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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

2

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

3

EIA - AEO2010 - Updated State air emissions regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Updated State air emissions regulations Updated State air emissions regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Updated State air emissions regulations Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast States that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their CO2 emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 mega-watts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted [30]. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009. Each participating State was provided a CO2 budget consisting of a history-based baseline with a cushion for emissions growth, so that meeting the cap is expected to be relatively easy initially and become more stringent in subsequent years. The requirements are expected to cover 95 percent of CO2 emissions from the region's electric power sector. Overall, the RGGI States as a whole must maintain covered emissions at a level of 188 million tons CO2 for the next 4 years, after which a mandatory 2.5-percent annual decrease in CO2 emissions through 2018 is expected to reduce the total for covered CO2 emissions in the RGGI States to 10 percent below the initial calculated bud-get. Although each State was given its own emissions budget, allowances are auctioned at a uniform price across the entire region.

4

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contaminants (Mississippi) Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contaminants (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Air Emission Regulation for the Prevention, Abatement and Control of

5

Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purpose of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act make the state Title V permitting program (Permit Regulations for the Construction and/or...

6

State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several States have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The regulations state that no person shall emit into the atmosphere from any source any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three minutes in any one hour which is greater...

8

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi) Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

9

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several States have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the States and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected States include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Federal Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In 2005, the EPA finalized two regulations, CAIR and CAMR, that would reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. Both CAIR and CAMR are included in the AEO2006 reference case. The EPA has received 11 petitions for reconsideration of CAIR and has provided an opportunity for public comment on reconsidering certain aspects of CAIR. Public comments were accepted until January 13, 2006. The EPA has also received 14 petitions for reconsideration of CAMR and is willing to reconsider certain aspects of the rule. Public comments were accepted for 45 days after publication of the reconsideration notice in the Federal Register. Several States and organizations have filed lawsuits against CAMR. The ultimate decision of the courts will have a significant impact on the implementation of CAMR.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

point source or emissions, which will obscure someone's view by 40%. For fossil fuel burning the maximum permissible emission of ash andor particulate matter shall be limited to...

12

Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are at a stationary source emitting or potentially emitting 100,000 tons per year of co2 equivalent emissions (calculated by multiplying the mass amount of emissions, for each...

13

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Type Environmental Regulations Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous...

14

Kansas Air Quality Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All new air contaminant emission sources or alterations to emission sources that are required to be reported shall be in compliance with all applicable emission control regulations at the time that...

15

Projections of air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility combustion: Input for hazardous air pollutant regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required by the 1990 CAAA to promulgate rules for all ``major`` sources of any of these HAPs. According to the HAPs section of the new Title III, any stationary source emitting 10 tons per year (TPY) of one HAP or 25 TPY of a combination of HAPs will be considered and designated a major source. In contrast to the original National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which were designed to protect public health to ``an ample margin of safety,`` the new Title III, in its first phase, will regulate by industrial category those sources emitting HAPs in excess of the 10/25-TPY threshold levels, regardless of health risks. The trace elements normally associated with coal mineral matter and the various compounds formed during coal combustion have the potential to produce hazardous air toxic emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. Under Title III, the EPA is required to perform certain studies, prior to any regulation of electric utilities; these studies are currently underway. Also, the US Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a vested interest in addressing those energy policy questions affecting electric utility generation, coal mining, and steel producing critical to this country`s economic well-being, where balancing the costs to the producers and users of energy with the benefits of environmental protection to the workers and the general populace remains of significant concern.

Szpunar, C.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Regulations for Air Quality (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Regulation establishes emission standards for particulates and gases, emission opacity standards, standards of air quality and control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the emission of...

17

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

18

2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report  

SciTech Connect

The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

Fuehne, David P.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /  

SciTech Connect

The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

Fuehne, David P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Eligibility Commercial...

22

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

23

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

24

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

25

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-470E-20Ģ1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public from airborne radionuclide emissions. We requestfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse SourcesHazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides), Availability ofLBNL to Revise Its Radionuclide NESHAP Monitoring Approach,”

Wahl, Linnea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

32

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

34

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory.

Stirrup, T.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, stored, and potentially emitted. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2011, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.01 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included about 90 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley lab operations. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer codes, CAP88-PC and COMPLY, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI).

Wahl, Linnea

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

Wahl, Linnea

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

37

Air Pollution Control Systems for Stack and Process Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strict environmental regulations at the federal and local levels require that industrial facilities control emissions of particulates, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants. To comply with regulations, industries must either modify the processes or fuels they use to limit the generation of air pollutants, or remove the pollutants from the process gas streams before release into the atmosphere. This report provides a comprehensive disc...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromHazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides), Availability ofLBNL to Revise Its Radionuclide NESHAP Monitoring Approach,”

Wahl, Linnea

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

Wahl, Linnea

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control

42

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions Date: March 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulating Greenhouse Gas Emissions Date: March 7, 2011 To: Michigan's Congressional Delegation From: Michigan College, University, Agency and NGO Researchers RE: Clean Air Act and Greenhouse Gas note that the EPA's rules to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new vehicles were welcomed

Shyy, Wei

44

Radioactive air emissions 1992 summary. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes, by radionuclide or product and by emitting facility, the Laboratory`s 1992 radioactive air emissions. In 1992, the total activity of radionuclides emitted into the air from Laboratory stacks was approximately 73,500 Ci. This was an increase over the activity of the total 1991 radioactive air emissions, which was approximately 62,400 Ci. Total 1992 Laboratory emissions of each radionuclide or product are summarized by tables and graphs in the first section of this report. Compared to 1991 radioactive air emissions, total tritium activity was decreased, total plutonium activity was decreased, total uranium activity was decreased, total mixed fission product activity was increased, total {sup 41}Ar activity was decreased, total gaseous/mixed activation product (except {sup 41}Ar) activity was increased, total particulate/vapor activation product activity was increased, and total {sup 32}P activity was decreased. Radioactive emissions from specific facilities are detailed in this report. Each section provides 1992 data on a single radionuclide or product and is further divided by emitting facility. For each facility from which a particular radionuclide or product was emitted, a bar chart displays the air emissions of each radionuclide or product from each facility over the 12 reporting periods of 1992, a line chart shows the trend in total emissions of that radionuclide or product from that facility for the past three years, the greatest activity during the 1990--1992 period is discussed, and unexpected or unusual results are noted.

Wahl, L. [comp.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

U.S. DOE 2004 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Amendments to the Clean Air Act, which added radionuclides to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), went into effect in 1990. Specifically, a subpart (H) of 40 CFR 61 established an annual limit on the impact to the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides from U.S. Department of Energy facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As part of the new NESHAP regulations, LANL must submit an annual report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency headquarters and the regional office in Dallas by June 30. This report includes results of monitoring at LANL and the dose calculations for the calendar year 2004.

K.W. Jacobson

2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sequim Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and ashington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. This report meets the calendar year 2012 Sequim Site annual reporting requirement for its operations as a privately-owned facility as well as its federally-contracted status that began in October 2012. Compliance is indicated by comparing the estimated dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) with the 10 mrem/yr Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard. The MSL contains only sources classified as fugitive emissions. Despite the fact that the regulations are intended for application to point source emissions, fugitive emissions are included with regard to complying with the EPA standard. The dose to the Sequim Site MEI due to routine operations in 2012 was 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2012. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

48

Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Regulations Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Study shows clean diesel programs slashed black carbon, a powerful short-term contributor to global warming June 13, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Jon Weiner 510-486-4014 jrweiner@lbl.gov CA-BC-graphic.jpg Sacramento - Reductions in emissions of black carbon since the late 1980s, mostly from diesel engines as a result of air quality programs, have resulted in a measurable reduction of concentrations of global warming pollutants in the atmosphere, according to a first-of-its-kind study examining the impact of black carbon on California's climate. The study, funded by the California Air Resources Board and led by Dr. Veerabhadran Ramanathan of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the

49

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rokkan, D.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site, Calendar year 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1994, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the ``MEI.`` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

Gleckler, B.P.; Diediker, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jette, S.J.; Rhoads, K.; Soldat, S.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy efficiency and air regulation | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA boiler rules New EPA regulations for industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers encourage energy efficiency measures to help reduce hazardous air pollutants. Energy...

53

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

54

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction portable temporary radioactive air emission units - August 1998  

SciTech Connect

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of three types of portable/temporary radionuclide airborne emission units (PTRAEUs). These three types are portable ventilation-filter systems (Type I), mobile sample preparation facilities (Type II), and mobile sample screening and analysis facilities (Type 111). Approval of the NOC application is intended to allow construction and operation of the three types of PTRAEUs without prior project-specific approval. Environmental cleanup efforts on the Hanford Site often require the use of PTRAEUs. The PTRAEUs support site characterization activities, expedited response actions (ERAs), sampling and monitoring activities, and other routine activities. The PTRAEUs operate at various locations around the Hanford Site. Radiation Air Emissions Program, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, requires that the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) be notified before construction of any new emission that would release airborne radioactivity. The WDOH also must receive notification before any modification of an existing source. This includes changes in the source term or replacement of emission control equipment that might significantly contribute to the offsite maximum dose from a licensed facility. During site characterization activities, ERAs, sampling and monitoring activities, and other routine activities, the PTRAEUs might require startup immediately. The notification period hampers efforts to complete such activities in an effective and timely manner. Additionally, notification is to be submitted to the WDOH when the PTRAEUs are turned off. The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) potentially could generate several notifications monthly. The WDOH would be required to review and provide approval on each NOC as well as review the notices of discontinued sources. The WDOH regulation also allows facilities the opportunity to request a single categorical license that identifies limits and conditions of operations for similar multipurpose temporary and or portable emission units. The DOE-RL will submit annually to the WDOH a report summarizing the log books maintained on the individual PTRAEUs that are used during the reporting period. The report will supply information needed to ensure compliance with the condition of operations. The NOC includes a general description of the three types of PTRAEUs, tracking mechanisms, emissions control systems, and radioactivity handling limits (RHLs) for the PTR4EUs. The NOC is based on hypothetical data to demonstrate how emission estimates could be calculated. Tracking will be performed and monitoring will be conducted for compliance with both federal and state regulations. Type I units will use a single isotope based on a calculated RHL (source term) to determine emissions, dose, and monitoring requirements. Type I1 and 111 units will use field data and process knowledge to determine emissions, dose, and monitoring requirements. New PTRAEUs that conform to any of the three types of PTRAEUs described in this application will be added to the next annual report after the units are placed in service. New PTRAEUs, which do not conform to any of the three types of PTRAEUs described in this application, will require approval on an individual basis by the WDOH before startup.

FRITZ, D.W.

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

56

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency/Company /Organization: CONEG Policy Research Center Inc. Partner: Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, Rick Handley and Associates, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, Economic Development Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.mass.gov/Eoeea/docs/doer/renewables/biomass/DOER%20Biomass%20Emiss Country: United States

57

Impact of Air Quality Regulations on Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively small projects for generating electrical power at or near the point of use--distributed generation (DG)--offer unique opportunities for enhancing the U.S. electric system. This report finds that current air quality regulatory practices are inappropriately inhibiting the development of DG through a failure to recognize the environmental benefits offered by DG or by imposing requirements designed for larger systems that are not appropriate to DG systems. The report recommends that air quality regulation be made more efficient and appropriate for DG by establishing national standards for DG equipment. This report also recommends that DG projects be evaluated on a''net'' emissions basis by being given credit for any emission sources that they displace. Air quality regulation should also recognize the benefits of combined heat and power (CHP).

Bluestein, J.; Horgan, S.; Eldridge, M. M.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

59

2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

David P. Fuehne

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Regional emissions of air pollutants in China.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the China-MAP program, sponsored by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, regional inventories of air pollutants emitted in China are being characterized, in order that the atmospheric chemistry over China can be more fully understood and the resulting ambient concentrations in Chinese cities and the deposition levels to Chinese ecosystems be determined with better confidence. In addition, the contributions of greenhouse gases from China and of acidic aerosols that counteract global warming are being quantified. This paper presents preliminary estimates of the emissions of some of the major air pollutants in China: sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and black carbon (C). Emissions are estimated for each of the 27 regions of China included in the RAINS-Asia simulation model and are subsequently distributed to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} grid using appropriate disaggregation factors. Emissions from all sectors of the Chinese economy are considered, including the combustion of biofuels in rural homes. Emissions from larger power plants are calculated individually and allocated to the grid accordingly. Data for the period 1990-1995 are being developed, as well as projections for the future under alternative assumptions about economic growth and environmental control.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Air Quality Regulations (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

regulates more than 70,000 inspection points such as pollution control devices, boilers, fuels and paints at 3,650 facilities that produce air pollution in Pennsylvania. The...

64

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - Nox Budget Trading 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum

65

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Environmental Regulations Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide...

66

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

67

Emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers: Arsenic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue; the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants has been greatly expanded through passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Arsenic and arsenic compounds are of concern mainly because of their generally recognized toxicity. Arsenic is also regarded as one of the trace elements in coal subject to significant vaporization. This report summarizes and evaluates available published information on the arsenic content of coals mined in the United States, on arsenic emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Bituminous and lignite coals have the highest mean arsenic concentrations, with subbituminous and anthracite coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in arsenic concentrations. Arsenic emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific arsenic compounds. Variations in emission, rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of arsenic by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with cold electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 50 to 98% have been reported. Limited data for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems show widely varying removals of from 6 to 97%. On the other hand, waste incineration plants report removals in a narrow range of from 95 to 99%. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in arsenic control for existing flue-gas-cleanup technologies and summarizes the status of analytical techniques for measuring arsenic emissions from combustion sources.

Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radionuclide air emission report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1993 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, {open_quotes}National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,{close_quotes} Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.{close_quotes}

Diediker, L.P.; Curn, B.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K.; Damberg, E.G.; Soldat, J.K.; Jette, S.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Infrared Continental Surface Emissivity Spectra Retrieved from AIRS Hyperspectral Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS; NASA Aqua platform) observations over land are interpreted in terms of monthly mean surface emissivity spectra at a resolution of 0.05 ?m and skin temperature. For each AIRS observation, an estimation of the ...

E. Péquignot; A. Chédin; N. A. Scott

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Environmental policymaking for air transportation : toward an emissions trading system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aviation is at a turning point. Considerable improvements in aircraft emissions efficiencies are expected through technological improvements, air traffic management, and managerial strategies. But global… (more)

De Serres, Martine.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

73

Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How to Cite. Tshudy, J. A. (1995), Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior products. J Vinyl Addit Technol, 1: 155–158. doi: ...

74

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9- Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.

75

Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

MULKEY, C.H.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1995, and the resulting effective dose equivalent (FDE) to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the `MEI.` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, `National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,` Subpart H, `National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.` This report has also been prepared for and will be submitted in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, `Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.`

Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Abstract This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies...

80

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington, DC). 31. US Environmental Protection Agency (2007) EGRID Emission Data for 2005 (Clean Energy

Michalek, Jeremy J.

82

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

ROKKAN, D.J.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

84

Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and must take immediate or reasonable steps to...

85

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Prescribed Fire Emission Factors Database for Land Management and Air Quality Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act, its amendments, and air quality regulations require that prescribed fire managers estimate the quantity of emissions that a prescribed fire will produce. Information on emissions is available for these calculations; however, it is often incomplete or difficult to find. Tables and computer models can also provide some of this information, but the quality and applicability of the data to a specific site are unknown. In conjunction with three research projects developing new emissions data and meteorological tools to assist prescribed fire managers, the Resource Conservation and Climate Change Program Area of the Department of Defense's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program is supporting development of a database that contains emissions information related to prescribed burning. Ultimately the vetted database will be available on the Internet and will contain emissions information that has been developed from laboratory and field-scale measurements and has been published.

Lincoln, Emily; Hao, WeiMin; Baker, S.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Urbanski, Shawn; Miller, J. Wayne; Weise, David; Johnson, Timothy J.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Impact of Air Emissions Controls on Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion products (CCPs) have been extensively studied and well characterized over the last 30 years. However, new air emissions control technologies at power plants will change the characteristics of some existing CCPs. These changes may affect the selection of appropriate management methods for high-volume CCPs with respect to both disposal and use. This report examines evolving air emissions controls and their likely impact on CCPs.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Emission estimates for air pollution transport models.  

SciTech Connect

The results of studies of energy consumption and emission inventories in Asia are discussed. These data primarily reflect emissions from fuel combustion (both biofuels and fossil fuels) and were collected to determine emissions of acid-deposition precursors (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) appropriate to RAINS-Asia regions. Current work is focusing on black carbon (soot), volatile organic compounds, and ammonia.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

U.S. Department of Energy Report, 2005 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Amendments to the Clean Air Act, which added radionuclides to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), went into effect in 1990. Specifically, a subpart (H) of 40 CFR 61 established an annual limit on the impact to the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides from U.S. Department of Energy facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As part of the new NESHAP regulations, LANL must submit an annual report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency headquarters and the regional office in Dallas by June 30. This report includes results of monitoring at LANL and the dose calculations for the calendar year 2006.

Keith W. Jacobson, David P. Fuehne

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site -- calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emission from the Hanford Site in 1997, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the MEI. The report has been prepared in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. This report has also been prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The effective dose equivalent to the MEI from the Hanford Site`s 1997 point source emissions was 1.2 E-03 mrem (1.2 E-05 mSv), which is well below the 40 CFR 61 Subpart H regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr. Radon and thoron emissions, exempted from 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the MEI of 2.5 E-03 mrem (2.5 E-05 mSv). The effective dose equivalent to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive emissions was 2.2 E-02 mrem (2.2 E-04 mSv). The total effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions was 2.6 E-02 mrem (2.6 E-04 mSv). The effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions is well below the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 246-247, regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr.

Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

1998-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For the Prevention of Air Pollution For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi) Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Climate Policies Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Quality The purpose of the Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes is to prevent the excessive buildup of air pollutants during air pollution episodes, thus preventing the occurrence of an emergency due to the effects of these pollutants of the health of

92

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The EDE to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine emissions in 2011 from PNNL Site sources was 1.7E 05 mrem (1.7E-7 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2011. The total radiological dose for 2011 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions was more than 10,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Air Operating Program are adopted in accordance with the provisions of Part UU of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act, Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101, and will be referred to in this description as "program", "regulations" and "regulation No. 26". The regulations are intended to meet the requirements of title of

94

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particulate air Joint BioEnergy Institute Lawrence Hall ofBuilding 978, the Joint BioEnergy Institute, are shown onStreet Facility) Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) C-14, Cd-

Wahl, Linnea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particulate air Joint BioEnergy Institute Lawrence Hall ofBuilding 978, the Joint BioEnergy Institute, are shown onStreet Facility) Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) Produced

Wahl, Linnea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Amplified radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in thunderstorms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic ray air showers produce radio emission, consisting in large part of geosynchrotron emission. Since the radiation mechanism is based on particle acceleration, the atmospheric electric field can play an important role. Especially inside thunderclouds large electric fields can be present. We examine the contribution of an electric field to the emission mechanism theoretically and experimentally. Two mechanisms of amplification of radio emission are considered: the acceleration radiation of the shower particles and the radiation from the current that is produced by ionization electrons moving in the electric field. We selected and evaluated LOPES data recorded during thunderstorms, periods of heavy cloudiness and periods of cloudless weather. We find that during thunderstorms the radio emission can be strongly enhanced. No amplified pulses were found during periods of cloudless sky or heavy cloudiness, suggesting that the electric field effect for radio air shower measurements can be safely ignored during non-thunderstorm conditions.

Stijn Buitink; for the LOPES collaboration

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Towards an Emissions Trading Scheme for Air Pollutants in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions trading schemes have great potential to lower pollution while minimizing compliance costs for firms in many areas now subject to traditional command-and-control regulation. This paper connects experience with ...

Duflo, Esther

98

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2012, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 0.5% to a maximum of 11.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Eligibility Utility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ā—¸ Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

102

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

103

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

104

Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Northeast States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Boiler and Furnace Emissions and Safety Regulations in the Northeast States Agency...

106

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.govmain Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation...

107

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Adequacy Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations December 2011 RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS iii Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... V CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2. ALIGNMENT OF POTENTIAL COMPLIANCE PATHWAYS WITH REGULATORY DEADLINES ......... 5 CHAPTER 3. RESOURCE ADEQUACY.......................................................................................................... 15 APPENDIX A: NERC REGIONS ................................................................................................................... 26

108

Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control are applicable to any stationary source that has the potential to emit any federally regulated air pollutant. The purpose and intent of Regulation 19, as amended, is to provide a clear delineation of those

109

esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules. This report considers two EPA regulations, the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) and the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), that are widely expected to have the greatest impact on

110

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Summary Executive Summary December 2011 Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules.

111

Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

JOHNSON, R.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

114

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7 - Emission of Air Contaminant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or cause damage to property or which unreasonably interferes with the enjoyment of...

115

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

116

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in I998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR SI), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H; require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv), which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.5 E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent ofthe 10 mrem/yr standard.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

118

Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Promoting Geothermal Energy: Air Emissions Comparison and Externality Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When compared to fossil fuel energy sources such as coal and natural gas, geothermal emerges as one of the least polluting forms of energy, producing virtually zero air emissions. Geothermal offers a baseload source of reliable power that compares favorably with fossil fuel power sources. But unless legislative changes are enacted, geothermal energy will continue to be produced at only a fraction of its potential.

Kagel, Alyssa; Gawell, Karl

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy consumption of the constant air volume (CAV) system largely depends on the regulation strategies. Although some air conditioning systems are equipped with automatic regulation devices, others lack effective regulation strategies. To avoid wasting energy and presenting simple regulation methods, fuzzy regulation strategies for CAV systems are studied in this research. A CAV system of an office building is modeled and simulated with the Designer's Simulation Toolkit (DeST). The operating parameters are calculated based on the instantaneous load obtained from simulation. The operation of the system is divided into five stages according to different conception of “cold” or “hot” in different seasons. The relationship between the outdoor air temperature and the fresh air volume, and the supply air temperature is presented in the form of fuzzy rules. Then the building is simulated under different load conditions and the operating parameters are obtained from fuzzy reasoning. Finally, the effect of fuzzy strategies on energy consumption is analyzed and compared with the effects of the operating parameters obtained from simulation. The results show that energy consumption using a fuzzy regulation strategy is close to the energy consumption of knowing the exact load of the building, while the fuzzy regulation strategy can largely simplify the regulation of the air conditioning system.

Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

122

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

123

Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

Economically consistent long-term scenarios for air pollutant emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutant emissions such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone precursors substantially influence climate. While future century-scale scenarios for these emissions have become more realistic through the inclusion of emission controls, they still potentially lack consistency between surface pollutant concentrations and regional levels of affluence. We demonstrate a methodology combining use of an integrated assessment model and a three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model, whereby a reference scenario is constructed by requiring consistent surface pollutant levels as a function of regional income over the 21st century. By adjusting air pollutant emission control parameters, we improve agreement between modeled PM2.5 and economic income among world regions through time; agreement for ozone is also improved but is more difficult to achieve because of the strong influence of upwind world regions. The scenario examined here was used as the basis for one of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. This analysis methodology could also be used to examine the consistency of other pollutant emission scenarios.

Smith, Steven J.; West, Jason; Kyle, G. Page

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of engineering controls on radioactive air emissions from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under federal regulations set forth in 40 CFR 61, releases of radioactive airborne effluents from a Department of Energy facility must be limited so that no member of the public receives more than 0. IO miflisievert (IO milhrem) effective dose equivalent annually. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has implemented engineering controls to ensure that emissions remain below this limit. At the accelerator beam stop, a delay line was constructed to delay exhaust air releases, and thereby allow for decay of any radioactivity prior to release. Also, an air scrubber was built at the beam stop to remove excess water, acids, triti@ and carbon dioxide from the air stream. This thesis describes the effectiveness of these emissions control efforts. Using a flow-through ionization chamber and high-purity germanium (HPGE) detector, the delay line was shown to reduce overall facility emissions by 29%. The scrubber effectiveness at removing tritium was found by collecting grab samples of the air stream on silica gel, both upstream and downstream of the scrubber. Results of liquid scintillation analysis show the tritium removal effectiveness to be greater than 95%. Removal of carbon-I I was determined by two methods. First, air samples upstream and downstream of the scrubber were collected on a carbon dioxide absorber and analyzed with a sodium iodide detector. The second method used a bench-top model scrubbing system to analyze scrubber performance with an BPGE detector. Different scenarios were examined with this model system, including varying the pH of the scrubber water and using catalytic conversion to convert all carbon in the air to carbon dioxide. The highest removal effectiveness of the model system was greater than 95%, under high pH and complete conversion of all carbon forms to C02-

Fuehne, David Patrick

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

Jacobson, D.; High, C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,” (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

Michael Sandvig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction portable/temporary radioactive air emission units  

SciTech Connect

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of three types of portable/temporary radionuclide airborne emission units (PTRAEUs). These three types are portable ventilation-filter systems (Type 1), mobile sample preparation facilities (Type II), and mobile sample screening and analysis facilities (Type III). Approval of the NOC application is intended to allow construction and operation of the three types of PTRAEUs without prior project-specific approval. Environmental cleanup efforts on the Hanford Site often require the use of PTRAEUS. The PTRAEUs support site characterization activities, expedited response actions (ERAs), sampling and monitoring activities, and other routine activities. The PTRAEUs operate at various locations around the Hanford Site.

Hays, C.B.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

BENECKE MW

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Air Pollution Controls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions regulations for hazardous and non-hazardous...

134

Impact of Ground-level Aviation Emissions on Air Quality in the Western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aviation industry has experienced sustained growth since its inception result- ing in an increase in air pollutant emissions. Exposure to particulate matter less than… (more)

Clark, Eric Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Clean Air Act's Impact on Environmental Regulation and Electric Power Conservation and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for electric power in Texas is expected to grow at about 2.3 percent over the next 15 years. Utilities plan to satisfy this demand by increasing the number of power generating facilities and improving energy conservation programs. New stringent environmental regulations force utilities to reconsider how best to meet the power demand. The new Clean Air Act permits utilities to use a market driven system of allowances to comply with sulfur dioxide emission limits. This paper discusses some of the environmental regulatory changes and their effect on the provision of electric power.

Ashley, H.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provide end-use energy efficiency, or avoid methane emissions...

138

The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FFV exhaust emissions using M85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of emission tests of a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) powered by an SI engine, fueled by M85 (methanol), and supplied with oxygen-enriched intake air containing 21, 23, and 25 vol% O2. Engine-out total hydrocarbons (THCs) and unburned methanol were considerably reduced in the entire FTP cycle when the O2 content of the intake air was either 23 or 25%. However, CO emissions did not vary much, and NOx emissions were higher. HCHO emissions were reduced by 53% in bag 1, 84% in bag 2, and 59% in bag 3 of the FTP cycle with 25% oxygen-enriched intake air. During cold-phase FTP,reductions of 42% in THCs, 40% in unburned methanol, 60% in nonmethane hydrocarbons, and 45% in nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs) were observed with 25% enriched air; NO{sub x} emissions increased by 78%. Converter-out emissions were also reduced with enriched air but to a lesser degree. FFVs operating on M85 that use 25% enriched air during only the initial 127 s of cold-phase FTP or that use 23 or 25% enriched air during only cold-phase FTP can meet the reactivity-adjusted NMOG, CO, NO{sub x}, and HCHO emission standards of the transitional low-emission vehicle.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.; Ng, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Baudino, J.H. [Autoresearch Labs., Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); Colucci, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding

140

Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Utilizing intake-air oxygen-enrichment technology to reduce cold- phase emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen-enriched combustion is a proven, serious considered technique to reduce exhaust hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from automotive gasoline engines. This paper presents the cold-phase emissions reduction results of using oxygen-enriched intake air containing about 23% and 25% oxygen (by volume) in a vehicle powered by a spark-ignition (SI) engine. Both engineout and converter-out emissions data were collected by following the standard federal test procedure (FTP). Converter-out emissions data were also obtained employing the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) ``Off-Cycle`` test. Test results indicate that the engine-out CO emissions during the cold phase (bag 1) were reduced by about 46 and 50%, and HC by about 33 and 43%, using nominal 23 and 25% oxygen-enriched air compared to ambient air (21% oxygen by volume), respectively. However, the corresponding oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions were increased by about 56 and 79%, respectively. Time-resolved emissions data indicate that both HC and CO emissions were reduced considerably during the initial 127 s of the cold-phase FTP, without any increase in NO, emissions in the first 25 s. Hydrocarbon speciation results indicate that all major toxic pollutants, including ozone-forming specific reactivity factors, such as maximum incremental reactivity (NUR) and maximum ozone incremental reactivity (MOIR), were reduced considerably with oxygen-enrichment. Based on these results, it seems that using oxygen-enriched intake air during the cold-phase FTP could potentially reduce HC and CO emissions sufficiently to meet future emissions standards. Off-cycle, converter-out, weighted-average emissions results show that both HC and CO emissions were reduced by about 60 to 75% with 23 or 25% oxygen-enrichment, but the accompanying NO{sub x}, emissions were much higher than those with the ambient air.

Poola, R.B.; Ng, H.K.; Sekar, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Baudino, J.H. [Autoresearch Labs., Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); Colucci, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

Robert F. Grossman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

144

Cross State Air Pollution Rule requires emissions reductions from ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

145

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

146

California's Zero Emission Vehicle Program Cleaner air needed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these highly functional vehicles and called for more. The regulation also spurred advances in natural gas regulation Ā­or "ZEV Mandate"as it is sometimes called -- required automakers to put small demonstration. Benefits of the ZEV Regulation The benefits of the ZEV regulation are now apparent: The major automakers

Gille, Sarah T.

147

1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tracking Progress in Reducing Mercury Air Emissions Compiled by the Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Northeast states have taken steps since at least the 1990s to reduce and eliminate mercury emitted to the air from local sources. These steps occurred despite objections often raised against them asserting that they would be ineffective. The objections typically invoke the existence of a global pool of mercury created by mercury emissions from around the world that dominates local and regional mercury deposition. According to this argument, local and regional mercury emission reductions should have negligible benefits for the local and regional environment because the reductions will be overwhelmed by mercury deposition from the global mercury pool. While a global mercury pool does exist, a wealth of real world observations shows that changes in local and regional mercury air emissions are in fact readily seen within fairly short time periods in the local and regional environment. This is indeed borne out by the results seen in the Northeast and elsewhere in the United States. The following sections present the results of scientific studies showing local and regional connections between changes in mercury air emissions and changes in mercury appearing in the environment. These are grouped according to the type of mercury emission source: 1) mercury from coal combustion, 2) mercury from waste incineration, and 3) mercury from smelters. While the main focus is on the Northeast, we include studies from outside the region to further illustrate the connections between changes in local and regional mercury emissions and changes in mercury found in the environment.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Updated cost estimates of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A means of estimating the cost of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emission control was investigated. This study was designed to derive H/sub 2/S emission abatement cost functions and illustrate the cost of H/sub 2/S emission abatement at a hydrothermal site. Four tasks were undertaken: document the release of H/sub 2/S associated with geothermal development; review H/sub 2/S environmental standards; develop functional relationships that may be used to estimate the most cose-effective available H/sub 2/S abatement process; and use the cost functions to generate abatement cost estimates for a specific site. The conclusions and recommendations derived from the research are presented. The definition of the term impacts as used in this research is discussed and current estimates of the highest expected H/sub 2/S concentrations of in geothermal reservoirs are provided. Regulations governing H/sub 2/S emissions are reviewed and a review of H/sub 2/S control technology and a summary of the control cost functions are included. A case study is presented to illustrate H/sub 2/S abatement costs at the Baca KGRA in New Mexico.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensity of coal- 89 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter GHGintensity of gas- 61 based corn ethanol in gCO2e/liter PriceIf a megajoule of corn ethanol reduces GHG emissions 18%

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

153

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

154

Novel Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces Engine NOx Emissions  

Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions pose risks to human health, and so they need to be reduced. One very effective tool for reducing engine in-cylinder temperature and, hence NOx emissions (NOx is a strong function of temperature), is Exhaust Gas ...

155

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each hour, equilibrium emissions and electricity prices areCalifornia Greenhouse Gas Emission and Sinks: 1990 to 2004 (estimates that CO 2 emissions from instate generationin 2004

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

159

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Environmental Regulations Siting & Permitting The Permit Board will issue two types of air pollution control permits, a permit to construct air emissions equipment and...

160

Updated State Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, Climate Initiative, and Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

162

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1 - Visible Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

163

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

164

Altitude dependence of fluorescence light emission by extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence light is induced by extensive air showers while developing in the Earth's atmosphere. The number of emitted fluorescence photons depends on the conditions of the air and on the energy deposited by the shower particles at every stage of the development. In a previous model calculation, the pressure and temperature dependences of the fluorescence yield have been studied on the basis of kinetic gas theory, assuming temperature-independent molecular collision cross-sections. In this work we investigate the importance of temperature-dependent collision cross-sections and of water vapour quenching on the expected fluorescence yield. The calculations will be applied to simulated air showers while using actual atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence on the reconstructed energy of extensive air showers.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 & 47 - CO2 Budget Trading...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe CO2 allowance allocations and transfers necessary to meet emissions standards. Rhode...

166

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 and 47 - CO2 Budget...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe CO2 allowance allocations and transfers necessary to meet emissions standards. Rhode...

167

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies BiomassBiogas Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator...

168

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Using hydroponic biomass to regulate NOx emissions in long range space travel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Hydroponic Biomass to Regulate NOx Emissions in Longprepared from hydroponic biomass prohibits high surface areapotato stalk are inedible biomass that can be continuously

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Optimal control of a bleed air temperature regulation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates temperature control of an aircraft engine bleed air system, aiming at reducing ram air usage to reduce fuel consumption while maintaining fast… (more)

Shang, Lan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations may apply to reciprocating engines, fuel-burning equipment, or waste combusting equipment which are either attached to major stationary sources of NOx or have high potential NOx...

172

Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air mixture with low NOx emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enabling a burner to stably burn a lean fuel/air mixture. The burner directs the lean fuel/air mixture in a stream. The apparatus comprises an annular flame stabilizer; and a device for mounting the flame stabilizer in the fuel/air mixture stream. The burner may include a body having an internal bore, in which case, the annular flame stabilizer is shaped to conform to the cross-sectional shape of the bore, is spaced from the bore by a distance greater than about 0.5 mm, and the mounting device mounts the flame stabilizer in the bore. An apparatus for burning a gaseous fuel with low NOx emissions comprises a device for premixing air with the fuel to provide a lean fuel/air mixture; a nozzle having an internal bore through which the lean fuel/air mixture passes in a stream; and a flame stabilizer mounted in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture. The flame stabilizer may be mounted in the internal bore, in which case, it is shaped and is spaced from the bore as just described. In a method of burning a lean fuel/air mixture, a lean fuel/air mixture is provided, and is directed in a stream; an annular eddy is created in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture; and the lean fuel/air mixture is ignited at the eddy.

Kostiuk, Larry W. (Edmonton, CA); Cheng, Robert K. (Kensington, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modelling vehicle emissions from an urban air-quality perspective:testing vehicle emissions interdependencies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract This thesis employs a statistical regression method to estimate models for testing the hypothesis of the thesis of vehicle emissions interdependencies. The thesis at… (more)

Dabbas, Wafa M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

NSTec Environmental Technical Services

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fluorescence emission induced by extensive air showers in dependence on atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS), mainly electrons and positrons, initiate the emission of fluorescence light in the Earth's atmosphere. This light provides a calorimetric measurement of the energy of cosmic rays. For reconstructing the primary energy from an observed light track of an EAS, the fluorescence yield in air has to be known in dependence on atmospheric conditions, like air temperature, pressure, and humidity. Several experiments on fluorescence emission have published various sets of data covering different parts of the dependence of the fluorescence yield on atmospheric conditions. Using a compilation of published measurements, a calculation of the fluorescence yield in dependence on altitude is presented. The fluorescence calculation is applied to simulated air showers and different atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence of the atmospheric conditions on the reconstructed shower parameters.

Keilhauer, Bianca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions  

SciTech Connect

Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

QA procedures and emissions from nonstandard sources in AQUIS, a PC-based emission inventory and air permit manager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS) is a database management system that operates under dBASE IV. It runs on an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) with MS DOS 5.0 or later, 4 megabytes of memory, and 30 megabytes of disk space. AQUIS calculates emissions for both traditional and toxic pollutants and reports emissions in user-defined formats. The system was originally designed for use at 7 facilities of the Air Force Materiel Command, and now more than 50 facilities use it. Within the last two years, the system has been used in support of Title V permit applications at Department of Defense facilities. Growth in the user community, changes and additions to reference emission factor data, and changing regulatory requirements have demanded additions and enhancements to the system. These changes have ranged from adding or updating an emission factor to restructuring databases and adding new capabilities. Quality assurance (QA) procedures have been developed to ensure that emission calculations are correct even when databases are reconfigured and major changes in calculation procedures are implemented. This paper describes these QA and updating procedures. Some user facilities include light industrial operations associated with aircraft maintenance. These facilities have operations such as fiberglass and composite layup and plating operations for which standard emission factors are not available or are inadequate. In addition, generally applied procedures such as material balances may need special treatment to work in an automated environment, for example, in the use of oils and greases and when materials such as polyurethane paints react chemically during application. Some techniques used in these situations are highlighted here. To provide a framework for the main discussions, this paper begins with a description of AQUIS.

Smith, A.E.; Tschanz, J.; Monarch, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIR TOXICS AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Prepared Under Burns and Roe Services Corporation Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC92100 .Subtask 44.02 July 1996 SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN . . UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center . Prepared by Adrian Radziwon and Edward Winter Burns and Roe Services Corporation Terence J. McManus, Oak Ridge Associated Universities July 1996 TABLE OF CONTERlW SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................... 1 Background . : .................. 1 Objectives .................... 1 Report Structure ................. 3 Uncertainties ................... 3 SECTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................. 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Biological Air Emissions Control for an Energy Efficient Forest Products Industry of the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wood products industry is a leader in the production of innovative wood materials. New products are taking shape within a growth industry for fiberboard, plywood, particle board, and other natural material-based energy efficient building materials. However, at the same time, standards for clean air are becoming ever stricter. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during production of wood products (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and mercaptans) must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOC and HAP emission control techniques such as regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) and regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) require significant amounts of energy and generate secondary pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and spent carbon. Biological treatment of air emissions offers a cost-effective and sustainable control technology for industrial facilities facing increasingly stringent air emission standards. A novel biological treatment system that integrates two types of biofilter systems, promises significant energy and cost savings. This novel system uses microorganisms to degrade air toxins without the use of natural gas as fuel or the creation of secondary pollutants. The replacement of conventional thermal oxidizers with biofilters will yield natural gas savings alone in the range of $82,500 to $231,000 per year per unit. Widespread use of biofilters across the entire forest products industry could yield fuel savings up to 5.6 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year and electricity savings of 2.1 trillion Btu per year. Biological treatment systems can also eliminate the production of NOx, SO2, and CO, and greatly reduce CO2 emissions, when compared to conventional thermal oxidizers. Use of biofilters for VOC and HAP emission control will provide not only the wood products industry but also the pulp and paper industry with a means to cost-effectively control air emissions. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a novel sequential treatment technology that integrates two types of biofilter systems – biotrickling filtration and biofiltration – for controlling forest product facility air emissions with a water-recycling feature for water conservation. This coupling design maximizes the conditions for microbial degradation of odor causing compounds at specific locations. Water entering the biotrickling filter is collected in a sump, treated, and recycled back to the biotrickling filter. The biofilter serves as a polishing step to remove more complex organic compounds (i.e., terpenes). The gaseous emissions from the hardboard mill presses at lumber plants such as that of the Stimson Lumber Company contain both volatile and condensable organic compounds (VOC and COC, respectively), as well as fine wood and other very small particulate material. In applying bio-oxidation technology to these emissions Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) and Bio•Reaction (BRI) evaluated the potential of this equipment to resolve two (2) control issues which are critical to the industry: • First, the hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions (primarily methanol and formaldehyde) and • Second, the fine particulate and COC from the press exhaust which contribute to visual emissions (opacity) from the stack. In a field test in 2006, the biological treatment technology met the HAP and COC control project objectives and demonstrated significantly lower energy use (than regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) or regenerative catalytic oxidizers (RCOs), lower water use (than conventional scrubbers) all the while being less costly than either for maintenance. The project was successfully continued into 2007-2008 to assist the commercial partner in reducing unit size and footprint and cost, through added optimization of water recycle and improved biofilm activity, and demonstration of opacity removal capabilities.

Jones, K; Boswell, J.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nia’ electricity sector under a source-based cap-and-tradeand-trade program limiting GHG emissions from electricityelectricity markets represent the majority of emissions currently targeted by regional cap-and-trade

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

Y. E. Townsend

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Air Emission Regulations State Air Emission Regulations Legislation and Regulations. State Air Emission Regulations Several States, primarily in the Northeast, have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the States and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected States include Connecticut, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Oregon. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and mercury from power plants. Table 2 shows emissions of NOx, SO2, and CO2 by electricity generators in the eight States and in the rest of the country. Comparable data on mercury emissions by State are not available.

186

Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

Sutherland, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and electricity prices are recorded for eachregulation a¤ects electricity prices and asset utilizationhours, wholesale electricity prices simulated using models

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

190

Volunteering for market-based environmental regulation : the substitution provision of the SO? emissions trading program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we explore the practical and welfare implications of a system of voluntary compliance within a market-based environmental regulation. The Substitution Provision of the SO2 emissions trading program allows the ...

Montero, Juan Pablo

191

Effects of Air Emissions Controls on Coal Combustion Products: Interim Data Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is collecting information describing the effects of air emissions controls on coal combustion products (CCPs) as they pertain to disposal and use. Specifically, data are being collected to assess the impacts of calcium bromide (CaBr2) addition to coal, refined coal, halogen injection in the boiler, brominated activated carbon injection (BrACI) in the flue gas, dry sorbent injection (DSI) in the flue gas, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies: A Synthesis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines conditions under which gridded photochemical air quality models are legitimate tools for determining the types of emission controls (VOC, NOx, or both) that would be most effective for reducing ozone concentration. In doing so, it emphasizes that models should not be used indiscriminately by pointing out their limitations and the resulting consequences. It also suggests ways to make models made more suitable for regulatory purposes by formulating results probabilistically.

1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

File:Air Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Air Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Size of this preview: 463 Ć— 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 Ć— 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page ā†’ next page ā†’ Full resolution ā€ˇ(1,275 Ć— 1,650 pixels, file size: 36 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:26, 14 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:26, 14 March 2013 1,275 Ć— 1,650, 2 pages (36 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

194

Cooperative Regulation of Emissions Using Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We exploit new types of vehicles, such as Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs), to control transport related emissions in urban environments. By appropriately choosing whether single power-split hybrid vehicles should be operated in fully electric ...

A. Schlote, F. Hausler, T. Hecker, A. Bergmann, E. Crisostomi, I. Radusch, R. Shorten

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Un-Regulated Emissions from CRT-Equipped Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Demonstrate applicability of the CRT TM to both new 4-stroke and older 2-stroke diesel engines Document the emissions reductions available using CRT TM retrofits in conjunction with reduced sulfur diesel fuel Evaluate the durability of CRTs in rigorous New York City bus service Apply new measurement and monitoring technologies for PM and toxic emissions Compare diesel-CRTTM with CNG and diesel-electric hybrid buses

Gibbs, Richard

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are exempt, the production costs of regulated producers willwith non-identical production costs exercise market power,abatement costs. Asymmetry in production costs gives rise to

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Pollution markets with imperfectly observed emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the advantages of pollution permit markets over traditional standard regulations when the regulator has incomplete information on firms? emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in large ...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Deducing Ground-to-Air Emissions from Observed Trace Gas Concentrations: A Field Trial with Wind Disturbance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse-dispersion techniques allow inference of a gas emission rate Q from measured air concentration. In “ideal surface layer problems,” where Monin–Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) describes the winds transporting the gas, the application of ...

T. K. Flesch; J. D. Wilson; L. A. Harper

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment - A laboratory measurement of the microwave emission from extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AMY experiment aims to measure the microwave bremsstrahlung radiation (MBR) emitted by air-showers secondary electrons accelerating in collisions with neutral molecules of the atmosphere. The measurements are performed using a beam of 510 MeV electrons at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories. The goal of the AMY experiment is to measure in laboratory conditions the yield and the spectrum of the GHz emission in the frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. The final purpose is to characterise the process to be used in a next generation detectors of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A description of the experimental setup and the first results are presented.

K. Louedec; J. Alvarez-Muńiz; M. Blanco; M. Bohįcovį; B. Buonomo; G. Cataldi; M. R. Coluccia; P. Creti; I. De Mitri; C. Di Giulio; P. Facal San Luis; L. Foggetta; R. Gaļor; D. Garcia-Fernandez; M. Iarlori; S. Le Coz; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. C. Mari?; D. Martello; G. Mazzitelli; M. Monasor; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; S. Petrera; P. Privitera; V. Rizi; G. Rodriguez Fernandez; F. Salamida; G. Salina; M. Settimo; P. Valente; J. R. Vazquez; V. Verzi; C. Williams

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air at 900 to 1100°F containing CO and VOC. By installing a furnace/heat recovery steam generator, Texas Petrochemicals achieved significant reductions of VOC, CO, and NOx, along with energy savings.

John, T. P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kansas Air Quality Act (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall construct, own, operate, install, alter or use any air contaminant emission stationary source which, in accordance with rules and regulations, the secretary finds may cause or...

202

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Air- Vehicle Air- Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range Preprint September 2000 * NREL/CP-540-28960 R. Farrington and J. Rugh To Be Presented at the Earth Technologies Forum Washington, D.C. October 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

203

Characterization of dielectric barrier discharge in air applying current measurement, numerical simulation and emission spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air is characterized applying current measurement, numerical simulation and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). For OES, a non-calibrated spectrometer is used. This diagnostic method is applicable when cross-sectional area of the active plasma volume and current density can be determined. The nitrogen emission in the spectral range of 380 nm- 406 nm is used for OES diagnostics. Electric field in the active plasma volume is determined applying the measured spectrum, well-known Frank-Condon factors for nitrogen transitions and numerically- simulated electron distribution functions. The measured electric current density is used for determination of electron density in plasma. Using the determined plasma parameters, the dissociation rate of nitrogen and oxygen in active plasma volume are calculated, which can be used by simulation of the chemical kinetics.

Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Awakowicz, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

CLEARING THE AIR? THE EFFECTS OF GASOLINE CONTENT REGULATION ON AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to ground-level ozone pollution. Ozone is an odorless, colorless gas that has been linked are particularly pronounced amongst children and the elderly. Moreover, ozone is destructive to crops and natural: restrictions on the chemical composition of gasoline that are primarily intended to reduce the VOC emissions

Edwards, Paul N.

206

The effects of air pollution regulations on the US refining industry. Task 3  

SciTech Connect

Numerous air pollution regulations affecting petroleum refineries recently have been promulgated, have been proposed, or are under consideration at the federal, state, and local level. As shown in Figure ES-1, all of these environmental regulations are intended to take effect over the relatively short time period from 1989 through 1995. In the aggregate these regulatory activities have significant implications for the US refining industry and the Nation, including: Major investment requirements; changes in industry profitability; potential closure of some refineries; and potential changes in crude oil or product import dependence. At issue is whether the cumulative effect of these regulations could so adversely affect the US refining industry that US national security would be affected. In addition to the regulations outlined in Figure ES-1, President Bush recently presented a major new plan to improve the nation`s air quality. The aspects of the President`s plan that could strongly affect US refineries are summarized below.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

An analysis of SO sub 2 emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC's of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 79th Legislature, through Senate Bill 20, House Bill 2481 and House Bill 2129, amended Senate Bill 5 to enhance its effectiveness by adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015, and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also requires PUC to establish a target of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and requires TCEQ to develop methodology for computing emissions reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this Legislation the Laboratory is to assist TCEQ in quantifying emissions reductions credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, through a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC) to develop and annually calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the state’s SIP. The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under this Legislation, submits its second annual report, “Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables,” to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in several deliverables: • A Summary Report, which details the key areas of work; • Supporting Documentation; • Supporting data files, including weather data, and wind production data, which have been assembled as part of the first year’s effort. This executive summary provides summaries of the key areas of accomplishment this year, including: • continuation of stakeholder’s meetings; • review of electricity savings reported by ERCOT; • analysis of wind farms using 2005 data; • preliminary reporting of NOx emissions savings in the 2006 Integrated Savings report to TCEQ; • prediction of on-site wind speeds using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN); • improvements to the daily modeling using ANN-derived wind speeds; • development of a degradation analysis; • development of a curtailment analysis; • analysis of other renewables, including: PV, solar thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal and landfill gas; • estimation of hourly solar radiation from limited data sets;

Turner, W. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Culp, C.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

A sensor management architecture concept for monitoring emissions from open-air demil operations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, CA proposed a sensor concept to detect emissions from open-burning/open-detonation (OB/OD) events. The system would serve two purposes: (1) Provide data to demilitarization operations about process efficiency, allowing process optimization for cleaner emissions and higher efficiency. (2) Provide data to regulators and neighboring communities about materials dispersing into the environment by OB/OD operations. The proposed sensor system uses instrument control hardware and data visualization software developed at Sandia National Laboratories to link together an array of sensors to monitor emissions from OB/OD events. The suite of sensors would consist of various physical and chemical detectors mounted on stationary or mobile platforms. The individual sensors would be wirelessly linked to one another and controlled through a central command center. Real-time data collection from the sensors, combined with integrated visualization of the data at the command center, would allow for feedback to the sensors to alter operational conditions to adjust for changing needs (i.e., moving plume position, increased spatial resolution, increased sensitivity). This report presents a systems study of the problem of implementing a sensor system for monitoring OB/OD emissions. The goal of this study was to gain a fuller understanding of the political, economic, and technical issues for developing and fielding this technology.

Johnson, Michael M.; Robinson, Jerry D.; Stoddard, Mary Clare; Horn, Brent A.; Lipkin, Joel; Foltz, Greg W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Market effects of environmental regulation: coal, railroads, and the 1990 Clean Air Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many environmental regulations encourage the use of 'clean' inputs. When the suppliers of such an input have market power, environmental regulation will affect not only the quantity of the input used but also its price. We investigate the effect of the Title IV emissions trading program for sulfur dioxide on the market for low-sulfur coal. We find that the two railroads transporting coal were able to price discriminate on the basis of environmental regulation and geographic location. Delivered prices rose for plants in the trading program relative to other plants, and by more at plants near a low-sulfur coal source.

Busse, M.R.; Keohane, N.O. [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Market effects of environmental regulation: coal, railroads, and the 1990 Clean Air Act ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many environmental regulations encourage the use of “clean ” inputs. When the suppliers of such an input have market power, environmental regulation will affect not only the quantity of the input used, but also its price. We investigate the effect of the Title IV emissions trading program for sulfur dioxide on the market for low-sulfur coal. We find that the two railroads transporting coal were able to price discriminate on the basis of environmental regulation and geographic location. Delivered prices rose for plants in the trading program relative to other plants, and by more at plants near a low-sulfur coal source.

Severin Borenstein; Michael Greenstone; Matthew Kotchen; Jonathan Levin; Paul Macavoy; Fiona Scott Morton; Sharon Oster; Christopher Timmins; Frank Wolak; Rob Williams

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Regulation of Emissions from Stationary Diesel Engines (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On July 11, 2006, the EPA issued regulations covering emissions from stationary diesel engines New Source Performance Standards that limit emissions of NOx, particulate matter, SO2, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons to the same levels required for nonroad diesel engines. The regulation affects new, modified, and reconstructed diesel engines. Beginning with MY 2007 [16], engine manufacturers must specify that new engines less than 3,000 horsepower meet the same emissions standard as nonroad diesel engines. For engines greater than 3,000 horsepower, the standard will be fully effective in 2011. Stationary diesel engine fuel will also be subject to the same standard as nonroad diesel engine fuel, which reduces the sulfur content of the fuel to 500 parts per million by mid-2007 and 15 parts per million by mid-2010.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Urban scale integrated assessment for London: Which emission reduction strategies are more effective in attaining prescribed PM10 air quality standards by 2005?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightening of air quality standards for populated urban areas has led to increasing attention to assessment of air quality management areas (AQMAs) where exceedance occurs, and development of control strategies to eliminate such exceedance. Software ... Keywords: Air quality management, Dispersion modelling, Emission reduction strategies, Integrated assessment, Particulate matter, Urban air pollution

A. Mediavilla-Sahagśn; H. M. ApSimon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Magnitude and value of electric vehicle emissions reductions for six driving cycles in four US cities with varying air quality problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emissions of logically competing mid-1990 gasoline vehicles (GVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) are estimated as if the vehicles were driven in the same pattern of driving. Six different driving cycles are evaluated, ranging in speed from 7 to 49 miles per hour (mph). These steps are repeated using specifics of fuel composition, electric power mix, and environmental conditions applicable to Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, and New York in the month of July. The year 2000 emissions differences for each of four regulated pollutants - HC, CO, NO{sub x,} SO{sub x} - are estimated. CO{sub 2} emissions are also estimated. With use of EVs, HC and CO emissions are consistently lowered by 98% or more. CO{sub 2} emissions reductions are uniformly large at low speed, but variable at high speed. It is found that initially introduced EVs could achieve 100% emission reductions in Chicago by using off-peak power from nuclear power plants for EV electricity generation. Emissions reductions occur for all combinations in Los Angeles, and for most combinations in New York, excepting SO{sub x}. NO{sub x} emissions are reduced in all four cities. An ``avoided cost`` value for each regulated pollutant is estimated for each of the cities. The values for each city depend on severity of air quality violations. It is estimated that the emissions reduction value of EVs driven an average of one and one half hours per day in Los Angeles ranges from $1050 to $3,900; $590 to $2100 in New York; $270 to $1200 in Chicago, and $330 to $1250 in Denver (1989$). Assuming a range of about 100 miles in congested conditions with speeds of 10 mph or less, the estimates range from $3600 to $13300 for Los Angeles; $2004 to $7200 for New York; $930 to $2930 for Chicago; and $1120 to $4290 for Denver. Low estimates are obtained using EPA`s draft Mobile5 model for GV emissions, high values by using California`s EMFAC7EP-SCF1 model. The dollar value benefit estimates include no economic value.

Wang, Q. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Santini, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Magnitude and value of electric vehicle emissions reductions for six driving cycles in four US cities with varying air quality problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emissions of logically competing mid-1990 gasoline vehicles (GVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) are estimated as if the vehicles were driven in the same pattern of driving. Six different driving cycles are evaluated, ranging in speed from 7 to 49 miles per hour (mph). These steps are repeated using specifics of fuel composition, electric power mix, and environmental conditions applicable to Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, and New York in the month of July. The year 2000 emissions differences for each of four regulated pollutants - HC, CO, NO[sub x,] SO[sub x] - are estimated. CO[sub 2] emissions are also estimated. With use of EVs, HC and CO emissions are consistently lowered by 98% or more. CO[sub 2] emissions reductions are uniformly large at low speed, but variable at high speed. It is found that initially introduced EVs could achieve 100% emission reductions in Chicago by using off-peak power from nuclear power plants for EV electricity generation. Emissions reductions occur for all combinations in Los Angeles, and for most combinations in New York, excepting SO[sub x]. NO[sub x] emissions are reduced in all four cities. An avoided cost'' value for each regulated pollutant is estimated for each of the cities. The values for each city depend on severity of air quality violations. It is estimated that the emissions reduction value of EVs driven an average of one and one half hours per day in Los Angeles ranges from $1050 to $3,900; $590 to $2100 in New York; $270 to $1200 in Chicago, and $330 to $1250 in Denver (1989$). Assuming a range of about 100 miles in congested conditions with speeds of 10 mph or less, the estimates range from $3600 to $13300 for Los Angeles; $2004 to $7200 for New York; $930 to $2930 for Chicago; and $1120 to $4290 for Denver. Low estimates are obtained using EPA's draft Mobile5 model for GV emissions, high values by using California's EMFAC7EP-SCF1 model. The dollar value benefit estimates include no economic value.

Wang, Q. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)); Santini, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Resource Board, Sacramento, CA, April 2006. CARB (Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. CARB (2009a).Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. http://www.arb.ca.gov/

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005). Particulate emissions from construction activities.M. S. , (2000b). In-use emissions from heavy- duty dieseland nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline- and diesel-

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits: Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST Pioneering Markets to Improve the Environment Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC Patrick Leahy and Alden Hathaway April 2004 The Renewable Energy Certificate Market The past few years have witnessed the emergence of the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) market as a viable model for the U.S. renewable energy industry. Once considered an esoteric topic for even the most ardent renewable energy expert, RECs have grown in popularity and exposure thanks to efforts of the renewable energy industry as well as several large purchases by high profile corporations and governmental organizations. Although still in its infancy, the Renewable Energy

220

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The impact of natural gas imports on air pollutant emissions in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the impact that natural gas imports could have on fuel emissions in northern Mexico. The authors discuss the problem created in the 1980s when a shift from natural gas to residual oil in industrial processes increased emissions of air pollutants significantly. The benefits of substituting leaded for unleaded gasoline in the 1990s are discussed also. In July 1992 the Mexican government announced for the first time since oil nationalization that private companies in Mexico are allowed to directly import natural gas. The transportation of natural gas, however, remains reserved only for Pemex, the national oil company. This opens the possibility of reducing the burning of high-sulfur residual oil in both the industrial and the energy production sectors in Mexico, particularly in the northern region where only 6.7% of the of the country`s natural gas is produced. Natural gas imports have also opened the possibility of using compressed natural gas (CNG) in vehicles in northern Mexico. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Bustani, A.; Cobas, E. [Center for Environmental Quality, Monterrey (Mexico)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Prospects of Oxy-Coal Steam-Electric Power Plants Achieving "Minor Source" Status for Air Emissions Permitting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-coal power plants have been proposed for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion in a relatively concentrated form for storage in geological formations. The particular processes employed for oxy-combustion have the positive side effect of reducing emissions to very low levels. This report assesses the extent to which oxy-coal power plants might meet “near-zero” emissions proposed by several organizations and qualify as a “minor source” for the purposes of air emissions permitting. The rep...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Air emissions from residential heating: The wood heating option put into environmental perspective. Report for June 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The paper compares the national scale (rather than local) air quality impacts of the various residential space heating options. Specifically, it compares the relative contributions of the space heating options to fine particulate emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and acid precipitation impacts. The major space heating energy options are natural gas, fuel oil, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), electricity, coal, and wood. Residential wood combustion (RWC) meets 9% of the Nation`s space heating energy needs and utilizes a renewable resource. Wood is burned regularly in about 30 million homes. Residential wood combustion is often perceived as environmentally dirty due to emissions from older wood burners.

Houck, J.E.; Tiegs, P.E.; McCrillis, R.C.; Keithley, C.; Crouch, J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Supplement D to compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1: Stationary point and area sources (fifth edition)  

SciTech Connect

This document contains emission factors and process information for more than 200 air pollution source categories. These emission factors have been compiled from source test data, material balance studies, and they can be used judiciously in making emission estimations for various purposes. This supplement to AP-42 addresses pollutant-generating activity from natural gas combustion, wood waste combustion in boilers; municipal solid waste landfills; waste water collection, treatment and storage; organic liquid storage tanks; nitric acid; grain elevators and processes; plywood manufacturing; lime manufacturing; primary aluminum production; paved roads; abrasive blasting; enteric fermentation -- greenhouse gases.

NONE

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Air pollutant emissions prediction by process modelling - Application in the iron and steel industry in the case of a re-heating furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring air pollutant emissions of large industrial installations is necessary to ensure compliance with environmental legislation. Most of the available measurement techniques are expensive, and measurement conditions such as high-temperature emissions, ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, CO2, Correlation method, Fume emissions, Multiple linear regression, NO2, Steelworks process modelling

Anda Ionescu; Yves Candau

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method of regulating the amount of underfire air for combustion of wood fuels in spreader-stroke boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of metering underfire air for increasing efficiency and reducing particulate emissions from wood-fire, spreader-stoker boilers is disclosed. A portion of the combustion air, approximately one pound of air per pound of wood, is fed through the grate into the fuel bed, while the remainder of the combustion air is distributed above the fuel in the furnace, and the fuel bed is maintained at a depth sufficient to consume all oxygen admitted under fire and to insure a continuous layer of fresh fuel thereover to entrap charred particles inside the fuel bed.

Tuttle, Kenneth L. (Federal Way, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Research and design work on heat emission and aerodynamic resistance of tube bundles in air cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect

Results of studies of heat emission using methods of local and global thermal simulation of crossflow small-array bundles of tubes finned with wound aluminum strip, and flared into the load-bearing wall, are reported. Correction factors applicable to the method of simulating convective heat transfer over the range Re = (2.5-25).10/sup 3/ are given, with variation in the number of rows over the air course from one to four.

Kuntysh, V.B.; Fedotova, L.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the intercontinental impacts of aviation emissions on air quality and health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 10,000 premature mortalities per year globally are attributed to the exposure to particulate matter caused by aircraft emissions. Unlike previous studies that focus on the regional impacts from the aircraft emissions ...

Koo, Jamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effectiveness of the Clean Air Act on SO? emissions from U.S. electric utilities : a detailed analysis of the influence of attainment status and unit-level characteristics on the reduction of SO? emissions from 1976 to 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continuing degradation of air quality in the U.S. during the 1950s and 1960s has led to increasing federal regulations to control air pollution. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1970 and 1977 were major pieces of ...

Dubroeucq, Florence

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radioactive air emissions program notice of construction, rotary mode core-sampling truck and exhauster  

SciTech Connect

Efforts have been ongoing to obtain core samples from the contents of each of the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs). The SSTs contain various amounts and combinations of liquid, sludge, and saltcake. Existing sampling equipment is unable to retrieve samples of hardened waste within established tank safety restrictions (particularly limits on temperature). A new rotary mode core-sampling system has been designed to sample tanks containing hardened wastes. The prominent feature of this new system is the use of a nitrogen gas purge. The nitrogen gas purge will cool the drill bit and prevent cross contamination of different waste layers in the tank. The nitrogen gas purge will also allow more complete sample recovery, by clearing cuttings that might otherwise obstruct the sampler or drill bit. Nitrogen was chosen over other compressed gases for its inherent safety. Many of the tanks to be sampled with the rotary mode core-sampling system are not actively ventilated, these tanks are operated at atmospheric pressure with passive (breather) high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Unless a ventilation system of the proper capacity is used, addition of the nitrogen purge gas to SSTs will cause the tanks to pressurize. Additionally, the use of the rotary mode core-sampling system will generate aerosols and dusts potentially containing radioactive particles in the tank vapor space. Consequently, an exhauster will be required during operation of the rotary mode core-sampling system on SSTs to prevent tank pressurization and to control emissions. This exhauster will be required to be moved from tank farm to tank farm with the rotary mode core-sampling system.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessing Natural Isothiocyanate Air Emissions after Field Incorporation of Mustard Cover Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional air assessment was performed to characterize volatile natural isothiocyanate (NITC) compounds in air during soil incorporation of mustard cover crops in Washington State. Field air sampling and analytical methods were developed specific to three NITCs known to be present in air at appreciable concentrations during/after field incorporation. The maximum observed concentrations in air for the allyl, benzyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were respectively 188, 6.1, and 0.7 lg m-3 during mustard incorporation. Based on limited inhalation toxicity information, airborne NITC concentrations did not appear to pose an acute human inhalation exposure concern to field operators and bystanders.

Trott, Donna M.; LePage, Jane; Hebert, Vincent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission is driven by the geomagnetic ?eld. When the showerand driven by the geomagnetic ?eld. The good angularmagnetic ?eld, causing the geomagnetic radiation to almost

Buitink, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the NO x emission reduction of wind energy from a number ofand Renewable Energy (Wind & Hy- dropower Technologiesand Renewable Energy (Wind & Hy- dropower Technologies

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

THE IMPACT OF SHRINKING HANFORD BOUNDARIES ON PERMITS FOR TOXIC AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM THE HANFORD 200 WEST AREA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation (CE-580. Graduate Seminar) presents a brief description of an approach to use a simpler dispersion modeling method (SCREEN3) in conjunction with joint frequency tables for Hanford wind conditions to evaluate the impacts of shrinking the Hanford boundaries on the current permits for facilities in the 200 West Area. To fulfill requirements for the graduate student project (CE-702. Master's Special Problems), this evaluation will be completed and published over the next two years. Air toxic emissions play an important role in environmental quality and require a state approved permit. One example relates to containers or waste that are designated as Transuranic Waste (TRU), which are required to have venting devices due to hydrogen generation. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) determined that the filters used did not meet the definition of a ''pressure relief device'' and that a permit application would have to be submitted by the Central Waste Complex (CWC) for criteria pollutant and toxic air pollutant (TAP) emissions in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-400 and 173-460. The permit application submitted in 2000 to Ecology used Industrial Source Code III (ISCIII) dispersion modeling to demonstrate that it was not possible for CWC to release a sufficient quantity of fugitive Toxic Air Pollutant emissions that could exceed the Acceptable Source Impact Levels (ASILs) at the Hanford Site Boundary. The modeled emission rates were based on the diurnal breathing in and out through the vented drums (approximately 20% of the drums), using published vapor pressure, molecular weight, and specific gravity data for all 600+ compounds, with a conservative estimate of one exchange volume per day (208 liters per drum). Two permit applications were submitted also to Ecology for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility and the T Plant Complex. Both permit applications were based on the Central Waste Complex approach, and relied on similar tracking requirements as at CWC. All three applications used ISCIII modeling, where unit release factors (lb/yr converted to g/s) were determined for estimating the highest 24-hr or annual average concentrations (in {micro}g/m{sup 3}), where the nearest public receptor was roughly 20 miles away. Plans to clean up and release portions of the Hanford Site over the next several decades would allow public access closer to these facilities in the 200 West Area. Before release of these areas, effectively shrinking the boundaries, the three permits would have to be re-evaluated to determine if toxic air pollutant emissions would remain below the ASILs if the restricted boundaries are moved closer than the current locations.

JOHNSON, R.E.

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

State Regulations on Airborne Emissions: Update Through 2007 (Update) (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

States are moving forward with implementation plans for the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) [42]. The program, promulgated by the EPA in March 2005, is a cap-and-trade system designed to reduce emissions of SO2 and NOx. States originally had until March 2007 to submit implementation plans, but the deadline has been extended by another year. CAIR covers 28 eastern States and the District of Columbia. States have the option to participate in the cap-andtrade plan or devise their own plans, which can be more stringent than the Federal requirements. To date, no State has indicated an intent to form NOx and SO2 programs with emissions limits stricter than those in CAIR, and it is expected that all States will participate in the EPA-administered cap-and-trade program. CAIR remains on schedule for implementation, and AEO2008 includes CAIR by assuming that all required States will meet only the Federal requirement and will trade credits.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effect on air and water emissions of energy conservation in industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental emissions for five large energy-consuming industries plus others are estimated for four US energy system scenarios for 1985 and 2000. Emissions are estimated by specifying fuel mixes to steam boilers and direct heat, combustion efficiencies, shifts in the relative shares of alternative industrial processes use of industrial cogenerators, and penetration of pollution-control technologies. Analyses show that emissions do not vary significantly among scenarios principally because of increased coal use and the reduced penetration rate of advanced pollution-control technologies in the low-energy-demand scenarios. Within scenarios, emissions from the chemical and iron and steel subsectors dominate all aggregate estimates. Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide process emission coefficients for the chemical subsector must be improved.

Raskin, P D; Rosen, R A

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ozone Modeling for Compliance Planning: A Synopsis of "The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies--A Synthesis Report"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require that many nonattainment areas use gridded, photochemical air quality models to develop compliance plans for meeting the ambient ozone standard. This report reviews the status of photochemical air models--the computer simulation programs that will be used to set emission control programs to meet ground level (tropospheric) ozone standards currently in use for regulatory planning. Regulatory application guidelines are discussed, as are the limitations and reliabili...

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The air quality impact of aviation in future-year emissions scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth of aviation is critical to the world and US economy, and it faces several important challenges among which lie the environmental impacts of aviation on noise, climate and air quality. The first objective ...

Ashok, Akshay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions.… (more)

Ruscio, Amanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

An Integrated Assessment of the Impacts of Hydrogen Economy on Transportation, Energy Use, and Air Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demands for the years 2000–2030, utilizing 5-year timeby H 2 demand level in 2030. (b) Change of CO 2 emissions (H 2 -FCV penetration in 2030. The regression coefficients

Yeh, Sonia; Loughlin, Daniel H.; Shay, Carol; Gage, Cynthia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to wind and solar power. Environ. Sci. Technol. (2)Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power” Andrew Mills, ? , †due to wind and solar power. Environ. Sci. Technol. (2)

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Shaping the terms of competition : environmental regulation and corporate strategies to reduce diesel vehicle emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental regulations are typically portrayed as an outside force stimulating development of environmental technologies in regulated industries. In reality, firms influence regulation by communicating their technological ...

Ng, Christine Bik-Kay, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (NESHAP) SUBPART H RADIONUCLIDES POTENTIAL TO EMIT CALCULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an update of the status of stacks on the Hanford Site and the potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions that could occur with no control devices in place. This review shows the calculations that determined whether the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) received by the maximum public receptor as a result of potential emissions from any one of these stacks would exceed 0.1 millirem/year. Such stacks require continuous monitoring of the effluent, or other monitoring, to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative code (WAC) 246-247-035(1)(a)(ii) and WAC 246-247-075(1), -(2), and -(6). This revised update reviews the potential-to-emit (PTE) calculations of 31 stacks for Fluor Hanford, Inc. Of those 31 stacks, 11 have the potential to cause a TEDE greater than 0.1 mrem/year.

EARLEY JN

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

250

Deducing Ground-to-Air Emissions from Observed Trace Gas Concentrations: A Field Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas emission rate Q from an artificial 36-m2 surface area source was inferred from line-average concentration CL measured by an open-path laser situated up to 100 m downwind. Using a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) model, a theoretical C...

T. K. Flesch; J. D. Wilson; L. A. Harper; B. P. Crenna; R. R. Sharpe

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

This research project has two primary objectives: (1) to further develop and refine the Multiscale Air Quality Simulation Platform-Variable Grid Resolution (MAQSIP-VGR) model, an advanced variable-grid-resolution air quality model, to provide detailed, accurate representation of the dynamical and chemical processes governing the fate of anthropogenic emissions in coastal environments; and (2) to improve current understanding of the potential impact of onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) emissions on O{sub 3} and particulate matter nonattainment in the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding states.

Kiran Alapaty; Adel Hanna

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Market Effects of Environmental Regulation: Coal, Railroads and the 1990 Clean Air Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rate Study: Final Report on Coal Transportation,” DOE/EIA-of Environmental Regulation: Coal, Railroads, and the 1990of Environmental Regulation: Coal, Railroads, and the 1990

Busse, Meghan R.; Keohane, Nathaniel O.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Examining the Effects of Variability in Average Link Speeds on Estimated Mobile Source Emissions and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine-Grained Regional Emissions Estimation." TransportationA New Mobile Source Emission Inventory Model." AtmosphericData for Mobile Source Emissions Estimates. Transportation

Sogutlugil, Mihriban

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hot Air? When Government Support for Intermittent Renewable Technologies can Increase Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the e¤ects of an intermittent technology on long-run incentives for investment in non-renewable electricity generation technologies. I …nd conditions under which supporting an intermittent technology may in fact increase carbon emissions. The variability of load usually determines the long run mix of generating technologies in a competitive electricity market. When there is a signi…cant amount of intermittent production the mix of other generating technologies is determined by the variability of net load (load net of intermittent output). Net load may be more variable than load itself if the intermittent output is not too positively correlated with load. This increase in variability results in a substitution away from baseload generating technologies towards peaking and intermediate technologies. If peaking and intermediate technologies are more carbon intensive than non-renewable "baseload " technologies, this substitution can more than o¤set the emission bene…ts derived from the output of the renewable technology. 1

Arthur Campbell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Integrated Analysis of Fuel, Technology and Emission Allowance Markets: Electric Utility Responses to the Clean Air Act Amendments o f 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of the strategic responses of the electric utility industry to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The study analyzes the competitive interactions between fuel switching, scrubbing, and emission trading options and provides information on future regional coal demands and prices, the adoption of SO2 control technologies, compliance costs, and the character of SO2 emission allowance markets.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

SciTech Connect

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power ignores the benefits of diversity. In real power systems, operators are required to balance only the net variations of all loads and all generators, not the output of individual loads or generators; doing otherwise would ensure an enormous amount of unnecessary investment and operating costs. As a result, detailed studies that aggregate the variability of all loads and generators to the system level find that the amount of operating reserves required to reliably integrate variable resources into the grid are on the order of 10% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generators, even when upto25%of gross demand is being met by variable generation. The authors implicit assumption that incremental operating reserves must be 100% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generation, and be available at all times to directly counter that variability, excludes the option of decommitting conventional units when the load net of variable generation is low. In real power systems, generation response to wind variation can typically be met by a combination of committed units, each operating at a relatively efficient point of their fuel curves. In the Supporting Information, we conceptually demonstrate that the CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} efficiency penalty found by the authors can be significantly reduced by considering the unit commitment decision with just five plants. Real systems often have tens to hundreds of plants that can be committed and decommitted over various time frames. Ignoring the flexibility of the unit commitment decision therefore leads to unsupportable results. Anumber of analyses of the fuel savings and CO{sub 2} emission benefits of variable generation have considered realistic operating reserve requirements and unit commitment decisions in models that include the reduction in part load efficiency of conventional plants. The efficiency penalty due to the variability of wind in four studies considered by Gross et al. is negligible to 7%, for up to a 20% wind penetration level. In short, for moderate wind penetration levels, 'there is no evidence available to

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

257

Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power ignores the benefits of diversity. In real power systems, operators are required to balance only the net variations of all loads and all generators, not the output of individual loads or generators; doing otherwise would ensure an enormous amount of unnecessary investment and operating costs. As a result, detailed studies that aggregate the variability of all loads and generators to the system level find that the amount of operating reserves required to reliably integrate variable resources into the grid are on the order of 10% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generators, even when upto25%of gross demand is being met by variable generation. The authors implicit assumption that incremental operating reserves must be 100% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generation, and be available at all times to directly counter that variability, excludes the option of decommitting conventional units when the load net of variable generation is low. In real power systems, generation response to wind variation can typically be met by a combination of committed units, each operating at a relatively efficient point of their fuel curves. In the Supporting Information, we conceptually demonstrate that the CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} efficiency penalty found by the authors can be significantly reduced by considering the unit commitment decision with just five plants. Real systems often have tens to hundreds of plants that can be committed and decommitted over various time frames. Ignoring the flexibility of the unit commitment decision therefore leads to unsupportable results. Anumber of analyses of the fuel savings and CO{sub 2} emission benefits of variable generation have considered realistic operating reserve requirements and unit commitment decisions in models that include the reduction in part load efficiency of conventional plants. The efficiency penalty due to the variability of wind in four studies considered by Gross et al. is negligible to 7%, for up to a 20% wind penetration level. In short, for moderate wind penetration levels, 'there is no evidence available to

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts (Revised), Energy Analysis, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navajo Generating Station Navajo Generating Station Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts David J. Hurlbut, Scott Haase, Gregory Brinkman, Kip Funk, Rachel Gelman, Eric Lantz, Christina Larney, David Peterson, Christopher Worley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Liebsch HDR Engineering, Inc. Prepared under Task No. WFJ5.1000 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53024 * Revised March 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Produced under direction of the U.S. Department of the Interior by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement R11PG30024 and Task No. WFJ5.1000. ERRATA SHEET NREL REPORT/PROJECT NUMBER: NREL/TP-6A20-53024 DOE NUMBER: N/A TITLE: Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and

259

Compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Supplement E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42 Volume I, new or revised emissions data are presented for Anthracite Coal Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Liquified Petroleum Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion In Boilers; Bagasse Combustion In Sugar Mills; Residential Fireplaces; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Automobile Body Incineration; Conical Burners; Open Burning; Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy Duty Natural Gas Fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Gasoline and Diesel Industrial Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and All Stationary Dual Fuel Engines; Soap and Detergents; and Storage of Organic Liquids.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

State Regulations on Airborne Emissions: Update Through 2006 (Update) (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In May 2005, the EPA published two final rules aimed at reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. CAIR [51] requires 28 States and the District of Columbia to reduce emissions of SO2 and/or NOx. CAMR [52] requires the States to reduce emissions of mercury from new and existing coal-fired plants.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions via landfill gas management in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of reducing the emission of greenhouse gases by collection, flaring, and possibly beneficially using the gas from landfills in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina (GBA). Another purpose was to prepare a proposal to the US Initiative on Joint Implementation (USIJI) for a project to collect and possibly use the landfill gas (LFG). The project was carried out from September 30, 1997 through September 30, 1998. Collection and flaring of gas is feasible provided private firms have sufficient incentive to obtain greenhouse gas emission reduction benefits. The value of those benefits that would be required to motivate funding of an LFG management project was not explicitly determined. However, one independent power producer has expressed an interest in funding the first phase of the proposed project and paid for a detailed feasibility study which was conducted in August and September of 1998. As a result of this project, a proposal was submitted to the USIJI Evaluation Panel in June, 1998. In August, 1998, an office was established for reviewing and approving joint implementation proposals. The proposal is currently under review by that office.

Jones, D.B.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Updated Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) Emissions Estimates and Inhalation Human Health Risk Assessment for U.S. Coal-Fired Electric Generating Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the mid-1990s, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emissions from U.S. coal-fired electric power plants and the risks associated with those emissions. With the exception of mercury, none of the HAPs-classified chemicals has been fundamentally reassessed for more than 15 years. The set of EPRI studies reported on here provides a fundamental reevaluation of potential HAPs emissions from coal-fired power plants based on current data concerning coals burned, co...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 & 47- CO2 Budget Trading Program & Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe...

264

Factors Regulating the Air–Sea Heat Fluxes Regime over the Aegean Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the impact of low-frequency atmospheric forcings on the air–sea heat fluxes over the Aegean Sea. The correlation between the air–sea heat flux components and three established [North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), east Atlantic–...

Vassilis P. Papadopoulos; Aristides Bartzokas; Themistoklis Chronis; Dimitris Georgopoulos; George Ferentinos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Program on Technology Innovation: Near Zero Emissions: Precombustion Cleaning Technologies Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precombustion treatment options can be part of a suite of choices to meet anticipated future regulations for the existing coal fleet, as well as for new advanced coal plants with a goal of zero emissions. In addition to reducing air emissions, precombustion treatment can improve boiler performance, reduce ash emissions, and reduce boiler chemical requirements.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KW Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as a Notice of Construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96, for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KW Basin. The purpose of the activities described in this NOC is to enable the eventual retrieval and transport of the fuel for processing. The fuel retrieval and transport will require an integrated water treatment system for which performance specifications have been developed. These specifications are currently in the procurement process. Following procurement (and before installation of this system and the handling of fuel) design details will be provided to Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The 105-K West Reactor (105-KW) and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. Although the 105-KW Basin has not been known to leak, the discharge chute and associated construction joint have been isolated from the rest of the basin by metal isolation barriers. This was a precautionary measure, to mitigate the consequences of a seismic event. The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

Hays, C.B.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KE basin  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96 for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KE Basin. The 105-K east reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin (105-KE Basin) were constructed in the early 1950s and are located in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KE Basin contains 1,152 metric tons of SNF stored underwater in 3,673 open canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 24 years. The 105-KE Basin is constructed of unlined concrete and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The fuel is corroding and an estimated 1,700 cubic feet of sludge, containing radionuclides and miscellaneous materials, have accumulated in the basin. The 105-KE Basin has leaked radiologically contaminated water to the soil beneath the basin in the past most likely at the construction joint between the foundation of the basin and the foundation of the reactor. The purpose of the activities described in this Notice of Construction (NOC) is to enable the retrieval and transport of the fuel to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This NOC describes modifications, the installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities expected to be routine in the future. Debris removal activities described in this NOC will supersede the previously approved NOC (DOE/RL-95-65). The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

Kamberg, L.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Measurement of air toxic emissions from a coal-fired boiler equipped with a tangentially-fired low NOx combustion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of measurements of chemical emissions from a coal-burning, tangentially-fired, utility boiler equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a low NOx firing system. The tests were conducted in response to Title III of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which lists 189 chemicals to be evaluated as {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} The project was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the US Department of Energy under an existing Innovative Clean Coal Technology Cooperative Agreement managed by Southern Company Services. Field chemical emissions monitoring was conducted in two phases: a baseline {open_quotes}pre-low NOx burner{close_quotes} condition in September 1991 and in the LNCFS Level III low NOx firing condition in January 1992. In addition to stack emissions measurements of both organic and inorganic chemicals, plant material balance evaluations were performed to determine the efficiency of the hot-side ESP at controlling emissions of air toxics and to determine the fate of the target chemicals in various plant process streams.

Dismukes, E.B. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Clarkson, R.J.; Hardman, R.R. [Southern Company Services, Birmingham, AL (United States); Elia, G.G. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stakeholder perspectives on the Clean Air Interstate and the Clean Air Mercury Rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a follow-up to last month's detailed overviews of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR), this month EM presents perspectives on the two rules from representatives of a range of stakeholders, including EPA, the states, the regulated community, and the environmental community. Titles of the perspectives are: A Multipollutant Approach to Emissions Reductions; Clean Air Lessons from the Myth of Sisyphus; Reactions to EPA's Clean Air Interstate and Clean Air Mercury Rules; The Case for Coal Rank Subcategorization to Regulate Mercury Emissions; EPA's Mercury Rule: The Latest Delay Tactic; EPA's Mercury Rule: With Technology Today, We Can Do Better; STAPPA/ALAPCO's Perspectives on CAMR and CAIR. 16 refs.

C.V. Mathai; Jeffrey Holmstead; Michael Shore; Skiles Boyd; Vicky Sullivan; Dan Weiss; John Kinsman; Steve Lomax; Michael Rossler; David Steele; Greg Schaefer; Felice Stadler; David Foerter; William Becker [Arizona Public Services, Phoenix, AZ (US)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparing LOPES measurements of air-shower radio emission with REAS 3.11 and CoREAS simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic ray air showers emit radio pulses at MHz frequencies, which can be measured with radio antenna arrays - like LOPES at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. To improve the understanding of the radio emission, we test theoretical descriptions with measured data. The observables used for these tests are the absolute amplitude of the radio signal, and the shape of the radio lateral distribution. We compare lateral distributions of more than 500 LOPES events with two recent and public Monte Carlo simulation codes, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS (v 1.0). The absolute radio amplitudes predicted by REAS 3.11 are in good agreement with the LOPES measurements. The amplitudes predicted by CoREAS are lower by a factor of two, and marginally compatible with the LOPES measurements within the systematic scale uncertainties. In contrast to any previous versions of REAS, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS now reproduce the shape of the measured lateral distributions correctly. This reflects a remarkable progress compared to the si...

Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

McKone, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

General Air Permits (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Air Permits (Louisiana) General Air Permits (Louisiana) General Air Permits (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality Any source, including a temporary source, which emits or has the potential to emit any air contaminant requires an air permit. Facilities with potential emissions less than 5 tons per year of any regulated air pollutant do not need a permit. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality issues Title V General Permits. The permit is developed based on equipment types versus facility types, the general permits are not limited in their use to a specific industry or category. Title V permits combine

273

Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10 tons per year, or any combination of hazardous air pollutants greater than 25 tons per year, must submit, in a form and manner prescribed by the director, a fee emission report that quantifies the actual emission data for particulate matter,

274

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to close the gap on unregulated greenhouse gas emissions.a higher lifecycle greenhouse gas content than conventionalIN- FORMATION ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONs AssocIATEIDn wrri

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Information Handbook, DOE/EH-0077, Washington,s emission-factor handbook does not give emission factorsHandbook, Environmental Pollution and Control Factors, Third Edition, DOE/

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Life-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions for air-blown gasification combined-cycle using selexol  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. With its higher efficiency, this process can reduce CO{sub 2} production. It is also amenable to CO{sub 2} capture, because CO{sub 2} Can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, CO{sub 2} transport -by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of CO{sub 2} in geological reservoirs. The intent of this study is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the fill study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget will be 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh{sub e}. The base case is a 470-MW (at the busbar) IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, US Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 461 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.830 kg/kWh{sub e}. In the CO{sub 2} recovery case, the gasifier output is taken through water-gas shift and then to Selexol, a glycol-based absorber-stripper process that recovers CO{sub 2} before it enters the combustion turbine. This process results in 350 MW at the busbar.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

279

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission and the oil & gas industries. The combustion system used in Solar's products are discussed along- bility for the introduction of new combustion systems for gas turbine products to enhance fuel

Ponce, V. Miguel

280

Cost of meeting geothermal hydrogen sulfide emission regulations. [DOW, EIC, Stretford, and iron catalyst processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H{sub 2}S emission abatement processes considered feasible for control of airborne emissions included two upstream and two downstream treatment techniques. From literature describing the technical aspects of the processes, individual treatment cost functions were developed. These functions were then used to estimate the range of costs that may be encountered when controlling H{sub 2}S emissions to meet given standards. Treatment costs include estimates of certain fixed charges and overheads that normally apply to long lived capital investment projects of similar nature. Continuing experience with control technology for H{sub 2}S abatement indicates process application may have a significant impact on the total cost of geothermal electricity at sites with H{sub 2}S concentrations in excess of 50 ppM{sub w}. Approximately four sites of the 38 USGS high temperature hydrothermal systems fall into this category. At Baca, New Mexico the cost of controlling H{sub 2}S emissions was estimated to be 5.5 mills per kWh. Calculations were based on a 50 MWe flashed steam plant using the Stretford-Peroxide combination of processes to achieve 99% abatement.

Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; Weakley, S.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

State emissions limitations for boilers: particulate matter  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes regulations applicable to boilers as reflected in current state and local air regulations. Not all of these regulations are officially part of Federally-approved State Implementation Plans (SIPs). Several regulations have only recently been adopted by the State and are now undergoing EPA review for incorporation into the SIP. Each summary also contains local regulations more stringent than the State rules. Most local regulations in this handbook are included in the State Implementation Plan. Site-specific emission limits (variances from State limits or limits more stringent than State limits) are not included in these summaries. Appendix A contains maps showing the location of Air Quality Control Regions or other districts by which several States regulate emissions. Appendix B contains a summary of National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which States are required to meet as a minimum. Appendix C contains a description and summary of Federal New Source Performance Standards. Appendix D contains formulas for conversion of emmissions limits expressed in one set of units to the most common units - No. PM/MMBtu. Appendix E contains Figure 2 of ASME APS-1, used for determining particulate emissions limits in some States.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Impact of Codes, Regulations, and Standards on Split-Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and Under  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes a framework for understanding the technology and regulation of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps 65,000 Btu/hr and under. The reporting framework is structured so that it can be added to in the future. This study is broken into six chapters:The basic components, refrigeration cycle, operation, and efficiency ratings of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps are covered for background information.Equipment efficiency ...

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling… (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Examining the Effects of Variability in Average Link Speeds on Estimated Mobile Source Emissions and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection Agency. Sacramento, CA. CARB (2003).Air Resources Board. Sacramento, CA. Cardelino, C. (1998). "of Transportation. Sacramento, CA. Girden, E. (1992). ANOVA

Sogutlugil, Mihriban

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants, petroleum refineries, and other sources. • We useLPG from petroleum Wood for power production Source: updatedfrom petroleum refining, and emissions from other sources

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Power Plants and Other Large Stationary Sources of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to fossil-fuel fired stationary sources which serve a generator with a nameplate capacity of 15 MW or more, or fossil-fuel fired boilers or indirect heat exchangers with a...

287

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

288

Atmospheric emissions of one pulp and paper mill. contribution to the air quality of Viana do Castelo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most sensitive environmental impact of the pulp and paper mills is associated with the atmospheric pollution namely with sulphur compounds, particulate matter and nitrogen oxides. The study undertaken aimed to evaluate the influence of one ... Keywords: air pollution modelling, kraft pulp and paper mill, urban air pollution

Lķgia T. Silva; José F. G. Mendes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report: A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the Period September 2007 - August 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 79th Legislature, through Senate Bill 20, House Bill 2481 and House Bill 2129, amended Senate Bill 5 to enhance its effectiveness by adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015 and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also requires the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT) to establish a target of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and requires the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop methodology for computing emissions reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this Legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL or Laboratory) is to assist the TCEQ in quantifying emissions reductions credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, through a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC) to develop and annually calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under this Legislation, submits its third annual report, “Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables,” to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in several deliverables: • A Summary Report, which details the key areas of work; • Supporting Documentation; and • Supporting data files, including weather data, and wind production data, which have been assembled as part of the third year’s effort. This executive summary provides summaries of the key areas of accomplishment this year, including: • Continuation of stakeholder’s meetings; • Analysis of power generation from wind farms using improved method and 2006 data; • Analysis of emissions reduction from wind farms; • Updates on degradation analysis; • Analysis of other renewables, including: PV, solar thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal and landfill gas; • Review of electricity generation by renewable sources and transmission planning study reported by ERCOT; • Review of combined heat and power projects in Texas; and • Preliminary reporting of NOx emissions savings in the 2007 Integrated Savings report to the TCEQ.

Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Subbarao, K.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A game of climate chicken : can EPA regulate greenhouse gases before the U.S. Senate ratifies the Kyoto Protocol?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA's legal authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act is reviewed. While EPA clearly does not have the authority to implement the precise terms of the Kyoto Protocol, arguments could be put ...

Bugnion, Véronique.; Reiner, David M.

291

Ground-to-Air Gas Emission Rate Inferred from Measured Concentration Rise within a Disturbed Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In reference to previously observed concentrations of methane released from a source enclosed by a windbreak, this paper examines a refined “inverse dispersion” approach for estimating the rate of emission Q from a small ground-level source, when ...

J. D. Wilson; T. K. Flesch; P. Bourdin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coal- or natural gas-fired power plants occur "up-of natural gas is lost before reaching the power plant." 30power plant. Yet, when it comes to upstream emissions, the lifecycle for natural gas

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The State of California was given authority under CAAA90 to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed Federal standards. In addition, other States that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the EPA under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the Nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other States have adopted the California standards.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coordination of energy and air quality management  

SciTech Connect

The project had two goals: first, to demonstrate industrial firms can improve plant energy efficiency as air pollution emissions are reduced; second, to demonstrate that both Seattle City Light and PSAPCA could more effectively accomplish their individual objectives through mutual cooperation, even though the two agencies have very different missions. The cooperative efforts promised benefits for all the parties involved. Seattle City Light hoped that PSAPCA`s knowledge of the likely developments in air pollution controls would help the utility better target energy conservation opportunities among its industrial customers. PSAPCA hoped that the financial assistance offer by Seattle City Light through its conservation programs would make industry less resistant to PSAPCA enforcement of new air pollution control regulations. Finally, individual industrial firms could mitigate some of the cost of meeting the new air pollution control standards. The results of the project were mixed. CEAM did demonstrate that industrial plants can improve energy efficiency as they reduce air pollution emissions, but the relationship between air pollution reduction and energy consumption is complicated; and the project was less successful in meeting its second goal. The project design did not include a measure by which results could be compared against what the two agencies would have accomplished had they not collaborated. Moreover, the project could have benefited substantially from a more complete implementation plan and the production of data quantifying the energy conservation potential resulting from the development of more stringent air pollution control regulations for each of Seattle`s major industries.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

299

Using hydroponic biomass to regulate NOx emissions in long range space travel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The incineration of wastes is one of the most promising reclamation technologies being developed for life support in long range space travel. However, incineration in a closed environment will build up hazardous NOx if not regulated. A technology that can remove NOx under microgravity conditions without the need of expendables is required. Activated carbon prepared from inedible wheat straw and sweet potato stalk that were grown under hydroponic conditions has been demonstrated to be able to adsorb NO and reduce it to N{sub 2}. The high mineral content in the activated carbon prepared from hydroponic biomass prohibits high surface area production and results in inferior NO adsorption capacity. The removal of mineral from the carbon circumvents the aforementioned negative effect. The optimal production conditions to obtain maximum yield and surface area for the activated carbon have been determined. A parametric study on the NO removal efficiency by the activated carbon has been done. The presence of oxygen in flue gas is essential for effective adsorption of NO by the activated carbon. On the contrary, water vapor inhibits the adsorption efficiency of NO. The NO adsorption capacity and the duration before it exceeds the Space Maximum Allowable Concentration were determined. After the adsorption of NO, the activated carbon can be regenerated for reuse by heating the carbon bed under anaerobic conditions to above 500 C, when the adsorbed NO is reduced to N{sub 2}. The regenerated activated carbon exhibits improved NO adsorption efficiency. However, regeneration had burned off a small percentage of the activated carbon.

Xu, X.H.; Shi, Y.; Chang, S.G.; Fisher, J.; Pisharody, S.; Moran, M.; Wignarajah, K.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

State of Washington Department of Health Radioactive air emissions notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - cold vacuum drying facility, project W-441  

SciTech Connect

This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the CVDF will be discussed again in the Phase 11 NOC. This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of WAC 246-247-060 for the completion of Phase I NOC, defined as the pouring of concrete for the foundation flooring, construction of external walls, and construction of the building excluding the installation of CVDF process equipment. A Phase 11 NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installing and is defined as the completion of the CVDF, which consisted installation of process equipment, air emissions control, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters while the SNF in the K East Basin is in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water.

Turnbaugh, J.E.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Air Permits, Licenses, Certifications (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Permits, Licenses, Certifications (Maine) Air Permits, Licenses, Certifications (Maine) Air Permits, Licenses, Certifications (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This program regulates and limits air emissions from a variety of sources within Maine through a statewide permitting program. Separate regulations exist for limiting emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide

302

Air toxics from heavy oil production and consumption  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential impact of recent Federal and state regulations for airborne toxic substances on the production and consumption of heavy fuel oils. Emissions of nickel from heavy oil production in California are considered in some detail, in conjunction with California state regulations for toxic emissions. Although the use of thermal energy from heavy crude oils could in theory be impacted by toxic air pollution regulations, recent trends towards the use of natural gas for the required extraction energy appear to provide substantial relief, in addition to reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants. However, the consumption of residual fuel oils containing toxic metals could result in higher population exposures to these substances and their attendant risks may be worthy of more detailed analysis.

Lipfert, F.W.; DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

305

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission...

306

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Air Pollution Control (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality This rule requires an annual report from a commercial, industrial, or governmental source of emission of an air contaminant if, in the judgment of the Department, information on the quantity and composition of an air

307

Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and evaluated this new system. We completed the development of our variable-grid-resolution air quality model (MAQSIP-VGR) and performed various diagnostic tests related to an enhanced cloud parameterization scheme. We also developed an important tool for variable-grid graphics using Google Earth. We ran the MAQSIP-VGR for the Houston-Galveston and southern Louisiana domains for an August 23 to September 2, 2002, episode. Results of the modeling simulations highlighted the usefulness of the variable-grid modeling approach when simulating complex terrain processes related to land and sea close to an urban area. Our results showed that realistic SST patterns based on remote sensing are critical to capturing the land-sea breeze, in particular the inland intrusion of the reversed mesoscale circulation that is critical for simulating air pollution over urban areas near coastal regions. Besides capturing the correct horizontal gradient between land and sea surface temperatures, it is important to use an adequate ABL scheme in order to quantify correctly the vertical profiles of various parameters. The ABL scheme should capture the dynamics of the marine boundary layer, which is not often considered in a typical simulation over land. Our results further showed the effect of using satellite-derived SSTs on the horizontal and vertical extent of the modeled pollution pattern, and the increase in hourly ozone concentrations associated with changes in ABL characteristics resulting from the enhanced mesoscale circulation in the lower troposphere.

Adel Hanna

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) Texas Clean Air Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This Act is designed to safeguard the state's air resources from pollution by requiring the control and abatement of air pollution and emissions of air contaminants, consistent with the protection of public health, general welfare, and physical property, including the esthetic enjoyment of air resources by the public and the maintenance of adequate visibility. The Act

310

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Compilation of air-pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources, Fourth Edition. Supplement B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42, new or revised emissions data are presented for Bituminous And Subbituminous Coal Combustion; Anthracite Coal Combustion; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Refuse Combustion; Sewage Sludge Incineration; Surface Coating; Polyester Resin Plastics Product Fabrication; Soap and Detergents; Grain Elevators and Processing Plants; Lime Manufacturing; Crushed Stone Processing; Western Surface Coal Mining; Wildfires and Prescribed Burning; Unpaved Roads; Aggregate Handling And Storage Piles; Industrial Paved Roads; Industrial Wind Erosion; and Appendix C.3, Silt Analysis Procedures.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 and 47- CO2 Budget Trading Program and Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe...

313

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010  

SciTech Connect

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007  

SciTech Connect

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Forecasting US CO2 Emissions Using State-Level Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve for air pollution emissions, Journal of EnvironmentalInformation Agency: 2004, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in1999, Controlling Carbon Emissions in China, Environment and

Steinhauser, Ralf; Auffhammer, Maximilian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Laboratory study of premixed H{sub 2}-air and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}-air flames in a low-swirl injector for ultralow emissions gas turbines - article no. 031503  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to conduct laboratory experiments on low-swirl injectors (LSIs) to obtain the basic information for adapting LSI to burn H{sub 2} and diluted H{sub 2} fuels that will be utilized in the gas turbines of the integrated gasification combined cycle coal power plants. The LSI is a novel ultralow emission dry-low NOx combustion method that has been developed for gas turbines operating on natural gas. It is being developed for fuel-flexible turbines burning a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, biomass gases, and refinery gases. The adaptation of the LSI to accept H{sub 2} flames is guided by an analytical expression derived from the flow field characteristics and the turbulent flame speed correlation. The evaluation of the operating regimes of nine LSI configurations for H{sub 2} shows an optimum swirl number of 0.51, which is slightly lower than the swirl number of 0.54 for the hydrocarbon LSI. Using particle image velocimetry (PIV), the flow fields of 32 premixed H{sub 2}-air and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}-air flames were measured. The turbulent flame speeds deduced from PIV show a linear correlation with turbulence intensity. The correlation constant for H{sub 2} is 3.1 and is higher than the 2.14 value for hydrocarbons. The analysis of velocity profiles confirms that the near field flow features of the H{sub 2} flames are self-similar. These results demonstrate that the basic LSI mechanism is not affected by the differences in the properties of H{sub 2} and hydrocarbon flames and support the feasibility of the LSI concept for hydrogen fueled gas turbines.

Cheng, R.K.; Littlejohn, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

319

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

322

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES III Speaker(s): Ronald Briggs Date: August 15, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer Do emissions from natural gas stoves in American homes degrade respiratory health? The combustion of natural gas yields byproducts such as NOx , PM2.5 , and CO that the US EPA regulates outdoors. But while ambient air quality has improved in the US over the last few decades as a consequence of the Clean Air Act of and its amendments, the prevalence of asthma and morbidity and mortality associated with asthma continue to rise (Mannino /et al./, 1998). Concentrations of most air pollutants are higher indoors than outdoors in the US, however, and people in the US spend more than 90%

323

State of Washington Department of Health radioactive air emission notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from the operation of the Hot Conditioning System Annex (HCSA). This information will be discussed again in the Phase II NOC, providing additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the HCSA. This Phase I NOC is defined as construct in the substructure, including but limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor; construction of the process pits and exterior walls; making necessary interface connections to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) ventilation and utility systems for personnel comfort; and extending the multi-canister over-pack (MCO) handling machine rails into the HCSA. A Phase II NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installation and is defined as the completion of the HCSA, which will consist of installation of Hot Conditioning System Equipment (HCSA), air emissions control equipment, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2,300 MT (2,530 tons) of N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The HCSA will be constructed as an addition to the CSB and will contain the HCSA. The hot conditioning system (HCS) will remove chemically-bound water and will passivate the exposed uranium surfaces associated,with the SNF. The HCSA will house seven hot conditioning process stations, six operational and one auxiliary pit, which could be used as a welding area for final sealing of the vessel containing the SNF, or for neutron interrogation of the vessel containing the SNF to determine residual water content. Figures 1 and 2 contain map locations of the Hanford Site and the HCSA. `Response to Requirement` subtitle under each of the following sections identifies the corresponding Appendix A NOC application requirement listed under WAC 246-247-1 10.

Turnbaugh, J.E.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Diffuse and fugitive emission dose assessment on the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and (2) continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request requires RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. The RL Compliance Plan included as one of its milestones the requirement to develop a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). An FFCA was negotiated between RL and the EPA, Region 10, and was entered into on February 7, 1994. One of the milestones was to provide EPA, Region 10, with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI will include an assessment of the diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Site. This assessment does not identify any diffuse or fugitive emission source that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This Act gives the Environmental Management Commission the authority to establish emission control requirements, by rule or regulation, as may be necessary to prevent, abate or control air pollution. Such requirements may be for the state as a whole or may vary from area to area, as may be appropriate, to facilitate accomplishment of the purposes of this chapter and in order to take account of varying local conditions. The Commission can prohibit the construction, installation, modification or

326

Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

Britter, Rex E.

327

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems  

SciTech Connect

Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R and D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

Barnett, J. M.; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

329

California's new mandatory greenhouse gas reporting regulation  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in early 2009, approximately 1000 California businesses will begin reporting their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based on the requirements of a new regulation adopted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in December 2007. California's mandatory GHG reporting regulation is the first rule adopted as a requirement of the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, passed by the California Legislature as Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32; Nunez, Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006) and signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in September 2006. The regulation is the first of its kind in the United States to require facilities to report annual GHG emissions. In general, all facilities subject to reporting are required to report their on-site stationary source combustion emissions of CO{sub 2}, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Some industrial sectors, such as cement producers and oil refineries, also must report their process emissions, which occur from chemical or other noncombustion activities. Fugitive emissions from facilities are required to be reported when specified in the regulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) use is prevalent in electricity facilities and must be reported. CO{sub 2} emissions from biomass-derived fuels must be separately identified during reporting, and reporters must also provide their consumption of purchased or acquired electricity and thermal energy; these requirements will assist facilities in evaluating changes in their fossil fuel carbon footprints. 1 tab.

Patrick Gaffney; Doug Thompson; Richard Bode [California Air Resources Board, CA (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARB's emission regulations (e.g. , natural gas and dieselnatural gas turbines) and those technologies that have been certified as meeting the 2003 or 2007 emissions regulations (

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE/EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air Integration System Emission Reduction Technology (03/11/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPACT IMPACT COMMERCIAL DEMONSRATION OF THE LOW NOx BURNER/SEPARATED OVER- FIRE AIR (LNB/SOFA) INTEGRATON SYSTEM EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY HOLCOMB STATION SUNFLOWER ELECTRIC POWER CORPORATION FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO,

332

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

M. Stockton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

Environmental Stewardship Group

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

`Capture ready' regulation of fossil fuel power plants Betting the UK's carbon emissions on promises of future technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preparation. In contrast, the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant in Seal Sands licensed in 2008 has not been CCGT Centrica Yes 05/02/09 Pembroke, South West Wales CCGT RWE npower Yes 28/08/08 Seal Sands, Teesside-leakage to boiler Design air ducts and fans for re-use for flue gas recycle FGD design that copes with different gas

Haszeldine, Stuart

337

Gas Turbine/Combined-Cycle Emissions Control Technology and Regulatory Issues Handbook-2010 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information pertaining to emissions from combustion turbines. Topics covered include low-NOx burner design and information on add-on control systems, including equipment used in practice as well as emerging technologies. Select air quality regulations that apply to new and existing combustion turbines are discussed, including requirements regarding best available control technology (BACT) (which also may represent the lowest-achievable emission rate or LAER) requirement. United State...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

State-of-the-Art Measurement of Organics and Very Low CO Emissions from Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As new regulations emerge from EPA controlling emissions from stationary sources of air pollution, emission limits are increasing driven into the low part per million (ppm) and part per billion (ppb) range. There is concern regarding the ability of test methods and instrumentation to produce reliable data at these very low concentrations. Sampling and interference issues that could be ignored when measuring higher pollutant concentrations become major issues at low concentration measurement. The two poll...

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Air Pollution- Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010,...

340

Overview of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Air Pollutant Early Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Under provision of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Title III, the EPA has proposed a regulation (Early Reduction Program) to allow a six-year compliance extension from Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for sources that voluntarily reduce emissions of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) by 90% or more (95% or more for particulates) from a base year of 1987 or later. The emission reduction must be made before the applicable MACT standard is proposed for the source category or be subject to an enforceable commitment to achieve the reduction by January 1, 1994 for sources subject to MACT standards prior to 1994. The primary purpose of this program is to encourage reduction of HAPs emissions sooner than otherwise required. Industry would be allowed additional time in evaluating emission reduction options and developing more cost-effective compliance strategies, although, under strict guidelines to ensure actual, significant and verifiable emission reductions occur.

Laznow, J. (International Technology Corp., Durham, NC (United States)); Daniel, J. (International Technology Corp., Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evolution of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of air pollutants at global and regional scales during the 1980-2010 period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different inventories of global and regional anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are assessed for the 1980-2010 period. The species considered in this study are carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black carbon. The inventories considered include the ACCMIP historical emissions developed in support of the simulations for the IPCC AR5 assessment. Emissions for 2005 and 2010 from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are also included. Large discrepancies between the global and regional emissions are identified, which shows that there is still no consensus on the best estimates for surface emissions of atmospheric compounds. At the global scale, anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 show the best agreement in most years. The agreement is low for BC emissions, particularly in the period prior to 2000. The best consensus is for NOx emissions for all periods and all regions, except for China where emissions in 1980 and 1990 need to be better defined. Emissions of CO need a better quantification in the USA for all periods; in Central Europe, the evolution of emissions during the past two decades needs to be better determined. The agreement between the different SO2 emissions datasets is rather good for the USA, but better quantification is needed elsewhere, particularly for Central Europe and China. The comparisons performed in this study show that the use of RCP8.5 for the extension of the ACCMIP inventory beyond 2000 is reasonable, until more global or regional estimates become available. Concerning biomass burning emissions, most inventories agree within 50-80%, depending on the year and season. The large differences are due to differences in the estimates of burned areas from the different available products, as well as in the amount of biomass burnt.

Granier, Claire; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bond, Tami C.; D'Angiola, Ariela; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Frost, G. J.; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Kinne, Stefan; Klimont, Z.; Kloster, Jean; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liousse, Catherine; Masui, Toshihiko; Meleux, Frederik; Mieville, Aude; Ohara, Toshimasa; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Riahi, Keywan; Schultz, Martin; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; van Aardenne, John; van der Werf, Guido R.; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

344

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

345

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Emissions Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Analysis Photo of researcher weighing a clean particulate filter. Emissions that result in pollution from engines are strictly regulated. The next generation of...

346

Probabilistic evaluation of mobile source air pollution: Volume 1 -- Probabilistic modeling of exhaust emissions from light duty gasoline vehicles. Final report, 1 August 1994--31 May 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission factors for light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGV) are typically developed based upon laboratory testing of vehicles for prescribed driving cycles. In this project, selected LDGV data sets and modeling assumptions used to develop Mobile5a were revisited. Probabilistic estimates of the inter-vehicle variability in emissions and the uncertainty in fleet average emissions for selected vehicle types and driving cycles were made. Case studies focused upon probabilistic analysis of base emission rate and speed correction estimates used in Mobile5a for throttle body and port fuel injected vehicles. Based upon inter-vehicle variability in the data sets and a probabilistic model in which the standard error terms of regression models employed in Mobile5a are also considered, the uncertainty was estimated for average emission factors for the selected fleets of light duty gasoline vehicles. The 90 percent confidence interval for the average emission factor varied in range with pollutant and driving cycle.

Frey, H.C.; Kini, M.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Review of BEIS3 Formulation and Consequences Relative to Air Quality Standards: Estimation of Uncertainties in BEIS3 Emission Output s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes estimates of uncertainties for outputs of the Biogenics Emissions Inventory System, Version 3 (BEIS3) model due to uncertainties in model parameters and input variables.

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Multi-Pollutant Legislation and Regulations (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The 108th Congress proposed and debated a variety of bills addressing pollution control at electric power plants but did not pass any of them into law. In addition, the EPA currently is preparing two regulationsa proposed Clean Air Interstate Rule (pCAIR) and a Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR)to address emissions from coal-fired power plants. Several States also have taken legislative actions to limit pollutants from power plants in their jurisdictions. This section discusses three Congressional air pollution bills and the EPAs pCAIR and CAMR regulations.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Air permitting of IGCC plants  

SciTech Connect

The IGCC process is, currently, the preferred choice over conventional thermal power production in regard to cleanup of fuel and significantly reduced contaminant emissions. The air permitting requirements include the review of: feed preparation and PM emissions; feed gasification and contaminant emissions; elemental sulfur recovery and SO{sub 2} emissions; options for carbon-dioxide recovery; syngas characteristics for combustion; CT design and combustion mechanisms; air contaminant emissions of CT; controlled CT emissions of nitrogen-oxides and carbon-monoxide gases using the SCR and oxidation catalysts, respectively; and, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). However, the IGCC processes are being rigorously reviewed for the system integration and reliability, and significant reduction of air contaminant emissions (including the greenhouse gases). This paper included a review of IGCC air contaminant emission rates, and various applicable regulatory requirements, such as NSR (New Source Review), NSPS (New Source Performance Standards), and MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology). The IGCC facility's NOX, CO, SO{sub 2}, PM, VOCs, and HAPs emission rates would be significantly low. Thus, effective, construction and installation, and operation air permits would be necessary for IGCC facilities.

Chitikela, S.R.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Louisiana Air Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law states regulations for air quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about permits and licenses, air quality...

351

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

352

US vehicle emissions: Creating a common currency to avoid model comparison problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III Computer programme to calculate emissions from roadtransport: methodology and emission factors (version 2.1).to compare air pollution emission estimates produced by di?

Kear, Tom P.; Eisinger, Douglas; Niemeier, Debbie A.; Brady, Mike

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

355

Available Technologies: Ultra-low Emission Natural Draft ...  

Low air emissions, particularly NOx, without post-combustion emissions controls ; Enables refineries to continuing using natural gas or refinery gas ...

356

SMALL CHAMBER MEASUREMENT OF CHEMICAL SPECIFIC EMISSION FACTORS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at...

357

Sections Affected: Proposed adoption of California Code of Regulations, title 17,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (ARB or Board) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider the adoption of a new regulation to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electricity sector by implementing a renewable electricity standard.

Byron Sher Auditorium; Second Floor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-House R&D In-House R&D The scrutiny of mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired utilities that began with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) resulted in a determination by the U.S. EPA that such emissions should be regulated. A number of techniques for control of mercury emissions from power plants have been evaluated at various scales. One technique that received a great deal of attention by the EPA, utilities, and technology developers was dry sorbent injection upstream of an existing particulate control device. The in-house, air toxics research effort at NETL consisted of two distinct efforts: the first was aimed at characterizing an existing pilot unit for distribution and fate of hazardous air pollutants, including mercury ; the second was examining sorbents and photochemical oxidation as means for mercury removal from flue gas at laboratory-scale.

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

364

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

365

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

366

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are available for emissions from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References...

368

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Air Pollution Regulation Agencies (SAPRAs) issue and enforce permits that limit particulate matter emissions from all sources including layer and broiler facilities, cattle feedyards, dairies, cotton gins, and grain elevators. In this research, a process was developed to determine distances from emitting sources to where the estimated concentrations were less than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). These distances are a function of emission rates and meteorological conditions. Different protocols were used to develop emission factors for cattle feedyards and layer houses. Dispersion modeling with American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was conducted to determine the emissions of particulate matter. These data were used to determine the distances from the sources to where the concentrations of particulate matter (PM) would be less than the NAAQS. The current air-permitting process requires that concentrations from a source do not exceed the NAAQS at the property line and beyond for the facility to be in compliance with its permit conditions. Emission factors for particulate matter less than 10 micrometers (PM10) were developed for cattle feedyards using a reverse modeling protocol and Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) sampler data. Corrections were applied to the TEOM measurements to account for TEOM vs. filter-based low-volume (FBLV) sampler bias and over-sampling of PM10 pre-collectors. Invalid concentrations and dust peaks larger than mean ± 3 times the standard deviation were excluded from this study. AERMOD predictions of downwind concentrations at cotton gins were observed for compliance with 24-hour PM10 and PM2.5 NAAQS at property lines. The emissions from three cotton gins were analyzed at 50 m and 100 m distances. TEOM and FBLV samplers were used to collect 24-hour PM10 measurements inside a laying hen house. The distances to the property lines at which the emissions of PM10 were below the 24-hour average PM10 standards were estimated using AERMOD. The results suggested that the special use of the NAAQS for as the property-line concentration not to be exceeded, could be problematic to agriculture. Emission factors that were comparable of published emission factors were obtained in this study. Large distances to property lines were required when minimum flow rate recommendations were not considered. Emission factors that are representative of the emissions in a particular facility are essential; else facilities could be inappropriately regulated.

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A science based emission factor for particulate matter emitted from cotton harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poor regional air quality in some states across the US cotton belt has resulted in increased pressure on agricultural sources of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution regulators. Moreover, inaccurate emission factors used in the calculation of annual emissions inventories led to the identification of cotton harvesting as a significant source of PM10 in California and Arizona. As a result, cotton growers in these states are now required to obtain air quality permits and submit management practice plans detailing the actions taken by the producer to reduce fugitive PM emissions from field operations. The objective of this work was to develop accurate PM emission factors for cotton harvesting in terms of total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5. Two protocols were developed and used to develop PM emission factors from cotton harvesting operations on three farms in Texas during 2006 and 2007. Protocol one utilized TSP concentrations measured downwind of harvesting operations with meteorological data measured onsite in a dispersion model to back-calculate TSP emission flux values. Flux values, determined with the regulatory dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, were converted to emission factors and corrected with results from particle size distribution (PSD) analyses to report emission factors in terms of PM10 and PM2.5. Emission factors were developed for two-row (John Deere 9910) and sixrow (John Deere 9996) cotton pickers with protocol one. The uncertainty associated with the emission factors developed through protocol one resulted in no significant difference between the emission factors for the two machines. Under the second protocol, emission concentrations were measured onboard the six-row cotton picker as the machine harvested cotton. PM10 and PM2.5 emission factors were developed from TSP emission concentration measurements converted to emission rates using the results of PSD analysis. The total TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emission factors resulting from the source measurement protocol are 1.64 ± 0.37, 0.55 ± 0.12, and 1.58E- 03 ± 4.5E-04 kg/ha, respectively. These emission factors contain the lowest uncertainty and highest level of precision of any cotton harvesting PM emission factors ever developed. Thus, the emission factors developed through the source sampling protocol are recommended for regulatory use.

Wanjura, John David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for absence of solar radiation. Using AERMOD predictions of pollutant concentrations off property for regulatory purposes will likely affect a source?s ability to comply with limits set forth by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) and could lead to inappropriate regulation of the source.

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Using economic incentives to regulate toxic substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the mid- to late 1960s, economists at Resources for the Future and elsewhere have sounded a common theme when discussing environmental regulation. Specifically, they have recommended that, wherever possible, so-called command-and-control regulation (for instance, requirements that manufacturers install specific types of pollution control equipment) be replaced by the use of economic incentives such as the imposition of taxes on pollutant emissions or the introduction of a system of marketable permits limiting the amount of pollution that can be discharged during some specified period of time. In demonstrating the considerable advantages of incentive-based approaches--most importantly, the cost savings they make possible--environmental economists have almost always used as examples air and water pollutants that are discharged from easily identifiable smokestacks or outfall pipes at which continuous monitoring of emissions is at least conceivable if not already currently practiced.

Macauley, M.K.; Bowes, M.D.; Palmer, K.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the energy efficiency of end-use equipment in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can reduce air pollution emissions and greenhouse gases significantly. Because energy efficiency is an effective means of reducing multi-pollutant emissions, it is important to ensure that energy efficiency is a fully engaged component of emission-reduction programs. However, while energy-efficiency measures are perceived by many stakeholders to be important options for improving air quality, some members in the air quality community are concerned about the ability of these measures to fit in a regulatory framework-in particular, the ability of emissions reductions from energy-efficiency measures to be real, quantifiable, certifiable, and enforceable. Hence, there are few air quality programs that include energy efficiency as a tool for complying with air quality regulations. This paper describes the connection between energy consumption and air quality, the potential role of energy-efficiency measures to meet air quality regulations, the barriers and challenges to the use of these measures in the air quality regulatory environment, and the potential role that the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Building Technology, State and Community Programs (EERE-Buildings) could play in this area. EERE-Buildings can play a very important role in promoting energy efficiency in the air quality community, in ways that are fully consistent with its overall mission. EERE-Buildings will need to work with other stakeholders to aggressively promote energy efficiency via multiple means: publications, analytical tools, pilot programs, demonstrations, and program and policy analysis and evaluation. EERE-Buildings and state energy officials have considerable experience in implementing and monitoring energy-savings projects, as well as in designing documentation and verification requirements of energy-efficiency improvements. The following lists suggest potential EERE-Buildings activities, grouped by whether EERE-Buildings would play a lead or supporting role.

Vine, Edward

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Air Resources Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (ARB or Board) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider adoption of the Proposed Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) to Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions from Composite Wood Products. The proposed ATCM would reduce the public’s current exposure to formaldehyde by reducing emissions from hardwood plywood (HWPW), particleboard (PB) and medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels. The ATCM would also apply to finished goods made with these materials.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2001, the Technical Area 3 steam plant was the primary source of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while research and development activities were the primary source of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from chemical use for research and development activities were also reported.

Margorie Stockton

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

GRR/Section 15-CO-a - Air Permit - Construction Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-CO-a - Air Permit - Construction Permit 5-CO-a - Air Permit - Construction Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-CO-a - Air Permit - Construction Permit 15COAAirPermitConstructionPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies 5 CCR 1001-5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution Control Emission Notice Requirements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15COAAirPermitConstructionPermit.pdf 15COAAirPermitConstructionPermit.pdf 15COAAirPermitConstructionPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Air

376

Mass composition of 10{sup 17}- to 10{sup 18}-eV primary cosmic rays according to data on the lateral distribution of radio emission from extensive air showers  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data obtained for the lateral distribution of radio emission from extensive air showers (EAS) at the array of Moscow State University (30-34 MHz) and the LOPES array (40-80 MHz) were comparedwith the results of calculations performed within amicroscopic approach based on aMonte Carlo simulation of EAS (CORSIKA code). The same experimental data were used to reconstruct the distribution of the depth of the EAS maximum at cosmic-ray energies in the range of 1017-1018 eV. The energy dependence of the depth of the EAS maximum was constructed for the case of data from the LOPES array, and the mass composition of cosmic rays was estimated for this case. From the resulting dependences, it follows that the mass composition shows a trend toward becoming lighter in the energy range being considered.

Kalmykov, N. N., E-mail: kalm@eas.sinp.msu.ru; Konstantinov, A. A.; Vedeneev, O. V. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Use of Positive Matrix Factorization with Conditional Probability Functions in Air Quality Studies: An Application to Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study to identify groups of compounds (‘source categories’) associated with different processing facilities, a multivariate receptor model called Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to hourly average concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured at five Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) located near the Ship Channel in Houston, Texas. The observations were made between June and October, 2003, and limited to nighttime measurements (21:00 pm – 6:00 am) in order to remove the complexity of photochemical processing and associated changes in the concentrations of primary and secondary VOCs. Six to eight volatile organic compounds source categories were identified for the five Ship Channel sites. The dominant source categories were found to be those associated with petrochemical, chemical industries and fuel evaporation. In contrast, source categories associated with on-road vehicles were found to be relatively insignificant. Although evidence of biogenic emissions was found at almost all the sites, this broad category was significant only at the Wallisville site, which was also the site furthest away from the Ship Channels area and closest to the northeast forest of Texas. Natural gas, accumulation and fuel evaporation sources were found to contribute most to the ambient VOCs, followed by the petrochemical emission of highly reactive ethene and propylene. Solvent / paint industry and fuel evaporation and emission from refineries were next in importance while the on-road vehicle exhaust generally contributed less than 10% of the total ambient VOCs. Specific geographic areas associated with each source category were identified through the use of a Conditional Probability Function (CPF) analysis that related elevated concentrations of key VOCs in each category to a network of grids superimposed on the source inventories of the VOCs.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables Summary Report Draft, a Report to the TCEQ for the Period Sept. 2005 - August 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This executive summary provides summaries of the key areas of accomplishment this year, including: • development of stakeholder’s meetings; • reporting of NOx emissions reductions from renewable energy generation in the 2005 report to the TCEQ; • results of preliminary literature search of previous methods; • proposed weather normalization procedure for a single wind turbine; • proposed weather normalization procedure for a wind farm containing multiple wind turbines; • testing of the models; • weather data collection efforts, and • proposed modifications to the Laboratory’s Quality Assurance Project Plan.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Subbarao, K.; Verdict, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Engines - Emissions Control - cerium-oxide catalyst, diesel,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Heavy duty diesel vehicles product particulate matter emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that heavy-duty diesel vehicles have...

382

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Low Emission Vehicle Program and Carbon Standard for Light-Duty Vehicles California Low Emission Vehicle Program and Carbon Standard for Light-Duty Vehicles Legislation and Regulations. California Low Emission Vehicle Program The Low Emission Vehicle Program (LEVP) was originally passed into legislation in 1990 in the State of California. It began as the implementation of a voluntary opt-in pilot program under the purview of CAAA90, which included a provision that other States could Ā“opt inĀ” to the California program to achieve lower emissions levels than would otherwise be achieved through CAAA90. The 1990 LEVP was an emissions-based policy, setting sales mandates for three categories of vehicles: low-emission vehicles (LEVs), ultra-low-emission vehicles (ULEVs), and zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs). The mandate required that ZEVs make up 2 percent of new vehicle sales in California by 1998, 5 percent by 2001, and 10 percent by 2003. At that time, the only vehicles certified as ZEVs by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) were battery-powered electric vehicles [1].

383

Laboratory Study of Premixed H2-Air and H2-N2-Air Flames in a...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Premixed H2-Air and H2-N2-Air Flames in a Low-Swirl Injector for Ultra-Low Emissions Gas Turbines Title Laboratory Study of Premixed H2-Air and H2-N2-Air Flames in a Low-Swirl...

384

The Clean Air Mercury Rule  

SciTech Connect

Coming into force on July 15, 2005, the US Clean Air Mercury Rule will use a market-based cap-and-trade approach under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act to reduce mercury emissions from the electric power sector. This article provides a comprehensive summary of the new rule. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Michael Rossler [Edison Electric Institute, Washington, DC (US)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

386

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Emission Factors Handbook: Guidelines for Estimating Trace Substance Emissions from Fossil Fuel Steam Electric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Emission Factors Handbook" provides a tool for estimating trace substances emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants. The suggested emission factors are based on EPRI and Department of Energy (DOE) field measurements conducted at over 50 power plants using generally consistent sampling and analytical protocols. This information will help utility personnel estimate air toxic emissions for permitting purposes.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Impacts of ethanol fuel level on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from a fleet of gasoline light-duty vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The study investigated the impact of ethanol blends on criteria emissions (THC, NMHC, CO, NOx), greenhouse gas (CO2), and a suite of unregulated pollutants in a fleet of gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. The vehicles ranged in model year from 1984 to 2007 and included one Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV). Emission and fuel consumption measurements were performed in duplicate or triplicate over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle using a chassis dynamometer for four fuels in each of seven vehicles. The test fuels included a CARB phase 2 certification fuel with 11% MTBE content, a CARB phase 3 certification fuel with a 5.7% ethanol content, and E10, E20, E50, and E85 fuels. In most cases, THC and NMHC emissions were lower with the ethanol blends, while the use of E85 resulted in increases of THC and NMHC for the FFV. CO emissions were lower with ethanol blends for all vehicles and significantly decreased for earlier model vehicles. Results for NOx emissions were mixed, with some older vehicles showing increases with increasing ethanol level, while other vehicles showed either no impact or a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease. CO2 emissions did not show any significant trends. Fuel economy showed decreasing trends with increasing ethanol content in later model vehicles. There was also a consistent trend of increasing acetaldehyde emissions with increasing ethanol level, but other carbonyls did not show strong trends. The use of E85 resulted in significantly higher formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions than the specification fuels or other ethanol blends. BTEX and 1,3-butadiene emissions were lower with ethanol blends compared to the CARB 2 fuel, and were almost undetectable from the E85 fuel. The largest contribution to total carbonyls and other toxics was during the cold-start phase of FTP.

Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zheng, Zhongqing; Villella, Phillip M.; Jung, Hee-Jung

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC) for Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2003, the Technical Area 3 steam plant and the air curtain destructors were the primary sources of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while the air curtain destructors and chemical use associated with research and development activities were the primary sources of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions were reported from chemical use as well as from all combustion sources. In addition, estimates of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometers and ammonia were provided as requested by the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau.

M. Stockton

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Back-calculating emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter from area sources using dispersion modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering directly impacts current and future regulatory policy decisions. The foundation of air pollution control and air pollution dispersion modeling lies in the math, chemistry, and physics of the environment. Therefore, regulatory decision making must rely upon sound science and engineering as the core of appropriate policy making (objective analysis in lieu of subjective opinion). This research evaluated particulate matter and ammonia concentration data as well as two modeling methods, a backward Lagrangian stochastic model and a Gaussian plume dispersion model. This analysis assessed the uncertainty surrounding each sampling procedure in order to gain a better understanding of the uncertainty in the final emission rate calculation (a basis for federal regulation), and it assessed the differences between emission rates generated using two different dispersion models. First, this research evaluated the uncertainty encompassing the gravimetric sampling of particulate matter and the passive ammonia sampling technique at an animal feeding operation. Future research will be to further determine the wind velocity profile as well as determining the vertical temperature gradient during the modeling time period. This information will help quantify the uncertainty of the meteorological model inputs into the dispersion model, which will aid in understanding the propagated uncertainty in the dispersion modeling outputs. Next, an evaluation of the emission rates generated by both the Industrial Source Complex (Gaussian) model and the WindTrax (backward-Lagrangian stochastic) model revealed that the calculated emission concentrations from each model using the average emission rate generated by the model are extremely close in value. However, the average emission rates calculated by the models vary by a factor of 10. This is extremely troubling. In conclusion, current and future sources are regulated based on emission rate data from previous time periods. Emission factors are published for regulation of various sources, and these emission factors are derived based upon back-calculated model emission rates and site management practices. Thus, this factor of 10 ratio in the emission rates could prove troubling in terms of regulation if the model that the emission rate is back-calculated from is not used as the model to predict a future downwind pollutant concentration.

Price, Jacqueline Elaine

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

392

Abatement of Air Pollution: The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Nitrogen Oxides (Nox) Ozone Season Trading Program (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations may apply to fossil-fuel fired emission units, and describe nitrogen emission allocations that owners of such units must meet. The regulations also contain provisions for...

393

Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Ritschard, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Compressed Air Energy Storage Act (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out regulations for the local authorities related to site selection, design, operation and monitoring for underground storage of compressed air.

395

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

44: 525- Page | 39 Chemical Emissions of ResidentialHazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured intoxicity Page | 37 Chemical Emissions of Residential

Willem, Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Emissions allowance prices for SO 2 and NO X remained low in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions allowances are a component of policy tools used to reduce emissions of air pollutants such as SO 2 or NO X. Such programs cap the total ...

397

Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

M. J. Holmes

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

406

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section...

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

414

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

416

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

418

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why Ā» What We Monitor & Why Ā» Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

419

High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission, Integrated Process Heater System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The team of TIAX LLC, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, and Callidus Technologies, LLC conducted a six-year program to develop an ultra-low emission process heater burner and an advanced high efficiency heater design. This project addresses the critical need of process heater operators for reliable, economical emission reduction technologies to comply with stringent emission regulations, and for heater design alternatives that reduce process heater energy requirements without significant cost increase. The key project targets were NOx emissions of 10 ppm (@ 3% O2), and a heater thermal efficiency of 95 percent. The ultra low NOx burner was developed through a series of pilot-scale and field tests combined with computational fluid dynamic modeling to arrive at simultaneous low emissions and suitable flame shape and stability. Pilot scale tests were run at TIAX, at the 2 MMBtu/hr scale, and at Callidus at 8 MMBtu/hr. The full scale burner was installed on a 14 burner atmospheric pipestill furnace at an ExxonMobil refinery. A variety of burner configurations, gas tips and flame stabilizers were tested to determine the lowest emissions with acceptable flame shape and stability. The resulting NOx emissions were 22 ppm on average. Starting in 2001, Callidus commercialized the original ultra low NOx burner and made subsequent design improvements in a series of commercial burners evolving from the original concept and/or development. Emissions in the field with the ultra low-NOx burner over a broad spectrum of heater applications have varied from 5 ppm to 30 ppm depending on heater geometry, heater service, fuel and firing capacity. To date, 1550 of the original burners, and 2500 of subsequent generation burners have been sold by Callidus. The advanced heater design was developed by parametric evaluations of a variety of furnace and combustion air preheater configurations and technologies for enhancing convective and radiative heat transfer. The design evolution relied heavily on computational fluid dynamic predictions of design alternatives. The final design features modular separate radiant cells, each with one and two-side fired vertical tubes. The convection section configuration is vertical tube banks enclosed in the radiant channels. Commercial modular plate air preheaters are used. The predicted performance for the integrated advanced heater and Callidus burner is 95 percent efficiency with 9 ppm NOx emissions firing natural gas, and 12 ppm firing refinery gas. The total erected cost is less than a conventional heater with combustion air preheat.

Mason, Howard; Boral, Anindya; Chhotray, San; Martin, Matthew

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Compressed Air Energy Storage: Proven US CAES Plant Cost Achievements and Potential Engineering, Design & Project Management Based C ost Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a market ready technology that can play a valuable role in enhancing grid flexibility for variable generation integration. Relative to combustion turbines, CAES provides additional benefits and value streams, such as potential classification as a transmission asset, lower emissions, superior regulation service, reduction of wind spillage and in other ways improving wind plant economics. Although high cost estimates for CAES circulate in the industry, the first ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

423

Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

424

Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Fuel Distributor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Air Pollution Control code is adopted pursuant to Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101). ) By authority of the same State law, the Commission has also adopted Regulation 19, Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Regulation 19) and Regulation 26, Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Regulation 26)

425

Revision D to 2006 AOP Renewal Statement of Basis For Hanford Site Air Operating Permit No. 00-05-006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Statement of Basis (Statement) is issued by the permitting agencies as a separate supporting reference document to the Hanford Air Operating Permit (AOP). The Statement sets forth the legal and factual basis for the AOP conditions, and is not intended for enforcement purposes. The Statement includes references to the applicable statutory or regulatory provisions, technical supporting information on specific emission units, and clarifications of specific requirements. [Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-401-700(8)] In 1990, U.S. Congress amended the federal Clean Air Act (CAA). One change was to create air operating permits for industrial sources of air pollution (codified in Title 5 of the CAA). Prior to the creation of these permits, facility managers, regulators and the public had to look through many separate requirements to find those that applied to a certain facility. An air operating permit brings all applicable requirements into one place and requires the manager of the source to certify that it complies with all the applicable requirements. Further, the burden of proof for compliance changed from the regulating agencies to the sources. In 1991, the Washington State Legislature updated the Washington Clean Air Act [Chapter 70.94 of the Revised Code of Washington (RCW)] to make it consistent with the new federal program. In 1993, Ecology developed Washington’s operating permits regulation to comply with federal

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Review and Assessment of Air Quality Management Activities in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many air quality studies indicate that ozone, fine particulates, and haze are interrelated and often regional in extent. Emission management strategies to mitigate these pollutants are likely to involve regional control measures. This report summarizes recent air quality studies in the State of Texas to support the development of integrated air quality management strategies to meet new air quality standards.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This broader assessment considered 65 different air toxics including metals, PAHs, coke oven emissions, and diesel particulate matter (DPM). Source apportionment yielded...

428

The Value of Air Quality Forecasting in the Mid-Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality forecasts produced by the National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC), human air quality forecasters, and persistence are evaluated for predictive skill and economic value when used to inform decisions regarding pollutant emission ...

Gregory G. Garner; Anne M. Thompson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas  

SciTech Connect

A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the syst