achieving an increase in firing capacity over pre-upgrade levels of up to 40%.

La Fond, J.F.; Jansen, J.H. (Jansen Combustion and Boiler Technologies, Inc., Woodinville, WA (United States)); Eide, P. (Boise Cascade Corp., International Falls, MN (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Battery-operated air sampler for remote areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An air sampling system developed to evaluate air quality in biosphere reserves or in other remote areas is described. The equipment consists of a Dupont P-4000A pump and a specially designed battery pack containing Gates batteries. This air sampling system was tested in southern Utah and at 10 remote sampling sites in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The equipment was backpacked to the remote sampling sites, and was operated continuously at full capacity for a maximum 8-day period. Except for tampering by curious hikers at one site, the equipment operated satisfactorily.

Brown, K.W. (EPA Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas, NV); Wiersma, G.B.; Frank, C.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air Ccilia Solal1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air fresheners CĂ©cilia Solal1: air fresheners, glass cleaners, furniture polishes, toilet products, carpet and floor cleaning Formaldehyde, Volatile organic compounds, Household products, Exposure INTRODUCTION Most indoor air pollutants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

Menut, Laurent

76

Effects of operation parameters on NO emission in an oxy-fired CFB combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) combustion technology, a very promising technology for CO2 capture, combines many advantages of oxy-fuel and CFB technologies. Experiments were carried out in a 50 kWth CFB facility to investigate how operation parameters influence the NO emission in O2/CO2 atmospheres. The simulated O2/CO2 atmospheres were used without recycling the flue gas. Results show that NO emission in 21% O2/79% CO2 atmosphere is lower than that in air atmosphere because of lower temperature and higher char and CO concentrations in the dense bed. Elevating O2 concentration from 21% to 40% in O2/CO2 atmosphere enhances fuel-N conversion to NO. Increasing bed temperature or oxygen/fuel stoichiometric ratio brings higher NO emission in O2/CO2 atmosphere, which is consistent with the results in air-fired CFB combustion. As primary stream fraction increases, NO emission increases more rapidly in O2/CO2 atmosphere than that in air atmosphere. Stream staging is more efficient for controlling NO emission in oxy-CFB combustion than that in air combustion. Oxygen staging provides an efficient way to reduce NO emission in oxy-CFB combustion without influencing the hydrodynamic characteristic in the riser.

Lunbo Duan; Changsui Zhao; Wu Zhou; Chengrui Qu; Xiaoping Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Achieving Acceptable Air Quality: Some Reflections on Controlling Vehicle Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ignore service or check-engine warning lights. The variability...emitting vehicles. Off-cycle operation. The remaining...adequately included in the FTP cycle. Emissions from one high...been neglected entirely. Diesel engines, which are used in the...

J. G. Calvert; J. B. Heywood; R. F. Sawyer; J. H. Seinfeld

1993-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Federal Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized two regulations, the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule CAMR, that would reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. Both CAIR and CAMR are included in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case. The EPA has received 11 petitions for reconsideration of CAIR and has provided an opportunity for public comment on reconsidering certain aspects of CAIR. Public comments were accepted until January 13, 2006. The EPA has also received 14 petitions for reconsideration of CAMR and is willing to reconsider certain aspects of the rule. Public comments were accepted for 45 days after publication of the reconsideration notice in the Federal Register. Several states and organizations have filed lawsuits against CAMR. The ultimate decision of the courts will have a significant impact on the implementation of CAMR.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

Jacobson, D.; High, C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Comment on “Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comment on “Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power” ... Energy Analysis Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 ... This work was funded by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program and Solar Energy Technologies Program) and by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (Permitting, Siting, and Analysis Division) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Contract DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ...

Andrew Mills; Ryan Wiser; Michael Milligan; Mark O’Malley

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

Air Quality: Emissions Source Inspection Form Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality: Emissions Source Inspection Form Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 This inspection form Quality", http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/environment/air_quality/policies.htm 29 Jul 2007 (updated

Wechsler, Risa H.

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emission notice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratory for Summary: emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico... Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emissions notice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratory for Summary: emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico... Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73...

88

IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 -19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan ENERGY EFFICIENT AIR TO AIR HEAT PUMP OPERATING WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

00149 -1- 10th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 - 19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan ENERGY EFFICIENT AIR TO AIR HEAT PUMP OPERATING WITH R-1234yf Sorina Mortada, Ph.D. student, Center for Energy and Processes Abstract: Significant improvements in energy performance of air-to-air heat pumps are the major reason

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rokkan, D.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Air- Vehicle Air- Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range Preprint September 2000 * NREL/CP-540-28960 R. Farrington and J. Rugh To Be Presented at the Earth Technologies Forum Washington, D.C. October 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

91

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D and Motivation 1 A. Background ­ Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter 2 B. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards 4 C. Improving Future Air Quality 6 D. Research Overview 8 Figures 10 References 15 Chapter 2

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

93

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado-1712 As demand for electricity increases, investments into new generation capacity from renewable,CaliforniaandtherestoftheWestCoastoftheUnited States started to experience severe shortages of electricity. Investments

Kammen, Daniel M.

94

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide end-use energy efficiency, or avoid methane emissions...

95

An integrated perspective on assessing agricultural air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated perspective on assessing agricultural air quality Viney P. Aneja* Department. In this paper, we summarise an integrated assessment framework for studying the agricultural air quality issues air quality; air emissions; air pollution; ammonia; animal feeding operations; biogeochemical cycles

Niyogi, Dev

96

Design and operation of a thermionic converter in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed, built and successfully tested in air. Several unique features were incorporated in this converter: an integral cesium reservoir, innovative ceramic-to-metal seals, a heat rejection system coupling the collector to a low temperature heat sink and an innovative cylindrical heater filament. The converter was operated for extended periods of time with the emitter at about 1900 K. the collector at about 700 K, and a power density of over 2 w(e)/sq. cm. Input power transients were run between 50% and 100% thermal power, at up to 1% per second, without instabilities in performance.

Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L.; Smith, J.N. Jr. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Geller, C.B.; Kallnowski, J.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Performance and emissions of a dual fuel operated diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vegetable oil and its esters (biodiesel) are the renewable alternative fuels that can be used as a substitute for diesel in the diesel engines. The vegetable oil fuelled diesel engine results in lower efficiency and higher smoke emission. Hence in this work, an attempt has been made to use inedible and under utilised mahua oil (MO) as a substitute for diesel by fumigating liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) along with the air. A single cylinder diesel engine was modified to work in dual fuel mode by suitable retrofitting. The MO was injected into the cylinder using a fuel pump and LPG was fumigated along with the air. In MO + LPG dual fuel mode, 9% increase in brake thermal efficiency and 35% reduction in smoke emission of the engine were observed as compared to the sole fuel mode with MO. Also, the engine performance characteristics in MO + LPG dual fuel mode are close to sole fuel mode with diesel. From this work, it is concluded that LPG can be fumigated along with the air to increase the performance of MO fuelled agricultural diesel engine.

N. Kapilan; R.P. Reddy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity ...

Judy L. Mumford; Ron W. Williams; Debra B. Walsh; Robert M. Burton; David J. Svendsgaard; Jane C. Chuang; Virginia S. Houk; Joellen Lewtas

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Assessment of free-rotating air swirling device to reduce SI engine emissions and improve fuel economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Claims are furnished in several patents that swirling the intake air in SI engines can improve fuel economy and reduce environmental impact. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a free rotating air swirling device (FRASD) installed in the air intake hose on the overall performance and emission characteristics of an SI engine. FRASDs with three vane angles were tested; 6, 9 and 12 degrees. The baseline engine was tested without FRASD at selected loads. Then, the engine was tested at the same loads with each FRASD and results were compared with the baseline engine. Experiments show that all tested FRASDs exhibit some degree of enhancement in the overall performance and reduction in exhaust emissions. It was found that enhancement greatly depends on the engine operating condition in addition to the FRASD vane angle. Specifically, best enhancement in performance and highest reduction in emissions was observed with the 9-degrees which reduced specific fuel consumption by 12%, hydrocarbon (HC) emissions by 20% and carbon monoxide emissions by 12%. Suggestions are made to modify the FRASD design to magnify its impact on engine performance.

Raed Kafafy; Sharzali Che Mat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

102

Combustion and \\{NOx\\} emissions of biomass-derived syngas under various gasification conditions utilizing oxygen-enriched-air and steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the \\{NOx\\} emissions from combustion of syngas derived from gasification of three different biomass feedstock (i.e., pine, maple–oak mixture, and seed corn) at different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions. Three different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions were tested for each feedstock, thus resulting in nine different sets of syngas. The biomass-derived syngas was burned in an industrial burner that was integrated into the gasification system. The gasifier and burner are rated at 800 kW and 879 kW thermal, respectively. For each set of biomass-derived syngas, \\{NOx\\} emissions were measured at different burner operating conditions including various heat rates and equivalence ratios using emission analyzers with chemiluminescence technology. All the combustion test conditions are in the lean mixture ranges in order to avoid the peak temperature limitation of both the burner and combustion chamber. Results show that \\{NOx\\} emissions using syngas obtained from woody feedstock decrease almost linearly as the combustion mixture becomes leaner and the heat rate decreases. When compared to natural gas, syngas from both woody feedstock generates higher \\{NOx\\} emissions even when the heat rates are comparable, indicating that fuel \\{NOx\\} formation is highly important in biomass-derived syngas combustion. In contrast to syngas from woody feedstock, syngas from seed corn results in peak \\{NOx\\} emissions before \\{NOx\\} decreases with leaner conditions. The trend is observed for all fuel flow rates and all oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions of seed corn-derived syngas. Among the three feedstock, seed corn has the highest nitrogen content which yields the highest ammonia concentration in syngas, which, in turn, results in the highest \\{NOx\\} emissions for all test conditions. Overall, the \\{NOx\\} emissions from seed corn-derived syngas combustion are approximately in the range of 450–900 ppm higher compared to those from wood-derived syngas combustion.

Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

GRR/Section 15-CA-b - Air Permit - Operating Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

15-CA-b - Air Permit - Operating Permit 15-CA-b - Air Permit - Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-CA-b - Air Permit - Operating Permit 15CABAirPermitOperatingPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Air Resources Board Regulations & Policies Clean Air Act (42 USC 1857 et seq.) California Air Pollution Control Laws Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15CABAirPermitOperatingPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer operating a facility that emits air pollutants must obtain an

104

Assessing the regional impacts of Mexico City emissions on air quality and chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of Mexico City (MCMA) emissions is examined by studying its effects on air quality, photochemistry, and on ozone production regimes by combining model products and aircraft observations from the MILAGRO experiment ...

Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo

105

An overview of air emission intensities and environmental performance of grey cement manufacturing in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Air emissions generated in grey cement manufacturing originate primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels required to heat the kiln and the chemical reaction of raw materials in the pyroprocessing phase. Gi...

Darren Brown; Rehan Sadiq; Kasun Hewage

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Campus Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2013 from PNNL Site sources is 2E-05 mrem (2E-07 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 2E-6 mrem (2E-8 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 1E-11 mrem (1E-13 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2013. The total radiological dose for 2013 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 2E-5 mrem (2E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Improving the Accuracy of Vehicle Emissions Profiles for Urban Transportation Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Inventories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the Accuracy of Vehicle Emissions Profiles for Urban Transportation Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Inventories ... Metropolitan greenhouse gas and air emissions inventories can better account for the variability in vehicle movement, fleet composition, and infrastructure that exists within and between regions, to develop more accurate information for environmental goals. ... Older vehicles tend to have higher levels of CAP not only because of less-advanced pollution control technology, but also because of the deterioration of aging control systems. ...

Janet L. Reyna; Mikhail V. Chester; Soyoung Ahn; Andrew M. Fraser

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Comment on 'Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power, is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators ''achieve {approx}80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.'' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam injected gas turbines and a 2--4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt.

Mills, A.; Wiser, R.; Milligan, M.; O'Malley, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

"The operation and development of air-ports generally involves the lease of dedicat-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leases "The operation and development of air- ports generally involves the lease of dedicat- ed property. · The right to approve or deny any lease or sublease of the premises, on the air- port or owned

Minnesota, University of

110

Pilot plant investigation of N{sub 2}O emissions including the effect of long term operation in circulating FBC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot plant test program was conducted at CANMET to study the emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) from circulating fluidized bed combustors using the same coal and similar limestones as those to be used with the 165 MWe CFBC boiler owned and operated by Nova Scotia Power Incorporated (NSPI). The feedstocks examined during this trial were Devco Prince coal and the Windsor Group and Calpo limestones, the fuel and potential sorbents for NSPI`s 165 MWe CFBC plant. Twelve tests were first carried out with the first test series (TS1) using CANMET`s 0.8 MWt pilot-scale CFBC. Later, three additional tests were conducted (test series TS2), to study the effect of long term operation on the emissions of N{sub 2}O from CFBC and generate ash for an ash utilization study under a separate program. The key parameters studied were: temperature, secondary air to primary air ratio and elevation of the secondary air injection level on N{sub 2}O emissions as well as sulfur capture, combustion efficiency and NO{sub x} and CO levels. The N{sub 2}O emissions ranged from 51 to 117 ppm (or 32 to 72 mg/MJ). As expected, temperature was the dominant influence on N{sub 2}O emissions. In addition, longer term operation (80 to 100 h) had no significant effect on N{sub 2}O emissions. Despite a change in limestones and a significant change in limestone utilization, the N{sub 2}O emissions were equivalent in the two test series. Neither was any significant correlation established by way of multilinear regression between N{sub 2}O and other emissions for the two test series (i.e., SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO or O{sub 2}).

Desai, D.L.; Anthony, E.J.; Lau, I. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Andrews, N. [Nova Scotia Power Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Operational air pollution prediction and doses calculation in case of nuclear emergency at Krško Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents fully operational air pollution prediction and doses calculation system working in 2/24/7/365 mode for more than a decade in Krško Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Krško NPP lies in complex terrain in Slovenia very close to Croatia border. A dedicated software is available for detailed estimation of possible radioactive emission (source term). This part of the procedure is used by trained NPP operators and then automatically coupled with dilution coefficients to obtain radionuclide air pollution concentrations. As radioactive material causes dose also with distant cloud shine not only by direct touch or inhalation, special procedure is implemented for dose estimation. We present in detail our algorithm for distant cloud shine estimation based on dilution coefficients calculation. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of correct air pollution prediction with best possible modelling techniques where achieving time and space accurate modelling is required for proper population protection.

PrimoĹľ Mlakar; Marija Zlata BoĹľnar; Borut Breznik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of life-cycle air emissions and oil consumption from conventional vehicles, hybrid-electric...efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in...average car vs. $0.004mi for an electric car on an average driving time and location...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction and to ozone byproducts. Currently there are standards and regulations that limit ozone emissions from portable cleaners (i.e., Viner et al., 1992), are generally exempt from standards and regulations because

Siegel, Jeffrey

114

Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 37513764 Modeling the effects of ship emissions on coastal air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 3751­3764 Modeling the effects of ship emissions on coastal air emissions, they could have important environmental effects on coastal areas near ports with heavy ship-going ships on ozone and particulate matter concentrations is quantified using UCI- CIT model for the South

Dabdub, Donald

115

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential of plug-in vehicles remains small compared to ownership cost. As such, to offer a socially efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in vehicles mustValuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits Jeremy J

Michalek, Jeremy J.

116

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

117

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimizing Electric Humidifier Operation with an Air Side Economizer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air side economizer cycle is a control scheme that is often used in WAC systems to reduce cooling energy consumption by introducing variable quantities of ambient air into a conditioned space to satisfy the space cooling load (free cooling...

Shami, U. F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

GRR/Section 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit 15-WA-b - Air Operating Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies WAC 173-401-500 WAC 173-401-800 WAC 173-401-810 WAC 173-401-735 WAC 173-401-610 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process for obtaining an Air Operating Permit in Washington State. The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) issues Air Operating Permit under WAC 173-401. An Air Operating Permit is required if a facility has the potential to emit

120

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the work performed during the quarter January-March 2003. The main objectives of the project are: To demonstrate the feasibility of the full-oxy combustion with flue gas recirculation on Babcock & Wilcox's 1.5MW pilot boiler, To measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection strategies, To perform an economical feasibility study, comparing this solution with alternate technologies, and To design a new generation, full oxy-fired boiler. The main objective of this quarter was to initiate the project, primarily the experimental tasks. The contractor and its subcontractors have defined a working plan, and the first tasks have been started. Task 1 (Site Preparation) is now in progress, defining the modifications to be implemented to the boiler and oxygen delivery system. The changes are required in order to overcome some current limitations of the existing system. As part of a previous project carried out in 2002, several changes have already been made on the pilot boiler, including the enrichment of the secondary and tertiary air with oxygen or the replacement of these streams with oxygen-enriched recycled flue gas. A notable modification for the current project involves the replacement of the primary air with oxygen-enriched flue gas. Consequently, the current oxygen supply and flue gas recycle system is being modified to meet this new requirement. Task 2 (Combustion and Emissions Performance Optimization) has been initiated with a preliminary selection of four series of tests to be performed. So far, the project schedule is on-track: site preparation (Task 1) should be completed by August 1st, 2003 and the tests (Task 2) are planned for September-October 2003. The Techno-Economic Study (Task 3) will be initiated in the following quarter.

Ovidiu Marin; Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Reducing NOx emissions using the humid air motor concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of water to prevent NOx...formation during the combustion process is well known. The H.A.M. system (Humid Air Motor) is an original and promising solution compared ... . This system involves evaporating l...

Emmanuel Riom; Lars-Ola Larsson; Ulf Hagström

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the work performed during the quarter April-June 2003. The main focus of this quarter has been the site preparation (task 1) for the test campaign scheduled in September/October 2003. Task 3 (Techno-economical assessment) has also been initiated while selecting the methodology to be used in the economics analysis and specifying the plants to be compared: In Task 1 (Site Preparation), the process definition and design activities have been completed, the equipment and instruments required have been identified, and the fabrication and installation activities have been initiated, to implement the required modifications on the pilot boiler. As of today, the schedule calls for completion of construction by late-July. System check-down is scheduled for the first two weeks of August. In Task 2 (Combustion and Emissions Performance Optimization), four weeks of testing are planned, two weeks starting second half of August and two weeks starting at the end of September. In Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study), the plants to be evaluated have been specified, including baseline cases (air fired PC boilers with or without CO{sub 2} capture), O{sub 2}-fired cases (with or without flue gas recirculation) and IGCC cases. Power plants ranging from 50 to 500MW have been selected and the methodology to be used has been described, both for performance evaluation and cost assessment. The first calculations will be performed soon and the first trends will be reported in the next quarter. As part of Task 5 (Project Management & Reporting), the subcontract between Babcock&Wilcox and American Air Liquide has been finalized. The subcontract between ISGS and American Air Liquide is in the final stages of completion.

Ovidiu Marin; Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean increases18 in global (excluding China) anthropogenic emissions, 37% to Chinese emission19 increases

Wu, Shiliang

126

INFLUENCE OF DESIGN AND OPERATING CONDITIONS ON UNDERFLOOR AIR DISTRIBUTION (UFAD) SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply temperature setpoints, operation of blinds at peak conditions, impact of occupant control, andcontrols the AHU fan. In both UFAD and OH systems, supply air temperature (

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe Improving modeling platforms with statistical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe ­ Improving modeling platforms. For regional air quality, seven regional modeling teams combine state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling the ensemble or a unique model. Keywords: Air quality, modeling system, ensemble approach, validation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from two different burning scenarios, so-called “burn piles/pits” and an air curtain burner/“burn box”, were compared using simulated FOB waste from municipal and commercial sources. ... Aerial- and ground-sampled emissions from three prescribed forest burns in the southeastern U.S. were compared to emissions from laboratory open burn tests using biomass from the same locations. ...

Johanna Aurell; Brian K. Gullett; Dirk Yamamoto

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nebraska Air Quality Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to ambient air quality standards, pollution source operating permits, emissions reporting,...

133

Physics of plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air Kunwar Pal Singh and Subrata Roya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics of plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air Kunwar Pal Singh and Subrata Roya; published online 19 March 2008 The physics of plasma actuator operating in the atmospheric air has been, dielectric heating, and power required to maintain the atmospheric pressure plasma have been reduced

Roy, Subrata

134

Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction for (NOC) Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project W-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 IO) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments, and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also constitutes EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided later. This NOC covers the activities associated with the construction and operation activities involving stabilization and/or repackaging of plutonium in the 2736-ZB Building. An operations support trailer will be installed in the proximity of the 2736-ZB Building. A new exhaust stack will be built and operated at the 2736-ZB Building to handle the effluents associated with the operation of the stabilization and repackaging process. Figures provided are based on preliminary design.

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the work performed during the quarter October-December 2003. Task 1 (Site Preparation) had been completed in the previous reporting period. In this reporting period, one week of combustion parameters optimization has been performed in Task 2 (experimental test performance) of the project. Under full-oxy conditions (100% air replacement with O{sub 2}-enriched flue gas) in 1.5MW{sub th} coal-fired boiler, the following parameters have been varied and their impact on combustion characteristics measured: the recirculated flue gas flow rate has been varied from 80% to 95% of total flue gas flow, and the total oxygen flow rate into the primary air zone of the boiler has been set to levels ranging from 15% to 25% of the total oxygen consumption in the overall combustion. In current reporting period, significant progress has also been made in Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) of the project: mass and energy balance calculations and cost assessment have been completed on plant capacity of 533MW{sub e} gross output while applying the methodology described in previous reporting periods. Air-fired PC Boiler and proposed Oxygen-fired PC Boiler have been assessed, both for retrofit application and new unit. The current work schedule is to review in more details the experimental data collected so far as well as the economics results obtained on the 533MWe cases, and to develop a work scope for the remainder of the project. Approximately one week of pilot testing is expected during the first quarter of 2004, including mercury emission measurement and heat transfer characterization. The project was on hold from mid-November through December 2003 due to non-availability of funds. Out of the {approx}$785k allocated DOE funds in this project, $497k have been spent to date ($480 reported so far), mainly in site preparation, test performance and economics assessment. In addition to DOE allocated funds, to date approximately $330k has been cost-shared by the participants, bringing the total project cost up to $827k ($810k reported so far) as on December 31st, 2003.

Fabienne Chatel-Pelage

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Air pollution and early deaths in the United States : attribution of PM?.? exposure to emissions species, time, location and sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion emissions constitute the largest source of anthropogenic emissions in the US. They lead to the degradation of air quality and human health, by contributing to the formation of fine particulate matter (PM2 .5 ), ...

Dedoussi, Irene Constantina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Updated State Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast states that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 megawatts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Reduction in air emissions attainable through implementation of district heating and cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

District heating and cooling (DHC) can provide multiple opportunities to reduce air emissions associated with space conditioning and electricity generation, which contribute 30% to 50% of all such emissions. When DHC is combined with cogeneration (CHP), maximum reductions in sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), particulates, and ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants can most effectively be achieved. Although significant improvements in air quality have been documented in Europe and Scandinavia due to DHC and CHP implementation, accurately predicting such improvements has been difficult. Without acceptable quantification methods, regulatory bodies are reluctant to grant air emissions credits, and local community leaders are unwilling to invest in DHC and CHP as preferred methods of providing energy or strategies for air quality improvement. The recent development and release of a number of computer models designed specifically to provide quantification of air emissions that can result from DHC and CHP implementation should help provide local, state, and national policymakers with information vital to increasing support and investment in DHC development.

Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Refrigerant Choices in Room Air Conditioner Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, potential replacement refrigerants for window-mounted room air conditioners (RACs) in the U.S. have been evaluated using a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions analysis. ... De Kleine, R. D.; Keoleian, G. A.; Kelly, J. C.Optimal replacement of residential air conditioning equipment to minimize energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and consumer cost in the US Energy Policy 2011, 39, 3144– 3153 ... Most of the inventory data have been collected from Thailand, except for the upstream of fuel oil and fuel transmission, which have been computed from Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation version 1.7 and Global Emission Model for Integrated Systems version 4.3. ...

Michael D. Galka; James M. Lownsbury; Paul Blowers

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air...

John, T. P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Texas Air Quality Status and the Texas Emission Reduction Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Millionsppb Eight-Hour Ozone Design Values and Population in Texas Population BPA CC DFW HGB ARR ELP SAN NET VIC BB LRG LAR 1997 Eight-Hour Ozone NAAQS... Ton - $5,202 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ? Galveston, Texas ? October 10, 2012 TERP Grant Amount by Area AUS Austin Area BPA Beaumont- Port Arthur CC Corpus Christi DFW Dallas-Fort Worth ELP El Paso HGB Houston...

Hildebrand, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction (NOC) for Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project W-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Additionally, the following description, attachments, and references are provided to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants''. The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also constitutes EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided later. This NOC covers the activities associated with the construction and operation activities involving stabilization and/or repackaging of plutonium in the 2736-ZB Building. A new exhaust stack will be built and operated at the 2736-ZB Building to handle the effluents associated with the operation of the stabilization and repackaging process. Figures provided are based on preliminary design. For the activities covered under this NOC, the unabated and abated TEDE to the hypothetical MEI is 1.67 E-03 and 8.34 E-01 millirem per year, respectively.

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Air Electrode Design for Sustained High Power Operation of Li/air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid development of portable electronic devices increasingly requires much more energy to support advanced functions. However, currently available batteries do not meet the high energy requirement of these devices. Metal/air batteries, especially Li/air batteries, have a much higher specific energy than most other available batteries, but their power rate is limited by the accumulation of reaction products in the air electrode. Several approaches to improve the power rate of Li/air batteries have been analyzed in this work, including adjustment of air electrode porosity and catalyst reactivity distributions to minimize diffusion limitations and maximize air electrode material utilization. An interconnected dual pore system (one catalyzed and one noncatalyzed) is proposed to improve oxygen transport into the inner regions of the air electrode, but this approach alone cannot supply high power for long term applications. A time-release multiple catalyst approach is analyzed to provide temporal release of reactivity in the air electrode. When coupled with the dual pore configuration and catalysts with high reactivities, the time-release catalyst concept can extend the duration of higher powers to longer times, and result in maximum utilization of air electrode materials.

Williford, Ralph E.; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced, Low/Zero Emission Boiler Design and Operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, B&W and Air Liquide are developing and optimizing the oxy-combustion process for retrofitting existing boilers as well as new plants. The main objectives of the project is to: (1) demonstrate the feasibility of the oxy-combustion technology with flue gas recycle in a 5-million Btu/hr coal-fired pilot boiler, (2) measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection and flue gas recycle strategies, and (3) perform technical and economic feasibility studies for application of the technology in demonstration and commercial scale boilers. This document summarizes the work performed during the period of performance of the project (Oct 2002 to June 2007). Detailed technical results are reported in corresponding topical reports that are attached as an appendix to this report. Task 1 (Site Preparation) has been completed in 2003. The experimental pilot-scale O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} combustion tests of Task 2 (experimental test performance) has been completed in Q2 2004. Process simulation and cost assessment of Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) has been completed in Q1 2005. The topical report on Task 3 has been finalized and submitted to DOE in Q3 2005. The calculations of Task 4 (Retrofit Recommendation and Preliminary Design of a New Generation Boiler) has been completed in 2004. In Task 6 (engineering study on retrofit applications), the engineering study on 25MW{sub e} unit has been completed in Q2, 2008 along with the corresponding cost assessment. In Task 7 (evaluation of new oxy-fuel power plants concepts), based on the design basis document prepared in 2005, the design and cost estimate of the Air Separation Units, the boiler islands and the CO{sub 2} compression and trains have been completed, for both super and ultra-supercritical case study. Final report of Task-7 is published by DOE in Oct 2007.

Babcock/Wilcox; Illinois State Geological; Worley Parsons; Parsons Infrastructure/Technology Group

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

LBNL-470E-2010 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Safety Division Environmental Services Group May 25, 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Report for 2010 (in compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office

Eisen, Michael

146

LBNL-470E-2009 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Safety Division Environmental Services Group June 2010 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Report for 2009 (in compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office

147

LBNL-470E-2011 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Safety Division Environmental Services Group June 4, 2012 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Report for 2011 (in compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office

Eisen, Michael

148

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions or oil consumption. Because such externality...associated with oil consumption. We compare externality and oil consumption costs to the costs...and no gasoline engine). We estimate...manufacturing, fuel cycle, and operation...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

150

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

151

Air drilling operations improved by percussion-bit/hammer-tool tandem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contractors and operators air drill whenever possible to improve rate of penetration (ROP). This is done with pneumatic hammer tools (HT's) and various bit types used with standard rotary air rigs. The recent application of a ''flat-bottomed'' percussion bit (FPB) combined with a custom-designed HT originally developed for mining operations has significantly improved air drilling operations in the Arkoma basin. The improvements include a large increase in ROP, improved hole geometry, reduced drillstring stresses, and a substantial reduction in cost per foot. This paper describes (1) a discussion of the engineering design and operation of the FPB/HT tandem, (2) applications and limitations of the tools, (3) guidelines for optimization of performance, and (4) documentation of field performance on Arkoma basin wells to demonstrate the improvements in air drilling operations.

Whiteley, M.C.; England, W.P.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY Susan T. Bagley1, Winthrop-1295 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Diesel Research, University of Minnesota, 111 Church St, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

Minnesota, University of

153

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline Jason Hilla,b,1 on the source of land used to produce biomass for biofuels, on the magnitude of any indirect land use that may result, and on other as yet unmeasured environmental impacts of biofuels. fine particulate matter ethanol

Weiblen, George D

154

Ethanol Blends and Engine Operating Strategy Effects on Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Engine Particle Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spark ignition (SI) engines with direct injection (DI) fueling can improve fuel economy and vehicle power beyond that of port fuel injection (PFI). Despite this distinct advantage, DI fueling often increases particle emissions such that SI exhaust may be subject to future particle emissions regulations. Challenges in controlling particle emissions arise as engines encounter varied fuel composition such as intermediate ethanol blends. Furthermore, modern engines are operated using unconventional breathing strategies with advanced cam-based variable valve actuation systems. In this study, we investigate particle emissions from a multi-cylinder DI engine operated with three different breathing strategies, fueling strategies and fuels. The breathing strategies are conventional throttled operation, early intake valve closing (EIVC) and late intake valve closing (LIVC); the fueling strategies are single injection DI (sDI), multi-injection DI (mDI), and PFI; and the fuels are emissions certification gasoline, E20 and E85. The results indicate the dominant factor influencing particle number concentration emissions for the sDI and mDI strategies is the fuel injection timing. Overly advanced injection timing results in particle formation due to fuel spray impingement on the piston, and overly retarded injection timing results in particle formation due to poor fuel and air mixing. In addition, fuel type has a significant effect on particle emissions for the DI fueling strategies. Gasoline and E20 fuels generate comparable levels of particle emissions, but E85 produces dramatically lower particle number concentration. The particle emissions for E85 are near the detection limit for the FSN instrument, and particle number emissions are one to two orders of magnitude lower for E85 relative to gasoline and E20. We found PFI fueling produces very low levels of particle emissions under all conditions and is much less sensitive to engine breathing strategy and fuel type than the DI fueling strategies. The particle number-size distributions for PFI fueling are of the same order for all of the breathing strategies and fuel types and are one to two orders lower than for the sDI fuel injection strategy with gasoline and E20. Remarkably, the particle emissions for E85 under the sDI fueling strategy are similar to particle emissions with a PFI fueling strategy. Thus by using E85, the efficiency and power advantages of DI fueling can be gained without generating high particle emissions.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AIR TOXICS AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Prepared Under Burns and Roe Services Corporation Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC92100 .Subtask 44.02 July 1996 SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN . . UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center . Prepared by Adrian Radziwon and Edward Winter Burns and Roe Services Corporation Terence J. McManus, Oak Ridge Associated Universities July 1996 TABLE OF CONTERlW SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................... 1 Background . : .................. 1 Objectives .................... 1 Report Structure ................. 3 Uncertainties ................... 3 SECTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................. 7

156

Operational background air pollution prediction over Slovenia by QualeAria modelling system - validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Slovenia is a country of very complex terrain and many problems with air pollution in the valleys, canyons and basins, where industrial air pollution is combined with traffic and domestic heating air pollution, giving rise to problems for the health impact and the ecosystems directly or indirectly. Among indirect effects is also effect on solar radiation budget because of photochemical smog and especially particulate air pollution. To assess air pollutants over the country, a preliminary application of an experimental operational forecast system is presented here, with the aim of exploring its potentials and limitations in modelling the background air quality, and to focus the aspects where improvements are needed for a true operational use.

Marija Zlata Božnar; Primož Mlakar; Boštjan Grašič; Giuseppe Calori; Alessio D'Allura; Sandro Finardi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy and Air Emission Effects of Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Breakdown of energy comsumption of a water utility: (a) life-cycle phase, (b) water supply phase, (c) life-cycle activity, and (d) material production category. ... The Water?Energy Sustainability Tool (WEST) can evaluate the construction, operation, and maintenance of water systems and compare the direct and indirect (supply chain) energy and environmental effects of alternative water sources in terms of material production (e.g., concrete, pipe, and chemicals), material delivery, construction and maintenance equipment use, energy production (electricity and fuel), and sludge disposal. ... The difference is due to fossil fuels, especially coal, which make up a larger portion of the U.S. electricity mix. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development of an air emissions inventory for Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate air emissions inventory is important in an effective Clean Air Act (CAA) compliance program; without it, a facility may have difficulty proving compliance with regulations or permit conditions. An emissions inventory can also serve for evaluating the applicability of new regulations (eg, Title V of CAA) and in complying with them. Therefore it is important for the inventory to be well-planned and comprehensive. Preparation of an emissions inventory for a large R&D facility such as ORNL can be a challenging task. ORNL, a government facility managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. for US DOE, consists of more than 300 buildings on about 1,500 acres. It has several thousand diverse emission sources, including small laboratory hoods, several wastewater treatment facilities, and a steam plant. This paper describes the development of ORNL`s emissions inventory with emphasis on setting goals and identifying the scope of the inventory, identifying the emission points, developing/implementing the inventory methodology, compiling data, and evaluating the results.

Skipper, D.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube-Oil-Consumption Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estimating and controlling air pollution from ocean-going ships carrying international cargo is particularly1 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube-lube-oil-consumption designs, for example, could be an option with existing engines. AIR POLLUTION FROM SHIPS The motivation

Brown, Alan

160

Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

Roberts, Bryan W.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Integrating VAV zone requirements with supply fan operation. [Variable Air Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of communicating direct digital controls (DDC) with distributed intelligence offers new opportunities for energy conservation while maintaining occupant comfort in commercial buildings. Integrating control within a single DDC panel improves performance. Integrating control by communications between multiple controllers can further enhance system operation. One example is a DDC static pressure reset strategy for supply fan operation in variable air volume (VAV) supply air distribution systems. This strategy integrates the requirements of the VAV terminal units serving the building zones to minimize fan energy use. This article describes terminal unit operation, supply fan control, concurrent polling, operational data and power savings.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (United States)); Norford, L.K. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G. Schuchmann,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of California Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G, Colorado 80208, United States ABSTRACT: California and Federal emissions regulations for 2007 and newer of nitrogen spurring the introduction of new aftertreatment systems. Since 2008, four emission measurement

Denver, University of

163

Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

Kota, Sri H

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Implementation of plume rise and its impacts on emissions and air quality modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work analyses the impact of implementing hourly plume rise calculations over Spain in terms of: i) vertical emission allocations and ii) modelled air quality concentrations. Two air quality simulations (4 km × 4 km, 1 h) were performed for February and June 2009, using the CALIOPE-AQFS system (WRF-ARW/HERMESv2.0/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b) differing only by the vertical allocation of point source emissions: i) using fixed vertical profiles based on the stack height of each facility and ii) using an hourly bottom-up calculations of effective emission heights. When using plume rise calculations, emissions are generally allocated to lower altitudes than when using the fixed vertical profiles, showing significant differences depending on source sector and air pollutant (up to 75% between estimated average effective emission heights). In terms of air quality, it is shown that hourly plume rise calculations lead to improved simulation of industrial SO2 concentrations, thus increasing modelled concentrations (1.4 ?g m?3 increase in February, 1.5 ?g m?3 increase in June) and reducing the model biases for both months (31.1% in February, 73.7% in June). The increase of SO2 concentrations leads to an increase of SO 4 ? 2 surface levels that varies according to the season and location (4.3% in February and 0.4% in June, on average). On the other hand, the impact on NO2 and PM10 concentrations is less significant, leading to average changes of a few ?g·m3 at most (0.4 ?g m?3 for NO2 and 0.2 ?g m?3 for PM10). In order to maximize the precision of plume rise calculations, the use of stack parameters based on real-world data is mandatory.

Marc Guevara; Albert Soret; Gustavo Arévalo; Francesc Martínez; José M. Baldasano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

166

Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating emissions from R&D facilities using chemical inventory data.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Passive landfill gas emission – Influence of atmospheric pressure and implications for the operation of methane-oxidising biofilters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A passively vented landfill site in Northern Germany was monitored for gas emission dynamics through high resolution measurements of landfill gas pressure, flow rate and composition as well as atmospheric pressure and temperature. Landfill gas emission could be directly related to atmospheric pressure changes on all scales as induced by the autooscillation of air, diurnal variations and the passage of pressure highs and lows. Gas flux reversed every 20 h on average, with 50% of emission phases lasting only 10 h or less. During gas emission phases, methane loads fed to a connected methane oxidising biofiltration unit varied between near zero and 247 g CH4 h?1 m?3 filter material. Emission dynamics not only influenced the amount of methane fed to the biofilter but also the establishment of gas composition profiles within the biofilter, thus being of high relevance for biofilter operation. The duration of the gas emission phase emerged as most significant variable for the distribution of landfill gas components within the biofilter.

Julia Gebert; Alexander Groengroeft

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Inter-comparison between HERMESv2.0 and TNO-MACC-II emission data using the CALIOPE air quality system (Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work examines and compares the performance of two emission datasets on modelling air quality concentrations for Spain: (i) the High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emissions System (HERMESv2.0) and (ii) the TNO-MACC-II emission inventory. For this purpose, the air quality system CALIOPE-AQFS (WRF-ARW/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b) was run over Spain for February and June 2009 using the two emission datasets (4 km × 4 km and 1 h). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), Ozone (O3) and particular matter (PM10) modelled concentrations were compared with measurements at different type of air quality stations (i.e. rural background, urban, suburban industrial). A preliminary emission comparison showed significant discrepancies between the two datasets, highlighting an overestimation of industrial emissions in urban areas when using TNO-MACC-II. However, simulations showed similar performances of both emission datasets in terms of air quality. Modelled NO2 concentrations were similar between both datasets at the background stations, although TNO-MACC-II presented lower underestimations due to differences in industrial, other mobile sources and residential emissions. At Madrid urban stations NO2 was significantly underestimated in both cases despite the fact that HERMESv2.0 estimates traffic emissions using a more local information and detailed methodology. This NO2 underestimation problem was not found in Barcelona due to the influence of international shipping emissions located in the coastline. An inadequate characterization of some TNO-MACC-II's point sources led to high SO2 biases at industrial stations, especially in northwest Spain where large facilities are grouped. In general, surface O3 was overestimated regardless of the emission dataset used, depicting the problematic of CMAQ on overestimating low ozone at night. On the other hand, modelled PM10 concentrations were less underestimated in urban areas when applying HERMESv2.0 due to the inclusion of road dust resuspension, whereas the underestimation at suburban industrial stations indicated deficiencies in fugitive emission sources characterization (agricultural operations, windblown dust emissions).

Marc Guevara; María Teresa Pay; Francesc Martínez; Albert Soret; Hugo Denier van der Gon; José M. Baldasano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/private stakeholders, and develop and use a methodology to annually report the energy savings from Wind and Other Renewables. This report summarizes the work performed by the ESL on this project from September 2008 to August 2009. Please contact me at (979) 845... Engineering Experiment Station or the Energy Systems Laboratory. Page August 2009 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System 3 SUMMARY REPORT Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

Chandrasekaran, Vivek; Turner, Dan; Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Gilman, Don; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Liu, Zi; Haberl, Jeff S.

170

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC). In this work the ESL is required to obtain input from public/private stakeholders, and develop and use a methodology to annually report the energy savings from Wind and Other... Station or the Energy Systems Laboratory. Page August 2007 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System 4 SUMMARY REPORT Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 79 th...

Turner, W. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Culp, C.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

PRELEVEMENTS DE DIOXINES ET DE FURANES A L'EMISSION ET DANS L'AIR AMBIANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

98-12 PRELEVEMENTS DE DIOXINES ET DE FURANES A L'EMISSION ET DANS L'AIR AMBIANT Claude FERRIERES polychlorodibenzo-/7-dioxines (PCDDs) et les polychlorodibenzofuranes (PCDFs) sont des composés aromatiques,3,7,8 TCDD (dite dioxine de SEVESO). Chaque congénère est affecté d'un facteur de toxicité (allant de 0,001 à

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

172

The Use of Modern Third-Generation Air Quality Models (MM5-EMIMO-CMAQ) for Real-Time Operational Air Quality Impact Assessment of Industrial Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many cases, a substantial proportion of large industrial emissions are located in the surrounding areas of cities and are the cause of an important part of air concentrations over the city and surrounding area...

R. San José; J. L. Pérez; J. L. Morant…

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Comparison of emissions from on-road sources using a mobile laboratory under various driving and operational sampling modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile sources produce a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in large cities and have harmful effects on air quality at multiple spatial scales. Mobile emissions are intrinsically difficult to ...

Zavala-Perez, Miguel Angel

174

GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit GRR/Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-ID-b - Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit 15IDBAirQualityPermitTierIIOperatingPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies IDAPA 58.01.01 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15IDBAirQualityPermitTierIIOperatingPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Tier II Operating Permits are issued to facilities or stationary sources

175

Will Monetized Carbon Emission Reductions Buy Enhanced Building Operations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Policies and Measures International and United State Programs - Kyoto Protocol - European Union Emission Trading Scheme - California Global Warming Solutions Act - Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative #0;z Strategies for Expanding Buildings Role Buildings... Emission Targets in 2008-2012 for 37 Annex I Countries Which Have Ratified It ? Relies Primarily on Policies and Measures ? Flexibility Measures Include CDMs and JIs #0;z European Climate Change Program ? Reflects EU’s Leadership in Implementing Kyoto...

Millhone, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

File:Air Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Air Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 36 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:26, 14 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:26, 14 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (36 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

177

Examining Air Pollution in China Using Production- And Consumption-Based Emissions Accounting Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study suggests that China should control air pollution using the following strategies: applying end-of-pipe abatement technologies and using cleaner fuels to further decrease the emission factors associated with rural cooking, electricity generation, and the transportation sector; continuing to limit highly emission-intensive but low value-added exports; developing a plan to reduce construction activities; and increasing the proportion of service GDP in the national economy. ... Diesel vehicles emit a substantial amount of NOx and PM2.5, and gasoline vehicles release substantial VOC emissions during the processes of gasoline refinery and transport, vehicle refueling and running. ... China also withdrew the previous tax rebate (6%) for coke export in 2004 and instead imposed a tax of 40%, which successfully reduced the ratio of export coke to national coke production from 12% in 2000 to 0% in 2009. ...

Hong Huo; Qiang Zhang; Dabo Guan; Xin Su; Hongyan Zhao; Kebin He

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

Shipboard Assessment of Hearing Sensitivity of Tropical Fishes Immediately After Exposure to Seismic Air Gun Emissions at Scott Reef  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A shipboard system for measurement of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in fish was developed to investigate the effects on hearing in tropical reef fish after exposure to emissions from an air ... gun array used...

Mardi C. Hastings; Jennifer Miksis-Olds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A dynamic model for air-based photovoltaic thermal systems working under real operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper a dynamic model suitable for simulating real operating conditions of air-based photovoltaic thermal (PVT) systems is presented. The performance of the model is validated by using the operational data collected from the building integrated photovoltaic (PVT) systems installed in two unique buildings. The modelled air outlet temperature and electrical power match very well with the experimental data. In Solar Decathlon house PVT, the average (RMS) error in air outlet temperatures was 4.2%. The average (RMS) error in electrical power was also 4.2%. In the Sustainable Buildings Research Centre PVT, the average errors (RMS) of PV and air temperatures were 3.8% and 2.2%, respectively. The performance of the PVT system under changing working condition is also analysed in this paper. The analysis includes the effect of ambient air temperature, air inlet temperature, air flow rate and solar irradiation on thermal, electrical, first law and second law efficiencies. Both the thermal and the 1st law efficiencies almost linearly increased with the increase of the ambient temperature. However, the PVT electrical efficiency and the second law efficiency decreased with the increase of the ambient temperature. All efficiencies expect the second law efficiency decreased with increase of the PVT air inlet temperature. The second law efficiency first increased and then reduced. With increasing the air flow rate all the efficiencies increased. The electrical and second law efficiencies become less sensitive when the air flow rate exceeded 300 l/s. Both the thermal and the 1st law efficiencies decreased while the electrical efficiency and the second law efficiency increased with the increase of the solar irradiation. The efficiencies found to be very sensitive for low level of solar irradiations. At about 400 W m?2 irradiation efficiencies became less sensitive.

M. Imroz Sohel; Zhenjun Ma; Paul Cooper; Jamie Adams; Robert Scott

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.6, and 2.2±1.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

LLOYD, E.R.

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

Dual Fuel Diesel Engine Operation Using H2. Effect on Particulate Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dual Fuel Diesel Engine Operation Using H2. ... School of Engineering, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom, Universidad de Castilla?La Mancha, Edificio Politecnico, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Avda. ... In diesel engines, the reduction of particulate emissions must be achieved in conjunction with the reduction of NOx emissions. ...

A. Tsolakis; J. J. Hernandez; A. Megaritis; M. Crampton

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

NASA/TM--2012216007 Performance Data Errors in Air Carrier Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA/TM--2012­216007 Performance Data Errors in Air Carrier Operations: Causes and Countermeaures Benjamin A. Berman San Jose State University R. Key Dismukes NASA Ames Research Center Kimberly K. Jobe San Jose State University June 2012 #12;ii NASA STI Program...in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been

184

Smart Operations of Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems in Government Buildings for Peak Power Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the summer 2007 smart operation strategies for air-conditioning (A/C) and lighting systems were developed and tested in a number of governmental buildings in Kuwait as one of the solutions to reduce the national peak demand for electrical...

Al-Hadban, Y.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A.; Alasseri, R.

185

Force approximation for a plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air Kunwar Pal Singh and Subrata Roya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Force approximation for a plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air Kunwar Pal Singh and Subrata to the actuator, dielectric heating, and power required to maintain the atmospheric pressure plasma during Roya Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory and Test Facility, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

Roy, Subrata

186

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Title Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5330E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bode, Josh, Michael J. Sullivan, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 120 Date Published 01/2012 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords consortium for electric reliability technology solutions (certs), electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Several recent demonstrations and pilots have shown that air conditioner (AC) electric loads can be controlled during the summer cooling season to provide ancillary services and improve the stability and reliability of the electricity grid. A key issue for integration of air conditioner load control into grid operations is how to accurately measure shorter-term (e.g., ten's of minutes to a couple of hours) demand reductions from AC load curtailments for operations and settlement. This report presents a framework for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction measurements. It also compares the accuracy of various alternatives for measuring AC reductions - including methods that rely on regression analysis, load matching and control groups - using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. A practical approach is recommended for settlement that relies on set of tables, updated annually, with pre-calculated load reduction estimates. The tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on the daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day and simplify the settlement process.

187

Exhaust emissions estimation during transient turbocharged diesel engine operation using a two-zone combustion model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive, two-zone, transient, diesel combustion model is used to study the performance and exhaust emissions of a turbocharged diesel engine during load transients. Analytical modelling of fuel spray and in-cylinder processes is included, while detailed equations concerning all engine sub-systems describe the phenomena, which diversify transient operation from the steady-state. Demonstrative diagrams are provided for the time histories of nitric oxide (NO) and soot emissions during transient operation, and the main factors affecting their formation are highlighted. Moreover, in-cylinder development of NO concentration and soot density during individual transient cycles is provided and compared with their respective steady-state counterparts. This comparison points out the differences between steady-state and transient operation, as regards exhaust emissions development. The study is expanded with the investigation of load change magnitude and cylinder wall insulation effects on transient emissions.

C.D. Rakopoulos; A.M. Dimaratos; E.G. Giakoumis; D.C. Rakopoulos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

J. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded light duty vehicles in Algeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Nejjari et al., 2003, Atek et al., 2004). As a result, many stations of air pollution measurement and Boukadoum, 2005). Vehicle pollutant emissions constitute not only a problem of air quality in big citiesJ. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded

Boyer, Edmond

189

Impact of Mexico City emissions on regional air quality from MOZART-4 simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 campaign: Mexico City emissions and their transport andtransport and photochemical aging of Mexico City emissions

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Predicting the energy use and operation cost of HVAC air filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model has been developed to predict the energy efficiency and annual operation cost for filters installed in an HVAC air handling system using filter data from standard ASHRAE 52.2-2007 filter tests. Thirty filters from six manufacturers were investigated to determine the most energy efficient and cost effective filtration solutions for an airport installation in Vancouver, Canada. A comparison of the output of the proposed model with the ‘kep’ and Wattage methods was performed to highlight the possible differences in filter choice that would be made using alternative approaches. The outcomes have been shown to differ due to data not incorporated in the older models such as filtration efficiency and particulate concentration. The sensitivity of filter cost to model parameters was also studied. It was found that the concentration of particles in the air stream and the cost of electricity had the largest effect on annual cost of operation. Increasing the concentration of particles in the air stream increases the cost of operating the filter and causes the installation of a prefilter upstream of the primary filter to be more economically attractive. Increasing electricity cost also increases the operation cost but has the reverse effect on attractiveness of prefilter installations.

James F. Montgomery; Sheldon I. Green; Steven N. Rogak; Karen Bartlett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Neuro-optimal operation of a variable air volume HVAC&R system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low operational efficiency especially under partial load conditions and poor control are some reasons for high energy consumption of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems. To improve energy efficiency, HVAC&R systems should be efficiently operated to maintain a desired indoor environment under dynamic ambient and indoor conditions. This study proposes a neural network based optimal supervisory operation strategy to find the optimal set points for chilled water supply temperature, discharge air temperature and VAV system fan static pressure such that the indoor environment is maintained with the least chiller and fan energy consumption. To achieve this objective, a dynamic system model is developed first to simulate the system behavior under different control schemes and operating conditions. A multi-layer feed forward neural network is constructed and trained in unsupervised mode to minimize the cost function which is comprised of overall energy cost and penalty cost when one or more constraints are violated. After training, the network is implemented as a supervisory controller to compute the optimal settings for the system. Simulation results show that compared to the conventional night reset operation scheme, the optimal operation scheme saves around 10% energy under full load condition and 19% energy under partial load conditions.

Min Ning; M. Zaheeruddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Innovative pollution prevention program at Air Force owned Raytheon operated facility incorporating Russian technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona is owned by the Air Force and operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. A joint Air Force/Raytheon Pollution Prevention Team operates at AFP 44 with the ultimate goal to minimize or eliminate the use of hazardous substances. The team works together to uncover new technologies and methods that will replace chemicals used in the plant's missile manufacturing facilities. The program maximizes pollution prevention by first eliminating hazardous material use, then chemical recycling, next hazardous waste reduction and finally wastewater treatment and recycling. From fiscal years 1994 through 1997, nine pollution prevention projects have been implemented, totaling $2.6 million, with a payback averaging less than two years. A unique wastewater treatment method has been demonstrated as part of this program. This is electroflotation, a Russian technology which removes dispersed particles from liquid with gas bubbles obtained during water electrolysis. A unit was built in the US which successfully removed organic emulsions from wastewater. Operational units are planned for the removal of waste from waterfall paint booths. The pollution prevention joint team continues to be very active with two projects underway in FY 98 and two more funded for FY 99.

Stallings, J.H.; Cepeda-Calderon, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

An Analysis of the health impacts from PM and NOx emissions resulting from train operations in the Alameda Corridor, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009). Estimating PM and NOx Train Emissions in the AlamedaAuthority. Number of Trains Running on the Alameda Corridor.x emissions resulting from train operations in the Alameda

Sangkapichai, Mana; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Ritchie, Stephen G.; You, Soyoung Iris; Lee, Gunwoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends have been assessed under warmed-up and cold idle conditions. The speciated emissions show that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

196

Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power ignores the benefits of diversity. In real power systems, operators are required to balance only the net variations of all loads and all generators, not the output of individual loads or generators; doing otherwise would ensure an enormous amount of unnecessary investment and operating costs. As a result, detailed studies that aggregate the variability of all loads and generators to the system level find that the amount of operating reserves required to reliably integrate variable resources into the grid are on the order of 10% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generators, even when upto25%of gross demand is being met by variable generation. The authors implicit assumption that incremental operating reserves must be 100% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generation, and be available at all times to directly counter that variability, excludes the option of decommitting conventional units when the load net of variable generation is low. In real power systems, generation response to wind variation can typically be met by a combination of committed units, each operating at a relatively efficient point of their fuel curves. In the Supporting Information, we conceptually demonstrate that the CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} efficiency penalty found by the authors can be significantly reduced by considering the unit commitment decision with just five plants. Real systems often have tens to hundreds of plants that can be committed and decommitted over various time frames. Ignoring the flexibility of the unit commitment decision therefore leads to unsupportable results. Anumber of analyses of the fuel savings and CO{sub 2} emission benefits of variable generation have considered realistic operating reserve requirements and unit commitment decisions in models that include the reduction in part load efficiency of conventional plants. The efficiency penalty due to the variability of wind in four studies considered by Gross et al. is negligible to 7%, for up to a 20% wind penetration level. In short, for moderate wind penetration levels, 'there is no evidence available to

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

197

Technical Report: Design and operation of a new transportable laboratory for emissions testing of heavy duty trucks and buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A significant number of city buses, city tractors and utility trucks are already operating on alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol and natural gas. In response to the need for reliable emissions data from these vehicles, a transportable laboratory has been constructed and has operated on six different dates over the past nine months. This laboratory consists of a semi-trailer incorporating a chassis rolls dynamometer and a second trailer containing the necessary emissions and controls equipment. The semi-trailer can be lowered to the ground using specially designed hydraulic jacks and the vehicle to be tested is driven up ramps onto the rolls. Power is taken from the vehicle to flywheels and air-cooled eddy-current absorbers which simulate inertia and road load. The vehicle is driven through a speed-time cycle by a driver receiving a prompt on a screen, and vehicle speed is monitored by shaft encoders at three locations. The load applied to the vehicle is found using a road load equation: part of this energy is dissipated in rotating component parasitic losses determined during a calibration procedure and the remainder is dissipated by the computer-controlled power absorbers. Tailpipe emissions are ducted to a dilution tunnel, powered by a blower with critical flow venturies, while probes in the tunnel draw continuous samples to an analyser bench. Total hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are all monitored, while a composite particulate matter sample is obtained on a filter. A bank of such data for methanol, diesel, jet fuel and natural gas powered buses operating primarily on the Central Business District Cycle is presently being gathered and analysed.

Nigel N. Clark; Mridul Gautam; Reda M. Bata; Wen-Guang Wang; John L. Loth; G. Michael Palmer; Donald W. Lyons

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits: Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST Pioneering Markets to Improve the Environment Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC Patrick Leahy and Alden Hathaway April 2004 The Renewable Energy Certificate Market The past few years have witnessed the emergence of the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) market as a viable model for the U.S. renewable energy industry. Once considered an esoteric topic for even the most ardent renewable energy expert, RECs have grown in popularity and exposure thanks to efforts of the renewable energy industry as well as several large purchases by high profile corporations and governmental organizations. Although still in its infancy, the Renewable Energy

199

Impact of Varying Atmospheric Profiles on Extensive Air Shower Observation: Fluorescence Light Emission and Energy Reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several experiments measure the fluorescence light produced by extensive air showers in the atmosphere. This light is converted into a longitudinal shower profile from which information on the primary energy and composition is derived. The fluorescence yield, as the conversion factor between light profile measured by EAS experiments and physical interpretation of showers, has been measured in several laboratory experiments. The results, however, differ considerably. In this article, a model calculation of the fluorescence emission from relevant band systems of nitrogen in dependence on wavelength and atmospheric conditions is presented. Different calculations are compared to each other in combination with varying input parameters. The predictions are compared with measurements and the altitude-dependence of the fluorescence yield is discussed in detail.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

The COMPLY computer program for demonstrating compliance with national radionuclide air emission standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed national radionuclide air emission standards for a number of source categories. One of these standards applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and non-Department of Energy facilities having the potential to release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Approximately 6000 facilities are subject to the standard, which limits the effective whole-body dose commitment to the maximally exposed individual from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. A computer program to assist the regulated community in determining compliance has been developed by the EPA's Office of Radiation Programs. The computer program COMPLY calculates the dose to an individual residing outside the facility. The program considers dose from inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food, air immersion, and ground deposition. It is based on models developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Compliance procedures provided in COMPLY are designed to reduce the burden on the regulated community. The approach begins with simple-to-use methods that are very conservative in determining compliance. The methods become progressively less conservative but more complicated at succeeding levels. Each higher level requires the input of site-specific information, but allows a more realistic estimate of dose. This paper describes the COMPLY program, and provides estimates of the work required and the degree of conservatism in the dose computed at each level.

Colli, A.; Beal, S.; Loomis, D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bay County, Florida waste-to-energy facility air emission tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bay County Resource Management Center is located 10 miles Northeast of Panama City, Florida. Panama City is a resort community approximately 100 miles east of Pensacola, Florida, on the northwest coast of Florida's panhandle. The average population of this area is approximately 115,000. The average quantity of municipal solid (MSW) waste generated in Bay County during most of the year is 300 tons per day. However, during the summer months when the population increases to more than 150,000 the community must handle in excess of 350 tons of MSW per day. The County decided to design the facility to ultimately burn 510 tons of MSW to allow additional waste to be processed as the population and quantity of waste increases. Until other sources of MSW are procured, the facility is supplementing the 350 tpd of MSW with about 160 tpd of wood waste.The facility began initial start-up, equipment check-out, and instrument calibration in February 1987. Plant shakedown and systems operational checks were made from February through May. This paper discusses emission testing which was conducted from late April through early June. The emission compliance tests were completed on June 4-5, 1987. The facility acceptance test and emission compliance test were completed five months ahead of the original project schedule.

Beachler, D.S.; Pompelia, D.M.; Weldon, J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Predictability of European air quality: Assessment of 3 years of operational forecasts and analyses by the PREV'AIR system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ments are still needed to manage and control the impacts of air pollution on health. [3] Facing, is proved to improve ozone forecasts, especially when photochemical pollution episodes occur. The PREV'AIR and laws regarding the pollutants of utmost importance in relation to human health, air pollution is still

Menut, Laurent

203

Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hot-standby for operational MetNet system used by Air Traffic Control (LVNL) at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hot-standby for operational MetNet system used by Air Traffic Control (LVNL) at Amsterdam Airport) patterns and OS abstraction library. Java Applet for remote operation and configuration. In commercial provider. They provide integrated design, build and operate solutions to large multi-national clients

Haak, Hein

205

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model aerosoland its role in regional air quality. Science, 311, 67-70.In United-States Air-Quality Studies. Atmos. Environ. , 27,

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Importance of the Return Air Opening to Degree of Turbulence in a I-Grade Clean Operating Room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a high Reynold K-etwo equation model has been used. The range of return air openings that can be used has been induced by numerical simulation to influence the return air opening and degree of turbulence in an I-Grade clean operating...

Cheng, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Implementation of the Clean Air Act, Title V operating permit program requirements for the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title V of the Clean Air Act (CAA) establishes a new permit program requiring major sources and sources subject to Title III (Hazardous Air Pollutants) to obtain a state operating permit. Historically, most states have issued operating permits for individual emission units. Under the Title V permit program, a single permit will be issued for all of the emission units at the facility much like the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. The permit will specify all reporting, monitoring, and record-keeping requirements for the facility. Sources required to obtain permits include (a) major sources that emit 100 tons per year or more of any criteria air contaminant, (b) any source subject to the HAP provisions of Title III, (c) any source subject to the acid rain provisions of Title IV, (d) any source subject to New Source Performance Standards, and (e) any source subject to new source review under the nonattainment or Prevention of Significant Deterioration provisions. The State of Tennessee Title V Operating Permit Program was approved by EPA on August 28, 1996. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title V Operating Permit Program. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the ETTP conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. Each of the three DOE Facilities is considered a major source under Title V of the CAA.

Humphreys, M.P. [Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States). Environmental Protection Div.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

210

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emissions inventory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) The goals of the inventory were to determine how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Duke is responsible... Emissions Inventoried 12;2004 Greenhouse Gas...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emission inventory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) The goals of the inventory were to determine how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Duke is responsible... Emissions Inventoried 12;2004 Greenhouse Gas...

213

Rules to Cut Carbon Emissions Also Reduce Other Air Pollutants A first-of-its-kind study released today by scientists at Syracuse and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rules to Cut Carbon Emissions Also Reduce Other Air Pollutants A first-of-its-kind study released to the reference case. This option reduced carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector by 35 percent from 2005 to significant gains in public and environmental health. "When power plants limit carbon dioxide emissions

Mather, Patrick T.

214

Cooling energy efficiency and classroom air environment of a school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently-built school buildings have adopted novel heat recovery ventilator and air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification and indoor air quality indicated by the CO2 concentration have been numerically modeled concerning the effects of delivering ventilation flow rate and supplying air temperature. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of mechanical ventilation rate can simultaneously boost the dilution of indoor air pollutants and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal and pollutant distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of supplying air. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Di Liu; Li-Qun Liu; Xiao-Chuan Pan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understand and control this air pollutant. The effectivenessair pollution time series requires long records of pollutant concentrations to control

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of total nitrate and ammonia were made during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study using a steam

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Impact on Health of Emissions to Air from Municipal Waste Incinerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact concentrations of air pollutants. The Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products responsibility to advise Government and Local Authorities on possible health impacts of air pollutants. 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Operations and maintenance report on Air Force oil/water separators. Final report, September 1985-August 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to provide general guidance for the routine operation and maintenance of oil/water separators. The report should help managers and operators to recognize and correct problems affecting the separation process of oil and water. The most common types of gravity separators used by the Air Force are discussed. Other topics include operation guidelines, flow measurements, maintenance service, waste disposal and regulations, sampling and testing, recordkeeping and spill-prevention measures.

Kilroy, M.D.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Application of a statistical post-processing technique to a gridded, operational, air quality forecast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An automated air quality forecast bias correction scheme based on the short-term persistence of model bias with respect to recent observations is described. The scheme has been implemented in the operational Met Office five day regional air quality forecast for the UK. It has been evaluated against routine hourly pollution observations for a year-long hindcast. The results demonstrate the value of the scheme in improving performance. For the first day of the forecast the post-processing reduces the bias from 7.02 to 0.53 ?g m?3 for O3, from ?4.70 to ?0.63 ?g m?3 for NO2, from ?4.00 to ?0.13 ?g m?3 for PM2.5 and from ?7.70 to ?0.25 ?g m?3 for PM10. Other metrics also improve for all species. An analysis of the variation of forecast skill with lead-time is presented and demonstrates that the post-processing increases forecast skill out to five days ahead.

L.S. Neal; P. Agnew; S. Moseley; C. Ordóńez; N.H. Savage; M. Tilbee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

330E 330E Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Josh Bode, Michael Sullivan, Joseph H. Eto January 2012 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

224

Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

Scudiere, Matthew B

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effects of Future Ship Emissions in the North Sea on Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of model simulations with the chemistry transport model CMAQ the influence of ship emissions in the North Sea on concentrations ... and nitrogen oxides over Europe was investigated. Ship emissions for th...

Armin Aulinger; Volker Matthias…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...greenhouse gas and SO2 emissions...greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...electricity generation, oil refining...from coal-fired power plants. Fig...electricity generation mixes as the...natural gas, coal, nuclear...hydroelectric power is assumed...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nitrogen oxide emissions from a kraft recovery furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions from a rebuilt kraft recovery furnace slightly exceeded the specified limit of 1.1 lb/ton (0.55 kg/metric ton) of black-liquor solids. Mill trials were undertaken to determine whether NOx emissions could be minimized by modifying furnace operation. NOx emissions increased when secondary air was shifted to tertiary ports. NOx emissions fell when the amounts of primary and total air were decreased, but this increased emissions of other pollutants. After demonstrating that best operation of the furnace could not meet the permit with an emissions limit that matched the furnace's performance at best operation.

Prouty, A.L.; Stuart, R.C. (James River Corp., Camas, WA (United States)); Caron, A.L. (NCASI West Coast Regional Office, Corvallis, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , (2008a). Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions fromstudy of indoor nitrogen dioxide levels and respiratoryand modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. All

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analysis of efficiency of control of operation conditions of air gas cooling devices at compressor stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on calculations of energy consumption by air gas cooling devices, an analysis has been made of the efficiency of the methods of control of temperature conditions of the transported gas. Two types of air ...

A. V. Krupnikov; A. D. Vanyashov; I. A. Yanvarev

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual...

McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Operation of Energy-Efficient Air-Conditioned Buildings: An Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To design an optimum HVAC airside system that provides comfort and air quality in the air-conditioned spaces with efficient energy consumption is a great challenge. This paper evaluates recent progresses of HVAC airside design for the air-conditioned...

Khalil, E. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Air Pollution Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum and chemical processes are responsible for many emissions both into the air. Most relevant emissions into the air are nitrous oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides ... compounds (VOC).The major cause of all air pollution

Alireza Bahadori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Polar firn air reveals large-scale impact of anthropogenic mercury emissions during the 1970s  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...anticipated growth in coal combustion, steel production, gold...i) air mixing by pressure and temperature gradients...Delineation of carbonate dust, aluminous dust, and sea salt deposition...Summit temperature and pressure (8): D T, PS urface...

Xavier Faďn; Christophe P. Ferrari; Aurélien Dommergue; Mary R. Albert; Mark Battle; Jeff Severinghaus; Laurent Arnaud; Jean-Marc Barnola; Warren Cairns; Carlo Barbante; Claude Boutron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The air quality impact of aviation in future-year emissions scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid growth of aviation is critical to the world and US economy, and it faces several important challenges among which lie the environmental impacts of aviation on noise, climate and air quality. The first objective ...

Ashok, Akshay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Simulation Of Emission Dispersion As The Method Of Air Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article overlooks the mathematical simulation of air pollutants dis persion in the ambient atmosphere. A short analysis of the necessity for atmospheric dispersion modeling is presented and the influence o...

Z. Comarova; S. Mangul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Emissions of Air Pollutants from Household Stoves:? Honeycomb Coal versus Coal Cake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In generating 1 MJ of delivered energy, the H-coal resulted in a significant reduction in emissions of SO2 (by 68%), NOx (by 47%), and TSP (by 56%) as compared to the C-coal, whereas the emissions of PM2.5 and total BaP from the H-coal combustion were 2?3-fold higher, indicating that improvements are needed to further reduce emissions of these pollutants in developing future honeycomb coals. ... NOx are responsible for numerous environmnetal problems including photochemical smog, acid rain, water quality deterioration, global warming, visibility imparment, etc. (30). ...

Su Ge; Xu Xu; Judith C. Chow; John Watson; Qing Sheng; Weili Liu; Zhipeng Bai; Tan Zhu; Junfeng Zhang

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...New biofuel feedstocks (e.g., algae, Jatropha, hybrid...4 McCormick R ( 2008 ) The impact of biodiesel on pollutant emissions and public health...and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels . Proc Natl Acad...

Jason Hill; Stephen Polasky; Erik Nelson; David Tilman; Hong Huo; Lindsay Ludwig; James Neumann; Haochi Zheng; Diego Bonta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

240

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to Wind and Solar Power” Andrew Mills, ? , † RyanDue to Wind and Solar Power” Andrew Mills, ? , † Ryanthat wind and solar decrease NO x emissions. Andrew Mills et

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Water Loss Control Using Pressure Management: Life-cycle Energy and Air Emission Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath; Reinhard Sturm

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions.… (more)

Ruscio, Amanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Implementation of Smart Operation Strategies for Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems for Ministries Complex in the State of Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the smart operation strategies. These savings led to a reduction of $1,500 per typical summer day of the MEW fuel bill and 8,918 kg/day of CO2 emissions. To make MC building more energy efficient, it is recommended to retrofit AHUs and secondary chilled...

Al-Mulla, A.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Al-Nakib, D.; Ishaqali, H.

244

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

245

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

Demirel, Melik C.

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - air operations vision Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

air quality, material use and reuse and waste management. With the completion of the LEED ... Source: Ponce, V. Miguel - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, San...

247

INFLUENCE OF DESIGN AND OPERATING CONDITIONS ON UNDERFLOOR AIR DISTRIBUTION (UFAD) SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zones. Variable speed fan coil units (VSFCU) provide air tounit (AHU) including an airside economizer, a chilled water cooling coil, and a relief fan.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-01-0474 -01-0474 The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions Thomas Wallner and Henry K. Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert W. Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham Copyright © 2007 SAE International ABSTRACT Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising future energy carriers and transportation fuels. Because of the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations, widespread introduction of vehicles powered by pure hydrogen is not likely in the near future. Blending hydrogen with methane could be one solution. Such blends take advantage of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and, at the same time, reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. In this paper, the authors analyze the combustion properties of hydrogen/methane

249

Operation of a Joint Utility/Industry Ambient Air Monitoring Program in the Houston Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for achieving compliance of the NAAQS for ozone in Houston have largely heen directed at controlling photochemically reactive volatile hydrocarbon emissions from industrial stationary and fugitive sources. Evidence gathered by the monitoring network and from... suggest that the most cost-effective emission controls for both stationary and fugitive emissions sources in Harris County have been implemented. It is estimated that a reduction of an additional 10,000 to 20,000 tons of Volatile Organic...

Kush, J. A.

250

Experimental Investigation on the Operation Performance of a Liquid Desiccant Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large share of energy consumption is taken by an air-conditioning system. It worsens the electricity load of the power network. Therefore, more and more scholars are paying attention to research on new types of air-conditioning systems...

Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wu, Z.; Gu, W.; Zhang, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Extremum seeking control for efficient and reliable operation of air-side economizers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economizers have been recognized as a class of energy-saving devices for heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems that may increase the energy efficiency by taking advantage of outdoor air during cool or cold weather. There has been a ...

Pengfei Li; Yaoyu Li; John E. Seem

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Abatement of Air Pollution: Permit to Construct and Operate Stationary Sources (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Permits are required for the construction or major modification of a stationary source or emission unit. Some exemptions apply. These regulations describe permit requirements, authorized activities...

253

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plant materials and wastes. Because plants...analysis on current industry data, with natural...for an integrated gasification combined-cycle...projections for the industry in 2020...connect . J Air and Waste Manage Assoc 56 : 709 – 742...is applied, an industry-weighted average...

Jason Hill; Stephen Polasky; Erik Nelson; David Tilman; Hong Huo; Lindsay Ludwig; James Neumann; Haochi Zheng; Diego Bonta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inc. , 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study, Volume I; Min-Parsons, B. Utility wind integration and operating impactthe 2005 New York Wind Integration Study (3), the 2006

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...realistic mass-market alternative and an...greater use of diesel, and shorter driving...required. Gasoline, diesel, liquefied petroleum...impacts on global markets (see for example...depending on secondary markets. GREET 2.7a pulls...emissions (e.g., diesel fuel combus-tion...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assumed. The life-cycle boundary includes emissions...the results of life-cycle assessment. Often...required. Gasoline, diesel, liquefied petroleum...prior work on the life cycle of petroleum products...and/or com-putable general equilibrium models with...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cold side thermal energy storage system for improved operation of air cooled power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air cooled power plants experience significant performance fluctuations as plant cooling capacity reduces due to higher daytime temperature than nighttime temperature. The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the detailed ...

Williams, Daniel David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - air operated valve Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.5 mm in dia- meter. To create an inlet for air into the pneumatic valve, we used polyethylene tubing... the pneumatic valve, we connected the tubing of the valve ... Source:...

259

The Role of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in Intermodal Air Cargo Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tpt/4lv_wtil.html . [6] Boeing Commercial Airplane Group,World Air Cargo Forecast, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group,Stage II noisy aircraft (e.g. , Boeing 727s) and moves their

Tsao, H.-S. Jacob; Rizwan, Asim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method and apparatus for operating a self-starting air heating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-starting, fuel fired, air heating system including a fuel burner fired vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser and heating the air. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with a method and apparatus which on start-up prevents the vapor generator's vapor output from being conducted to the turbine until a predetermined pressure differential has been achieved. However, after the vapor flow is once permitted, it cannot again be prevented until after the fuel burner has been shut off and restarted.

Heinrich, Charles E. (Mentor, OH)

1983-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Enhanced Operation Strategies for Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems Toward Peak Power Reduction for an Office Building in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced?Operation?Strategies?for?Air? Conditioning?and?Lighting? Systems?Toward?Peak?Power?Reduction? for?an?Office?Building?in?Kuwait F. Alghimlas A. Al-Mulla G.P. Maheshwari D. Al-Nakib Building and Energy Technologies Department... Environment and Urban Development Division ICEBO 2012 Manchester, United Kingdom October 23-26, 2012 Electricity?Use?by?Sector?in?Kuwait Percentages?of?Primary?Energy?Utilization Percentages?of?Electricity?Utilization Yearly?Increase?in...

Alghimlas, F.; Al-Mulla, A.; Maheshwari, G.P.; Al-Nakib, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Generation of ultrahigh frequency air microplasma in a magnetic loop and effects of pulse modulation on operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An atmospheric pressure air microplasma (APAMP) source was developed under ambient conditions using a magnetic loop at an operating frequency of 740 MHz. A self-igniting, stable APAMP was generated at 9.5 W. Pulse modulation (PM) was applied to the ultra high frequency signal. The effects of PM on self-ignition and operation of the APAMP source were studied by using a square wave modulating signal in the frequency range of 5-30 KHz. With the application of PM on the APAMP, in the best case, the plasma self-ignites and is sustained at 2.5 W.

Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Perlow, Joshua; Zaghloul, Mona [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Montaser, Akbar [Department of Chemistry, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modification of boiler operating conditions for mercury emissions reductions in coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter and char, and cold-end air pollution control devices. There is also evidence that boiler is equipped with hot and cold precipitators and a tubular air preheater. A strategy for mercury control designated hazardous air pollutants by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), mercury (Hg) has

Li, Ying

264

Characterization of terahertz emission from a dc-biased filament in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the terahertz emission from a dc-biased filament can be regarded as a sum of an elliptically polarized terahertz source (generated by a filament without external electric field) and a linearly polarized terahertz source induced by the external electric field applied to the filament. The peak frequency and linewidth of the linearly polarized terahertz source are related to the average plasma density of the filament.

Chen Yanping; Wang Tiejun; Marceau, Claude; Chin, See Leang [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL), and Departement de Physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Theberge, Francis; Chateauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques [Defence Research and Development Canada-Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Blvd. North, Quebec, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada); Kosareva, Olga [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...total cost at each location. Refineries are then rank ordered, and the...gasoline refining. Using the refinery operable capacities, a weighting is determined...The weighting vector for the refineries is multiplied and then summed...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, TX 78711-3087 Dear Chairman Shaw: The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of The Texas A&M University System is pleased to provide its sixth annual report, “Statewide Emissions Calculations From Wind..., and develop and use a methodology to annually report the energy savings from wind and other renewables. This report summarizes the work performed by the ESL on this project from September 2011 to July 2012. Please contact me at (979) 845-1280 should you...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Claridge, D.; Do, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the 300 Area Process Sewer Cleanout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the cleanout of sections of the 300 Area PS. Approval of the NOC will allow the pressure washing of certain pipe sections, the sump in the TEDF lift station, and the cleaning of PS 16 of the 300 Area PS that contains low levels of radioactivity. Section 15.0 of this NOC discusses the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) resulting from the unabated emissions from these cleaning activities. Using the currently approved unit dose conversion factors in HNF-3602, the estimated potential TEDE to the MEI resulting from the unabated, fugitive emissions from cleanout of the 300 Area PS is 4.70 E-05 millirem (mrem) per year. This dose was derived by conservatively estimating the doses from both the pressure washing and the use of the Guzzler{trademark} for removal of the liquid/soil mixture, as described in Section 5.0. and adding these doses together.

MENARD, N.M.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Federal operating permits program under Title V of the Clean Air Act. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

;Table of Contents: Introduction; Transition Between Parts 70 and 71; Title V Obligations and Applicability; Synthetic Minors, Potential to Emit, and Transition Policy; Permit Application Step and Content; Flexible Permit Approaches; Hazardous Air Pollution Program Requirements for Title V; Information Sources; Appendix A. EPA Memoranda; and Appendix B. Seminar Overhead Transparencies.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

Gary D. McGinnis

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - air transport operations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . Experience ORNL has developed the Transportation Operations Model (TOM) software for the Department of Energy... for optimization Center for Transportation...

271

Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Results show that fuel-injection timing is the dominant factor contributing to PN emissions from this wall-guided GDI engine.

272

Improving the Operating Efficiency of Packaged Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses several control strategies that can significantly reduce energy consumption associated with packaged rooftop units RTUs). Although all of the considered strategies are widely used in built-up air-handing units, they are not commonly used in existing RTUs. Both simulation and field evaluations show that adding these control strategies to existing RTUs can reduce their energy consumption by between 30% and 60%.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Vowles, Mira

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

274

Characteristics of a Direct Current-driven plasma jet operated in open air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A DC-driven plasma jet has been developed to generate a diffuse plasma plume by blowing argon into the ambient air. The plasma plume, showing a cup shape with a diameter of several centimeters at a higher voltage, is a pulsed discharge despite a DC voltage is applied. The pulse frequency is investigated as a function of the voltage under different gap widths and gas flow rates. Results show that plasma bullets propagate from the hollow needle to the plate electrode by spatially resolved measurement. A supposition about non-electroneutral trail of the streamer is proposed to interpret these experimental phenomena.

Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China) [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronics Information Materials of Hebei Province, Baoding 071002 (China); Di, Cong; Jia, Pengying [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)] [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Conceptual aircraft design for environmental impact : modeling operations for emissions assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decisions that guide technology investment and policy-making for the future of air transportation will be based in part on the tradeoffs between environmental performance and economics. The Environmental Design Space (EDS) ...

King, Daniel J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

New standards for mechanical loading of HV air switches to reduce operating problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problems inherent in dealing with mechanical forces upon switch terminals of high voltage air disconnect switches could be reduced substantially if proposed new mechanical loading standards were adopted, says Donald L. Lott of Siemens-Allis' Power Switching division. The result would be longer, more reliable service life. Simply stated, current standards do not take into consideration the bending moment exerted on the switch terminal pad, which can lead to improper alignment, misoperation and high stress on terminal pads. Lott says that mechanical loadings on terminal pads of HV substation air disconnect switches dictate the location of bus or cable support insulators and expansion connectors for rigid bus. While horizontal and vertical (weight of the conductor) forces are usually considered in design criteria, the bending moment caused by rigid bus sag is not taken into consideration when span lengths are long. Yet, he warns, this force often may be the most significant and can influence the location of the bus support insulators. The proposed standards would incorporate the effect of such bending moments.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Effect of Model and Operating Parameters on Air Gasification of Char  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Sheffield University, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom ... It produces gaseous species such as CO, H2, and CH4 which can either be burned in a separated chamber with ultralow pollutant emissions or further synthesized into materials for the chemical industry. ... The effect on the gasification rate is very small, though, no more than 3%, and the case for ? = 0 results in a slightly higher gasifying rate than ? = 1. ...

Yao Bin Yang; ChangKook Ryu; Vida N. Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Annual report summarizes the research performed from 17 April 2005 through 16 April 2006. Major portions of the research in several of the project's current eight tasks have been completed. We have successfully developed the meteorological inputs using the best possible modeling configurations, resulting in improved representation of atmospheric processes. The development of the variable-grid-resolution emissions model, SMOKE-VGR, is also completed. The development of the MAQSIP-VGR has been completed and a test run was performed to ensure the functionality of this air quality model. We have incorporated new emission data base to update the offshore emissions. However, we have faced some bottleneck problems in the testing the integrity of the new database. For this reason, we have asked for a no cost extension of this project to tackle these scientific problems. Thus, the project is on a one-year delay schedule. During the reporting period, we solved all problems related to the new emission database. We are ready to move to developing the final product, implementation and testing of the variable grid technology into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) to develop the CMAQ-VGR. During the upcoming months we will perform the first CMAQ-VGR simulations over the Houston-Galveston region to study the roles of the meteorology, offshore emissions, and chemistry-transport interactions that determine the temporal and spatial evolution of ozone and its precursors.

Kiran Alapaty

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sequential quadratic programming particle swarm optimization for wind power system operations considering emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a computation framework for addressing combined economic and emission dispatch (CEED) problem with valve-point effects as well ... swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed. The CEED problem aims to min...

Yang Zhang; Fang Yao; Herbert Ho-Ching Iu…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Some operational aspects and applications of dividing wall columns: energy requirements and carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the end of 20th century and beginning of the 21st, oil prices reached 100 USD per barrel, and more attention was given to environmental regulations on carbon dioxide emissions. As a result, applications of...

Raúl Delgado-Delgado; Salvador Hernández…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Air Transport and Operations Symposium 2011 Strategic Jet Engine System Design in Light of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices that result from increasingly restricted access to crude oil. Climate change will also force ETWEEN 1971 and 2009, the 12-month average oil price fluctuated between $15 and over $90 per barrel Operating Cost of U.S. airlines* as Fig. 1 on the next page proves. 2. Peak Oil & Oil Price Predictions

283

An Analysis of the health impacts from PM and NOx emissions resulting from train operations in the Alameda Corridor, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Ballester, F. Air Pollution and Health: An Overview WithAir Pollution and Mortality, Special Report, Health Effectsrespiratory Health Effects of Air Pollution on Children with

Sangkapichai, Mana; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Ritchie, Stephen G.; You, Soyoung Iris; Lee, Gunwoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control technology.1 46 sions from the list of regulated hazardous air pollutantsAir Act includes "only those pollutants subject to a statutory or regulatory provision that requires actual control

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The effect of air charge temperature on performance, ignition delay and exhaust emissions of diesel engines using w/o emulsions as fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the work performed on the use of water/oil emulsions in diesel engines showed that increasing the water content in the emulsified fuel was effective in reducing NO/sub x/ and soot emissions. Unfortunately, the increase in water content in the emulsified fuel also increases the ignition delay and may cause diesel knock. One way to reduce the ignition delay is to increase the air charge temperature. In this study, the effect of increasing the air charge temperature on ignition delay, performance and exhaust emissions was investigated. The experiments were conducted on a CLR diesel engine using base-line diesel fuel number2 and stabilized macro-emulsions containing 15 percent, 30 percent and 45 percent water by volume.

Afify, E.M.; Korah, N.S.; Dickey, D.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Robust economic/emission dispatch considering wind power uncertainties and flexible operation of carbon capture and storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With increasing wind farm development, solutions of Economic/Emission Power Dispatch (EED) are becoming more difficult to meet the demand of both optimality and robustness because of wind power uncertainties. In this paper, a Robust Economic/Emission Dispatch (REED) model based on effective function is built to deal with wind power uncertainties and Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) method is employed to improve the calculation precision of effective function. As carbon capture and storage (CCS) plays an important role in reducing carbon emission, the impact of CCS, which operates in flexible mode, on EED problem is also investigated. Multi-objective bacterial colony chemotaxis (MOBCC) is adopted to solve the REED problem. Finally, tests of the proposed method are carried out in the IEEE 30-bus test system. Results demonstrate that the REED model can meet the demand of obtaining robust solutions in the presence of wind power uncertainties and flexible operation of CCS has the advantage of dealing with different carbon reduction index.

Zhigang Lu; Shoulong He; Tao Feng; Xueping Li; Xiaoqiang Guo; Xiaofeng Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Influence of operating conditions and coal properties on \\{NOx\\} and N2O emissions in pressurized fluidized bed combustion of subbituminous coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This experimental study is aimed at finding effects of operating conditions in PFBC on nitrogen oxide emissions for subbituminous coals differing in ash content/composition, combustion/gasification reactivities and in particle size distribution. The experiments have been done on a smaller laboratory apparatus with ID=8 cm. The effects of operating pressure (0.1–1 MPa), temperature of the fluidized bed (800–900 °C), freeboard temperature and oxygen concentration (3–10 vol.%) on the nitrogen oxides emissions are relatively complex, coupled with temperature of burning coal particles. The coal ash content/composition (esp. CaO and Fe2O3) and fly ash freeboard concentration play an important role in formation/destruction chemistry of both NO and N2O. The \\{NOx\\} emissions decrease with increasing operating pressure at the same volumetric oxygen concentration and temperature. Temperature, volatile content, reactivities of coals and ash composition are the most important factors for N2O emissions. The N2O emissions are either almost constant or can exhibit a maximum at increasing operating pressure. Influence of increasing oxygen concentration on \\{NOx\\} and N2O emissions is more pronounced at lower operating pressures, esp. for the less reactive, medium ash coal. The particle size distribution of the coal (influence of coal dust) can cause characteristic changes in \\{NOx\\} and N2O emissions in PFBC, esp. at lower combustion temperatures (800–840 °C). The emission changes are dependent on ash properties/composition.

Karel Svoboda; Michael Poho?elý

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 5, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) selected remedial action decisions for contaminant source areas at the following Areas of Contamination (AOCs) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) in Barnstable County on Cape Cod, Massachusetts: Fire Training Area No. 2 and Landfill No. 2 (FTA-2/LF-2); Petroleum Fuels Storage Area, Fuel Spill No. 10, and Fuel Spill No. 11 (PFSA/FS-10/FS-11); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 2, Fuel Spill No. 6, and Fuel Spill No. 8 (SD-2/FS-6/FS-8); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 2, Fire Training Area No. 3, and Coal Storage Yard No. 4 (SF-3/FTA-3/CY-4); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 4 (SD-4); and Storm Drainage Ditch No. 5 and Fuel Spill No. 5 (SD-5/FS-5). The selected remedy for AOC FTA-2/LF-2 is Biosparging with Ambient Air Monitoring. This remedial action is a source control action that addresses leaching of organic compounds to groundwater, the principal known threat at AOC FTA-2/LF-2. It consists of designing, constructing, and operating a biosparging treatment system, maintaining institutional controls, and five-year reviews of remedy protectiveness. The remedy reduces the release of contaminants from subsurface soils by treating subsurface soils to meet protective cleanup levels.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference ...

Andreas Petzold; Peter Lauer; Uwe Fritsche; Jan Hasselbach; Michael Lichtenstern; Hans Schlager; Fritz Fleischer

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

293

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FROM BIOMASS, COAL, AN) ASSESSMENT NATURAL GAS 1 (2002),ASSESSMENT OF GREENiiousE GAS EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Estimated 2017 Refrigerant Emissions of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFC-1234yf) in the United States Resulting from Automobile Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of MAC systems also consumes significant quantities of fuel as compared to similar driving conditions without operating the air conditioning. ... However, turning off the air conditioner and rolling-down the windows also decreases fuel economy due to increased air drag but this scenario is not considered in these studies (1, 2). ... In 2006, the European Commission issued Directive 2006/40/EC (commonly known as the F-Gas Directive) (3), which requires new types of air-conditioned cars sold in the EU to have a refrigerant with a GWP of 150 or less starting in 2011, and all new vehicles to have a refrigerant with a GWP of 150 or less by 2017. ...

Stella Papasavva; Deborah J. Luecken; Robert L. Waterland; Kristen N. Taddonio; Stephen O. Andersen

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

Performance analysis and exhaust emissions of neem methyl ester operated compression ignition engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neem oil methyl ester (NOME) was prepared from neem oil using alkaline catalyzed transesterification. The important fuel properties of NOME 20% blend of NOME with diesel were compared with those of diesel. Optimum injection pressures were determined for neat diesel and NOME-20 blend. Comparison of brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) brake thermal efficiency (BTE) exhaust gas temperature (EGT) and smoke density was done for diesel and NOME-20 blend at their respective optimum injection pressure. Higher BSFC a slight decrease in BTE and a sharp decrease in EGT and smoke density were recorded with NOME-20 blend. Emissions with NOME-20 blend were also compared with diesel emissions at their respective optimum injection pressures. Significant reductions in carbon monoxide hydrocarbon and oxides of nitrogen and increase in carbon-di-oxide were observed with NOME-20 blend. Hence neem biodiesel has an environmental importance over diesel and shows a promising future.

Vinod Singh Yadav; Kamal Kishore Khatri; Deepak Tanwar; Ajayta; Dilip Sharma; S. L. Soni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both natural processes and human activities contribute to air pollution, with the combustion of fossil fuels being the largest anthropogenic source of air pollutants. Adverse health effects (above all respiratory and cardiovascular complications), damage to crops, natural vegetation and materials, reduced visibility and changed radiation balance of the atmosphere are the major consequences of high concentrations of air pollutants. Technical fixes can sharply reduce emissions from large stationary sources and lower the rates of automotive emissions, but the rising number of vehicles and longer time spent on the road will call for more radical solutions to traffic-generated photochemical smog now present in all major urban areas.

V. Smil

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Characteristic fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in fully mechanized logging operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was done using eight different logging machines (harvesters and forwarders) in clear-felling operations to quantify the associated fuel consumption, and to define the inherent relationship between engine ...

Radomir Klvac; Alois Skoupy

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

300

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine – Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine – Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions ... † Center of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409, United States ... Growing concern over emissions from increased airport operations has resulted in a need to assess the impact of aviation related activities on local air quality in and around airports, and to develop strategies to mitigate these effects. ...

Prem Lobo; Lucas Rye; Paul I. Williams; Simon Christie; Ilona Uryga-Bugajska; Christopher W. Wilson; Donald E. Hagen; Philip D. Whitefield; Simon Blakey; Hugh Coe; David Raper; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Air Quality Rules (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a comprehensive air quality rule for North Carolina that includes ambient air quality standards, emission control standards, monitoring and reporting requirements, and permitting procedures...

302

Biofiltration of Asphalt Emissions: Full-scale Operation Treating Off-gases from Polymer-modified Asphalt Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to complaints from nearby residents, a biofilter was designed, installed, and tested for treating odors in one of three odorous emission streams from an asphalt plant producing polymer-modified asphalt. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was determined to be the most prevalent gaseous reduced sulfur compound and was detected in the emission stream only when polymer material was being added to raw asphalt. Emission stream H2S concentrations we requite variable, ranging from 16 to approximately 30,000 ppm (v/v) and considered the likely compound contributing most to the plant's odor complaints. The biofilter was effective in controlling odor from the production process and removed an overall average of 65% of the H2S during polymer addition, and for H2S concentrations less than 400 ppmv, re m oval averaged 98%. These removal efficiencies reflect data from the biofilter operating at 2.5-minute empty bed residence time in 1996 and a 6.1-minute empty bed residence time in 1997. The biofilter's bed became increasingly acidified during the plant's 1997 operating season producing a pH gradient through the bed ranging from a high of 6.6 to a low of 3.1. The bed medium moisture content remained constant at about 60% (wet weight basis), but changes were observed in the water potential: no correlation to performance was determined. Changes in the microbial community reflected the bed acidification trend, with acidophiles becoming gene rally more numerous in the bed's deeper portions and in the mid to late season when the bed was most acidified. Bed acidification did not impact the biofilter's H2S removal efficiency. Nearby residents we resurveyed and roughly half of the respondents indicated that the odor conditions had improved, one-third felt odor conditions were unchanged and the remaining 15% felt odor conditions were worse despite the fact that only one of three of the plant's odorous emission streams were treated by the biofilter. Plans are to implement biofiltration for odor control at all of the facility's emission points.

Cook, Lawrence Leslie; Apel, William Arnold; Gostomski, P. A.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Regulations for Air Quality (Quebec, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Regulation establishes emission standards for particulates and gases, emission opacity standards, standards of air quality and control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the emission of...

304

Biofiltration of asphalt emissions: Full-scale operation treating off-gases from polymer-modified asphalt production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to complaints from nearby residents, a biofilter was designed, installed, and tested for treating odors in one of three odorous emission streams from an asphalt plant producing polymer-modified asphalt. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) was determined to be the most prevalent gaseous reduced sulfur compound and was detected in the emission stream only when polymer material was being added to raw asphalt. Emission stream H{sub 2}S concentrations were quite variable, ranging from 16 to approximately 30,000 ppm (v/v) and considered the likely compound contributing most to the plant's odor complaints. The biofilter was effective in controlling odor from the production process and removed an overall average of 65% of the H{sub 2}S during polymer addition, and for H{sub 2}S concentrations less than 400 ppmv, removal averaged 98%. These removal efficiencies reflect data from the biofilter operating at 2.5-minute empty bed residence time in 1996 and a 6.1-minute empty bed residence time in 1997. The biofilter's bed became increasingly acidified during the plant's 1997 operating season producing a pH gradient through the bed ranging from a high of 6.6 to a low of 3.1. The bed medium moisture content remained constant at about 60% (wet weight basis), but changes were observed in the water potential: no correlation to performance was determined. Changes in the microbial community reflected the bed acidification trend, with acidophiles becoming generally more numerous in the bed's deeper portions and in the mid to late season when the bed was most acidified. Bed acidification did not impact the biofilter's H{sub 2}S removal efficiency.

Cook, L.L.; Gostomski, P.A.; Apel, W.A.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR THE PARALLEL OPERATION OF MULTIPLE BENCH SCALE BIOTRICKLING FILTERS FOR WASTE AIR TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollutants into the atmosphere. Amongst the various air pollution control techniques available, biological provides a new and inexpensive tool for comparative studies in biotrickling filtration for air pollution: biofilters and biotrickling filters. In biofilters, humidified polluted air is passed through a packed bed

306

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

308

MODELING THE TRANSPORT AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE EMISSIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON LOCAL AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY USING A VARIABLE-GRID-RESOLUTION AIR QUALITY MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second annual report summarizes the research performed from 17 April 2004 through 16 April 2005. Major portions of the research in several of the project's current eight tasks have been completed. We have successfully developed the meteorological inputs using the best possible modeling configurations, resulting in improved representation of atmospheric processes. The development of the variable-grid-resolution emissions model, SMOKE-VGR, is also completed. The development of the MAQSIP-VGR has been completed and a test run was performed to ensure the functionality of this air quality model. Thus, the project is on schedule as planned. During the upcoming reporting period, we expect to perform the first MAQSIP-VGR simulations over the Houston-Galveston region to study the roles of the meteorology, offshore emissions, and chemistry-transport interactions that determine the temporal and spatial evolution of ozone and its precursors.

Kiran Alapaty

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This semiannual report summarizes the research performed from 17 April through 16 October 2004. Major portions of the research in several of the project's current eight tasks have been completed, and the results obtained are briefly presented. We have successfully developed the meteorological inputs using the best possible modeling configurations, resulting in improved representation of atmospheric processes. Ingestion of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures in conjunction with the use of our new surface data assimilation technique have resulted in largely improved meteorological inputs to drive the MAQSIP-VGR. The development of the variable-grid-resolution emissions model, SMOKE-VGR, is also largely complete. We expect to develop the final configuration of the SMOKE-VGR during the upcoming reporting period. We are in the process of acquiring the newly released emissions database and offshore emissions data sets to update our archives. The development of the MAQSIP-VGR has been completed and a test run was performed to ensure the functionality of this air quality model. During the upcoming reporting period, we expect to perform the first MAQSIP-VGR simulations over the Houston-Galveston region to study the roles of the meteorology, offshore emissions, and chemistry-transport interactions that determine the temporal and spatial evolution of ozone and its precursors.

Kiran Alapaty

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Emissions characteristics of modern oil heating equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 10 years there have been some very interesting developments in oil heating. These include higher static pressure burners, air atomizing nozzles, low firing rate nozzles, low heat loss combustion chambers and condensing boilers and furnaces. The current data base on the emissions characteristics of oil-fired residential heating equipment is based primarily on data taken in the 1970's. The objective of the work described in this report is to evaluate the effects of recent developments in oil-fired equipment on emissions. Detailed emissions measurements have been made on a number of currently available residential oil burners and whole systems selected to represent recent development trends. Some additional data was taken with equipment which is in the prototype stage. These units are a prevaporizing burner and a retention head burner modified with an air atomizing nozzle. Measurements include No{sub x}, smoke numbers, CO, gas phase hydrocarbon emissions and particulate mass emission rates. Emissions of smoke, CO and hydrocarbons were found to be significantly greater under cyclic operation for all burners tested. Generally, particulate emission rates were found to be 3 to 4 times greater in cyclic operation than in steady state. Air atomized burners were found to be capable of operation at much lower excess air levels than pressure atomized burners without producing significant amounts of smoke. As burner performance is improved, either through air atomization or prevaporization of the fuel, there appears to be a general trend towards producing CO at lower smoke levels as excess air is decreased. The criteria of adjusting burners for trace smoke may need to be abandoned for advanced burners and replaced with an adjustment for specific excess air levels. 17 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Coughlan, R.; Butcher, T.; McDonald, R.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities conducted for the project “The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel” under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuel’s characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the project’s objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers’ expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers’ expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Emissions inventories for MSW landfills under Title V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, many states were either not concerned with, or unaware that, municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) were potential sources of regulated air pollutants. This philosophy is rapidly changing, in part due to US EPA policy documents concerning (and defining) fugitive and non-fugitive emissions from MSWLFs, the attention given to the newly released New Source Performance Standards and a recent lawsuit that gained national notoriety involving landfill air emissions and air permitting applicability issues. Most states now recognize that MSWLFs are sources of regulated air pollutants and are subject to permitting requirements (and pollutant emission fees) as other industries; i.e., state-level minor- and major-source operating permit programs, and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments Title V Operating Permits Program (Title V).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Peyser, T.R. [SCS Engineers, Birmingham, AL (United States); Hamilton, S.M. [SCS Engineers, Tampa, FL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Real-Time, On-Line Characterization of Diesel Generator Air Toxic Emissions by Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Real-Time, On-Line Characterization of Diesel Generator Air Toxic Emissions by Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry ... For the same reasons, the far more abundant exhaust gases such as nitrogen, water, and carbon dioxide cannot be ionized and, therefore, do not interfere with the potential detection of low (2?100 pptv) concentrations of organic molecules. ... The sample was introduced into the ionization chamber (Figure 1) through a modified pulsed valve (General Valve Series 99) that delivers 150-?s sample pulses at atmospheric back pressure through a 0.5-mm orifice at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. ...

Lukas Oudejans; Abderrahmane Touati; Brian K. Gullett

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers a series of operations which are essential for the implementation of an efficient emissions trading market on the domestic and international level. An introduction to how a national emissions trading

Dr. Michael See

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Indoor air environment and night cooling energy efficiency of a southern German passive public school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently built school building has adopted a novel heat recovery air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification have been numerically investigated concerning the effects of the heat flow flux of passive cooling within the ceiling concrete in the classroom due to night ventilation in summer which could result in cooling energy storage. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of passive cooling can simultaneously decrease the volume averaged indoor temperatures and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air-cooling unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of exhaust air and the heat flux value for passive cooling within the classroom ceiling concrete. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Xiao-Hong Li; Han-Qing Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NOx Emission Reduction by the Optimization of the Primary Air Distribution in the 235Mwe CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article presents the results of experimental studies conducted on a large-scale 235 MWe CFB (Circulating Fluidized Bed) boiler, in which...x emission has been reduced by up to ten percent and the temperature ...

P. Mirek; T. Czakiert; W. Nowak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Determination of naval medium speed diesel engine air exhaust emissions and validation of a proposed estimation model. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady state marine diesel engine exhaust emissions are being reviewed by the Environmental Protection Agency for possible regulation. In anticipation of future regulation, the United States Navy is developing appropriate emissions models for naval vessels. A procedure for collecting this data from an U. S. Navy ship with medium speed main propulsion diesels is presented. It is based on similar testing conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard for measuring patrol boat diesel engine emissions and International Standards Organization methodology. The primary challenge of the experiment design was to minimize interference with the engineering plant as the assigned ship was concurrently tasked for other operations. Data gathered allowed calculation of engine rpm, engine load, exhaust gas flow rate, and determination of pollutant amounts. The tests were conducted at a series of predetermined speeds to reflect an 11-Mode duty cycle developed previously for the LSD 41 Class propulsion diesel engines.

Mayeaux, A.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Regional-Scale Estimation of Electric Power and Power Plant CO2 Emissions Using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System Nighttime Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For estimation, the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) annual nighttime stable light product (NSL) for 2006 and statistical data on power generation, power consumption, and power plant CO2 emissions in 10 electric power supply regions of Japan was investigated. ... There are similar linear correlations of electricity consumption for lighting and total electricity consumption at the regional (e.g., state and province) level, but possibly not for CO2 emissions because of regional concentrations of electricity from renewable energy and nuclear power plants, which produce low CO2 emissions. ...

Husi Letu; Takashi Y. Nakajima; Fumihiko Nishio

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Kansas Air Quality Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All new air contaminant emission sources or alterations to emission sources that are required to be reported shall be in compliance with all applicable emission control regulations at the time that...

322

242-A Evaporator/plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) effluent treatment facility (ETF) nonradioactive air emission test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report shows the methods used to test the stack gas outlet concentration and emission rate of Volatile Organic Compounds as Total Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in parts per million by volume,grams per dry standard cubic meter, and grams per minute from the PUREX ETF stream number G6 on the Hanford Site. Test results are shown in Appendix B.1.

Hill, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

323

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel, or about 46,200 BTUs of diesel fuel per mile. 4.1.8BTU/bbl 3575 g/gal Diesel fuel 106 BTU/gal 106 BTU/bbl 3192gasoline or diesel vehicles (g/106-BTU) E NMOG = emissions

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Influence of Operating Modes, Room Temperature Set Point and Curtain Styles on Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A field investigation was carried out in an office building of Changsha city in winter and summer, the influence of different running modes, curtain styles and room temperature set point on energy consumption of room air conditioner (RAC...

Yu, J.; Yang, C.; Guo, R.; Wu, D.; Chen, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ocean Wave Energy Systems Design: Conceptual Design Methodology for the Operational Matching of the Wells Air Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper has set out a conceptual design methodology that was employed in the design of a Wells air turbine for OWC ocean wave energy plants. In particular, the ... sizing, given the range and frequency of power

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assuring safety through operational approval : challenges in assessing and approving the safety of systems-level changes in air transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To improve capacity and efficiency of the air transportation system, a number of new systems-level changes have been proposed. Key aspects of the proposed changes are combined functionality across technology and procedures ...

Weibel, Roland E. (Roland Everett)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 3, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The Area of Contamination (AOC) known as Chemical Spill 3 United States Coast Guard (CS-3 (USCG)) is located on Lee Road, in the south central portion of the MMR. The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) Installation Restoration Program Office at Otis Air National Guard (ANG) Base, Massachusetts.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species) control technology criteria pollutant air pollutantControl Cogen Urban Santa Maria Elevated Data sources: Emissions: 1999 National Emissions Inventory for Hazardous Air Pollutants (

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

330

Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and evaluated this new system. We completed the development of our variable-grid-resolution air quality model (MAQSIP-VGR) and performed various diagnostic tests related to an enhanced cloud parameterization scheme. We also developed an important tool for variable-grid graphics using Google Earth. We ran the MAQSIP-VGR for the Houston-Galveston and southern Louisiana domains for an August 23 to September 2, 2002, episode. Results of the modeling simulations highlighted the usefulness of the variable-grid modeling approach when simulating complex terrain processes related to land and sea close to an urban area. Our results showed that realistic SST patterns based on remote sensing are critical to capturing the land-sea breeze, in particular the inland intrusion of the reversed mesoscale circulation that is critical for simulating air pollution over urban areas near coastal regions. Besides capturing the correct horizontal gradient between land and sea surface temperatures, it is important to use an adequate ABL scheme in order to quantify correctly the vertical profiles of various parameters. The ABL scheme should capture the dynamics of the marine boundary layer, which is not often considered in a typical simulation over land. Our results further showed the effect of using satellite-derived SSTs on the horizontal and vertical extent of the modeled pollution pattern, and the increase in hourly ozone concentrations associated with changes in ABL characteristics resulting from the enhanced mesoscale circulation in the lower troposphere.

Adel Hanna

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Urban Transportation Emission Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Transport Canada Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng Cost: Free References: http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Prog/2/UTEC-CETU/Menu.aspx?lang=eng The Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions from the operation of vehicles. It also estimates upstream GHG emissions from the production, refining and

332

Emissions and fuel economy of a prechamber diesel engine with natural gas dual fuelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four-cylinder turbocharged prechamber diesel engine (Caterpillar 3304) was operated with natural gas and pilot diesel fuel ignition over a wide range of load and speed. Measurements were made of fuel consumption and the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and the oxides of nitrogen. Improvements in fuel economy and emissions were found to be affected by the diesel fuel-gas fraction, and by air restriction and fuel injection timing. Boundaries of unstable, inefficient and knocking operation were defined and the importance of gas-air equivalance ratio was demonstrated in its effect on economy, emissions and stability of operation.

Ding, X.; Hill, P.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Measurements of the soot emissions and engine operat-ing parameters from a diesel engine during transient op-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Measurements of the soot emissions and engine operat- ing parameters from a diesel engine and are the subject of future research. INTRODUCTION Soot emissions from diesel engines are well known to have gov- erning the emission of particles from diesel engines are becoming ever more stringent. The soot

Daraio, Chiara

334

Flue Gas Emissions from the Burning of Asphaltite and Lignite in a Rotating Head Combustor with Secondary Air Delivery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1, 2) In this context, Turkey is rich in coal reserves, and it is among the biggest coal producers in the world with a production of about 76 million tons (Mt) in 2011, and a large portion of this production is lignite. ... (5) Turkey has also a high asphaltite reserve, which is mostly found in the southeastern part of Anatolia and used around the region for domestic heating. ... Modeling of NOx emissions from fluidized Bed combustion of high volatile lignites ...

Cengiz Öner; ?ehmus Altun

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Effect of air preheat temperature on the MILD combustion of syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of air preheat temperature on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in parallel jet forward flow combustor. The results were presented on flow field using numerical simulations and on global flame signatures, OH? radicals distribution and exhaust emissions using experiments. The discrete and high speed air/fuel injections into the combustor is necessary for the establishment of MILD conditions, because they cause strong gas recirculation and form large mixing region between the air and fuel jets. The critical equivalence ratio above which MILD combustion occurred was identified. The MILD regime was established for syngas fuel under air preheating conditions with lean operational limit and suppressed \\{NOx\\} and CO emissions. In the MILD combustion regime, the air preheating resulted in higher \\{NOx\\} but lower CO emissions, while the increase of equivalence ratio led to the increase of \\{NOx\\} and the decrease of CO emissions.

Mingming Huang; Zhedian Zhang; Weiwei Shao; Yan Xiong; Yan Liu; Fulin Lei; Yunhan Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineering, Coordinating Committee of Air QualityStandards: Air Quality and Automobile Emission Control, Vol.of ilitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards. Paper tlo. 76-

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Experimental investigation of an innovative thermochemical process operating with a hydrate salt and moist air for thermal storage of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and moist air for thermal storage of solar energy: global performance Benoit Michela, *, Nathalie Mazeta-gas reaction, hydration, thermal storage, seasonal storage, solar energy * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet in solar energy. Solar energy is widely affordable and has the capability to meet household demand over

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

9th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration, and Operations Conference (ATIO) Effects of Fuel Prices on Air Transportation Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fluctuations in terms of fuel prices, seasonality, distance flown, competition, and other economic impacts, La Guardia. I. Introduction Fuel prices have increased 131% over the past four years as shown by the average air carrier cost factors shown in figure 1. This fluctuation of fuel prices, followed

339

Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits Forms and Air Pollutant Emission...

340

Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazardous air pollutant removal’, Proceeding of SO 2 Controlto control emissions of harmful air pollutants from electric

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Conceptual Approach For Estimating Potential Air Toxics And Radionuclide Airborne Emissions From A Temporary Exhaust System For The 216-Z-9 Crib Removal Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 216-Z-9 Crib, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeastern Washington State, was the site of a successful mining effort to recover plutonium from the contaminated soils at the disposal site. A CERCLA Action Memorandum (AM) issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires the removal of the buildings associated with this mining effort to facilitate a remedial action planned for the near future. The decontamination and demolition of the 216 Z-9 Crib facilities is required under a consent order between the DOE, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Removal of the buildings located on and near the concrete cover slab over the 216-Z-9 Crib will require removal of the large soil-packaging glovebox located inside the 216-Z- 9A Building. Prior to cleaning out the glovebox, it will be necessary to provide active filtered ventilation capability to ensure a negative pressure exists between the glovebox and the adjacent airspace while hands-on work proceeds within. The glovebox floor is open to the Z-9 crib cavern environment below. For this reason the crib and glovebox currently share a common airspace. The functional requirements for safely conducting work within the glovebox include provision of a negative pressure in the box of about 0.5 inches of water gage (nominal) less than the interior of the building. In addition, the building surrounding the glovebox will be maintained at a slight negative pressure with respect to outdoor ambient pressure. In order to assess the relevant and appropriate clean air requirements for the new temporary ventilation system and associated emissions monitoring, it was necessary to reliably predict the nature of the exhaust air stream. Factors used to predict the presence and concentrations of certain radionuclide particulates and certain gases considered to be air toxics, included reliability parameters, flow rates, radionuclide content, and off-gas compositions. Radionuclide content includes transuranic isotopes, primarily of plutonium and americium. Air toxics include carbon tetrachloride, butane, methanol, acetone and toluene. Flow rate prediction was based on available design and test data and considered equipment sizes, glovebox negative pressure requirements, and filter flow characteristics. The approach used to predict the off-gas composition from the crib required experience-based predictive analysis combined with crib head space analytical results. Input information for emission estimates included: (1) gas composition sample data obtained from recent samples taken within the crib head space during static conditions, and (2) air in-leakage/dilution estimates based on physical characteristics of both the crib and the new temporary ventilation system. The conceptual approach combined measurement-based data with conservative assumptions, and provides the estimates necessary to determine relevance and appropriateness of substantive requirements under federal and state laws and regulations. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Sutter, C.; O'Brien, P.; Bates, J.; Klos, B. [Fluor Hanford Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Teal, J. [Fluor Federal Services, Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [Environmental Quality Management, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effect of syngas composition on combustion and exhaust emission characteristics in a pilot-ignited dual-fuel engine operated in PREMIER combustion mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the performance and emissions of a pilot-ignited, supercharged, dual-fuel engine powered by different types of syngas at various equivalence ratios. It was found that if certain operating conditions were maintained, conventional engine combustion could be transformed into combustion with two-stage heat release. This mode of combustion has been investigated in previous studies with natural gas, and has been given the name \\{PREmixed\\} Mixture Ignition in the End-gas Region (PREMIER) combustion. PREMIER combustion begins as premixed flame propagation, and then, because of mixture autoignition in the end-gas region, ahead of the propagating flame front, a transition occurs, with a rapid increase in the heat release rate. It was determined that the mass of fuel burned during the second stage affected the rate of maximum pressure rise. As the fuel mass fraction burned during the second stage increased, the rate of maximum pressure rise also increased, with a gradual decrease in the delay between the first increase in the heat release rate following pilot fuel injection and the point when the transition to the second stage occurred. The H2 and CO2 content of syngas affected the engine performance and emissions. Increased H2 content led to higher combustion temperatures and efficiency, lower CO and HC emissions, but higher \\{NOx\\} emissions. Increased CO2 content influenced performance and emissions only when it reached a certain level. In the most recent studies, the mean combustion temperature, indicated thermal efficiency, and \\{NOx\\} emissions decreased only when the CO2 content of the syngas increased to 34%. PREMIER combustion did not have a major effect on engine cycle-to-cycle variation. The coefficient of variation of the indicated mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) was less than 4% for all types of fuel at various equivalence ratios, indicating that the combustion was within the stability range for engine operation.

Ulugbek Azimov; Eiji Tomita; Nobuyuki Kawahara; Yuji Harada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An assessment of operations of oil-exporting countries in terms of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from 16 oil-exporting countries are studied using Data Envelopment Analysis using indicators representing economic growth, energy consumption and emissions. The analysis for 1996 shows that Norway, Gabon and Nigeria are efficient and that Russia is inefficient. Malmquist Productivity Index analysis shows that there is progress in achieving higher values of GDP and non-fossil fuel consumption and in achieving lower values of fossil fuel consumption and carbon emissions in the year 1996 when compared with 1992 for Norway, Russia, Mexico, Algeria, Libya, Gabon and Oman.

Ramakrishnan Ramanathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Operational and policy implications of managing uncertainty in quality and emissions of multi-feedstock biodiesel systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an alternative transportation fuel to petrodiesel, biodiesel has been widely promoted within national energy portfolio targets across the world. Early estimations of low lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ...

Gül?en, Ece

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Effect of Operating Conditions on SO2 and NOx Emissions in Oxy-Fuel Mini-CFB Combustion Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 production is caused primarily by fossil fuel combustion. In consequence, it is increasingly necessary to find ways to reduce these emissions when fossil fuel is used. CO2 capture and storage (C...

L. Jia; Y. Tan; E. J. Anthony

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Speciated Engine-Out Organic Gas Emissions from a PFI-SI Engine Operating on Ethanol/Gasoline Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engine-out HC emissions from a PFI spark ignition engine were measured using a gas chromatograph and a flame ionization detector (FID). Two port fuel injectors were used respectively for ethanol and gasoline so that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

349

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

350

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

M. Stockton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Introduction to continuous emission monitoring programs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a general introduction to continuous emission monitoring for those persons not previously involved in this field. Information is presented on continuous opacity monitoring, as well as instrumental and alternative monitoring techniques for SO2 and NOx (i.e., continuous wet-chemical measurement methods and fuel sampling and analysis methods). This document presents an outline and review of the fundamental concepts, terminology, and procedures used in a continuous emission monitoring program. Also presented are selected technical details necessary to understand the operation of emission monitors, the use of continuous emission monitoring data by air pollution control agencies, and references to other available documents which provide additional information.

Peeler, J.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP;of chemistry–climate models with RCP emissions thus projectto project air quality responses to future climate change

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

International MODIS and AIRS processing package: AIRS products and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International MODIS and AIRS processing package: AIRS products and applications Elisabeth Weisz presented and discussed in this paper demonstrate that the IMAPP AIRS retrieval product is rigorously parameters from the operational AIRS L2 product and data from other instruments. Keywords: AIRS, IMAPP

Li, Jun

354

DOE Launches Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D Program Enhancing Pipeline and Distribution System Operational Efficiency, Reducing Methane Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Following the White House and the Department of Energy Capstone Methane Stakeholder Roundtable on July 29th, DOE announced a series of actions, partnerships, and stakeholder commitments to help modernize the nation’s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions. Through common-sense standards, smart investments, and innovative research, DOE seeks to advance the state of the art in natural gas system performance. DOE’s effort is part of the larger Administration’s Climate Action Plan Interagency Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions.

355

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Investigation of the Performance and Emission Characteristics of Biodiesel Fuel Containing Butanol under the Conditions of Diesel Engine Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(17) However, emissions of engines fueled with multicomponent fuels containing fossil diesel, butanol, and rapeseed oil butyl/methyl esters have not been tested. ... Break specific fuel consumption when engine is fuelled with fossil diesel fuel (n = 1500 min?1). ... For all cases, engine torque was retained the same by adjusting fueling rate. ...

Sergejus Lebedevas; Galina Lebedeva; Egle Sendzikiene; Violeta Makareviciene

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Ellsworth Air Force Base, Operable Unit 1, Rapid City, SD, May 10, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ROD is for remedial action at OU-1. The selected alternative, source area soil and ground-water treatment, includes: Continued operation of the interim remedial action (IRA) which consisted of contaminated ground-water removal, soil vapor extraction (SVE), and treatment; Installation of additional SVE wells within the historical burn-pit area to be added to the existing IRA SVE system; Removal of contaminated ground water using additional ground-water wells and collection trenches to be added to the IRA ground-water recovery system; Treatment of ground water at the existing IRA treatment plant; and Institutional controls for the area.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R and D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

Barnett, J. M.; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Economic impact analysis for proposed emission standards and guidelines for municipal waste combustors: A description of the basis for, and impacts of, proposed revisions to air pollutant emission regulations for new and existing municipal waste combustors under Clean Air Act Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA is proposing revised and expanded air pollutant emission standards for new, and guidelines for existing, municipal waste combustors (MWCs), pursuant to Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129 of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The regulations will replace or supplement those promulgated by EPA on February 11, 1991. The standards and guidelines will apply to MWCs with a capacity to combust 35 or more Mg of municipal solid waste per day. The pollutants to be regulated are particulate matter (total and fine), opacity, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, lead, cadmium mercury, and dibenzofurans and dioxins. The report describes the standards and guidelines, their potential economic impacts, and related matters. EPA estimates the national annual cost of the standards in 1994 will be $44 million, plus the cost of the 1991 standards, $157 million, for a total of $201 million. EPA estimates the equivalent cost of the guidelines at $280 million plus $168 million for a total of $448 million.

Jellicorse, B.L.; Dempsey, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE/EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air Integration System Emission Reduction Technology (03/11/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IMPACT IMPACT COMMERCIAL DEMONSRATION OF THE LOW NOx BURNER/SEPARATED OVER- FIRE AIR (LNB/SOFA) INTEGRATON SYSTEM EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY HOLCOMB STATION SUNFLOWER ELECTRIC POWER CORPORATION FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz [Laboratoire ICARE CNRS, 1C Av. de la Recherche Scientifique 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Fees Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Renewable Operating Permit (ROP) is required by Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The ROP program clarifies the requirements that apply to a facility that emits air contaminants. Any facility in Michigan

363

Low-Load Dual-Fuel Compression Ignition (CI) Engine Operation with an On-Board Reformer and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst: Effects on Engine Performance and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ideally, homogeneous air fuel mixtures ignited spontaneously exhibit less pollutants and can improve engine efficiency compared to standard diesel combustion, which is based on diffusion combustion. ... Although optimization of the injection timing of the in-cylinder DI fuel (e.g., diesel) aims to ignite the mixture and control the start of combustion (SOC) for the different premixed fuel ratios, the fuel ignition timing is complicated and problematic for a dual-fueled engine under a number of engine-operating conditions (e.g., low loads and use of residual gas trapping). ... Deactivation due to coking of a single Ni/Pt-based catalyst is significant, but operation using a platinum-ceria catalyst in line with a Ni-based steam-reforming catalyst allows acceptable efficiencies. ...

A. Tsolakis; R. Torbati; A. Megaritis; A. Abu-Jrai

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume I. Recent airport measurement programs, data analyses, and sub-model development. Final report Jan78-Jul 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

Britter, Rex E.

366

Air Quality/Emissions Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum...

367

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold air distribution systems may reduce the operating energy consumption of air-conditioned air supply system and improve the outside air volume percentages and indoor air quality. However, indoor temperature patterns and velocity field are easily...

Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Influence of Mobile Air-Conditioning on Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption:? A Model Approach for Modern Gasoline Cars Used in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, apart from studies involving MOBILE6 in the United States (1) and other U. S. studies (2?5), air-conditioning activity in relation to meteorological conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. ... For manual air conditioners, a good setting was sought before the test and the knobs for cooling and ventilation were readjusted if the temperature drifted more than 1 °C. ... The temperatures of the conditioned air range from 5 to 11 °C. ...

Martin F. Weilenmann; Ana-Marija Vasic; Peter Stettler; Philippe Novak

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality information Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and...

371

Comprehensive assessment of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) have two primary goals: pollution prevention and a market-based least-cost approach to emission control. To address air quality issues as well as permitting and enforcement, the 1990 CAAA contain 11 sections or titles. The individual amendment titles are as follows: Title I - National Ambient Air Quality Standards Title II - Mobile Sources Title III - Hazardous Air Pollutants Title IV - Acid Deposition Control Title V - Permits Title VI - Stratospheric Ozone Protection Chemicals Title VII - Enforcement Title VIII - Miscellaneous Provisions Title IX - Clean Air Research Title X - Disadvantaged Business Concerns Title XI - Clean Air Employment Transition Assistance Titles I, III, IV, and V will change or have the potential to change how operators of coal-fired utility boilers control, monitor, and report emissions. For the purpose of this discussion, Title III is the primary focus.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

373

PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed and Fertilizer Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to which crop root penetration is achieved. Root penetration measured after harvest for two air drill. These evaluations were conducted using the `Concord' air drill with seeding rate and overall fertilizer rate (70

Maxwell, Bruce D.

374

Evolution of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of air pollutants at global and regional scales during the 1980-2010 period  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several different inventories of global and regional anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are assessed for the 1980-2010 period. The species considered in this study are carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black carbon. The inventories considered include the ACCMIP historical emissions developed in support of the simulations for the IPCC AR5 assessment. Emissions for 2005 and 2010 from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are also included. Large discrepancies between the global and regional emissions are identified, which shows that there is still no consensus on the best estimates for surface emissions of atmospheric compounds. At the global scale, anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 show the best agreement in most years. The agreement is low for BC emissions, particularly in the period prior to 2000. The best consensus is for NOx emissions for all periods and all regions, except for China where emissions in 1980 and 1990 need to be better defined. Emissions of CO need a better quantification in the USA for all periods; in Central Europe, the evolution of emissions during the past two decades needs to be better determined. The agreement between the different SO2 emissions datasets is rather good for the USA, but better quantification is needed elsewhere, particularly for Central Europe and China. The comparisons performed in this study show that the use of RCP8.5 for the extension of the ACCMIP inventory beyond 2000 is reasonable, until more global or regional estimates become available. Concerning biomass burning emissions, most inventories agree within 50-80%, depending on the year and season. The large differences are due to differences in the estimates of burned areas from the different available products, as well as in the amount of biomass burnt.

Granier, Claire; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bond, Tami C.; D'Angiola, Ariela; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Frost, G. J.; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Kinne, Stefan; Klimont, Z.; Kloster, Jean; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liousse, Catherine; Masui, Toshihiko; Meleux, Frederik; Mieville, Aude; Ohara, Toshimasa; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Riahi, Keywan; Schultz, Martin; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; van Aardenne, John; van der Werf, Guido R.; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Emission reduction of NOx and CO by optimization of the automatic control system in a coal-fired stoker boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date research on NO, and CO emission reduction in stoker-fired boilers has been devoted to combustion modification to the overfire air, diverting air to a selected set of burners, using modified low-NOx, burners, using flue gas recirculation or flue gas treatment with specially controlled catalyst and additives. This study introduces a concept that focuses on the dynamics of the boiler and the automatic control system. The objective of this study was to reduce the NO and CO emissions by restructuring the automatic control system and then tuning the control system with parameters that have been optimized with emission reduction as the objective. Dynamic data were obtained from a step-input test of either the underfire air or the overfire air. These data were used to model the boiler with a transfer function describing the emissions. The analyzer dynamic response was included in the overall model. The control parameters were determined from this overall emissions transfer function by mathematical optimization. These control parameters constituted the initial values in the automatic control system used for the final tests in the boiler. Additional adjustments to reduce the emissions were carried out during boiler operation. A low controller gain and a fast reset time were found to be the most suitable setting for the control system. The NO emissions controlled by the overfire air and CO emissions controlled by the underfire air produced the best results.

Schnelle, K.B.; Laungphairojana, A.; Debelak, K.A. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

377

Helium corona-assisted air discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases including air at low voltages yet without consuming any inert gas will enormously promote the application of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium-filled glass bulb--for a needle-plate distance of 12 mm, 1.0 kV suffices. Ultraviolet emission from helium corona facilitates the discharging of air, and the discharge current manifests distinct features such as relatively broad Trichel pulses in both half periods. This design allows safe and economic implementation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases, which will find a broad palette of applications in surface modification, plasma medicine and gas treatment, etc.

Jiang Nan; Gao Lei; Ji Ailing; Cao Zexian [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

New gas turbine combustor supports emissions limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas Research Institute, in partnership with Allison Engine Co. of Indianapolis, has introduced a natural gas-fired, low-emissions combustor that it says will give customers of industrial gas turbines a least-cost approach for meeting US emissions regulations. The LE IV combustor uses dry, low-nitrogen oxides (DLN) technology to reduce emissions from the Allison 501K industrial gas turbine to 25 parts per million or less (corrected to 15 percent oxygen)--levels that are expected to meet pending federal emissions regulations. GRI is funding similar efforts with other manufacturers of turbines commonly used at pipeline compressor stations and industrial power generation sites. The Allison combustor features a dual operating mode. During the pilot mode of operation, fuel is directly injected into the combustor`s liner where it is consumed in a diffusion flame reaction. During higher power operation, the fuel and air are uniformly premixed in fuel-lean proportions to control NO{sub x} formation. In addition, optimum engine performance is maintained by the dry, lean-mixed combustion technology as it suppresses NO{sub x} formation in the turbine`s combustion section. An added advantage of the LE IV combustor is its ability to lower emissions without any adverse affect on engine performance and operations, according to GRI> The combustor is available as either a retrofit or as an option on a new engine.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Lessons from Iowa : development of a 270 megawatt compressed air energy storage project in midwest Independent System Operator : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iowa Stored Energy Park was an innovative, 270 Megawatt, $400 million compressed air energy storage (CAES) project proposed for in-service near Des Moines, Iowa, in 2015. After eight years in development the project was terminated because of site geological limitations. However, much was learned in the development process regarding what it takes to do a utility-scale, bulk energy storage facility and coordinate it with regional renewable wind energy resources in an Independent System Operator (ISO) marketplace. Lessons include the costs and long-term economics of a CAES facility compared to conventional natural gas-fired generation alternatives; market, legislative, and contract issues related to enabling energy storage in an ISO market; the importance of due diligence in project management; and community relations and marketing for siting of large energy projects. Although many of the lessons relate to CAES applications in particular, most of the lessons learned are independent of site location or geology, or even the particular energy storage technology involved.

Holst, Kent (Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency, Traer, IA); Huff, Georgianne; Schulte, Robert H. (Schulte Associates LLC, Northfield, MN); Critelli, Nicholas (Critelli Law Office PC, Des Moines, IA)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Evaluation of an operational method for the estimation of emissions of nitrogen compounds for a group of farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this article is to evaluate a practical method for estimating nitrogen emissions on the scale of a group of farms, to be used in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The method rests on the estimation of nitrogen inputs and outputs to calculate the surplus of the annual nitrogen balance on the scale of a farm. The different gaseous nitrogen losses (NH3, NO, N2O, N3) are then estimated for each livestock or cropping system. The leaching losses in the form of NO3 are assumed to correspond to the surplus of the apparent nitrogen balance to which are added the atmospheric depositions, minus the gaseous losses. The feasibility of this method was studied on 24 farms in the Naizin catchment area (Brittany, France). An analysis of the sensitivity of NO3 estimates to different parameters used to calculate gaseous losses was carried out. Lastly the robustness of the NO3 estimates was examined by comparing them with measurements of NO3 collected within this catchment area.

Sylvain Payraudeau; Hayo M.G. Van Der Werf; Francoise Vertes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Estimating HAPs and radionuclide emissions from a laboratory complex at a nuclear processing site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique methodology was developed for conducting an air emission inventory (AEI) at a DOE nuclear processing facility. This methodology involved the use of computer-assisted design (CAD) drawings to document emission points, computerized process drawings to document industrial processes leading to emissions, and a computerized data base of AEI forms to document emission estimates and related process data. A detailed air emissions inventory for operating years 1985--1991 was recently implemented for the entire site using this methodology. One industrial area at the DOE Site is comprised of laboratory facilities that provide direct support to the nuclear reactor and recovery operations, developmental studies to support reactor and separation operations, and developmental studies to support waste handling and storage. The majority of the functions are conducted in a single large building complex wherein bench scale and pilot scale experiments are carried out involving radionuclides, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and other chemicals reportable under the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act (SARA) Title 111. The results of the inventory showed that HAP and radionuclide emissions from the laboratory complex were relatively minor.

Paul, R.A. [IT Corp., Durham, NC (United States); Faugl, T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air Conditioning ... CHEMISTS and engineers use air conditioning as a valuable tool in more than two hundred industries. ... Air conditioning is a tool with many facets. ...

MARGARET INGELS

1938-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Air transducers with high acoustic impedance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High?Z air transducers evolved from several industrial transducers. These predecessors include (a) acoustic emission and angle?beam NDT contact transducers; (b) flowmeter transducers for high?pressure methane hot refinery gases and corrosive flare gases; and (c) transducer arrays for monitoring hot corrosive gases flowing at Mach 0.1 in smokestacks of ?3–13 m. This peculiar ancestry accounts for their unusual high?acoustic?impedance construction. By not employing low?Z air?backed radiating membranes transducer bandwidth response time and sensitivity are sacrificed. The solid robust construction however offers some compensating features: tolerance to wide ranges in pressure and temperature including rapid rates of change (thermal shock depressurization); corrosion resistance; operable with standard lab equipment without bias voltage; mounting options where the transducer forms part of the pressure boundary or where it is outside the pressure boundary. Clamp?on air flow applications at one bar include small wind tunnels and plastic pipes. Acoustically isolated pairs measure secondary flow components (crossflow circulation) in a plane perpendicular to the pipe axis. Flow applications include gases such as air mild steam (pending) or other hot pressurized or corrosive fluids. Air?coupled measurements of transmission characteristics of wood or other low?density solids and air?ranging are readily demonstrated with the low?Z transducers.

Lawrence C. Lynnworth

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS – FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Wood Products, California Air Resources Board.in Air and Emission Rates from Wood Products Using a LargeComposite Wood Products, California Air Resources Board.

Maddalena, Randy L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Urban air quality improvement by using a CNG lean burn engine for city buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled lean-burn city bus engines has a significant potential for air quality improvement in urban areas. Particularly important is the reduction of NOx, as well as particulate and non-regulated HC-emissions. For this reason, a CNG-fuelled, lean-bum, turbocharged, intercooled engine equipped with catalytic converter was developed. The basic engine is a 6-cylinder, heavy duty, serial production Hungarian diesel engine which complies with Euro-2 emissions limits. The objective of this development was to meet European emission limits forecast for the year 2005 (NOx fuel consumption capability of the engine are reported. Based on the evaluation of economical feasibility, the costs of CNG bus operation is additionally discussed. It can be concluded that CNG city bus operation is - compared to diesel operation - a promising way to improve economically the local air quality.

Tamas Meretei; Joep A.N. van Ling; Cornelis Havenith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Health Impacts Research - Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health Impacts Research Health Impacts Research Another aspect of the emissions research at ORNL focuses on Health Impacts. This effort concentrates on analyzing exhaust for Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) or other unregulated exhaust species that have the potential to harm human health. MSATs are a group of chemical species defined by the U.S. EPA that may pose risk to humans; formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and toluene are some example species. Engines operated with new combustion modes and alternative fuels are studied for MSAT emissions to determine insure that the advanced technologies being developed pose no additional risk to humans. A large part of the Health Impacts research effort at ORNL focuses on particulate matter (PM) which is also defined as an MSAT by the U.S. EPA.

387

Utilization of Lignite Reserves and Simultaneous Improvement of Dust Emissions and Operation Efficiency of a Power Plant by Controlling the Calcium (Total and Free) Content of the Fed Lignite. Application on the Agios Dimitrios Power Plant, Ptolemais, Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Utilization of Lignite Reserves and Simultaneous Improvement of Dust Emissions and Operation Efficiency of a Power Plant by Controlling the Calcium (Total and Free) Content of the Fed Lignite. ... Using the technique mentioned above, by determining the lignite recoverable blocks and progressively improving the mixing of the lignites with different qualities, the solid particle emissions were generally stabilized and reduced (lower than 150 mg m-3), with the best improvement observed around April 1999 and afterward (Figures 2?5). ...

Nestoras Kolovos; Andreas Georgakopoulos; Anestis Filippidis; Constantinos Kavouridis

2002-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section...

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

393

Contribution of Saharan dust in an integrated air quality system and its on-line assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and categorical (skill scores) statistics by a fully operational on-line comparison of the first-layer simulations since some of the objectives proposed by the EU Directives related to air quality for year 2010 are less-mass coastal re-circula- tions become large natural photo-chemical reactors where most of the NOx emissions

394

4-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 4: AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(from the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants or NESHAPs), DOE Order 5400.1 (1990. Figure 4-1 indicates the location of each of the monitored facilities, and Table 4-1 presents uranium, moderated and cooled by light water, and was operated intermittently at power levels up to 3 MW

Homes, Christopher C.

395

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cool roofs—roofs that stay cool in the sun by minimizing solar absorption and maximizing thermal emission—lessen the flow of heat from the roof into the building, reducing the need for space cooling energy in con...

Ronnen Levinson; Hashem Akbari

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reducing NO[sub x] emissions from magnesium sulfite liquor boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Current design of liquor-combustion boilers is reviewed, along with options for lowering exhaust-gas emissions, particularly NOx. In many cases, modern boilers are being operated at or near optimal conditions for minimum NOx emissions. Possible upgrades to further reduce NOx emissions include addition of a selective noncatalytic reduction step, design modifications to lower the sectional load, a flue-gas recirculation system, and air staging. Calculated and experimental results show that these applications can lower NOx emissions by 40% or more.

Bobik, M. (Austrian Energy and Environment, Graz (Austria))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

400

Traffic air quality index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Vehicle emissions are responsible for a considerable share of urban air pollution concentrations. The traffic air quality index (TAQI) is proposed as a useful tool for evaluating air quality near roadways. The TAQI associates air quality with the equivalent emission from traffic sources and with street structure (roadway structure) as anthropogenic factors. The paper presents a method of determining the TAQI and defines the degrees of harmfulness of emitted pollution. It proposes a classification specifying a potential threat to human health based on the TAQI value and shows an example of calculating the TAQI value for real urban streets. It also considers the role that car traffic plays in creating a local UHI.

Zbigniew Bagie?ski

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BOREAS Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Study Area Operations/Thompson Airport (NSA-Ops) Study Area Operations/Thompson Airport (NSA-Ops) NSA Operations (NSA-Ops) The Keewatin Air Hanger: site of BOREAS Ops 1994 Dr. Piers Sellers working in Ops, 1994 BOREAS "Air Force" The NASA C-130 The University of Wyoming King Air The NASA Helicopter The NRC Twin Otter The NCAR Electra The Ontario Chieftain Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help |

402

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-to-air heat pumps Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions... data on the seasonal performance of air-to-air residential heat pump systems. The purpose of this paper... of operation 10, 197778, the Control House ......

405

Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Emissions from marine diesel engines are mainly uncontrolled and affect regional air quality and health of people living near ports. Many emission control strategies are… (more)

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emission compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emission control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

409

Air America: Upholding the Airmen's Bond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Ed Adams, Air America, Conducted rescue operations in Laos and South Vietnam Mr. Marius Burke, Air America, Conducted rescue operations in Laos and South Vietnam Mr. Robert Grealy, CIA, Retired Senior

Kilgard, Michael P.

410

Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation; California Air Resources Board

411

Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory of methane from flooded unexploited coal seams Field experience from the flooding operations of the abandoned sorption capacity of coal in the dry-air state through determining the isotherm of methane sorption

Boyer, Edmond

412

Advanced furnace air staging and burner modifications for ultra-low NOx firing systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overfire air is an effective means to reduce NOx emissions from coal fired furnaces. The current range of overfire air usage on wall-fired boilers in the US is in the range of 10 to 20%. In most cases this is enough to achieve current Title IV NOx reduction requirements. Future applications are likely to go beyond 20% Overfire Air to reduce NOx further for lower investment and operating costs of SCR retrofits. Summer ozone reduction requires NOx emissions of 0.15 lb/MBtu. Currently, industry is exploring the conditions under which this goal is attainable. The paper discussed the approach to achieve ultra-low NOx emissions by using advanced furnace air staging. It describes the unique approach of redesigning the burner to maintain low NOx burner performance when the overfire air system is added or increased in capacity. The impact on furnace corrosion and unburned carbon losses are presented. A case study is used to show the effects of overfire air both on emissions and unburned carbon.

McCarthy, K.; Laux, S.; Grusha, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables Summary Report Draft, a Report to the TCEQ for the Period Sept. 2005 - August 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System DRAFT 2005/2006 Wind/Renewables Summary Report, p. 2 August 2006 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System ENERGY SYSTEMS...-3087 Dear Chairman White: The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System is pleased to provide its first annual report, ?Statewide Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables...

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Subbarao, K.; Verdict, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Compressed Air  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPA Utility Reimbursement Programs for Compressed Air Projects Customer Proposal Template Measurement & Verification Plan for Compressed Air CA 2006-15 A template for utilities to...

415

Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. C. Lal, R. (2004), Carbon emission from farm operations,facts: Average carbon dioxide emissions resulting fromcalculation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from fuel

Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Improvement of combustion efficiency and emission characteristics of IC diesel engine operating on ESC cycle applying Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) with vaneless turbine volute  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on experimental data, the present study investigates the influence of turbine adjustment in a turbocharger with vaneless turbine volute on diesel combustion efficiency indices and emission characteristics. ...

D. Samoilenko; H. M. Cho

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Use of emission spectroscopy for real-time assessment of relative wall erosion rate of BHT-200 hall thruster for various regimes of operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation emission due to Boron atoms sputtered from the Boron-Nitride ceramic walls of a BHT-200 Hall thruster was measured as

Çelik, Murat Alp

418

Reducing emissions by addressing steam turbine inefficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that inefficient steam turbines increase fossil plant emissions because additional fuel must be burned to meet the power output requirements. During a turbine outage, plant performance and maintenance staff make and prioritize repair decisions within tight time and budget constraints. This paper describes how Georgia Power identifies performance losses of degraded components in the steam path and determines their impact on heat rate. Turbine performance is assessed by a steam path audit program that Encotech has developed and make available to utilities. Georgia Power has conducted several operating tests that give good correlation with audit results. Georgia Power uses the audit information to make the most cost-effective repairs to maintain a low heat rate and to reduce emissions. The Clean Air Act presents electric utilities with the challenge of reducing emissions from fossil plants in the most cost-effective way possible. Meeting the stack emissions limitations often translates to large capital expenditures and increased cycle heat rate. One resource the electric utilities have to reduce the costly impact of compliance with the Clean Air Act is control over the efficiency of their steam turbines.

Harris, J.C. (Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Cioffi, D.H. (Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control Standard NESHAPs National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NOx oxides of nitrogen NPOC nonAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner

Wechsler, Risa H.

420

Improving central heating plant performance at the defense construction supply center (DCSC): Advanced operation and maintenance methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1987 air pollution emissions test done by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA) identified several problems with the central heating plant (CHP) at the Defense Construction Supply Center (DCSC), Columbus, OH. Though DCSC repaired the specified problems, improved coal specifications, and tried to reduce air infiltration, CHP performance remained at unacceptable levels. Consequently, DCSC contracted the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) to apply advanced operation and maintenance procedures to improve its combustion system. This study employed a system-wide approach to evaluate the CHP 5 fuel storage, combustion, heat distribution, and the control of air emissions. Many short-term improvements to the CHP were identified and tested. Subsequent combustion and air emissions tests revealed that the recommended improvements successfully increased CHP efficiency. Long-term improvements were also recommended to help maintain the short-term improvements.

Savoie, M.J.; Standerfer, J.; Schmidt, C.M.; Gostich, J.; Mignacca, J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Quantifying the air quality-CO2 tradeoff potential for airports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aircraft movements on the airport surface are responsible for CO2 emissions that contribute to climate change and other emissions that affect air quality and human health. While the potential for optimizing aircraft surface movements to minimize CO2 emissions has been assessed, the implications of CO2 emissions minimization for air quality have not been quantified. In this paper, we identify conditions in which there is a tradeoff between CO2 emissions and population exposure to O3 and secondary PM2.5 – i.e. where decreasing fuel burn (which is directly proportional to CO2 emissions) results in increased exposure. Fuel burn and emissions are estimated as a function of thrust setting for five common gas turbine engines at 34 US airports. Regional air quality impacts, which are dominated by ozone and secondary PM2.5, are computed as a function of airport location and time using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model. Tradeoffs between CO2 emissions and population exposure to PM2.5 and O3 occur between 2–18% and 5–60% of the year, respectively, depending on airport location, engine type, and thrust setting. The total duration of tradeoff conditions is 5–12 times longer at maximum thrust operations (typical for takeoff) relative to 4% thrust operations (typical for taxiing). Per kilogram of additional fuel burn at constant thrust setting during tradeoff conditions, reductions in population exposure to PM2.5 and O3 are 6–13% and 32–1060% of the annual average (positive) population exposure per kilogram fuel burn, where the ranges encompass the medians over the 34 airports. For fuel burn increases due to thrust increases (i.e. for constant operating time), reductions in both PM2.5 and O3 exposure are 1.5–6.4 times larger in magnitude than those due to increasing fuel burn at constant thrust (i.e. increasing operating time). Airports with relatively high population exposure reduction potentials – which occur due to a combination of high duration and magnitude of tradeoff conditions – are identified. Our results are the first to quantify the extent of the tradeoff between CO2 emissions and air quality impacts at airports. This raises the possibility of reducing the air quality impacts of airports beyond minimizing fuel burn and/or optimizing for minimum net environmental impact.

Akshay Ashok; Irene C. Dedoussi; Steve H.L. Yim; Hamsa Balakrishnan; Steven R.H. Barrett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Physiological responses to air pollutants G. Halbwachs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physiological responses to air pollutants G. Halbwachs Zentrum fur Umwelt- und Naturschutz of fumigation experiments on young plants could be utilized for inter- preting some effects when air pollution of the interaction between air pollution and the forest ecosystem, where not only emission stress is at hand

Boyer, Edmond

423

Air Quality Standards & ATOC/CHEM 5151  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Lecture 22 Air Quality Standards & Control ATOC/CHEM 5151 #12;2 Primary Pollutants Things to reduce air pollution emissions ­ Latest version ­ 1990 (original, 1963) ­ What is an "air pollutant that are directly emitted Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Hydrocarbons (VOCs) Carbon Monoxide (CO) #12;3 Secondary Pollutants

Toohey, Darin W.

424

Energy performance of direct expansion air handling unit in office buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings and their occupants generate a large amount of carbon emissions. In Korea, buildings contribute to about 30% of the total greenhouse gases emissions, and the proportion has been rapidly increasing to the level of the developed counties (i.e., more than 40% of the total emissions. A direct expansion air handling unit, of which a refrigerant is directly delivered to the heating and cooling, has a potential to save cooling and heating energy use, compared to water-based central air conditioning systems. The aim of this study is to compare heating and cooling energy uses of an identical office building but with different air conditioning systems, i.e. direct expansion and water-based air conditioning systems. Dynamic building energy simulations that reflect the actual use of a monitored building and its air handling unit operation have been conducted in this study. Simulation results show good agreement with the actual energy consumption obtained from the field measurements of the building. Our study quantifies the amount of cooling and heating energy uses saved by a direct expansion air handing unit and reveals reasons for this savings, i.e. higher energy efficiency of the unit and reduction in pump and fan energy demands.

Geun Young Yun; Jongdae Choi; Jeong Tai Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - air currents Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solvent cleaners (currently four units on-site) Emissions standards for air pollutants... Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety...

426

Vegetation and Other Development Options for Mitigating Urban Air Pollution Impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While air pollution control devices and programs are the primary method of reducing emissions, urban air pollution can be further mitigated through planning and...

Richard Baldauf; David Nowak

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - air showers electromagnetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

traversing... , air showers alone will not increase the conductivity enough to initiate lightning. If air showers... source altitudes From Dwyer and Smith (2005) 12;RF emissions...

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in voter... reasons to consider air quality when distributing these funds. Including air pollution as a screening... emissions." The State of California must therefore include...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality planning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in voter... reasons to consider air quality when distributing these funds. Including air pollution as a screening... emissions." The State of California must therefore include...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality benefits Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in voter... reasons to consider air quality when distributing these funds. Including air pollution as a screening... emissions." The State of California must therefore include...

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - air particulate samples Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: air particulate samples Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via...

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality related Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in voter... reasons to consider air quality when distributing these funds. Including air pollution as a screening... emissions." The State of California must therefore include...

433

Evaluating point and process fugitive emission sources of particulate matter from feed mills associated with cattle feed yards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. by emitting more than 90.7 tonnes (100 tons) of a regulated pollutant annually) to obtain from its state air pollution regulatory agency (SAPRA) a federal operating permit (FOP). The results from this study will be used to develop scientifically based emission...

Demny, Michael Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Biomass Gasification with Air in an Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed. Effect of Six Operational Variables on the Quality of the Produced Raw Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variables analyzed are equivalence ratio (from 0.20 to 0.45), temperatures of the gasifier bed (750?850 °C) and of its freeboard (500?600 °C), H/C ratio in the feed, use of secondary air (10% of the overall) in the freeboard, and addition (2?5 wt %) of a calcined dolomite mixed with the biomass used as the feedstock. ... Biomass has a density 2?5 times lower than silica sand, used as the fluidizing medium in the bed. ... The particle size for the silica sand in the bed is important. ...

Ian Narváez; Alberto Orío; Maria P. Aznar; José Corella

1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

436

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.22 Gaseous Emissions: Nitrogen Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide,3- 4 GASEOUS EMISSIONS: NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE,

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations...

Verma, Ankit

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Loring Air Force Base, Operable Units 3, 5, 10, and 11, Limestone, ME, August 21, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Loring Air Force Base National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Aroostook County, Maine. This decision document presents the selected remedial actions for the source areas at the following sites located within OUs 3, 5, 10, and 11 at the Site: OU3 - Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range Outdoor Firing Range; OU5 -- Base Exchange Service Station (BXSS); OU10 -- Pumphouse (PH) 8210; PH 8270; Former Solvent Storage Building (FSSB); and OU11 -- Refueling Maintenance Shop Area (RMSA); Vehicle Maintenance Building (VMB); The USAF has evaluated the potential risks to human health and the environment at each of the these sites and developed the site-specific remediation goals for the source areas at each of these sites based on the future land use determinations made in the April 1996 Record of Decision (PB96-963703) for the Disposal of Loring Air Force Base, Maine. Therefore, the No Further CERCLA Action decisions for the source areas at each of these sites is based on the assumption that future land use at each site shall be in accordance with the Disposal ROD (i.e., that real property comprising the site shall be parceled, disposed of, and reused in accordance with the Disposal ROD).

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Basly L., Couvercelle C., Cauneau F., Ranchin T., Wald L., 1999. SAR imagery for urban air quality. In Proceedings of the 18th EARSeL Symposium on Operational Remote Sensing for Sustainable Development, Enschede, The Netherlands, Nieuwenhuis G.,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basly L., Couvercelle C., Cauneau F., Ranchin T., Wald L., 1999. SAR imagery for urban air quality IMAGERY FOR URBAN AIR QUALITY L. Basly, F. Cauneau, C. Couvercelle, T. Ranchin, L. Wald Groupe micro-climate and air quality. In urban area, air quality is quite dependent on the air flow drag which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

444

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

445

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

446

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

449

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section...

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

454

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

455

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

456

Central Air Conditioning | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Central Air Conditioning Central Air Conditioning Central Air Conditioning May 30, 2012 - 8:01pm Addthis Central air conditioners circulate cool air through a system of supply and return ducts. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/DonNichols. Central air conditioners circulate cool air through a system of supply and return ducts. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/DonNichols. What does this mean for me? Central air conditioning systems are thermostatically controlled and convenient to use. Central air conditioning systems must be installed properly to operate efficiently. Central air conditioning systems can share ductwork with your heating system. Central air conditioners circulate cool air through a system of supply and return ducts. Supply ducts and registers (i.e., openings in the walls,

457

Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners July 1, 2012 - 5:35pm Addthis A window air conditioner is one solution to cooling part of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kschulze. A window air conditioner is one solution to cooling part of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kschulze. What does this mean for me? Room air conditioners are less expensive and disruptive to install than central air conditioning systems. Room air conditioners can be a cost-effective alternative to central air conditioning systems. How does it work? Room air conditioners work by cooling one part of your home. Room or window air conditioners cool rooms rather than the entire home or business. If they provide cooling only where they're needed, room air conditioners are less expensive to operate than central units, even though

458

Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: high-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating compressor; compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

Benton, N.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pollutants emissions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Environmental Engineering Summary: Pollution Sources & Emissions a. Introduction b. Air pollution episodes & nature of air pollution problems c... Pollution Prevention,...

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pollutant emissions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Environmental Engineering Summary: Pollution Sources & Emissions a. Introduction b. Air pollution episodes & nature of air pollution problems c... Pollution Prevention,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emissions operating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Survey your options: Continuous emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the US the public`s growing concern for air quality over the last twenty-five years has led to a complex patchwork of federal, state and local regulations aimed at controlling the emissions of pollutants from manufacturing facilities, power plants and municipal waste-incineration facilities. Like a shadow on the heels of a sprinter, the continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) industry has developed as a direct result of these regulations. In just two and a half decades, the CEM market has grown from a few specialized instrument firms to a billion-dollar business today--a remarkable feat considering there were few true CEM systems in existence prior to the enactment of the original US Clean Air Act of 1970. Despite the emergence of so many vendors offering so many different monitoring techniques, operators still face a host of complex issues when trying to select the right CEM. For facilities operating in today`s competitive, highly regulated environment, cost and performance pressures are stronger than ever. These pressures have forced CEM developers toward innovation to improve performance while containing capital and plant operating costs. This article provides an overview of the current status of CEM systems, and provides a glimpse at some of the new developments that will affect future monitoring configurations. Noteworthy new techniques include continuous emissions monitoring using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analyzers, laser-based opacity monitors, and the growing use of software-based, predictive CEMs. Also discussed is a new approach that overcomes the problems associated with measuring SO{sub 2} in fluegas streams downstream of NOx-reduction systems that use ammonia or urea injection.

White, J.R. [KVB/Analect, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Impact of Traffic-Related Air Pollution on Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Road transport contributes significantly to air quality problems through vehicle emissions, which have ... was to assess the impact of traffic-related air pollution on health of Warsaw citizens, following the...1...

J. Jakubiak-Lasocka; J. Lasocki; R. Siekmeier; Z. Ch?opek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Potential of air-side economizers for data center cooling: A case study for key Australian cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The provision of low cost cooling is challenging due to high energy costs and increasing heat dissipation volumes from data centers. In Australia, with the introduction of emissions trading scheme, the cost of energy with carbon origin is expected to increase. In order to reduce cooling costs, alternative low cost cooling methods for data centers are highly sought after. In this study, we investigated using air-side economizers to introduce outside air with desired supply air conditions, by exploiting the cool and dry Australian climate conditions. Our approach was based on analyzing the hourly temperature and humidity data gathered over past 12 years for 20 weather monitoring stations across Australia representing all geographical regions and determining the potential of using air-side economizers for those locations. As the result, we demonstrated that there is a sizable potential for using air-side economizers in some states that could lead to significant savings on cooling costs to data center operators.

Jayantha Siriwardana; Saliya Jayasekara; Saman K. Halgamuge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Air Quality Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT Air Quality Impact Study for UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project City of Rosemount trademark of Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc. Air Quality Impact Study - DRAFT UOFMN 103496 University......................................................................... 2 2.3 Air Emissions

Netoff, Theoden

466

Air Emmissions Trading Program/Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Environmental Services Air Resources Division The New Hampshire Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative is a carbon dioxide emissions budget trading program. The program includes...

467

Common Air Conditioner Problems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems May 30, 2012 - 6:41pm Addthis A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. What does this mean for me? You can eliminate the most common air conditioner problems before hiring an air conditioning technician. You can do some air conditioner maintenance and repair tasks yourself. One of the most common air conditioning problems is improper operation. If your air conditioner is on, be sure to close your home's windows and outside doors. For room air conditioners, isolate the room or a group of connected rooms as much as possible from the rest of your home.

468

Common Air Conditioner Problems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems May 30, 2012 - 6:41pm Addthis A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. What does this mean for me? You can eliminate the most common air conditioner problems before hiring an air conditioning technician. You can do some air conditioner maintenance and repair tasks yourself. One of the most common air conditioning problems is improper operation. If your air conditioner is on, be sure to close your home's windows and outside doors. For room air conditioners, isolate the room or a group of connected rooms as much as possible from the rest of your home.

469

Compressed Air Energy Storage Act (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act lays out regulations for the local authorities related to site selection, design, operation and monitoring for underground storage of compressed air.

470

Environmental emissions and socioeconomic considerations in the production, storage, and transportation of biomass energy feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis was conducted to identify major sources and approximate levels of emissions to land, air, and water, that may result, in the year 2010, from supplying biofuel conversion facilities with energy crops. Land, fuel, and chemicals are all used in the establishment, maintenance, harvest, handling and transport of energy crops. The operations involved create soil erosion and compaction, particulate releases, air emissions from fuel use and chemical applications, and runoff or leachate. The analysis considered five different energy facility locations (each in a different major crop growing region) and three classes of energy crops -- woody crops, perennial herbaceous grasses, and an annual herbaceous crop (sorghum). All projections had to be based on reasonable assumptions regarding probable species used, type of land used, equipment requirements, chemical input requirements, and transportation fuel types. Emissions were summarized by location and class of energy crop.

Perlack, R.D.; Ranney, J.W.; Wright, L.L.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

472

Field evaluation of cofiring gas with coal for quantifying operational benefits and emissions trim in a utility boiler. Volume 2. Topical report, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume consists of 14 appendixes to accompany volume 1 of the report, and covers the following test data: analysis of coal, fylash, and bottom ash samples; cleanliness factors; slagging observation record sheets; stack opacity measurements; stack sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides measurements; total coal flow; fuel gas flow; furnace exit gas temperature; percent oxygen at economizer outlet; percent excess air; bulk steam temperatures at secondary superheater and reheater outlets; secondary superheater and reheater tube outlet leg temperatures; unit heat rate; and models used for data interpretation.

Clark, K.J.; Torbov, T.S.; Impey, R.J.; Hara, K.G.; Burnett, T.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

8, 34053430, 2008 Climate and emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions The role of climate and emission changes in future air quality over.russell@ce.gatech.edu) 3405 #12;ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al

Boyer, Edmond

474

Capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from ambient air could compensate for all carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Such capture would, for example, make it possible to use liquid, carbon-based fuels in cars or airplane...

K.S. Lackner

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Improving Air Quality with Solar Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet series highlights how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can and are being used to reduce air emissions and meet environmental goals, showcasing case studies and technology-specific topics. This one focus on solar energy technologies.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Health Damages from Air Pollution in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In China, elevated levels of urban air pollution result in substantial adverse health impacts for its large and rapidly growing urban population. An expanded version of the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA), ...

Matus, Kira

477

Improving Air Quality with Solar Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

This fact sheet series highlights how renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can and are being used to reduce air emissions and meet environmental goals, showcasing case studies and technology-specific topics. This one focus on solar energy technologies.

2008-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

478

Effects of Air Pollution Control on Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban air pollution and climate are closely connected due to shared generating processes (e.g., combustion) for emissions of the driving gases and aerosols. They are also connected because the atmospheric lifecycles of ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

479

Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mills  A,  Wiser  R,  Milligan  M,  O'Malley  M.  Comment  on  "Air  Emissions  Due  to  Wind  and