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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D and Motivation 1 A. Background ­ Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter 2 B. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards 4 C. Improving Future Air Quality 6 D. Research Overview 8 Figures 10 References 15 Chapter 2

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

2

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

3

Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 37513764 Modeling the effects of ship emissions on coastal air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 3751­3764 Modeling the effects of ship emissions on coastal air emissions, they could have important environmental effects on coastal areas near ports with heavy ship-going ships on ozone and particulate matter concentrations is quantified using UCI- CIT model for the South

Dabdub, Donald

4

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

5

Energy and Air Emission Effects of Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Breakdown of energy comsumption of a water utility: (a) life-cycle phase, (b) water supply phase, (c) life-cycle activity, and (d) material production category. ... The Water?Energy Sustainability Tool (WEST) can evaluate the construction, operation, and maintenance of water systems and compare the direct and indirect (supply chain) energy and environmental effects of alternative water sources in terms of material production (e.g., concrete, pipe, and chemicals), material delivery, construction and maintenance equipment use, energy production (electricity and fuel), and sludge disposal. ... The difference is due to fossil fuels, especially coal, which make up a larger portion of the U.S. electricity mix. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA expands air quality emissions trading policy ... The Environmental Protection Agency has expanded its old "bubble policy" into a wider-ranging, supposedly more effective, emissions trading program designed to speed up attainment of national air quality standards and save money. ... It also authorizes states to adopt generic emissions trading rules and extend these to all ... ...

1982-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMISSIONS TO AIR OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services Singleton Park Swansea to Air Department: Estates and Facilities Site: All Author: Ambreen Jahangir Approved by: Mark Durdin PURPOSE: To minimise emissions and discharges to air from boilers, fume cupboards, air conditioning

Harman, Neal.A.

8

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Emissions Annual Reports for DOE Sites, memo tooffices providing guidance for report preparation (March 22,470E-2012 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by

Wahl, Linnea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

470E-201 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:Environmental Protection Agency, National Emission Standardsfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Water Loss Control Using Pressure Management: Life-cycle Energy and Air Emission Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. ...

Jennifer R. Stokes; Arpad Horvath; Reinhard Sturm

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effects of Future Ship Emissions in the North Sea on Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of model simulations with the chemistry transport model CMAQ the influence of ship emissions in the North Sea on concentrations ... and nitrogen oxides over Europe was investigated. Ship emissions for th...

Armin Aulinger; Volker Matthias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to severalAir Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

Wechsler, Risa H.

14

Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considerations, implementation plans, and an initial evaluation of solar energy systems' potential air quality in state implementation plans for air quality improvement. · Analyze the potential effects of largescaleAir Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH

15

Effects of engineering controls on radioactive air emissions from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under federal regulations set forth in 40 CFR 61, releases of radioactive airborne effluents from a Department of Energy facility must be limited so that no member of the public receives more than 0. IO miflisievert (IO milhrem) effective dose...

Fuehne, David Patrick

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The effect of air charge temperature on performance, ignition delay and exhaust emissions of diesel engines using w/o emulsions as fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the work performed on the use of water/oil emulsions in diesel engines showed that increasing the water content in the emulsified fuel was effective in reducing NO/sub x/ and soot emissions. Unfortunately, the increase in water content in the emulsified fuel also increases the ignition delay and may cause diesel knock. One way to reduce the ignition delay is to increase the air charge temperature. In this study, the effect of increasing the air charge temperature on ignition delay, performance and exhaust emissions was investigated. The experiments were conducted on a CLR diesel engine using base-line diesel fuel number2 and stabilized macro-emulsions containing 15 percent, 30 percent and 45 percent water by volume.

Afify, E.M.; Korah, N.S.; Dickey, D.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Air Products effective way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PE O A e s a b O T A O ENNST Overview Air Products effective way standard me Departm Shipping has recently y of shipping eans. Air Pro ontainer that es of this pro onduct mark eep accelera eep the cost tilize widely a earch and m m visited Air er needs wer model was cr m approache ms

Demirel, Melik C.

18

Radionuclide Air Emission Report May 21, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment, Safety, and Health Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2006 (in compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Site Name: Ernest Orlando

19

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

20

Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rokkan, D.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

26

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation by Erica Bickford A dissertation rights reserved. #12;Abstract Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford.S. transportation is the largest source of national nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and the third largest source

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

27

Air Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quality of the air we breathe is still a major concern to human health. Notwithstanding the air pollution mitigation efforts that have been pursued since ... be attributed to the effects of urban outdoor air

Ana Isabel Miranda; Joana Valente

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution emission...

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutant emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollutant emission...

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air toxics emission...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - air traffic emission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air traffic emission...

32

Reduction of Emission Variance by Intelligent Air Path Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This poster describes an air path control concept, which minimizes NOx and PM emission variance while having the ability to run reliably with many different sensor configurations.

33

Colorado Air Pollutant Emission Notice (APEN) Form | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of Public Health and Environment of the construction of a new source of pollution. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Air Pollutant Emission Notice &...

34

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On-Road Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Road Emissions Estimates of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrocarbons for School and Transit Buses Report No. FHWY/NC/97Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 2 1.2 Emission Regulations 2 1.3 Emissions Contributions of "Non

Frey, H. Christopher

36

Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean increases18 in global (excluding China) anthropogenic emissions, 37% to Chinese emission19 increases

Wu, Shiliang

37

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory.

Stirrup, T.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessing the regional impacts of Mexico City emissions on air quality and chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of Mexico City (MCMA) emissions is examined by studying its effects on air quality, photochemistry, and on ozone production regimes by combining model products and aircraft observations from the MILAGRO experiment ...

Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo

39

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air PollutantsCalendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides (2014)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

42

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contaminants (Mississippi) Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Air Contaminants (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Air Emission Regulation for the Prevention, Abatement and Control of

43

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2010, LBNL Report number LBNL-470E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2010 2010 Average Windat DOE Facilities, Final Report, Eastern Research Group,470E-2010 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic emissions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... report permit renewal July 31 National Emissions Standards for...

45

Market-based approach for improving ship air emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study considered how appropriate different market-based approaches are for the reduction of ship air emissions, particularly CO2. Furthermore, the study also considered which types of market-based tools may be available ...

Donatelli, Matthew (Matthew Alfred)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

J. W. Tkachyk

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EIA - AEO2010 - Updated State air emissions regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Updated State air emissions regulations Updated State air emissions regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Updated State air emissions regulations Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast States that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their CO2 emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 mega-watts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted [30]. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009. Each participating State was provided a CO2 budget consisting of a history-based baseline with a cushion for emissions growth, so that meeting the cap is expected to be relatively easy initially and become more stringent in subsequent years. The requirements are expected to cover 95 percent of CO2 emissions from the region's electric power sector. Overall, the RGGI States as a whole must maintain covered emissions at a level of 188 million tons CO2 for the next 4 years, after which a mandatory 2.5-percent annual decrease in CO2 emissions through 2018 is expected to reduce the total for covered CO2 emissions in the RGGI States to 10 percent below the initial calculated bud-get. Although each State was given its own emissions budget, allowances are auctioned at a uniform price across the entire region.

48

Cleaning Products and Air Fresheners: Emissions and Resulting Concentrations of Glycol Ethers and Terpenoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with realistic air-exchange and product usage rates, theand total rate of air freshener product volatilization (26, 589-597. Cleaning Product and Air Freshener Emissions (

Singer, Brett C.; Destaillat, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff, William W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Radiofrequency conical emission from femtosecond filaments in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the broadband conical emission associated with filaments in air extends down to the radiofrequency region. This rf emission which originates from the longitudinal oscillation of charged ions formed during filamentation is strongly enhanced by the presence of a longitudinal static electric field.

Forestier, B.; Houard, A.; Durand, M.; Andre, Y. B.; Prade, B.; Mysyrowicz, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Dauvignac, J.-Y.; Perret, F.; Pichot, Ch. [Laboratoire d'Electronique, Antennes et Telecommunications, CNRS UMR 6071, Universite Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pellet, M. [Ministere de la Defense, F-00457 Armees (France)

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

50

Achieving Acceptable Air Quality: Some Reflections on Controlling Vehicle Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of CO and HCs. Diesel particulate emissions...v) in-use fuel is not as clean...reduce gasoline engine ex-haust emissions...in (i) basic engine improvements...improved air and fuel distribution...reduced oil consumption; tighter tol-erances on engine design and manufacture...

J. G. Calvert; J. B. Heywood; R. F. Sawyer; J. H. Seinfeld

1993-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery packs allow vehicles to travel longer distance on electric power instead of gasoline may (1) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when powered by electricity instead of gasoline emissions relative to HEVs, depending on electricity source. Plug-in vehicles with large battery packs

Michalek, Jeremy J.

52

A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Campus Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2013 from PNNL Site sources is 2E-05 mrem (2E-07 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 2E-6 mrem (2E-8 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 1E-11 mrem (1E-13 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2013. The total radiological dose for 2013 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 2E-5 mrem (2E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: South Coast Air Quality Management District

55

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy and Air Emission Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia C. High Resource Systems Group Inc. White River Junction, Vermont Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-42616 February 2008 Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer D. Jacobson D.J. Consulting LLC McLean, Virginia

57

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-13-07-01 STATEWIDE AIR EMISSIONS CALCULATIONS FROM WIND AND OTHER RENEWABLES SUMMARY REPORT A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality For the Period September 2012 July 2013 Jeff Haberl... report, Statewide Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables, as required by the 79th Legislature. This work has been performed through a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC). In this work the ESL is required...

Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Bahman, Yazdani; Claridge, David; Mao, Chunliu; Sandeep, Kota

58

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

59

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclides concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Warren, R.

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

JOHNSON, R.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Control of air pollution emissions from municipal waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The November 1990 Clear Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) directed EPA to establish municipal waste combustor (MWC) emissions limits for particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, dioxins, dibenzofurans, cadmium, lead, and mercury. Revised MWC air pollution regulations were subsequently proposed by EPA on September 20, 1994, and promulgated on December 19, 1995. The MWC emission limits were based on the application of maximum achievable control technology (MACT). This paper provides a brief overview of MWC technologies, a summary of EPA`s revised air pollution rules for MWCs, a review of current knowledge concerning formation and control of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and a discussion of the behavior and control of mercury in MWC flue gases. 56 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Kolgroe, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.; Licata, A. [Licata Energy and Environmental Consultants, Inc., Yonkers, NY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Upgraded recovery boiler meets low air emissions standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the fall of 1990, the Boise Cascade mill in International Falls, MN, carried out a millwide modernization project. One critical element of the project was the upgrade of their recovery boiler. As a result of the recovery boiler upgrade, the mill was required to obtain a prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) air permit. A best available control technology (BACT) assessment was performed as a requirement of the PSD regulations. Ultimately, a number of more stringent air pollution emission limits were established for the boiler, and a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) was purchased and installed to report daily results to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This paper describes efforts to achieve increased firing capacity in the mill's recovery boiler while meeting more severe air emissions regulations. The authors will show that each of the emissions limits, including CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], TRS, and opacity, are met by the upgraded boiler, while achieving an increase in firing capacity over pre-upgrade levels of up to 40%.

La Fond, J.F.; Jansen, J.H. (Jansen Combustion and Boiler Technologies, Inc., Woodinville, WA (United States)); Eide, P. (Boise Cascade Corp., International Falls, MN (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Shipboard Assessment of Hearing Sensitivity of Tropical Fishes Immediately After Exposure to Seismic Air Gun Emissions at Scott Reef  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A shipboard system for measurement of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in fish was developed to investigate the effects on hearing in tropical reef fish after exposure to emissions from an air ... gun array used...

Mardi C. Hastings; Jennifer Miksis-Olds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purpose of Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act make the state Title V permitting program (Permit Regulations for the Construction and/or...

66

Reduction in air emissions attainable through implementation of district heating and cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

District heating and cooling (DHC) can provide multiple opportunities to reduce air emissions associated with space conditioning and electricity generation, which contribute 30% to 50% of all such emissions. When DHC is combined with cogeneration (CHP), maximum reductions in sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), particulates, and ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants can most effectively be achieved. Although significant improvements in air quality have been documented in Europe and Scandinavia due to DHC and CHP implementation, accurately predicting such improvements has been difficult. Without acceptable quantification methods, regulatory bodies are reluctant to grant air emissions credits, and local community leaders are unwilling to invest in DHC and CHP as preferred methods of providing energy or strategies for air quality improvement. The recent development and release of a number of computer models designed specifically to provide quantification of air emissions that can result from DHC and CHP implementation should help provide local, state, and national policymakers with information vital to increasing support and investment in DHC development.

Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air Ccilia Solal1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOCs and formaldehyde emissions from cleaning products and air fresheners Cécilia Solal1: air fresheners, glass cleaners, furniture polishes, toilet products, carpet and floor cleaning Formaldehyde, Volatile organic compounds, Household products, Exposure INTRODUCTION Most indoor air pollutants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

Menut, Laurent

69

Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Effects of Air Pollution Control on Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban air pollution and climate are closely connected due to shared generating processes (e.g., combustion) for emissions of the driving gases and aerosols. They are also connected because the atmospheric lifecycles of ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

71

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Federal Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized two regulations, the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule CAMR, that would reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. Both CAIR and CAMR are included in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case. The EPA has received 11 petitions for reconsideration of CAIR and has provided an opportunity for public comment on reconsidering certain aspects of CAIR. Public comments were accepted until January 13, 2006. The EPA has also received 14 petitions for reconsideration of CAMR and is willing to reconsider certain aspects of the rule. Public comments were accepted for 45 days after publication of the reconsideration notice in the Federal Register. Several states and organizations have filed lawsuits against CAMR. The ultimate decision of the courts will have a significant impact on the implementation of CAMR.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

Jacobson, D.; High, C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comment on Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comment on Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power ... Energy Analysis Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 ... This work was funded by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program and Solar Energy Technologies Program) and by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (Permitting, Siting, and Analysis Division) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Contract DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ...

Andrew Mills; Ryan Wiser; Michael Milligan; Mark OMalley

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of an air emissions inventory for Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate air emissions inventory is important in an effective Clean Air Act (CAA) compliance program; without it, a facility may have difficulty proving compliance with regulations or permit conditions. An emissions inventory can also serve for evaluating the applicability of new regulations (eg, Title V of CAA) and in complying with them. Therefore it is important for the inventory to be well-planned and comprehensive. Preparation of an emissions inventory for a large R&D facility such as ORNL can be a challenging task. ORNL, a government facility managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. for US DOE, consists of more than 300 buildings on about 1,500 acres. It has several thousand diverse emission sources, including small laboratory hoods, several wastewater treatment facilities, and a steam plant. This paper describes the development of ORNL`s emissions inventory with emphasis on setting goals and identifying the scope of the inventory, identifying the emission points, developing/implementing the inventory methodology, compiling data, and evaluating the results.

Skipper, D.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Implementation of plume rise and its impacts on emissions and air quality modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work analyses the impact of implementing hourly plume rise calculations over Spain in terms of: i) vertical emission allocations and ii) modelled air quality concentrations. Two air quality simulations (4kmנ4km, 1h) were performed for February and June 2009, using the CALIOPE-AQFS system (WRF-ARW/HERMESv2.0/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b) differing only by the vertical allocation of point source emissions: i) using fixed vertical profiles based on the stack height of each facility and ii) using an hourly bottom-up calculations of effective emission heights. When using plume rise calculations, emissions are generally allocated to lower altitudes than when using the fixed vertical profiles, showing significant differences depending on source sector and air pollutant (up to 75% between estimated average effective emission heights). In terms of air quality, it is shown that hourly plume rise calculations lead to improved simulation of industrial SO2 concentrations, thus increasing modelled concentrations (1.4?gm?3 increase in February, 1.5?gm?3 increase in June) and reducing the model biases for both months (31.1% in February, 73.7% in June). The increase of SO2 concentrations leads to an increase of SO 4 ? 2 surface levels that varies according to the season and location (4.3% in February and 0.4% in June, on average). On the other hand, the impact on NO2 and PM10 concentrations is less significant, leading to average changes of a few ?gm3 at most (0.4?gm?3 for NO2 and 0.2?gm?3 for PM10). In order to maximize the precision of plume rise calculations, the use of stack parameters based on real-world data is mandatory.

Marc Guevara; Albert Soret; Gustavo Arvalo; Francesc Martnez; Jos M. Baldasano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Air Quality: Emissions Source Inspection Form Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality: Emissions Source Inspection Form Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 This inspection form Quality", http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/environment/air_quality/policies.htm 29 Jul 2007 (updated

Wechsler, Risa H.

78

Health effects of air pollution: some historical notes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that was his first air pollution health effects committeeand direction of air pollution health effects research inof community air pollution, including health ef- fects, has

Whittenberger, J L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An experimental study on combustion processes and nox emission characteristics of the air-staged burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion processes and emission characteristics in air-staged burner...5H5N) is used to investigate the fuel NOX emission characteristics. Experiments are carried out for a wide range of operating condition...

Kook-Young Ahn; Han-Seok Kim; Eun-Seong Cho; Jin-Hyuk Ahn

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emission notice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratory for Summary: emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico... Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emissions notice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratory for Summary: emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico... Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73...

82

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

83

Abatement of Air Pollution: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offset Projects (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Projects that either capture and destroy landfill methane, avoid sulfur hexafluoride emissions, sequester carbon through afforestation, provideend-use energy efficiency, or avoid methane emissions...

84

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity ...

Judy L. Mumford; Ron W. Williams; Debra B. Walsh; Robert M. Burton; David J. Svendsgaard; Jane C. Chuang; Virginia S. Houk; Joellen Lewtas

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Effect of air preheat temperature on the MILD combustion of syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of air preheat temperature on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in parallel jet forward flow combustor. The results were presented on flow field using numerical simulations and on global flame signatures, OH? radicals distribution and exhaust emissions using experiments. The discrete and high speed air/fuel injections into the combustor is necessary for the establishment of MILD conditions, because they cause strong gas recirculation and form large mixing region between the air and fuel jets. The critical equivalence ratio above which MILD combustion occurred was identified. The MILD regime was established for syngas fuel under air preheating conditions with lean operational limit and suppressed \\{NOx\\} and CO emissions. In the MILD combustion regime, the air preheating resulted in higher \\{NOx\\} but lower CO emissions, while the increase of equivalence ratio led to the increase of \\{NOx\\} and the decrease of CO emissions.

Mingming Huang; Zhedian Zhang; Weiwei Shao; Yan Xiong; Yan Liu; Fulin Lei; Yunhan Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Arene Trifluoromethylation: An Effective Strategy to Obtain Air...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effective Strategy to Obtain Air-Stable nType Organic Semiconductors with Tunable Optoelectronic Arene Trifluoromethylation: An Effective Strategy to Obtain Air-Stable nType...

88

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Characterized particulate emissions from U.S.-legal...

89

An overview of air emission intensities and environmental performance of grey cement manufacturing in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Air emissions generated in grey cement manufacturing originate primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels required to heat the kiln and the chemical reaction of raw materials in the pyroprocessing phase. Gi...

Darren Brown; Rehan Sadiq; Kasun Hewage

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Improving the Accuracy of Vehicle Emissions Profiles for Urban Transportation Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Inventories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the Accuracy of Vehicle Emissions Profiles for Urban Transportation Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Inventories ... Metropolitan greenhouse gas and air emissions inventories can better account for the variability in vehicle movement, fleet composition, and infrastructure that exists within and between regions, to develop more accurate information for environmental goals. ... Older vehicles tend to have higher levels of CAP not only because of less-advanced pollution control technology, but also because of the deterioration of aging control systems. ...

Janet L. Reyna; Mikhail V. Chester; Soyoung Ahn; Andrew M. Fraser

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comment on 'Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power, is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators ''achieve {approx}80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.'' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam injected gas turbines and a 2--4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt.

Mills, A.; Wiser, R.; Milligan, M.; O'Malley, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The effects of EGR and ignition timing on emissions of GDI engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of EGR and ignition timing on engine emissions and combustion were studied through an experiment carried out on an air-guided GDI engine. The test results showed that the ignition timing significantly...

LiFeng Zhao; XiuMin Yu; DingChao Qian; Wei Dong

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Air-driven Brazil nut effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large heavy object may rise to the top of a bed of smaller particles under the influence of vertical vibration, the Brazil nut effect. Recently it has been noted that interstitial air can influence the Brazil nut rise time. Here we report that the air movement induced by vertical vibration produces a very strong Brazil nut effect for fine granular beds. We use a porous-bottomed box to investigate the mechanism responsible for this effect and to demonstrate that it is related to the piling of fine beds, first reported by Chladni and studied by Faraday. Both effects are due to the strong interaction of the fine particles with the air, as it is forced through the bed by the vibration.

M. A. Naylor; Michael R. Swift; P. J. King

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of life-cycle air emissions and oil consumption from conventional vehicles, hybrid-electric...efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in...average car vs. $0.004mi for an electric car on an average driving time and location...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction and to ozone byproducts. Currently there are standards and regulations that limit ozone emissions from portable cleaners (i.e., Viner et al., 1992), are generally exempt from standards and regulations because

Siegel, Jeffrey

96

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential of plug-in vehicles remains small compared to ownership cost. As such, to offer a socially efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in vehicles mustValuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits Jeremy J

Michalek, Jeremy J.

97

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

Air pollutants effects on forest ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the effects of acid rain on forests. The conference was sponsored by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Topics considered at the conference included the status of US research on acid deposition and its effects contributing factors to the decline of forests, evidence for effects on ecosystems, the effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems in North America and Europe, forest management, and future scientific research programs and management approaches.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessment of free-rotating air swirling device to reduce SI engine emissions and improve fuel economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Claims are furnished in several patents that swirling the intake air in SI engines can improve fuel economy and reduce environmental impact. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a free rotating air swirling device (FRASD) installed in the air intake hose on the overall performance and emission characteristics of an SI engine. FRASDs with three vane angles were tested; 6, 9 and 12 degrees. The baseline engine was tested without FRASD at selected loads. Then, the engine was tested at the same loads with each FRASD and results were compared with the baseline engine. Experiments show that all tested FRASDs exhibit some degree of enhancement in the overall performance and reduction in exhaust emissions. It was found that enhancement greatly depends on the engine operating condition in addition to the FRASD vane angle. Specifically, best enhancement in performance and highest reduction in emissions was observed with the 9-degrees which reduced specific fuel consumption by 12%, hydrocarbon (HC) emissions by 20% and carbon monoxide emissions by 12%. Suggestions are made to modify the FRASD design to magnify its impact on engine performance.

Raed Kafafy; Sharzali Che Mat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi) Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reducing NOx emissions using the humid air motor concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of water to prevent NOx...formation during the combustion process is well known. The H.A.M. system (Humid Air Motor) is an original and promising solution compared ... . This system involves evaporating l...

Emmanuel Riom; Lars-Ola Larsson; Ulf Hagstrm

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Air Emissions Operating Permit Regulations for the Purposes of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

These shall not be subject to regulation unless, as of July 1, 2011 the Green House Gas emissions are at a stationary source emitting or potentially emitting 100,000 tons per...

105

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

106

Method and apparatus for reducing cold-phase emissions by utilizing oxygen-enriched intake air  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen-enriched air intake control system for an internal combustion engine includes air directing apparatus to control the air flow into the intake of the engine. During normal operation of the engine, ambient air flowing from an air filter of the engine flows through the air directing apparatus into the intake of the engine. In order to decrease the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions that tend to be produced by the engine during a short period of time after the engine is started, the air directing apparatus diverts for a short period of time following the start up of the engine at least a portion of the ambient air from the air filter through a secondary path. The secondary path includes a selectively permeable membrane through which the diverted portion of the ambient air flows. The selectively permeable membrane separates nitrogen and oxygen from the diverted air so that oxygen enriched air containing from about 23% to 25% oxygen by volume is supplied to the intake of the engine.

Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Stork, Kevin C. (Chicago, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land Sequim (Sequim). This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation ProtectionAir Emissions. The EDE to the Sequim MEI due to routine operations in 2013 was 5E-05 mrem (5E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2013. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

Szpunar, C.B.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Air Permit Compliance for Hanford Waste Retrieval Operations Involving Multi-Unit Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1970, approximately 38,000 suspect-transuranic and transuranic waste containers have been placed in retrievable storage on the Hanford Site in the 200 Areas burial grounds. Hanford's Waste Retrieval Project is retrieving these buried containers and processing them for safe storage and disposition. Container retrieval activities require an air emissions permit to account for potential emissions of radionuclides. The air permit covers the excavation activities as well as activities associated with assaying containers and installing filters in the retrieved transuranic containers lacking proper venting devices. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is required to track radioactive emissions resulting from the retrieval activities. Air, soil, and debris media contribute to the emissions and enabling assumptions allow for calculation of emissions. Each of these activities is limited to an allowed annual emission (per calendar year) and contributes to the overall total emissions allowed for waste retrieval operations. Tracking these emissions is required to ensure a permit exceedance does not occur. A tracking tool was developed to calculate potential emissions in real time sense. Logic evaluations are established within the tracking system to compare real time data against license limits to ensure values are not exceeded for either an individual activity or the total limit. Data input are based on field survey and workplace air monitoring activities. This tracking tool is used monthly and quarterly to verify compliance to the license limits. Use of this tool has allowed Fluor Hanford, Inc. to successfully retrieve a significant number of containers in a safe manner without any exceedance of emission limits. (authors)

Faulk, D.E.; Simmons, F.M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Achieving Acceptable Air Quality: Some Reflections on Controlling Vehicle Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ignore service or check-engine warning lights. The variability...emitting vehicles. Off-cycle operation. The remaining...adequately included in the FTP cycle. Emissions from one high...been neglected entirely. Diesel engines, which are used in the...

J. G. Calvert; J. B. Heywood; R. F. Sawyer; J. H. Seinfeld

1993-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

112

The Impact on Health of Emissions to Air from Municipal Waste Incinerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact concentrations of air pollutants. The Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products responsibility to advise Government and Local Authorities on possible health impacts of air pollutants. 2

113

Air pollution and early deaths in the United States : attribution of PM?.? exposure to emissions species, time, location and sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion emissions constitute the largest source of anthropogenic emissions in the US. They lead to the degradation of air quality and human health, by contributing to the formation of fine particulate matter (PM2 .5 ), ...

Dedoussi, Irene Constantina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Updated State Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast states that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 megawatts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Refrigerant Choices in Room Air Conditioner Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, potential replacement refrigerants for window-mounted room air conditioners (RACs) in the U.S. have been evaluated using a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions analysis. ... De Kleine, R. D.; Keoleian, G. A.; Kelly, J. C.Optimal replacement of residential air conditioning equipment to minimize energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and consumer cost in the US Energy Policy 2011, 39, 3144 3153 ... Most of the inventory data have been collected from Thailand, except for the upstream of fuel oil and fuel transmission, which have been computed from Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation version 1.7 and Global Emission Model for Integrated Systems version 4.3. ...

Michael D. Galka; James M. Lownsbury; Paul Blowers

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Emissions trading and effects on financial markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change and its effects on business has become a focal discussion point in relation to corporate financial performance. As emissions trading is one of the closest and most ... However, these direct and ind...

Timo Busch

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Texas Air Quality Status and the Texas Emission Reduction Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Millionsppb Eight-Hour Ozone Design Values and Population in Texas Population BPA CC DFW HGB ARR ELP SAN NET VIC BB LRG LAR 1997 Eight-Hour Ozone NAAQS... Ton - $5,202 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ? Galveston, Texas ? October 10, 2012 TERP Grant Amount by Area AUS Austin Area BPA Beaumont- Port Arthur CC Corpus Christi DFW Dallas-Fort Worth ELP El Paso HGB Houston...

Hildebrand, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The COMPLY computer program for demonstrating compliance with national radionuclide air emission standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed national radionuclide air emission standards for a number of source categories. One of these standards applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and non-Department of Energy facilities having the potential to release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Approximately 6000 facilities are subject to the standard, which limits the effective whole-body dose commitment to the maximally exposed individual from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. A computer program to assist the regulated community in determining compliance has been developed by the EPA's Office of Radiation Programs. The computer program COMPLY calculates the dose to an individual residing outside the facility. The program considers dose from inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food, air immersion, and ground deposition. It is based on models developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Compliance procedures provided in COMPLY are designed to reduce the burden on the regulated community. The approach begins with simple-to-use methods that are very conservative in determining compliance. The methods become progressively less conservative but more complicated at succeeding levels. Each higher level requires the input of site-specific information, but allows a more realistic estimate of dose. This paper describes the COMPLY program, and provides estimates of the work required and the degree of conservatism in the dose computed at each level.

Colli, A.; Beal, S.; Loomis, D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

QA procedures and emissions from nonstandard sources in AQUIS, a PC-based emission inventory and air permit manager  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS) is a database management system that operates under dBASE IV. It runs on an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) with MS DOS 5.0 or later, 4 megabytes of memory, and 30 megabytes of disk space. AQUIS calculates emissions for both traditional and toxic pollutants and reports emissions in user-defined formats. The system was originally designed for use at 7 facilities of the Air Force Materiel Command, and now more than 50 facilities use it. Within the last two years, the system has been used in support of Title V permit applications at Department of Defense facilities. Growth in the user community, changes and additions to reference emission factor data, and changing regulatory requirements have demanded additions and enhancements to the system. These changes have ranged from adding or updating an emission factor to restructuring databases and adding new capabilities. Quality assurance (QA) procedures have been developed to ensure that emission calculations are correct even when databases are reconfigured and major changes in calculation procedures are implemented. This paper describes these QA and updating procedures. Some user facilities include light industrial operations associated with aircraft maintenance. These facilities have operations such as fiberglass and composite layup and plating operations for which standard emission factors are not available or are inadequate. In addition, generally applied procedures such as material balances may need special treatment to work in an automated environment, for example, in the use of oils and greases and when materials such as polyurethane paints react chemically during application. Some techniques used in these situations are highlighted here. To provide a framework for the main discussions, this paper begins with a description of AQUIS.

Smith, A.E.; Tschanz, J.; Monarch, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY Susan T. Bagley1, Winthrop-1295 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Diesel Research, University of Minnesota, 111 Church St, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

Minnesota, University of

123

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline Jason Hilla,b,1 on the source of land used to produce biomass for biofuels, on the magnitude of any indirect land use that may result, and on other as yet unmeasured environmental impacts of biofuels. fine particulate matter ethanol

Weiblen, George D

124

SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AIR TOXICS AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Prepared Under Burns and Roe Services Corporation Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC92100 .Subtask 44.02 July 1996 SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN . . UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center . Prepared by Adrian Radziwon and Edward Winter Burns and Roe Services Corporation Terence J. McManus, Oak Ridge Associated Universities July 1996 TABLE OF CONTERlW SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................... 1 Background . : .................. 1 Objectives .................... 1 Report Structure ................. 3 Uncertainties ................... 3 SECTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................. 7

125

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube-Oil-Consumption Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estimating and controlling air pollution from ocean-going ships carrying international cargo is particularly1 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube-lube-oil-consumption designs, for example, could be an option with existing engines. AIR POLLUTION FROM SHIPS The motivation

Brown, Alan

127

Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G. Schuchmann,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of California Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G, Colorado 80208, United States ABSTRACT: California and Federal emissions regulations for 2007 and newer of nitrogen spurring the introduction of new aftertreatment systems. Since 2008, four emission measurement

Denver, University of

128

Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

Kota, Sri H

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mathematical modeling of air pollution emissions and dispersion near intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are calculated by approximating the crosswind finite line source equation with: 10 N c- Q2x u I - (z - E + 2kL) CNT 2 P o k~CN 2o 2 z. z. I (z + E + 2kL) I 2 + exp 2o z. (6) where: n " total number of elements CNT = number of multtple reflections... 142 142 143 145 145 145 149 158 C. Explanation aud Location of Files D. TEXIN Model Computer Listing 166 VITA 243 LIST OF TABLES Table Passenger car equivalency (PCE) values for left turn effects Page 36 Lane-use factors 38 Level...

Nelli, James Patrick

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Materials that Improve the Cost-Effectiveness of Air Barrier...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Cost-Effectiveness of Air Barrier Systems Addthis 1 of 3 3M has developed a primer-less self-adhered membrane that serves as an air, liquid water, and water vapor...

131

The effects of galvanic corrosion on air conditioner performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of air conditioner outdoor heat exchangers (condensers) poses a significant problem for consumers living in coastal regions. This research sought to experimentally determine effects of galvanic corrosion on air conditioner condenser coils...

Grisham, Phillip Ryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Chapter 16 - Fuel Effects on Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The majority of fuels consumed by internal combustion engines (ICE) are fossil fuels, mainly gasoline and diesel fuel. Through the fuels' history, their properties have kept changing because of various reasons, such as crude oil prices, progress in refinery technology, changes in vehicle technology, environmental legislation, and political considerations. The environmental legislation has become the most important factor affecting the requirements of automotive fuels, because of: additional limitations caused by changes in vehicle technology (such as the need of unleaded gasoline for catalyst-equipped vehicles); the growing importance of direct fuel effects (their weighting factor rising sharply as a result of very low emission levels mandated in ecological regulations). Numerous research works have been performed to investigate the fuel composition effects on engine exhaust emissions. The effects of different fuel variables on regulated (CO, HC, NOx, PM) and unregulated (benzene, 1,3-butadiene, aldehydes, and PAH) engine exhaust emissions were investigated in the foregoing and in many other research programs. The accumulated knowledge allows main fuel parameters to be defined affecting pollutants emission and fuel/engine/emissions relationships to be revealed with good agreement between different studies.

Yoram Zvirin; Marcel Gutman; Leonid Tartakovsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

134

Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance Results of an...

135

Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using CFD Simulations With Detailed Fuel Chemistry Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using...

136

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

137

Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating emissions from R&D facilities using chemical inventory data.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Polymer combustion: effects of flame emissivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gas phase. Polymer combustion chemistry is modelled...investigating polymer combustion it has proven advantageous...properties and treat the heat flux from the ignition...luminous flames from hydrocarbon fuels, it is common...A (1999) Polymer combustion: effects of flame emissivity...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on clean air: ? 2007: Encouraging energy efficiencies, no more coal plants ? 2009: Retrofitting old coal plants and old diesel engines ? 2011: Disclosure of ?fracking? fluids injected below ground ? Alliance with Texas Business for Clean Air ? Financed...

Haley, R. W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/private stakeholders, and develop and use a methodology to annually report the energy savings from Wind and Other Renewables. This report summarizes the work performed by the ESL on this project from September 2008 to August 2009. Please contact me at (979) 845... Engineering Experiment Station or the Energy Systems Laboratory. Page August 2009 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System 3 SUMMARY REPORT Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

Chandrasekaran, Vivek; Turner, Dan; Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Gilman, Don; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Liu, Zi; Haberl, Jeff S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC). In this work the ESL is required to obtain input from public/private stakeholders, and develop and use a methodology to annually report the energy savings from Wind and Other... Station or the Energy Systems Laboratory. Page August 2007 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University System 4 SUMMARY REPORT Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 79 th...

Turner, W. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Culp, C.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

PRELEVEMENTS DE DIOXINES ET DE FURANES A L'EMISSION ET DANS L'AIR AMBIANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

98-12 PRELEVEMENTS DE DIOXINES ET DE FURANES A L'EMISSION ET DANS L'AIR AMBIANT Claude FERRIERES polychlorodibenzo-/7-dioxines (PCDDs) et les polychlorodibenzofuranes (PCDFs) sont des composés aromatiques,3,7,8 TCDD (dite dioxine de SEVESO). Chaque congénère est affecté d'un facteur de toxicité (allant de 0,001 à

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

143

Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holgate S. 2002. Air pollution and health. Lancet Brunekreef2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects withExposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

CLEARING THE AIR? THE EFFECTS OF GASOLINE CONTENT REGULATION ON AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLEARING THE AIR? THE EFFECTS OF GASOLINE CONTENT REGULATION ON AIR QUALITY Maximilian Auffhammer and Ryan Kellogg* January 2009 Abstract This paper examines the effects of U.S. gasoline content gasoline markets and raise prices paid by consumers. We provide the first comprehensive empirical estimates

Edwards, Paul N.

145

Meteorological Effects on Air/Fuel Ratio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. "Temperature Compensat d Air/Fuel Ratio Control on a Recuperated Furnace," by J. L. Ferri. GTE Products Corporation, Towanda, PA, lECTC '83 2. Chemical Engineers Handbook, PerTY and Chilton, 5th ed.., (McGraw Hlln, p. 12-7. 3. "Technology..., E = (100 ... 10) (ill) - 100 = 17.2% excess a . 2 Example 2 A furnace uses recuperators which prehe~t the combustion air to 1200 OF using 30 OF air. WithJlOO OF air, the preheated air temperature will be approxIjrnately 1270 OF, a 70 OF increase...

Ferri, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

File:Air Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Air Pollututant Emission Notice (APEN) Form.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 36 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:26, 14 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:26, 14 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (36 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

148

Examining Air Pollution in China Using Production- And Consumption-Based Emissions Accounting Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study suggests that China should control air pollution using the following strategies: applying end-of-pipe abatement technologies and using cleaner fuels to further decrease the emission factors associated with rural cooking, electricity generation, and the transportation sector; continuing to limit highly emission-intensive but low value-added exports; developing a plan to reduce construction activities; and increasing the proportion of service GDP in the national economy. ... Diesel vehicles emit a substantial amount of NOx and PM2.5, and gasoline vehicles release substantial VOC emissions during the processes of gasoline refinery and transport, vehicle refueling and running. ... China also withdrew the previous tax rebate (6%) for coke export in 2004 and instead imposed a tax of 40%, which successfully reduced the ratio of export coke to national coke production from 12% in 2000 to 0% in 2009. ...

Hong Huo; Qiang Zhang; Dabo Guan; Xin Su; Hongyan Zhao; Kebin He

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Characterization of air emissions and residual ash from open burning of electronic wastes during simulated rudimentary recycling operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air emissions and residual ash samples were collected and analyzed during experiments of open, uncontrolled combustion of electronic waste (e-waste), simulating practices associated with rudimentary e-waste recyc...

Brian K. Gullett; William P. Linak

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2010 -- Washington D.C. ft007sluder2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions...

151

Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction for (NOC) Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project W-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 IO) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments, and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also constitutes EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided later. This NOC covers the activities associated with the construction and operation activities involving stabilization and/or repackaging of plutonium in the 2736-ZB Building. An operations support trailer will be installed in the proximity of the 2736-ZB Building. A new exhaust stack will be built and operated at the 2736-ZB Building to handle the effluents associated with the operation of the stabilization and repackaging process. Figures provided are based on preliminary design.

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction (NOC) for Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project W-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Additionally, the following description, attachments, and references are provided to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants''. The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also constitutes EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided later. This NOC covers the activities associated with the construction and operation activities involving stabilization and/or repackaging of plutonium in the 2736-ZB Building. A new exhaust stack will be built and operated at the 2736-ZB Building to handle the effluents associated with the operation of the stabilization and repackaging process. Figures provided are based on preliminary design. For the activities covered under this NOC, the unabated and abated TEDE to the hypothetical MEI is 1.67 E-03 and 8.34 E-01 millirem per year, respectively.

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both natural processes and human activities contribute to air pollution, with the combustion of fossil fuels being the largest anthropogenic source of air pollutants. Adverse health effects (above all respiratory and cardiovascular complications), damage to crops, natural vegetation and materials, reduced visibility and changed radiation balance of the atmosphere are the major consequences of high concentrations of air pollutants. Technical fixes can sharply reduce emissions from large stationary sources and lower the rates of automotive emissions, but the rising number of vehicles and longer time spent on the road will call for more radical solutions to traffic-generated photochemical smog now present in all major urban areas.

V. Smil

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The effect of marine isoprene emissions on secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation in the coastal United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of marine isoprene emissions on secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation) in the coastal areas of the continental United States is studied using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regional-scale Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Marine isoprene emission rates

Zhang, Yang

155

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Air- Vehicle Air- Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range Preprint September 2000 * NREL/CP-540-28960 R. Farrington and J. Rugh To Be Presented at the Earth Technologies Forum Washington, D.C. October 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - air guiding effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in voter... for the project in order to effectively improve air quality. Including air pollution as a screening criterion... reasons to consider air quality when ... Source:...

157

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

J. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded light duty vehicles in Algeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Nejjari et al., 2003, Atek et al., 2004). As a result, many stations of air pollution measurement and Boukadoum, 2005). Vehicle pollutant emissions constitute not only a problem of air quality in big citiesJ. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded

Boyer, Edmond

159

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effects of Switching to Lower Sulfur Marine Fuel Oil on Air Quality in the San Francisco Bay Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of Switching to Lower Sulfur Marine Fuel Oil on Air Quality in the San Francisco Bay Area ... Beginning in July 2009, an emission control area was put into effect at ports and along the California coastline, requiring use of lower sulfur fuels in place of heavy fuel oil in main engines of ships. ...

Ling Tao; David Fairley; Michael J. Kleeman; Robert A. Harley

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Impact of Mexico City emissions on regional air quality from MOZART-4 simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 campaign: Mexico City emissions and their transport andtransport and photochemical aging of Mexico City emissions

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effect of Combustion Air Preheat on a Forged Furnace Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine are the effects of combustion air preheat on four additional furnace operating characteristics. These characteristics are: (1) fuel utilization of a furnace operating cycle; (2) time to heat the furnace load; (3) scale production; and (4) furnace...

Ward, M. E.; Bohn, J.; Davis, S. R.; Knowles, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits: Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES TRUST Pioneering Markets to Improve the Environment Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits Developing an Appropriate Definition for a REC Patrick Leahy and Alden Hathaway April 2004 The Renewable Energy Certificate Market The past few years have witnessed the emergence of the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) market as a viable model for the U.S. renewable energy industry. Once considered an esoteric topic for even the most ardent renewable energy expert, RECs have grown in popularity and exposure thanks to efforts of the renewable energy industry as well as several large purchases by high profile corporations and governmental organizations. Although still in its infancy, the Renewable Energy

164

Impact of Varying Atmospheric Profiles on Extensive Air Shower Observation: Fluorescence Light Emission and Energy Reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several experiments measure the fluorescence light produced by extensive air showers in the atmosphere. This light is converted into a longitudinal shower profile from which information on the primary energy and composition is derived. The fluorescence yield, as the conversion factor between light profile measured by EAS experiments and physical interpretation of showers, has been measured in several laboratory experiments. The results, however, differ considerably. In this article, a model calculation of the fluorescence emission from relevant band systems of nitrogen in dependence on wavelength and atmospheric conditions is presented. Different calculations are compared to each other in combination with varying input parameters. The predictions are compared with measurements and the altitude-dependence of the fluorescence yield is discussed in detail.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Effects of Nonaqueous Electrolytes on Primary Li-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of nonaqueous electrolytes on the performance of primary Li-air batteries operated in dry air environment have been investigated. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between Li anode and water during the discharge process. The polarity of aprotic solvents outweighs the viscosity, ion conductivity and oxygen solubility on the performance of Li-air batteries once these latter properties attain certain reasonable level, because the solvent polarity significantly affects the number of tri-phase regions formed by oxygen, electrolyte, and active carbons (with catalyst) in the air electrode. The most feasible electrolyte formulation is the system of LiTFSI in PC/EC mixtures, whose performance is relatively insensitive to PC/EC ratio and salt concentration. The quantity of such electrolyte added to a Li-air cell has notably effects on the discharge performance of the Li-air battery as well, and a maximum in capacity is observed as a function of electrolyte amount. The coordination effect from the additives or co-solvents [tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and crown ethers in this study] also greatly affects the discharge performance of a Li-air battery.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Aftertreatment Systems -- DEER Conference 1 6 October 2011 Kevin Barnum Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance DEER 2011 Conference...

168

Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

169

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement Number 13425)NPBF Effects on PM OxidationNPBF Effects on EGR System Performance Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

170

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 43, NO. 8, AUGUST 2005 1763 Effects of AirSea Interaction Parameters on Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 43, NO. 8, AUGUST 2005 1763 Effects of Air retrievals.Such coordinated observations were performed during the Fluxes, Air­Sea Inter- action, and Remote velocity, heat fluxes, and significant wave height. The measured dependence of ocean surface emissivity

Reising, Steven C.

171

Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Wheeze in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of winter air pollution on respira- tory health of asthmaticChildrens Health Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution onEnvironmental Health Perspectives Effects of air pollution

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Combustion and \\{NOx\\} emissions of biomass-derived syngas under various gasification conditions utilizing oxygen-enriched-air and steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the \\{NOx\\} emissions from combustion of syngas derived from gasification of three different biomass feedstock (i.e., pine, mapleoak mixture, and seed corn) at different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions. Three different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions were tested for each feedstock, thus resulting in nine different sets of syngas. The biomass-derived syngas was burned in an industrial burner that was integrated into the gasification system. The gasifier and burner are rated at 800kW and 879kW thermal, respectively. For each set of biomass-derived syngas, \\{NOx\\} emissions were measured at different burner operating conditions including various heat rates and equivalence ratios using emission analyzers with chemiluminescence technology. All the combustion test conditions are in the lean mixture ranges in order to avoid the peak temperature limitation of both the burner and combustion chamber. Results show that \\{NOx\\} emissions using syngas obtained from woody feedstock decrease almost linearly as the combustion mixture becomes leaner and the heat rate decreases. When compared to natural gas, syngas from both woody feedstock generates higher \\{NOx\\} emissions even when the heat rates are comparable, indicating that fuel \\{NOx\\} formation is highly important in biomass-derived syngas combustion. In contrast to syngas from woody feedstock, syngas from seed corn results in peak \\{NOx\\} emissions before \\{NOx\\} decreases with leaner conditions. The trend is observed for all fuel flow rates and all oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions of seed corn-derived syngas. Among the three feedstock, seed corn has the highest nitrogen content which yields the highest ammonia concentration in syngas, which, in turn, results in the highest \\{NOx\\} emissions for all test conditions. Overall, the \\{NOx\\} emissions from seed corn-derived syngas combustion are approximately in the range of 450900ppm higher compared to those from wood-derived syngas combustion.

Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model aerosoland its role in regional air quality. Science, 311, 67-70.In United-States Air-Quality Studies. Atmos. Environ. , 27,

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Effect of Ethanol on Blending Stability and Diesel Engine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Ethanol on Blending Stability and Diesel Engine Emissions ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research2013 52 (44), 15504-15508 ... This article describes the effects of hydroxylated biodiesel (castor oil methyl ester COME) on the properties, combustion, and emissions of butanoldiesel blends used within compression ignition engines. ...

Magn Lapuerta; Octavio Armas; Reyes Garca-Contreras

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Air toxics being measured more accurately, controlled more effectively  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the directives of the Clean Air Act Amendments, Argonne National Laboratory is developing new or improved pollutant control technologies for industries that burn fossil fuels. This research continues Argonne`s traditional support for the US DOE Flue Gas Cleanup Program. Research is underway to measure process emissions and identify new and improved control measures. Argonne`s emission control research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. Whenever appropriate, the work has emphasized integrated or combined control systems as the best approach to technologies that offer low cost and good operating characteristics.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 7- Emission of Air Contaminants Detrimental to Person or Property (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No person shall emit any contaminant which either alone or in connection with other emissions, by reason of their concentration or duration, may be injurious to human, plant or animal life, or...

178

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Particulate Matter and Visible Emissions (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set emissions opacity standards for stationary sources with opacity continuous emissions monitoring equipment, stationary sources without such equipment, and mobile sources. The...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emissions inventory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) The goals of the inventory were to determine how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Duke is responsible... Emissions Inventoried 12;2004 Greenhouse Gas...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emission inventory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) The goals of the inventory were to determine how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Duke is responsible... Emissions Inventoried 12;2004 Greenhouse Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - air distribution effectiveness Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in voter... reasons to consider air quality when distributing these funds. Including air pollution as a screening... for the project in order to effectively improve ......

182

Rules to Cut Carbon Emissions Also Reduce Other Air Pollutants A first-of-its-kind study released today by scientists at Syracuse and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rules to Cut Carbon Emissions Also Reduce Other Air Pollutants A first-of-its-kind study released to the reference case. This option reduced carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector by 35 percent from 2005 to significant gains in public and environmental health. "When power plants limit carbon dioxide emissions

Mather, Patrick T.

183

Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Cost: Free Equivalent URI: www.esmap.org/esmap/EFFECT Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) Screenshot

184

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

so on. 11.1.2 Air pollution and health effects Weestimateavailabihty of air pollution and health data in a particularRelationships of Air Pollution Health: Results Prom the

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

New indicator approaches for effective urban air quality management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of urban air quality at monitoring stations in developed countries have frequently involved the criteria gaseous pollutants, particulates, hazardous air pollutants, perceived air quality and relev...

Peter J. Peterson; W. Peter Williams

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understand and control this air pollutant. The effectivenessair pollution time series requires long records of pollutant concentrations to control

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of total nitrate and ammonia were made during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study using a steam

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ft07sluder.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

191

Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Emissions trading in Europe: Effective tool or flight of fancy?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Germany as well as in many other countries, negotiations between politicians and industrial lobbyists has led to a less effective emissions trading system. It is questionable whether there will be significant

Claudia Kemfert; Jochen Diekmann; Hans-Joachim Ziesing

193

The effect of the Kyoto Protocol on carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the impact of the Kyoto Protocol on world emissions of a greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. We use a large unbalanced panel data ... the effects of the international agreement. While carbon

Risa Kumazawa; Michael S. Callaghan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the 300 Area Process Sewer Cleanout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the cleanout of sections of the 300 Area PS. Approval of the NOC will allow the pressure washing of certain pipe sections, the sump in the TEDF lift station, and the cleaning of PS 16 of the 300 Area PS that contains low levels of radioactivity. Section 15.0 of this NOC discusses the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) resulting from the unabated emissions from these cleaning activities. Using the currently approved unit dose conversion factors in HNF-3602, the estimated potential TEDE to the MEI resulting from the unabated, fugitive emissions from cleanout of the 300 Area PS is 4.70 E-05 millirem (mrem) per year. This dose was derived by conservatively estimating the doses from both the pressure washing and the use of the Guzzler{trademark} for removal of the liquid/soil mixture, as described in Section 5.0. and adding these doses together.

MENARD, N.M.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...greenhouse gas and SO2 emissions...greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...electricity generation, oil refining...from coal-fired power plants. Fig...electricity generation mixes as the...natural gas, coal, nuclear...hydroelectric power is assumed...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

199

Effects of Sounds From Seismic Air Guns on Fish Behavior and Catch Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic surveys are performed to explore for oil ... Concerns have been raised about the impacts of seismic air gun emissions on marine life, and fishermen in particular claim that seismic surveys have a serious ...

Svein Lkkeborg; Egil Ona; Aud Vold; Are Salthaug

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , (2008a). Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions fromstudy of indoor nitrogen dioxide levels and respiratoryand modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. All

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pilot plant investigation of N{sub 2}O emissions including the effect of long term operation in circulating FBC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot plant test program was conducted at CANMET to study the emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) from circulating fluidized bed combustors using the same coal and similar limestones as those to be used with the 165 MWe CFBC boiler owned and operated by Nova Scotia Power Incorporated (NSPI). The feedstocks examined during this trial were Devco Prince coal and the Windsor Group and Calpo limestones, the fuel and potential sorbents for NSPI`s 165 MWe CFBC plant. Twelve tests were first carried out with the first test series (TS1) using CANMET`s 0.8 MWt pilot-scale CFBC. Later, three additional tests were conducted (test series TS2), to study the effect of long term operation on the emissions of N{sub 2}O from CFBC and generate ash for an ash utilization study under a separate program. The key parameters studied were: temperature, secondary air to primary air ratio and elevation of the secondary air injection level on N{sub 2}O emissions as well as sulfur capture, combustion efficiency and NO{sub x} and CO levels. The N{sub 2}O emissions ranged from 51 to 117 ppm (or 32 to 72 mg/MJ). As expected, temperature was the dominant influence on N{sub 2}O emissions. In addition, longer term operation (80 to 100 h) had no significant effect on N{sub 2}O emissions. Despite a change in limestones and a significant change in limestone utilization, the N{sub 2}O emissions were equivalent in the two test series. Neither was any significant correlation established by way of multilinear regression between N{sub 2}O and other emissions for the two test series (i.e., SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO or O{sub 2}).

Desai, D.L.; Anthony, E.J.; Lau, I. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Andrews, N. [Nova Scotia Power Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Inhalation of motor vehicle emissions: effects of urban population and land area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer factors for air pollution health risk assessment.of the health impacts attributable to air pollution (Bennettair-quality management is to minimize adverse health effects of air pollution.

Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; Nazaroff, William W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the effects of air pollution/climate change on forests; information on forest health in several CentralProceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems; 1996 February 5

Standiford, Richard B.

204

Studies on Steam Sterilization and the Effects of Air in the Autoclave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

research-article Articles Studies on Steam Sterilization and the Effects of Air in...Hospital, Los Angeles, Cal. Studies on Steam Sterilization and the Effects of Air in...Angeles, Cal. | Journal Article STUDIES ON STEAM STERILIZATION AND THE EFFECTS OF AIR IN...

Anson Hoyt; Albert L. Chaney; Korine Cavell

1938-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution, affects nearly 15 million people in the United States, one-third of them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimension to our understanding the health effects of air pollution. Contact: Trina Wood, (530) 752-5257 3Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution as a greater understanding of the types of air pollutants that cause the most harm. Seminal findings

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

206

Disability-Adjusted Life Years in the Assessment of Health Effects of Traffic-Related Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Road transport plays a vital role in air pollution emissions, especially in large cities. According...10...and 32% of nitrogen oxides in the European Union. An adverse influence of high air pollution on human he...

?. Adamkiewicz; A. J. Badyda; A. Gayer; D. Mucha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Air Pollution Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum and chemical processes are responsible for many emissions both into the air. Most relevant emissions into the air are nitrous oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides ... compounds (VOC).The major cause of all air pollution

Alireza Bahadori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Modelling the Impact of Energy Transitions on Air Quality and Source Receptor Relations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air pollution is associated with adverse effects on human health through exposure to PM and ozone. To design effective air pollution mitigation strategies it is essential to quantify the effect of pollutant emiss...

C. Hendriks; J. Kuenen; R. Kranenburg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Polar firn air reveals large-scale impact of anthropogenic mercury emissions during the 1970s  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...anticipated growth in coal combustion, steel production, gold...i) air mixing by pressure and temperature gradients...Delineation of carbonate dust, aluminous dust, and sea salt deposition...Summit temperature and pressure (8): D T, PS urface...

Xavier Fan; Christophe P. Ferrari; Aurlien Dommergue; Mary R. Albert; Mark Battle; Jeff Severinghaus; Laurent Arnaud; Jean-Marc Barnola; Warren Cairns; Carlo Barbante; Claude Boutron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The air quality impact of aviation in future-year emissions scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid growth of aviation is critical to the world and US economy, and it faces several important challenges among which lie the environmental impacts of aviation on noise, climate and air quality. The first objective ...

Ashok, Akshay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air...

John, T. P.

212

Simulation Of Emission Dispersion As The Method Of Air Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article overlooks the mathematical simulation of air pollutants dis persion in the ambient atmosphere. A short analysis of the necessity for atmospheric dispersion modeling is presented and the influence o...

Z. Comarova; S. Mangul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Emissions of Air Pollutants from Household Stoves:? Honeycomb Coal versus Coal Cake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In generating 1 MJ of delivered energy, the H-coal resulted in a significant reduction in emissions of SO2 (by 68%), NOx (by 47%), and TSP (by 56%) as compared to the C-coal, whereas the emissions of PM2.5 and total BaP from the H-coal combustion were 2?3-fold higher, indicating that improvements are needed to further reduce emissions of these pollutants in developing future honeycomb coals. ... NOx are responsible for numerous environmnetal problems including photochemical smog, acid rain, water quality deterioration, global warming, visibility imparment, etc. (30). ...

Su Ge; Xu Xu; Judith C. Chow; John Watson; Qing Sheng; Weili Liu; Zhipeng Bai; Tan Zhu; Junfeng Zhang

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

214

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...New biofuel feedstocks (e.g., algae, Jatropha, hybrid...4 McCormick R ( 2008 ) The impact of biodiesel on pollutant emissions and public health...and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels . Proc Natl Acad...

Jason Hill; Stephen Polasky; Erik Nelson; David Tilman; Hong Huo; Lindsay Ludwig; James Neumann; Haochi Zheng; Diego Bonta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

216

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to Wind and Solar Power Andrew Mills, ? , RyanDue to Wind and Solar Power Andrew Mills, ? , Ryanthat wind and solar decrease NO x emissions. Andrew Mills et

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions or oil consumption. Because such externality...associated with oil consumption. We compare externality and oil consumption costs to the costs...and no gasoline engine). We estimate...manufacturing, fuel cycle, and operation...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

219

Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions. (more)

Ruscio, Amanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Health Effects of SubChronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sara M. Pletcher sara M. Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Joe L. Mauderly Principal Investigator Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, SE Albuquerque, NM 87108-5129 505-348-9432 jmauderl@lrri.org Environmental and Water Resources HealtH effects of sub-cHronic inHalation of simulated downwind coal combustion emissions Background Emissions from coal-fired power plants and their associated atmospheric reaction products contribute to environmental air pollution and are often cited as a critical cause of pollution-related health risks. However, there have been few toxicological evaluations of the heath hazards resulting from the inhalation of coal combustion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

222

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

Menut, Laurent

223

Experimental evaluation of cell temperature effects on miniature, air-breathing PEM fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental evaluation of cell temperature effects on miniature, air-breathing PEM fuel cells Z June 2011 Available online 14 June 2011 Keywords: Air-breathing PEM fuel cell Temperature effects Air) fuel cells is investi- gated using polarization and impedance spectroscopy. Three active area sizes

Lee, Tonghun

224

Effect of biodiesel fuels on diesel engine emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The call for the use of biofuels which is being made by most governments following international energy policies is presently finding some resistance from car and components manufacturing companies, private users and local administrations. This opposition makes it more difficult to reach the targets of increased shares of use of biofuels in internal combustion engines. One of the reasons for this resistance is a certain lack of knowledge about the effect of biofuels on engine emissions. This paper collects and analyzes the body of work written mainly in scientific journals about diesel engine emissions when using biodiesel fuels as opposed to conventional diesel fuels. Since the basis for comparison is to maintain engine performance, the first section is dedicated to the effect of biodiesel fuel on engine power, fuel consumption and thermal efficiency. The highest consensus lies in an increase in fuel consumption in approximate proportion to the loss of heating value. In the subsequent sections, the engine emissions from biodiesel and diesel fuels are compared, paying special attention to the most concerning emissions: nitric oxides and particulate matter, the latter not only in mass and composition but also in size distributions. In this case the highest consensus was found in the sharp reduction in particulate emissions.

Magn Lapuerta; Octavio Armas; Jos Rodrguez-Fernndez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Overview of the effect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the natural gas industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regulation of hazardous air pollutants by Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has a potential wide-ranging impact for the natural gas industry. Title III includes a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) which are targeted for reduction. Under Title III, HAP emissions from major sources will be reduced by the implementation of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. If the source is defined as a major source, it must also comply with Title V (operating permit) and Title VII (enhanced monitoring) requirements. This presentation will review Title III`s effect on the natural gas industry by discussing the regulatory requirements and schedules associated with MACT as well as the control technology options available for affected sources.

Child, C.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutant effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: air pollutant effects Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:05 to 2:55...

227

High-frequency Stark-effect measurements in emission spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The applicability of the high-frequency Stark effect in the diagnostics of turbulent plasmas is demonstrated by measurements of He I line profiles (4D1-2P1) in a turbulent linear discharge. The existence of electron plasma waves with field strengths of 6-9 kV/cm is confirmed spectroscopically. Competing effectse.g., the emission of molecular linesare discussed in detail and are shown to be negligible under our experimental conditions.

N. J. Wiegart

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Climate change and health costs of air emissions from biofuels and gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plant materials and wastes. Because plants...analysis on current industry data, with natural...for an integrated gasification combined-cycle...projections for the industry in 2020...connect . J Air and Waste Manage Assoc 56 : 709 742...is applied, an industry-weighted average...

Jason Hill; Stephen Polasky; Erik Nelson; David Tilman; Hong Huo; Lindsay Ludwig; James Neumann; Haochi Zheng; Diego Bonta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2{lambda}{sub De}) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

Wang, X.; Howes, C. T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Horanyi, M. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Robertson, S. [NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Physiological responses to air pollutants G. Halbwachs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physiological responses to air pollutants G. Halbwachs Zentrum fur Umwelt- und Naturschutz of fumigation experiments on young plants could be utilized for inter- preting some effects when air pollution of the interaction between air pollution and the forest ecosystem, where not only emission stress is at hand

Boyer, Edmond

231

The Effect of Reduced Evaporator Air Flow on the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under reduced evaporator air flow. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 three-ton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice...

Palani, M.; O'Neal, D.; Haberl, J.

232

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...realistic mass-market alternative and an...greater use of diesel, and shorter driving...required. Gasoline, diesel, liquefied petroleum...impacts on global markets (see for example...depending on secondary markets. GREET 2.7a pulls...emissions (e.g., diesel fuel combus-tion...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assumed. The life-cycle boundary includes emissions...the results of life-cycle assessment. Often...required. Gasoline, diesel, liquefied petroleum...prior work on the life cycle of petroleum products...and/or com-putable general equilibrium models with...

Jeremy J. Michalek; Mikhail Chester; Paulina Jaramillo; Constantine Samaras; Ching-Shin Norman Shiau; Lester B. Lave

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The effect of reformer gas mixture on the performance and emissions of an HSDI diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exhaust gas assisted fuel reforming is an attractive on-board hydrogen production method, which can open new frontiers in diesel engines. Apart from hydrogen, and depending on the reactions promoted, the reformate typically contains a significant amount of carbon monoxide, which is produced as a by-product. Moreover, admission of reformed gas into the engine, through the inlet pipe, leads to an increase of intake air nitrogen to oxygen ratio. It is therefore necessary to study how a mixture of syngas and nitrogen affects the performance and emissions of a diesel engine, in order to gain a better understanding of the effects of supplying fuel reformer products into the engine. In the current research work, a bottled gas mixture with H2 and CO contents resembling those of typical diesel reformer product gas was injected into the inlet pipe of an HSDI diesel engine. Nitrogen (drawn from a separate bottle) at the same volumetric fraction to syngas was simultaneously admitted into the inlet pipe. Exhaust analysis and performance calculation was carried out and compared to a neat diesel operation. Introduction of syngas+N2 gas mixture resulted in simultaneous reduction of the formation of \\{NOx\\} and smoke emissions over a broad range of the engine operating window. Estimation of the bottled carbon monoxide utilisation showed that by increasing either the load or the speed the admitted carbon monoxide is utilised more efficiently. As a general rule, CO2 emissions increase when the bottled carbon monoxide utilisation is approximately over 88%. Isolation of the H2 and N2 effect revealed that a CO diluted flame promotes the formation of smoke. When the intake air is enriched with syngas+N2, an increase of engine speed results in reduction of maximum pressure rise rate (dp/da). The effect of load on dp/da varies depending on engine speed. Finally, the engine is more fuel efficient when running on neat diesel.

Fanos Christodoulou; Athanasios Megaritis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of terahertz emission from a dc-biased filament in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the terahertz emission from a dc-biased filament can be regarded as a sum of an elliptically polarized terahertz source (generated by a filament without external electric field) and a linearly polarized terahertz source induced by the external electric field applied to the filament. The peak frequency and linewidth of the linearly polarized terahertz source are related to the average plasma density of the filament.

Chen Yanping; Wang Tiejun; Marceau, Claude; Chin, See Leang [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL), and Departement de Physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Theberge, Francis; Chateauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques [Defence Research and Development Canada-Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Blvd. North, Quebec, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada); Kosareva, Olga [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

DOE/EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air Integration System Emission Reduction Technology (03/11/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IMPACT IMPACT COMMERCIAL DEMONSRATION OF THE LOW NOx BURNER/SEPARATED OVER- FIRE AIR (LNB/SOFA) INTEGRATON SYSTEM EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY HOLCOMB STATION SUNFLOWER ELECTRIC POWER CORPORATION FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO,

237

Bay County, Florida waste-to-energy facility air emission tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bay County Resource Management Center is located 10 miles Northeast of Panama City, Florida. Panama City is a resort community approximately 100 miles east of Pensacola, Florida, on the northwest coast of Florida's panhandle. The average population of this area is approximately 115,000. The average quantity of municipal solid (MSW) waste generated in Bay County during most of the year is 300 tons per day. However, during the summer months when the population increases to more than 150,000 the community must handle in excess of 350 tons of MSW per day. The County decided to design the facility to ultimately burn 510 tons of MSW to allow additional waste to be processed as the population and quantity of waste increases. Until other sources of MSW are procured, the facility is supplementing the 350 tpd of MSW with about 160 tpd of wood waste.The facility began initial start-up, equipment check-out, and instrument calibration in February 1987. Plant shakedown and systems operational checks were made from February through May. This paper discusses emission testing which was conducted from late April through early June. The emission compliance tests were completed on June 4-5, 1987. The facility acceptance test and emission compliance test were completed five months ahead of the original project schedule.

Beachler, D.S.; Pompelia, D.M.; Weldon, J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power ignores the benefits of diversity. In real power systems, operators are required to balance only the net variations of all loads and all generators, not the output of individual loads or generators; doing otherwise would ensure an enormous amount of unnecessary investment and operating costs. As a result, detailed studies that aggregate the variability of all loads and generators to the system level find that the amount of operating reserves required to reliably integrate variable resources into the grid are on the order of 10% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generators, even when upto25%of gross demand is being met by variable generation. The authors implicit assumption that incremental operating reserves must be 100% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generation, and be available at all times to directly counter that variability, excludes the option of decommitting conventional units when the load net of variable generation is low. In real power systems, generation response to wind variation can typically be met by a combination of committed units, each operating at a relatively efficient point of their fuel curves. In the Supporting Information, we conceptually demonstrate that the CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} efficiency penalty found by the authors can be significantly reduced by considering the unit commitment decision with just five plants. Real systems often have tens to hundreds of plants that can be committed and decommitted over various time frames. Ignoring the flexibility of the unit commitment decision therefore leads to unsupportable results. Anumber of analyses of the fuel savings and CO{sub 2} emission benefits of variable generation have considered realistic operating reserve requirements and unit commitment decisions in models that include the reduction in part load efficiency of conventional plants. The efficiency penalty due to the variability of wind in four studies considered by Gross et al. is negligible to 7%, for up to a 20% wind penetration level. In short, for moderate wind penetration levels, 'there is no evidence available to

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided rebates to residential customers for purchasing high efficiency air conditioners and heat pumps. The rebates have helped increase the demand for higher efficiency air conditioning units. However, even the most efficient system will not perform... of supply ducts (Table 1). The predominance of return duct leakage over supply duct leakage confirmed the investigators' theory that installers were more careful to seal seams on supply ducts (Robison and Lambert, 1989). Table 1 - Measured Leakage...

O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and evaluated this new system. We completed the development of our variable-grid-resolution air quality model (MAQSIP-VGR) and performed various diagnostic tests related to an enhanced cloud parameterization scheme. We also developed an important tool for variable-grid graphics using Google Earth. We ran the MAQSIP-VGR for the Houston-Galveston and southern Louisiana domains for an August 23 to September 2, 2002, episode. Results of the modeling simulations highlighted the usefulness of the variable-grid modeling approach when simulating complex terrain processes related to land and sea close to an urban area. Our results showed that realistic SST patterns based on remote sensing are critical to capturing the land-sea breeze, in particular the inland intrusion of the reversed mesoscale circulation that is critical for simulating air pollution over urban areas near coastal regions. Besides capturing the correct horizontal gradient between land and sea surface temperatures, it is important to use an adequate ABL scheme in order to quantify correctly the vertical profiles of various parameters. The ABL scheme should capture the dynamics of the marine boundary layer, which is not often considered in a typical simulation over land. Our results further showed the effect of using satellite-derived SSTs on the horizontal and vertical extent of the modeled pollution pattern, and the increase in hourly ozone concentrations associated with changes in ABL characteristics resulting from the enhanced mesoscale circulation in the lower troposphere.

Adel Hanna

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Inter-comparison between HERMESv2.0 and TNO-MACC-II emission data using the CALIOPE air quality system (Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work examines and compares the performance of two emission datasets on modelling air quality concentrations for Spain: (i) the High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emissions System (HERMESv2.0) and (ii) the TNO-MACC-II emission inventory. For this purpose, the air quality system CALIOPE-AQFS (WRF-ARW/CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b) was run over Spain for February and June 2009 using the two emission datasets (4kmנ4km and 1h). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), Ozone (O3) and particular matter (PM10) modelled concentrations were compared with measurements at different type of air quality stations (i.e. rural background, urban, suburban industrial). A preliminary emission comparison showed significant discrepancies between the two datasets, highlighting an overestimation of industrial emissions in urban areas when using TNO-MACC-II. However, simulations showed similar performances of both emission datasets in terms of air quality. Modelled NO2 concentrations were similar between both datasets at the background stations, although TNO-MACC-II presented lower underestimations due to differences in industrial, other mobile sources and residential emissions. At Madrid urban stations NO2 was significantly underestimated in both cases despite the fact that HERMESv2.0 estimates traffic emissions using a more local information and detailed methodology. This NO2 underestimation problem was not found in Barcelona due to the influence of international shipping emissions located in the coastline. An inadequate characterization of some TNO-MACC-II's point sources led to high SO2 biases at industrial stations, especially in northwest Spain where large facilities are grouped. In general, surface O3 was overestimated regardless of the emission dataset used, depicting the problematic of CMAQ on overestimating low ozone at night. On the other hand, modelled PM10 concentrations were less underestimated in urban areas when applying HERMESv2.0 due to the inclusion of road dust resuspension, whereas the underestimation at suburban industrial stations indicated deficiencies in fugitive emission sources characterization (agricultural operations, windblown dust emissions).

Marc Guevara; Mara Teresa Pay; Francesc Martnez; Albert Soret; Hugo Denier van der Gon; Jos M. Baldasano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, TX 78711-3087 Dear Chairman Shaw: The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of The Texas A&M University System is pleased to provide its sixth annual report, Statewide Emissions Calculations From Wind..., and develop and use a methodology to annually report the energy savings from wind and other renewables. This report summarizes the work performed by the ESL on this project from September 2011 to July 2012. Please contact me at (979) 845-1280 should you...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Claridge, D.; Do, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DPF regeneration experiments verified the effects of NO2 and O2 emissions found from the thermogravimetric analyzer soot oxidation.

244

Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

Gary D. McGinnis

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effect of air density variations on greenhouse temperature model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Basically, a greenhouse temperature model is determined based on the balances of mass and energy. In most of the available models, the air density is considered constant. This fact limits the model because of the natural existing relationship between ... Keywords: Air density, Greenhouse, Humidity, Nonlinear systems, Temperature

Javier Leal Iga; Jorge Leal Iga; Carlos Leal Iga; Ramiro Ayala Flores

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of operation parameters on NO emission in an oxy-fired CFB combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) combustion technology, a very promising technology for CO2 capture, combines many advantages of oxy-fuel and CFB technologies. Experiments were carried out in a 50kWth CFB facility to investigate how operation parameters influence the NO emission in O2/CO2 atmospheres. The simulated O2/CO2 atmospheres were used without recycling the flue gas. Results show that NO emission in 21% O2/79% CO2 atmosphere is lower than that in air atmosphere because of lower temperature and higher char and CO concentrations in the dense bed. Elevating O2 concentration from 21% to 40% in O2/CO2 atmosphere enhances fuel-N conversion to NO. Increasing bed temperature or oxygen/fuel stoichiometric ratio brings higher NO emission in O2/CO2 atmosphere, which is consistent with the results in air-fired CFB combustion. As primary stream fraction increases, NO emission increases more rapidly in O2/CO2 atmosphere than that in air atmosphere. Stream staging is more efficient for controlling NO emission in oxy-CFB combustion than that in air combustion. Oxygen staging provides an efficient way to reduce NO emission in oxy-CFB combustion without influencing the hydrodynamic characteristic in the riser.

Lunbo Duan; Changsui Zhao; Wu Zhou; Chengrui Qu; Xiaoping Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ethanol Blends and Engine Operating Strategy Effects on Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Engine Particle Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spark ignition (SI) engines with direct injection (DI) fueling can improve fuel economy and vehicle power beyond that of port fuel injection (PFI). Despite this distinct advantage, DI fueling often increases particle emissions such that SI exhaust may be subject to future particle emissions regulations. Challenges in controlling particle emissions arise as engines encounter varied fuel composition such as intermediate ethanol blends. Furthermore, modern engines are operated using unconventional breathing strategies with advanced cam-based variable valve actuation systems. In this study, we investigate particle emissions from a multi-cylinder DI engine operated with three different breathing strategies, fueling strategies and fuels. The breathing strategies are conventional throttled operation, early intake valve closing (EIVC) and late intake valve closing (LIVC); the fueling strategies are single injection DI (sDI), multi-injection DI (mDI), and PFI; and the fuels are emissions certification gasoline, E20 and E85. The results indicate the dominant factor influencing particle number concentration emissions for the sDI and mDI strategies is the fuel injection timing. Overly advanced injection timing results in particle formation due to fuel spray impingement on the piston, and overly retarded injection timing results in particle formation due to poor fuel and air mixing. In addition, fuel type has a significant effect on particle emissions for the DI fueling strategies. Gasoline and E20 fuels generate comparable levels of particle emissions, but E85 produces dramatically lower particle number concentration. The particle emissions for E85 are near the detection limit for the FSN instrument, and particle number emissions are one to two orders of magnitude lower for E85 relative to gasoline and E20. We found PFI fueling produces very low levels of particle emissions under all conditions and is much less sensitive to engine breathing strategy and fuel type than the DI fueling strategies. The particle number-size distributions for PFI fueling are of the same order for all of the breathing strategies and fuel types and are one to two orders lower than for the sDI fuel injection strategy with gasoline and E20. Remarkably, the particle emissions for E85 under the sDI fueling strategy are similar to particle emissions with a PFI fueling strategy. Thus by using E85, the efficiency and power advantages of DI fueling can be gained without generating high particle emissions.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United David J. Nowak a, *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States David J. Nowak a 26 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Air pollution removal Air quality Ecosystem services Human and value of the effects of trees and forests on air quality and human health across the United States

249

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Pump Combustor? Radiator H 2 recirc pmp Coolant Loop Water Separator Cathode Loop Anode Loop Air Compressor 90 kWe Table 1. Typical "gas wetted" components used in a PEMFC...

250

Air Pollution Health Effects: Toward an Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientists and policy makers have become increasingly aware of the need to jointly study climate change and air pollution because of the interactions among policy measures and in the atmospheric chemistry that creates the ...

Yang, Trent.

251

Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

Walker, Iain S.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effect of GTL Diesel Fuels on Emissions and Engine Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology

253

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. natural gas composition is expected to be more variable in the future. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Unconventional gas supplies, like coal-bed methane, are also expected to grow. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from existing domestic natural gas supplies. To allow the greatest use of gas supplies, end-use equipment should be able to accommodate the widest possible gas composition. For this reason, the effect of gas composition on combustion behavior is of interest. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 589K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx emissions. These results vary from data reported in the literature for some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

D. Straub; D. Ferguson; K. Casleton; G. Richards

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation (more)

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Diesel Particle Filter and Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel Particle Filter and Fuel Effects on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Emissions ... Gaseous and Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines at Idle and under Load: Comparison of Biodiesel Blend and Ultralow Sulfur Diesel Fuels ...

Matthew A. Ratcliff; A. John Dane; Aaron Williams; John Ireland; Jon Luecke; Robert L. McCormick; Kent J. Voorhees

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control The more...

257

Steam generator air-cooling and ways to increase its effectiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To shorten the downtime for repair of steam turbines, various methods for rapid cooling of the turbine can be used. One method is to cool the turbine with free air whose movement is controlled by a standard ejector through the flow passage in sequence of the high-, medium-, and low-pressure zones of the turbine. The effectiveness of air cooling the turbine through use of a counterflow system for controlling air flow through the turbine is discussed.

Kulichikhin, V.V.; Tazhiev, E.I.; Leshchinskii, A.M.; Zubov, P.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Annual report summarizes the research performed from 17 April 2005 through 16 April 2006. Major portions of the research in several of the project's current eight tasks have been completed. We have successfully developed the meteorological inputs using the best possible modeling configurations, resulting in improved representation of atmospheric processes. The development of the variable-grid-resolution emissions model, SMOKE-VGR, is also completed. The development of the MAQSIP-VGR has been completed and a test run was performed to ensure the functionality of this air quality model. We have incorporated new emission data base to update the offshore emissions. However, we have faced some bottleneck problems in the testing the integrity of the new database. For this reason, we have asked for a no cost extension of this project to tackle these scientific problems. Thus, the project is on a one-year delay schedule. During the reporting period, we solved all problems related to the new emission database. We are ready to move to developing the final product, implementation and testing of the variable grid technology into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) to develop the CMAQ-VGR. During the upcoming months we will perform the first CMAQ-VGR simulations over the Houston-Galveston region to study the roles of the meteorology, offshore emissions, and chemistry-transport interactions that determine the temporal and spatial evolution of ozone and its precursors.

Kiran Alapaty

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

260

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Diesel Emissions Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program Status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determine the impact of fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems that could be implemented to lower emissions of NO{sub x} and PM from on-highway trucks in the 2002-2004 time frame.

None

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.

Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Colin P. Duffy; Richard. Letz; Theodore W. Tibbitts; Benjamin G. Ferris

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control technology.1 46 sions from the list of regulated hazardous air pollutantsAir Act includes "only those pollutants subject to a statutory or regulatory provision that requires actual control

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the Tokay gecko the pharmacological sensitivity of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in a lizard, the Tokay gecko. In a quiet environment, each ear produced a complex but stable pattern of emissions. These SOAEs were reversibly

Hudspeth, A. James

266

Projected Effects of Climate and Development on California Wildfire Emissions through 2100  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Projected Effects of Climate and Development on California Wildfire Emissions through 2100 ... Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80305, United States ... Understanding how climate change, population growth, and development patterns will affect the area burned by and emissions from wildfires and how populations will in turn be exposed to emissions is critical for climate change adaptation and mitigation planning. ...

Matthew D. Hurteau; Anthony L. Westerling; Christine Wiedinmyer; Benjamin P. Bryant

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma Carbon nanofibers Metal coating Results from electron field-emission studies using arrays of patterned carbon nanofiber bundles are reported. We find that the desired field-emission characteristics were

Javey, Ali

268

Analysis of Air Conditioning Effectiveness vs. Outdoor Conditions: Traditional Bins or Joint Frequency Bins?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are a number of methods used to estimate the effectiveness of air conditioning equipment in handling loads. Full hourly computer simulations are probably the most accurate, but lack flexibility and are more cumbersome to use than more compact...

Cohen, B. M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

Kulcu, Recep [Akdeniz University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Farm Machinery, Antalya (Turkey); Yaldiz, Osman [Akdeniz University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Farm Machinery, Antalya (Turkey)], E-mail: yaldiz@akdeniz.edu.tr

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The effects of air pollution on visibility at Edwards AFB, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON VISIBILITY AT EDWARDS AFB, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JEFFREY SCOTT TONGUE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1987 Major Subject: Meteorology THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON VISIBILITY AT EDWARDS AFB, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JEFFREY SCOTT TONGUE Approved as to style and content by: Walter K. Henry (Chairman of Committee) Kenneth C. Brundidge...

Tongue, Jeffrey Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications WeekendWeekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California...

272

Fact #771: March 18, 2013 California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate is Now in Effect  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A waiver granted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on December 27, 2012, allowed the Amendments to the California Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Regulation to become effective immediately....

273

Status of Heavy Vehicle Diesel Emission Control Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Test Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DECSE test program is well under way to providing data on effects of sulfur levels in diesel fuel on performance of emission control technologies.

George Sverdrup

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Method of Controlling Corona Effects and Breakdown Voltage of Small Air Gaps Stressed by Impulse Voltages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the influence of a resistor on the dielectric behavior of an air gap. The resistor is connected in series with the air gap and the latter is stressed by impulse voltage. Air gap arrangements of different geometry with either the rod or the plate grounded are stressed with impulse voltages of both positive and negative polarity. The resistor is connected in series with the air gap in the return circuit connecting the gap with the impulse generator. The method followed involves the investigation of the graphs of the charging time concerning the air gaps capacitances, in connection to the value of the resistor, the geometry of the gap, the effect of grounding and the polarity effect. It is determined that the charging time of the air gap increases, as the value of the resistor increases. It is also determined that the peak voltage value of the fully charged air gap decreases as the value of the resistor increases. The results of the mathematical and simulation analysis are compared with the results of the oscillograms taken from experimental work. In addition and consequently to the above results it is concluded from the experimental work that the in series connection of the resistor in the circuit has significant influence on corona pulses (partial discharges) occurring in the gap and on the breakdown voltage of the gap. A new method of controlling the corona effects and consequently the breakdown voltage of small air gaps stressed by impulse voltage of short duration in connection to the ground effect and the polarity effect has arisen. Furthermore through mathematical analysis of the charging graphs obtained from simulation and experimental oscillograms there was a calculation of the values of the capacitance of the air gaps in relation to their geometry and the results were compared to the values calculated with mathematical analysis.

Athanasios Maglaras; Trifon Kousiouris; Frangiskos Topalis; Dimitrios Katsaros; Leandros A. Maglaras; Konstantina Giannakopoulou

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FROM BIOMASS, COAL, AN) ASSESSMENT NATURAL GAS 1 (2002),ASSESSMENT OF GREENiiousE GAS EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic Solutions for Air Handling UnitVariable Air Volume and Air Handling UnitConstant Air Volume Systems- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Jin Wen, Drexel University The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a library of diagnostics decision-support tools for medium-to-large-sized commercial buildings that use air handling unit (AHU) systems that can enable cost-effective diagnostics solutions (both embedded and add-on solutions) for existing buildings.

278

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

279

Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications A New Active DPF System for "Stop and Go" Duty-Cycle Vehicles Review of SCR Technologies for Diesel Emission Control: Euruopean Experience and Worldwide...

280

The Effect of Diesel Fuel Properties on Emissions-Restrained...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(varying fuel properties and engine control parameters) were used to optimize fuel consumption subject to emissions and engine performance constraints. deer08kumar.pdf More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

282

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

283

Effect of microstructure on air oxidation resistance of nuclear graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation resistance in air of three grades of nuclear graphite with different structures was compared using a standard thermogravimetric method. Differences in the oxidation behavior have been identified with respect to both (i) the rate of oxidation in identical conditions and the derived apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor and (ii) the penetration depth of the oxidant and the development of the oxidized layer. These differences were ascribed to structural differences between the three graphite grades, in particular the grain size and shape of the graphite filler, and the associated textural properties, such as total BET surface area and porosity distribution in the un-oxidized material. It was also found that the amount of strongly bonded surface oxygen complexes measured by thermodesorption significantly exceeds the amount afforded by the low BET surface area, and therefore low temperature oxygen chemisorption is not a reliable method for determining the amount of surface sites (re)active during air oxidation. The relationship between nuclear graphite microstructure and its oxidation resistance demonstrated in this work underlines the importance of performing comprehensive oxidation characterization studies of the new grades of nuclear graphite considered as candidates for very high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Guldan, Tyler R [ORNL; Wang, Peng [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fireside corrosion of superheaters: Effects of air and oxy-firing of coal and biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing world population requires increasing quantities of electricity from sources that have reduced environmental impact, especially CO2 emissions. For pulverised coal-fired power plants, reduced CO2 emissions can be achieved by increasing the operating temperatures/pressures of the steam systems (which increases the efficiency of power generation), the use of carbon-neutral fuels such as biomass, and/or the implementation of CO2 capture technologies. The use of small quantities of biomass fuels (typically up to 5% of the energy content of the fuels) is already widely practised in the UK. As an alternative, oxy-firing pulverised fuel power plants provides a route to enable CO2 capture technologies to be introduced; but this route also requires the use of higher temperature/pressure steam systems to counter-act the efficiency penalty of CO2 capture and handling systems. All of these options to reduce CO2 emissions result in significant changes to the operating conditions (e.g. metal temperatures, gas temperatures, gaseous environments and deposits) that are anticipated for superheaters in these power systems. Such changes in operating conditions are expected to result in higher rates of fireside corrosion and so reduce the potential lives of these critical components. This paper reports the results of investigations that have been carried out to assess the effect on fireside corrosion of operating superheaters at higher metal temperatures in power systems using coal/biomass fuels fired with air or oxygen. A series of fireside corrosion experiments has been carried out using the deposit recoat test method to simulate the damage anticipated in different specific environments. Using an alumina-lined controlled-atmosphere furnace, the gaseous and deposit environments were simulated for superheaters in (a) air-fired and (b) oxy-fired (hot gas recycle system variant) power plants using cereal co-product and a UK coal. The corrosion tests were carried out at temperatures of 600 and 650C, to represent the metal temperatures anticipated in power plants in the near future. The potential superheater materials used in these tests were T92, 347HFG and HR3C steels, as well as one nickel-based material, alloy 625. The progress of the exposures was monitored using traditional mass change methods. Destructive examinations of the samples were carried out after their exposures, using optical microscopy and SEM/EDX methods to characterise the damage observed. The performance of the materials was determined using dimensional metrology; pre-exposure micrometer measurements and post-exposure image analyser measurements on polished cross-sections. The resulting metal loss distribution data for each sample exposed are being used for the development of statistical models of the fireside corrosion of superheater materials in novel operating environments.

A.U. Syed; N.J. Simms; J.E. Oakey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Chronic effects of ambient air pollution on respiratory morbidities among Chinese children: a cross-sectional study in Hong Kong  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chronic health effects from exposure to ambient air pollution are still unclear. This study primarily aims ... the relationship between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities ...

Yang Gao; Emily YY Chan; Liping Li; Patrick WC Lau; Tze Wai Wong

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

H.N. Knudsen, P. Wargocki and J. Vondruskova (2006) "Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality of air polluted by building materials ­ a summary of reported data", Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Vol. 1, 57-62. #12;#12;Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted

287

Air Quality Rules (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a comprehensive air quality rule for North Carolina that includes ambient air quality standards, emission control standards, monitoring and reporting requirements, and permitting procedures...

288

SUBSTITUTION OF NATURAL GAS FOR COAL: CLIMATIC EFFECTS OF UTILITY SECTOR EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSTITUTION OF NATURAL GAS FOR COAL: CLIMATIC EFFECTS OF UTILITY SECTOR EMISSIONS KATHARINE HAYHOE. Substitution of natural gas for coal is one means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, natural of coal by natural gas are evaluated, and their modeled net effect on global mean-annual temperature

Jain, Atul K.

289

Regulations for Air Quality (Quebec, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Regulation establishes emission standards for particulates and gases, emission opacity standards, standards of air quality and control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the emission of...

290

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

292

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with ultra low-NO{sub X} burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effects of air pollution on meteorological parameters during Deepawali festival over an Indian urban metropolis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pollutants (NO2, SO2, PM10, BC, CO, surface O3), emitted during fireworks display, have significant effects on meteorological parameters like air temperature, relative humidity, lapse rate and visibility in air over Kolkata (2265? N, 8845? E), a metropolitan city near the landocean boundary, on the eve of Deepawali festival when extensive fireworks are burnt. Long-term trend (20052013), indicates that the yearly average concentrations of both primary and secondary air pollutants have increased, exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) limit, on the respective Deepawali days. Short-term study (20122013) during the festival shows that the average pollutant concentrations have increased too compared to normal days. This study also reveals the immediate effects of the increased air pollutants on the boundary layer meteorology. PM10 has been found to be the most dominant atmospheric pollutants during this period. As a result of an increase in atmospheric heat content with elevated surface air temperature, a significant increase in the environmental lapse rate bears a signature of the influence of pollutants on the boundary layer temperature profile. A change in the diurnal pattern of relative humidity as well as in the vertical temperature profile is due to the change of the lapse rate during the festival days. Thus, the atmospheric pollutants during this festival over the urban region have significant effect on the boundary layer meteorology with bearings on environmental hazards.

Upal Saha; Shamitaksha Talukdar; Soumyajyoti Jana; Animesh Maitra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Assessing the Effect of Mercury Emissions from Contaminated Soil at Natural Gas Gate Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of mercury emissions from contaminated soil at natural gas distribution stations is presented. The effects were estimated as part of a risk assessment that included inhalation and multimedia exposure pathways. The purpose of the paper ...

A. Roffman; K. Macoskey; R. P. Shervill

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

MODELING THE TRANSPORT AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE EMISSIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON LOCAL AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY USING A VARIABLE-GRID-RESOLUTION AIR QUALITY MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second annual report summarizes the research performed from 17 April 2004 through 16 April 2005. Major portions of the research in several of the project's current eight tasks have been completed. We have successfully developed the meteorological inputs using the best possible modeling configurations, resulting in improved representation of atmospheric processes. The development of the variable-grid-resolution emissions model, SMOKE-VGR, is also completed. The development of the MAQSIP-VGR has been completed and a test run was performed to ensure the functionality of this air quality model. Thus, the project is on schedule as planned. During the upcoming reporting period, we expect to perform the first MAQSIP-VGR simulations over the Houston-Galveston region to study the roles of the meteorology, offshore emissions, and chemistry-transport interactions that determine the temporal and spatial evolution of ozone and its precursors.

Kiran Alapaty

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced...

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wind- and thermal-driven air flows and the buoyancy and advection effects on air exchange within urban environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human exposure to air pollutants and thermal stress in urban areas are public health concerns. The year 2008 was the first year when more than half of the human population lived in urban areas. Studies of the urban air ...

Magnusson, Sigurur Ptur

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effect of air flow rate and fuel moisture on the burning behaviours of biomass and simulated municipal solid wastes in packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of biomass and municipal solid wastes is one of the key areas in the global cleaner energy strategy. But there is still a lack of detailed and systematically theoretical study on the packed bed burning of biomass and municipal solid wastes. The advantage of theoretical study lies in its ability to reveal features of the detailed structure of the burning process inside a solid bed, such as reaction zone thickness, combustion staging, rates of individual sub-processes, gas emission and char burning characteristics. These characteristics are hard to measure by conventional experimental techniques. In this paper, mathematical simulations as well as experiments have been carried out for the combustion of wood chips and the incineration of simulated municipal solid wastes in a bench-top stationary bed and the effects of primary air flow rate and moisture level in the fuel have been assessed over wide ranges. It is found that volatile release as well as char burning intensifies with an increase in the primary air flow until a critical point is reached where a further increase in the primary air results in slowing down of the combustion process; a higher primary airflow also reduces the char fraction burned in the final char-burning-only stage, shifts combustion in the bed to a more fuel-lean environment and reduces CO emission at the bed top; an increase in the moisture level in the fuel produces a higher flame front temperature in the bed at low primary air flow rates.

Y.B Yang; V.N Sharifi; J Swithenbank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This semiannual report summarizes the research performed from 17 April through 16 October 2004. Major portions of the research in several of the project's current eight tasks have been completed, and the results obtained are briefly presented. We have successfully developed the meteorological inputs using the best possible modeling configurations, resulting in improved representation of atmospheric processes. Ingestion of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures in conjunction with the use of our new surface data assimilation technique have resulted in largely improved meteorological inputs to drive the MAQSIP-VGR. The development of the variable-grid-resolution emissions model, SMOKE-VGR, is also largely complete. We expect to develop the final configuration of the SMOKE-VGR during the upcoming reporting period. We are in the process of acquiring the newly released emissions database and offshore emissions data sets to update our archives. The development of the MAQSIP-VGR has been completed and a test run was performed to ensure the functionality of this air quality model. During the upcoming reporting period, we expect to perform the first MAQSIP-VGR simulations over the Houston-Galveston region to study the roles of the meteorology, offshore emissions, and chemistry-transport interactions that determine the temporal and spatial evolution of ozone and its precursors.

Kiran Alapaty

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Emissions from Ships with respect to Their Effects on Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions of particles, gases, heat, and water vapor from ships are discussed with respect to their potential for changing the microstructure of marine stratiform clouds and producing the phenomenon known as ship tracks. Airborne measurements ...

Peter V. Hobbs; Timothy J. Garrett; Ronald J. Ferek; Scott R. Strader; Dean A. Hegg; Glendon M. Frick; William A. Hoppel; Richard F. Gasparovic; Lynn M. Russell; Douglas W. Johnson; Colin ODowd; Philip A. Durkee; Kurt E. Nielsen; George Innis

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

302

Air temperature effect on thermal models for ventilated dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temperature of the air surrounding the windings of ventilated dry-type transformers is an important factor in the cooling of the windings since they are cooled only by the air. In particular, inner windings are sensitive to the air temperature in vertical cooling ducts. This study presents air temperature effect on the temperatures in foil-type inner winding for the dry-type transformers. A transformer rated at 2000kVA was selected for the research and temperature distribution was calculated under constant and varying air temperatures inside vertical ducts at three different loads. The 2-D transient heat diffusion equation was solved using the finite element method by coupling it with the vector potential equation due to non-uniformly generated heat caused by eddy currents in the foil winding. The calculated temperatures at constant and varying air temperatures are presented together with experimental values. The numerical and experimental results of this study showed that the air temperature affects the accuracy of temperatures in foil-type inner winding greatly.

Moonhee Lee; Hussein A. Abdullah; Jan C. Jofriet; Dhiru Patel; Murat Fahrioglu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

304

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of electric field on heat transfer performance of automobile radiator at low frontal air velocity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of electric field on the performance of automobile radiator is investigated in this work. In this experiment, a louvered fin and flat tube automobile radiator was mounted in a wind tunnel and there was heat exchange between a hot water stream circulating inside the tube and a cold air stream flowing through the external surface. The electric field was supplied on the airside of the heat exchanger and its supply voltage was adjusted from 0kV to 12kV. From the experiment, it was found that the unit with electric field pronounced better heat transfer rate, especially at low frontal velocity of air. The correlations for predicting the air-side heat transfer coefficient of the automobile radiator, with and without electric field, at low frontal air velocity were also developed and the predicted results agreed very well with the experimental data.

S. Vithayasai; T. Kiatsiriroat; A. Nuntaphan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Real-Time, On-Line Characterization of Diesel Generator Air Toxic Emissions by Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Real-Time, On-Line Characterization of Diesel Generator Air Toxic Emissions by Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry ... For the same reasons, the far more abundant exhaust gases such as nitrogen, water, and carbon dioxide cannot be ionized and, therefore, do not interfere with the potential detection of low (2?100 pptv) concentrations of organic molecules. ... The sample was introduced into the ionization chamber (Figure 1) through a modified pulsed valve (General Valve Series 99) that delivers 150-?s sample pulses at atmospheric back pressure through a 0.5-mm orifice at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. ...

Lukas Oudejans; Abderrahmane Touati; Brian K. Gullett

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

308

1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Comparison of emissions from on-road sources using a mobile laboratory under various driving and operational sampling modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile sources produce a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in large cities and have harmful effects on air quality at multiple spatial scales. Mobile emissions are intrinsically difficult to ...

Zavala-Perez, Miguel Angel

310

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim data report summarizes results as of August, 1999, on the status of the test programs being conducted on three technologies: lean-NO{sub x} catalysts, diesel particulate filters and diesel oxidation catalysts.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Policy effectiveness for road passenger transport emissions reductions across the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effectiveness of policy for emissions reductions in private passenger road transport depends on its ability to incentivise consumers to make choices oriented towards lower emissions vehicles. However, car purchase choices are known to be strongly socially determined, and this sector is highly diverse due to significant socio-economic differences between consumer groups. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the structure of the 2012 private passenger vehicle fleet-years in six major economies across the World (UK, USA, China, India, Japan and Brazil) in terms of prices, engine sizes and emissions. This is done in order to evaluate the effectiveness of existing and possible fiscal and technological change policies for emissions reductions. We provide tools to understand and evaluate the effectiveness of policy taking account of the distributive structure of prices and emissions in segments of a diverse market, both for conventional as well as unconventional engine technologies. We furthermore explai...

Mercure, J -F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

Brown, T.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

NOx Emission Reduction by the Optimization of the Primary Air Distribution in the 235Mwe CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article presents the results of experimental studies conducted on a large-scale 235 MWe CFB (Circulating Fluidized Bed) boiler, in which...x emission has been reduced by up to ten percent and the temperature ...

P. Mirek; T. Czakiert; W. Nowak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump were investigated. The base case tests used a (more)

Parker, Brandon DeWayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dinh Dinh (PI) National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives To assist the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in meeting cost, durability, and performance targets in the areas of fuel cell systems. The effort is focused on system-derived contaminants, but has a small component addressing "gaps" in the area of air contaminants. Premise System-derived contaminants can have negative effect on fuel cell performance. Current density (A/cm 2 ) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 g ( SHE ) Average cell voltage after air oxidation exposure Average cell voltage as measured in vehicle

316

Are renewables portfolio standards cost-effective emission abatement policy?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) could be an important policy instrument for 3P and 4P control. The authors examine the costs of renewable power, accounting for the federal production tax credit, the market value of a renewable credit, and the value of producing electricity without emissions of SO{sub 2}, NOx, mercury, and CO{sub 2}. The focus is on Texas, which has a large RPS and is the largest U.S. electricity producer and one of the largest emitters of pollutants and CO{sub 2}. The private and social costs of wind generation in an RPS is compared with the current cost of fossil generation, accounting for the pollution and CO{sub 2} emissions. It was found that society paid about 5.7 cents/kWh more for wind power, counting the additional generation, transmission, intermittency, and other costs. The higher cost includes credits amounting to 1.1 cents/kWh in reduced SO{sub 2}, NOx, and Hg emissions. These pollution reductions and lower CO{sub 2} emissions could be attained at about the same cost using pulverized coal (PC) or natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS); the reductions could be obtained more cheaply with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CCS. 35 refs., 7 tabs.

Katerina Dobesova; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effect of Background Emissivity on Gas Detection in Thermal Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temper- ature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on net chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plumes physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity have inhibiting effects on the net chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the Adaptive Matched Filter using four chemicals and three distinct background emissivities. Two chemicals (Carbontetrachloride and Tetraflourosilane) in the analysis had a very strong relationship with the background emissivities: they exhibited absorbance over a small range of wavenumbers and the background emissivities showed a consistent ordering at these wavenumbers. Analysis of simulated hyperspectral images containing these chemicals showed complete agreement with the analysis of the physics-based model that described when the background emissivities would have inhibiting effects on gas detection. The other chemicals considered (Ammonia and Tributylphosphate) exhibited very complex absorbance structure across the longwave infrared spectrum. Analysis of images containing these chemicals revealed that the the analysis of the physics-based model did not hold completely for these complex chemicals but did suggest that gas detection was dominated by their dominant absorbance features. These results provide some explanation of the effect of the background emissivity on gas detection and a more general exploration of gas absorbance/background emissivity variability and their effects on gas detection is warranted. i

Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence K.; Metoyer, Candace N.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Studying the feedback effects of aerosols on ozone and temperatures in Los Angeles with an Eulerian air pollution model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Eulerian air pollution model (GATOR/MMTD) was used to study the effects of aerosols on surface solar radiation, surface air temperatures, and ozone mixing ratios. Model results were also compared to data from the Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS) period of August 27-29, 1987. Gross errors for sulfate, sodium, light absorption, temperature, surface solar radiation, sulfur dioxide gas, formaldehyde gas, and ozone were lowest among parameters compared (1-40%). Gross errors for elemental carbon, organic carbon, total particulate mass, ammonium, ammonia gas, nitric acid gas, and light scattering, were larger (40-61%). Gross errors for particulate nitrate were largest (65-70%). Doubling of the land-based particulate emissions inventory caused gross errors of total particulate mass and elemental carbon to increase by factors of more than two. Also, setting lateral boundary inflow concentrations of particles to zero caused slight (< 1%) erosion of results for most species, large erosion (10%) for sodium and chloride, but slight improvement (< 1%) for a few species. Spinning up the meteorological model 24 hours in advance caused most gross errors to increase. Finally, model predictions for several parameters, with and without the inclusion of aerosols, were compared to data. The presence of aerosols reduced peak daytime surface solar radiation by approximately 6.4% (55 W m-2), increased night-time temperatures by about 0.77 K, decreased daytime temperatures by about 0.08 K, and increased overall temperatures (day plus night during the two day simulation period) by 0.43 K. The relatively small cooling during the day was due to heat trapping by elemental carbon-containing aerosols. The presence of aerosols also caused ozone mixing ratios to decrease by 2%.

Jacobson, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Orographic effects during winter cold air outbreaks over the Sea of Japan (East Sea): Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scatterometer wind measurements, such as the wakes (vortex street) in the lee of peaks along the range. Our of the coastal topography on the surface wind field during outbreaks has not been investigated in de- tail equations, orographic effect, gap wind, rotating channel flow, Rossby adjustment, Sea of Japan, air

Scotti, Alberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) brought about new awareness regarding the overall health-effects of stationary source fossil combustion emissions. Title III of the CAAA identified 189 pollutants, including mercury, as hazardous or toxic and required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate their emissions by source, health effects and environmental implications, including the need to control these emissions. These pollutants are collectively referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The provisions in Title III specific to electric generating units (EGU) were comprehensively addressed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaborative air toxic characterization programs conducted between 1990 and 1997. This work provided most of the data supporting the conclusions found in EPA's congressionally mandated reports regarding air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility boilers; the Mercury Study Report to Congress (1997)1 and the "Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units -- Final Report to Congress" (1998).2 The first report identified coal-fired power plants as the largest source of human-generated mercury emissions in the U.S. and the second concluded that mercury from coal-fired utilities was the HAP of "greatest potential concern" to the environment and human health that merited additional research and monitoring.

323

Emissions Trading with Updated Allocation: Effects on Entry/Exit and Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Allocation of emissions allowances may have significant distributional and efficiency effects. It is well known that cost-efficiency may be achieved if allowances are auctioned or distributed in a lump sum man...

Knut Einar Rosendahl; Halvor Briseid Storrsten

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model Uwe earth system model con- sisting of an atmospheric general circulation model, an ocean general

Winguth, Arne

325

Effects of particulate air pollution and ozone on lung function in non-asthmatic children  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction Information on the long-term effects of different air pollutant levels on lung function is relatively lacking in Asia and still inconclusive in the world. Age differential effects of air pollution are not known. Objectives To assess the acute and subchronic effects of ambient air pollution on lung function and compared among children of different ages. Methods From April to May 2011, a nationwide study was conducted on schoolchildren aged 615 years in 44 schools of 24 districts in Taiwan. Spirograms were obtained from 1494 non-asthmatic children. Air pollution data were retrieved from air monitoring stations within one kilometre of the schools. Using three-level hierarchical linear models, individual lung function was fitted to air pollution, with adjustments for demographics, indoor exposures, outdoor activity, and districts. Results Lung function changes per inter-quartile increase of the past two-months average levels of particulate matter <2.5?m (PM2.5) and ozone (12?g/m3, 3244 and 6.7ppb, 3238, respectively) were ?103 and ?142ml on FVC, ?86 and ?131 on FEV1, and ?102 and ?188ml/s on MMEF, respectively. Lag-1-day ozone exposure was associated with decreased MMEF. In children aged 610, PM2.5 was associated with decreased FEV1/FVC and MMEF/FVC ratios. Conclusions In children aged 615 years, sub-chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 and ozone leads to reduced lung capacity, whereas acute exposure to ozone decreases mid-expiratory flow. In children aged 610 years, additional airway obstructive patterns in lung function may be associated with PM2.5 exposure.

Chi-Hsien Chen; Chang-Chuan Chan; Bing-Yu Chen; Tsun-Jen Cheng; Yue Leon Guo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Kansas Air Quality Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All new air contaminant emission sources or alterations to emission sources that are required to be reported shall be in compliance with all applicable emission control regulations at the time that...

327

Effects of seismic air guns on marine fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of marine fish and invertebrates on an inshore reef were made using TV and acoustic tags one week before, during, and four days after a seismic triple G. airgun (three synchronised airguns, each gun 2.5l and 2000psi) was deployed and repeatedly fired. The guns were fired once/min for eight periods on four days at different positions. The structure and intensity of the sound of each triple G. gun explosion was recorded and calibrated. Peak sound pressure levels of 210dB (rel to 1?Pa) at 16m range and 195dB (rel to 1?Pa) at 109m range were measured at positions where the fish were being observed. The final position of the triple G. gun, at 5.3m range, had a peak pressure level of 218dB (rel to 1?Pa). Neither the fish, nor the invertebrates, showed any signs of moving away from the reef. Firing the guns did not interrupt a diurnal rhythm of fish gathering at dusk and passing the TV camera position while the guns were firing. The long-term day-to-night movements of two tagged pollack were slightly changed by the arrival and banging of the guns particularly when positioned within 10m of their normal living positions. Those reef fish, watched by the TV camera, always showed involuntary reactions in the form of a Mauthner cell reflex, C-start, at each explosion of the guns at all ranges tested (maximum range was 109m, 195dB rel to 1?Pa). When the explosion source was not visible to the fish, the C-start reaction was cut short and the fish continued with what they were doing before the stimulus. When the G. gun rack was sunk to the seabed (depth 14m) visible to the fish and the TV camera, those fish that were observed approaching the G. gun rack when the guns were fired were seen to turn and flee from the very visible explosion. When the gun rack was suspended midwater (5m depth) and just outside visible range at 16 metres, the fish receiving a 6ms peak to peak, 206dB (rel to 1?Pa) pressure swing exhibited a C-start and then continued to swim towards the gun position, their intended swimming track apparently unaltered. The sound of the G. guns had little effect on the day-to-day behaviour of the resident fish and invertebrates.

C.S Wardle; T.J Carter; G.G Urquhart; A.D.F Johnstone; A.M Ziolkowski; G Hampson; D Mackie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

242-A Evaporator/plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) effluent treatment facility (ETF) nonradioactive air emission test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report shows the methods used to test the stack gas outlet concentration and emission rate of Volatile Organic Compounds as Total Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in parts per million by volume,grams per dry standard cubic meter, and grams per minute from the PUREX ETF stream number G6 on the Hanford Site. Test results are shown in Appendix B.1.

Hill, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel, or about 46,200 BTUs of diesel fuel per mile. 4.1.8BTU/bbl 3575 g/gal Diesel fuel 106 BTU/gal 106 BTU/bbl 3192gasoline or diesel vehicles (g/106-BTU) E NMOG = emissions

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economizer control with constant supply air temperature seteconomizer control with constant supply air temperature setcontrol under the constraint of constant supply air temperature

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

332

Acute effect of ambient air pollution on heart failure in Guangzhou, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem of increasing importance. The association between acute exposure to air pollution and HF has been well established in developed countries, but little evidence was available in developing countries where air pollution levels were much higher. We conducted a time-series study to investigate the short-term association between air pollution and overall emergency ambulance dispatches (EAD) due to HF in Guangzhou, China. Methods Daily data of EAD due to HF from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012 were obtained from Guangzhou Emergency Center. We applied the over-dispersed Poisson generalized addictive model to analyze the associations after controlling for the seasonality, day of the week and weather conditions. Results We identified a total of 3375 EAD for HF. A 10-?g/m3 increase in the present-day concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10?m, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide corresponded to increases of 3.54% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35%, 5.74%], 5.29% (95% CI: 2.28%, 8.30%) and 4.34% (95% CI: 1.71%, 6.97%) in daily EAD for HF, respectively. The effects of air pollution on acute HF were restricted on the concurrent day and in the cool seasons. Conclusions Our results provided the first population-based evidence in Mainland China that outdoor air pollution could trigger the exacerbation of HF.

Changyuan Yang; Ailan Chen; Renjie Chen; Yongqing Qi; Jianjun Ye; Shuangming Li; Wanglin Li; Zijing Liang; Qing Liang; Duanqiang Guo; Haidong Kan; Xinyu Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species) control technology criteria pollutant air pollutantControl Cogen Urban Santa Maria Elevated Data sources: Emissions: 1999 National Emissions Inventory for Hazardous Air Pollutants (

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

335

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions Pascal Boeckx negative to positive. We studied the short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions. We site, an intermediately aerated Luvisol in Belgium, were similar. Nitrous oxide and CO2 emissions were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects A Report to the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution Health Effects 1 #12;2 A Report to the US Centers Tracking of Air Pollution Effects January 15-16, 2008 #12;HEI/CDC/EPA Workshop on Tracking Air Pollution ........................................................................................................................................... 13 AN INCREMENTAL APPROACH TO PUBLIC HEALTH TRACKING OF AIR POLLUTION

337

Diminished Defenses In Children May Lead To Increased Susceptibility To Inflammatory Effects of Air Pollutants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Environmental, Ambient air pollution: health hazards toJ. , Air pollution and children's health. Pediatrics, 2004.O.o.E.H.H.A. Air Pollution and Children's Health. Air

Lin, Erina May

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Flue Gas Emissions from the Burning of Asphaltite and Lignite in a Rotating Head Combustor with Secondary Air Delivery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1, 2) In this context, Turkey is rich in coal reserves, and it is among the biggest coal producers in the world with a production of about 76 million tons (Mt) in 2011, and a large portion of this production is lignite. ... (5) Turkey has also a high asphaltite reserve, which is mostly found in the southeastern part of Anatolia and used around the region for domestic heating. ... Modeling of NOx emissions from fluidized Bed combustion of high volatile lignites ...

Cengiz ner; ?ehmus Altun

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Comparison of marginal abatement cost curves for 2020 and 2030: longer perspectives for effective global GHG emission reductions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study focuses on analyses of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions, from the perspective of ... order to seek effective reductions. We assessed GHG emission reduction potentials and costs in 2020 ... 2030...

Keigo Akimoto; Fuminori Sano; Takashi Homma; Kenichi Wada

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Measuring Bicyclists' Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

doses 4.Health effects 4Urban Bicyclists' Pollution Uptake #12;Bicyclists' Exposure to Air Pollution 5Measuring Bicyclists' Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Alex Bigazzi PSU Transportation Uptake 1 #12;Bicycle & Health Promotion Public Health Exercise CrashesPollution Emissions Exposure/ Dose

Bertini, Robert L.

343

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions ... Center of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409, United States ... Growing concern over emissions from increased airport operations has resulted in a need to assess the impact of aviation related activities on local air quality in and around airports, and to develop strategies to mitigate these effects. ...

Prem Lobo; Lucas Rye; Paul I. Williams; Simon Christie; Ilona Uryga-Bugajska; Christopher W. Wilson; Donald E. Hagen; Philip D. Whitefield; Simon Blakey; Hugh Coe; David Raper; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nucleon effective masses within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory: Impact on stellar neutrino emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the effective masses of neutrons and protons in dense nuclear matter within the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock many-body theory and study the impact on the neutrino emissivity processes of neutron stars. We compare results based on different nucleon-nucleon potentials and nuclear three-body forces. Useful parametrizations of the numerical results are given. We find substantial in-medium suppression of the emissivities, strongly dependent on the interactions.

Baldo, M; Schulze, H -J; Taranto, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

Filter, Robert; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

348

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineering, Coordinating Committee of Air QualityStandards: Air Quality and Automobile Emission Control, Vol.of ilitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards. Paper tlo. 76-

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effects of radiation on NO kinetics in turbulent hydrogen/air diffusion flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a coupled radiation and NO kinetics calculation of turbulent hydrogen/air diffusion flame properties. Transport equations for mass, momentum, mixture fraction, enthalpy (sensible + chemical) including gas band radiation, and NO mass fraction are solved. NO kinetics is described by a one step thermal production mechanism. The local temperature is obtained by solving the enthalpy equation taking radiation loss from H{sub 2}O into consideration. Radiation/turbulence and chemical kinetics/turbulence interactions are treated using a clipped Gaussian probability density function (PDF) for the mixture fraction, and a delta PDF for the enthalpy. The source terms in the enthalpy and mass fraction of NO equations are treated using assumed PDF integration over the mixture fraction space. The results of the simulation are compared with existing measurements of the Emission Indices of NO (EINO) in turbulent H{sub 2}/air diffusion flames. The major conclusion of the paper is that coupled turbulence/radiation interactions should be taken into account while computing the EINO.

Sivathanu, Y.R.; Gore, J.P.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

An integrated perspective on assessing agricultural air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated perspective on assessing agricultural air quality Viney P. Aneja* Department. In this paper, we summarise an integrated assessment framework for studying the agricultural air quality issues air quality; air emissions; air pollution; ammonia; animal feeding operations; biogeochemical cycles

Niyogi, Dev

352

Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Air Pollution Control Division - Construction Permits Forms and Air Pollutant Emission...

353

Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazardous air pollutant removal, Proceeding of SO 2 Controlto control emissions of harmful air pollutants from electric

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The effect of natural gas supply on US renewable energy and CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas has been promoted as a means of decarbonizing the US power sector, because of superior generator efficiency and lower CO2 emissions per unit of electricity than coal. We model the effect of different gas supplies on the US power sector and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Across a range of climate policies, we find that abundant natural gas decreases use of both coal and renewable energy technologies in the future. Without a climate policy, overall electricity use also increases as the gas supply increases. With reduced deployment of lower-carbon renewable energies and increased electricity consumption, the effect of higher gas supplies on GHG emissions is small: cumulative emissions 201355 in our high gas supply scenario are 2% less than in our low gas supply scenario, when there are no new climate policies and a methane leakage rate of 1.5% is assumed. Assuming leakage rates of 0 or 3% does not substantially alter this finding. In our results, only climate policies bring about a significant reduction in future CO2 emissions within the US electricity sector. Our results suggest that without strong limits on GHG emissions or policies that explicitly encourage renewable electricity, abundant natural gas may actually slow the process of decarbonization, primarily by delaying deployment of renewable energy technologies.

Christine Shearer; John Bistline; Mason Inman; Steven J Davis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effects of population and affluence on CO{sub 2} emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors developed a stochastic version of the IMpact = Population-Affluence-Technology (IPAT) model to estimate the effects of population, affluence, and technology on national CO{sub 2} emissions.Results suggest that, for population, there are diseconomies of scale for the largest nations that are not consistent with the assumption of direct proportionality (log-linear effects) common to most previous research. In contrast, the effects of affluence on CO{sub 2} emissions appear to reach a maximum at about $10,000 in per-capita gross domestic product and to decline at higher levels of affluence. These results confirm the general value of the IPAT model as a starting point for understanding the anthropogenic driving forces of global change and suggest that population and economic growth anticipated over the next decade will exacerbate greenhouse gas emissions. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Dietz, T. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Rosa, E.A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

Zhou, Yaoqi

357

Conceptual Approach For Estimating Potential Air Toxics And Radionuclide Airborne Emissions From A Temporary Exhaust System For The 216-Z-9 Crib Removal Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 216-Z-9 Crib, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeastern Washington State, was the site of a successful mining effort to recover plutonium from the contaminated soils at the disposal site. A CERCLA Action Memorandum (AM) issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires the removal of the buildings associated with this mining effort to facilitate a remedial action planned for the near future. The decontamination and demolition of the 216 Z-9 Crib facilities is required under a consent order between the DOE, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Removal of the buildings located on and near the concrete cover slab over the 216-Z-9 Crib will require removal of the large soil-packaging glovebox located inside the 216-Z- 9A Building. Prior to cleaning out the glovebox, it will be necessary to provide active filtered ventilation capability to ensure a negative pressure exists between the glovebox and the adjacent airspace while hands-on work proceeds within. The glovebox floor is open to the Z-9 crib cavern environment below. For this reason the crib and glovebox currently share a common airspace. The functional requirements for safely conducting work within the glovebox include provision of a negative pressure in the box of about 0.5 inches of water gage (nominal) less than the interior of the building. In addition, the building surrounding the glovebox will be maintained at a slight negative pressure with respect to outdoor ambient pressure. In order to assess the relevant and appropriate clean air requirements for the new temporary ventilation system and associated emissions monitoring, it was necessary to reliably predict the nature of the exhaust air stream. Factors used to predict the presence and concentrations of certain radionuclide particulates and certain gases considered to be air toxics, included reliability parameters, flow rates, radionuclide content, and off-gas compositions. Radionuclide content includes transuranic isotopes, primarily of plutonium and americium. Air toxics include carbon tetrachloride, butane, methanol, acetone and toluene. Flow rate prediction was based on available design and test data and considered equipment sizes, glovebox negative pressure requirements, and filter flow characteristics. The approach used to predict the off-gas composition from the crib required experience-based predictive analysis combined with crib head space analytical results. Input information for emission estimates included: (1) gas composition sample data obtained from recent samples taken within the crib head space during static conditions, and (2) air in-leakage/dilution estimates based on physical characteristics of both the crib and the new temporary ventilation system. The conceptual approach combined measurement-based data with conservative assumptions, and provides the estimates necessary to determine relevance and appropriateness of substantive requirements under federal and state laws and regulations. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Sutter, C.; O'Brien, P.; Bates, J.; Klos, B. [Fluor Hanford Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Teal, J. [Fluor Federal Services, Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [Environmental Quality Management, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Seeking effective dyes for a mediated glucoseair alkaline battery/fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A significant level of power generation from an abiotic, air breathing, mediated reducing sugarair alkaline battery/fuel cell has been achieved in our laboratories at room temperature without complicated catalysis or membrane separation in the reaction chamber. Our prior studies suggested that mass transport limitation by the mediator is a limiting factor in power generation. New and effective mediators were sought here to improve charge transfer and power density. Forty-five redox dyes were studied to identify if any can facilitate mass transport in alkaline electrolyte solution; namely, by increasing the solubility and mobility of the dye, and the valence charge carried per molecule. Indigo dyes were studied more closely to understand the complexity involved in mass transport. The viability of water-miscible co-solvents was also explored to understand their effect on solubility and mass transport of the dyes. Using a 2.0 mL solution, 20% methanol by volume, with 100 mM indigo carmine, 1.0 M glucose and 2.5 M sodium hydroxide, the glucoseair alkaline battery/fuel cell attained 8 mA cm2 at short-circuit and 800 ?W cm2 at the maximum power point. This work shall aid future optimization of mediated charge transfer mechanism in batteries or fuel cells.

Ross Eustis; Tsz Ming Tsang; Brigham Yang; Daniel Scott; Bor Yann Liaw

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Airground interaction effects in the propagation of low?frequency impulse noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four large?scale sound propagation experiments performed in Norway from 1994 to 1996 under both summer and winter conditions clearly demonstrate that airground interaction has a significant effect on the propagation of low?frequency impulse noise. During the experiments specific measurements were made for detailed investigation of this interaction. The paper will present the instrumentation used and some typical measured data. Various numerical simulations of the experiments are made covering both poro?elastic and visco?elastic description of the ground. Based on the measured data theoretical considerations and the numerical simulations the paper will discuss mechanisms for acoustic energy loss from the air into the ground. Special emphasis will be put on the effect of the interaction of the propagating air pressure with the slow p?waves and with the dispersive Rayleigh waves in the ground. The relative importance of these two interaction mechanisms on the energy loss and thus on the sound attenuation will be examined for various ground conditions.

Christian Madshus; Amir M. Kaynia; Lars R. Hole

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Forest models: their development and potential applications for air pollution effects research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As research tools for evaluating the effects of chronic air pollution stress, forest simulation models offer one means of integrating forest growth and development data with generalized indices of pollution stress. This approach permits consideration of both the competitive interactions of trees in the forest stand and the influences of the stage of stand development on sensitivity of component species. A review of forest growth models, including tree, stand, and gap models, is provided as a means of evaluating relative strengths, weaknesses, and limits of applicability of representative examples of each type. Data from recent simulations with a gap model of eastern deciduous forest responses to air pollution stress are presented to emphasize the potential importance of competition in modifying individual species' responses in a forest stand. Recent developments in dendroecology are discussed as a potential mechanism for model validation and extended application.

Shugart, H.H.; McLaughlin, S.B.; West, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Back-action effects in an all-optical model of dynamical Casimir emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a theoretical study of the optical properties of a three-level emitter embedded in an optical cavity including the non-rotating wave terms of the light-matter interaction Hamiltonian. Rabi oscillations induced by a continuous wave drive laser are responsible for a periodic time-modulation of the effective cavity resonance, which results in a significant dynamical Casimir emission. A clear signature of the back-action effect of the dynamical Casimir emission onto the drive laser is visible as a sizable suppression of its absorption.

I. Carusotto; S. De Liberato; D. Gerace; C. Ciuti

2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

Towards Elimination of the Anode Effect and Perfluorocarbon Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on anode effect Hall-H�roult cell produces CF4 and C2F6 (PFCs) p PFCs have high GWP p in US, Al smelting & Sadoway (1997) r CF4 = a exp (b E ), where b = 0.331 V�1 #12;Sadoway, MIT ECS Meeting, Philadelphia, May

Sadoway, Donald Robert

363

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerosol climate e?ects and air quality impacts from 1980 toAerosol climate e?ects and air quality impacts from 1980 toAerosol climate e?ects and air quality impacts from 1980 to

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Air quality standards: Role of the Health Effects Institute in conducting research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Health Effects Institute is an independently governed organization, jointly funded by the public and private sectors to conduct scientific research, for regulatory purposes, concerning the health effects on humans of motor vehicle emissions. The consensus is that research HEI is performing is credible and of high quality. GAO believes that future funding should still be considered and that more open dialogue between the Environmental Protection Agency and HEI could help ensure that an increasing number of mutually agreed upon relevant research projects are undertaken.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The effect of developing nations' municipal waste composition on PCDD/PCDF emissions from open burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Open burning tests of municipal waste from two countries, Mexico and China, showed composition-related differences in emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs). Twenty-six burn tests were conducted, comparing results from two laboratory combustion facilities. Waste was shredded to isolate composition-specific effects from those due to random waste orientation. Emissions ranged from 5 to 780ng toxic equivalent/kg carbon burned (ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1) with an average of 140ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1 (stdev=170). The waste from Mexico (17ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1) had a statistically lower average emission factor than waste from China (240ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1. This difference was attributed primarily to waste composition differences, although one time-integrated combustion quality measure, ?CO/?CO2, showed statistical significance between laboratories. However, waste composition differences were far more determinant than which laboratory conducted the tests, illustrated using both statistical techniques and comparison of cross-over samples (wastes tested at both facilities). Comparison of emissions from previous waste combustion tests in Sweden and the U.S.A, showed emission factors within the range of those determined for Mexico and China waste. For laboratory-scale combustion, existing emission factors and test methodologies are generally applicable to both developed and developing countries.

Lisa Lundin; Brian Gullett; William F. Carroll Jr.; Abderrahmane Touati; Stellan Marklund; Heidelore Fiedler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

367

The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF OUTDOOR HEAT EXCHANGER HYDROPHOBIC TREATMENT ON THE PERFORMANCE OF AN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP A Thesis by BRANDON DEWAYNE PARKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1995 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECTS OF OUTDOOR HEAT EXCHANGER HYDROPHOBIC TREATMENT ON THE PERFORMANCE OF AN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP A Thesis by BRANDON DEWAYNE PARKER Submitted...

Parker, Brandon DeWayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Safeguarding indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California has created and implemented the first state program devoted exclusively to the investigation of nonindustrial indoor air quality. The program is responsible for promoting and conducting research on the determining factors of healthful indoor environments and is structured to obtain information about emission sources, ventilation effects, indoor concentrations, human activity patterns, exposures, health risks, control measures and public policy options. Data are gathered by a variety of methods, including research conducted by staff members, review of the available scientific literature, participation in technical meetings, contractual agreements with outside agencies, cooperative research projects with other groups and consultation with experts. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Sexton, K.; Wesolowski, J.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An integrated assessment of air pollutant abatement opportunities in a computable general equilibrium framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air pollution and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission reduction policies are desirable to reduce smog, tropospheric concentrations of ozone precursors, acid rain, and other adverse effects on human health, the environment, ...

Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend...

371

Exhaust emissions and mutagenic effects of diesel fuel, biodiesel and biodiesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The replacement of petroleum-derived fuels by renewable biogenic fuels has become of worldwide interest with the environmental effects being scientifically investigated. Biodiesel has been proven to be a suitable alternative to petrodiesel and blending up to 20% biodiesel with petrodiesel is policy promoted in the USA and the EU. To investigate the influence of blends on the exhaust emissions and possible health effects, we performed a series of studies with several engines (Euro 0, III and IV) using blends of rapeseed-derived biodiesel and petrodiesel. Regulated and non-regulated exhaust compounds were measured and their mutagenic effects were determined using the Bacterial Reverse Mutation Assay (Ames-Test) according to OECD Guideline 471. Exhaust emissions of blends were approximately linearly dependent on the blend composition, particularly when considering regulated emissions. However, a negative effect of blends was observed with respect to mutagenicity of the exhaust emissions. In detail, an increase of the mutagenic potential was found for blends with the maximum observed for B20. From this point of view, B20 must be considered as a critical blend when petrodiesel and biodiesel are used as binary mixtures.

Olaf Schrder; Jrgen Bnger; Axel Munack; Gerhard Knothe; Jrgen Krahl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Comparing the climate effect of emissions of short- and long-lived climate agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formation of gases and particles...change. These gases and particles...Earth's energy budget...stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations...requires policies to be cost-effective...policies and measures shouldbe...Many issues related to the impact...practicalities of reducing emissions...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Will joint regional air pollution control be more cost-effective? Anempirical study of China's BeijingTianjinHebei region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract By following an empirical approach, this study proves that joint regional air pollution control (JRAPC) in the BeijingTianjinHebei region will save the expense on air pollution control compared with a locally-based pollution control strategy. The evidences below were found. (A) Local pollutant concentration in some of the cities is significantly affected by emissions from their surrounding areas. (B) There is heterogeneity in the marginal pollutant concentration reduction cost among various districts as a result of the cities' varying contribution of unit emission reduction to the pollutant concentration reduction, and their diverse unit cost of emission reduction brought about by their different industry composition. The results imply that the cost-efficiency of air pollution control will be improved in China if the conventional locally based regime of air pollution control can shift to a regionally based one.

Dan Wu; Yuan Xu; Shiqiu Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Emissions characteristics of modern oil heating equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 10 years there have been some very interesting developments in oil heating. These include higher static pressure burners, air atomizing nozzles, low firing rate nozzles, low heat loss combustion chambers and condensing boilers and furnaces. The current data base on the emissions characteristics of oil-fired residential heating equipment is based primarily on data taken in the 1970's. The objective of the work described in this report is to evaluate the effects of recent developments in oil-fired equipment on emissions. Detailed emissions measurements have been made on a number of currently available residential oil burners and whole systems selected to represent recent development trends. Some additional data was taken with equipment which is in the prototype stage. These units are a prevaporizing burner and a retention head burner modified with an air atomizing nozzle. Measurements include No{sub x}, smoke numbers, CO, gas phase hydrocarbon emissions and particulate mass emission rates. Emissions of smoke, CO and hydrocarbons were found to be significantly greater under cyclic operation for all burners tested. Generally, particulate emission rates were found to be 3 to 4 times greater in cyclic operation than in steady state. Air atomized burners were found to be capable of operation at much lower excess air levels than pressure atomized burners without producing significant amounts of smoke. As burner performance is improved, either through air atomization or prevaporization of the fuel, there appears to be a general trend towards producing CO at lower smoke levels as excess air is decreased. The criteria of adjusting burners for trace smoke may need to be abandoned for advanced burners and replaced with an adjustment for specific excess air levels. 17 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Coughlan, R.; Butcher, T.; McDonald, R.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

THE BURSTY NATURE OF SOLAR FLARE X-RAY EMISSION. II. THE NEUPERT EFFECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carry out a novel statistical test of the Neupert effect based on multifractal spectra. The multifractal spectrum is the number distribution of the strengths (i.e., the Hlder exponents) of bursts in a signal. This is tested on simulations and carried out on RHESSI X-ray data from a well observed GOES X4.8 magnitude flare. The multifractal spectra is ideally suited to quantifying the relative smooth and bursty signals typically found in (thermal) soft X-ray and (non-thermal) hard X-ray data of solar flares. We show that light curves from all energies between 3 keV and 25 keV are statistically similar, suggesting that all these signals are dominated by the same (presumably thermal) emission. Emission lying between 25 keV and 100 keV probably contains some contribution from both thermal and non-thermal sources. The multifractal spectrum of a signal and that of its (cumulative) temporal integration are statistically similar (i.e., low residuals upon subtraction), but shifted by one in the peak Hlder exponent. We find the pairs of 3-6 keV and 100-300 keV emissions, the 6-12 keV and 100-300 keV emissions and the 12-25 keV and 100-300 keV emissions are all consistent with the Neupert effect. The best agreement with the Neupert effect is between the 12-25 keV and 100-300 keV pair, although possibly with some secondary source of thermal emission present.

McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, MSC 4500, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Bloomfield, D. Shaun, E-mail: mcateer@nmsu.edu [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

377

Effect of Model and Operating Parameters on Air Gasification of Char  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Sheffield University, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom ... It produces gaseous species such as CO, H2, and CH4 which can either be burned in a separated chamber with ultralow pollutant emissions or further synthesized into materials for the chemical industry. ... The effect on the gasification rate is very small, though, no more than 3%, and the case for ? = 0 results in a slightly higher gasifying rate than ? = 1. ...

Yao Bin Yang; ChangKook Ryu; Vida N. Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of use of low oxygenate gasoline blends upon emissions from California vehicles. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to investigate the emissions effects of low-oxygenate gasoline blends on exhaust and evaporative emissions from a test fleet of California certified light-duty autos. Thirteen vehicles were procured and tested using four gasoline-oxygenate blends over three test cycles. The four gasoline blends were: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE), Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE), and 'match' and 'splash' blends of ethanol (in the 'match' blend the fuel Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) is held constant, while in the 'splash' blend the fuel RVP is allowed to increase). Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide exhaust emissions were generally reduced for the oxygenated blends, the exception being the 'splash-blended' ethanol gasoline which showed mixed results. Older technology vehicles (e.g., non-catalyst and oxidation catalyst) showed the greatest emissions reductions regardless of gasoline blend, while later technology vehicles showed the smallest reductions. Evaporative emissions and toxics were generally reduced for ETBE, while results for the other blends were mixed.

Born, G.L.; Lucas, S.V.; Scott, R.D.; DeFries, T.H.; Kishan, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effect of long-term outdoor air pollution and noise on cognitive and psychological functions in adults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It has been hypothesized that air pollution and ambient noise might impact neurocognitive function. Early studies mostly investigated the associations of air pollution and ambient noise exposure with cognitive development in children. More recently, several studies investigating associations with neurocognitive function, mood disorders, and neurodegenerative disease in adult populations were published, yielding inconsistent results. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence on air pollution and noise effects on mental health in adults. We included studies in adult populations (?18 years old) published in English language in peer-reviewed journals. Fifteen articles related to long-term effects of air pollution and eight articles on long-term effects of ambient noise were extracted. Both exposures were separately shown to be associated with one or several measures of global cognitive function, verbal and nonverbal learning and memory, activities of daily living, depressive symptoms, elevated anxiety, and nuisance. No study considered both exposures simultaneously and few studies investigated progression of neurocognitive decline or psychological factors. The existing evidence generally supports associations of environmental factors with mental health, but does not suffice for an overall conclusion about the independent effect of air pollution and noise. There is a need for studies investigating simultaneously air pollution and noise exposures in association mental health, for longitudinal studies to corroborate findings from cross-sectional analyses, and for parallel toxicological and epidemiological studies to elucidate mechanisms and pathways of action.

Lilian Tzivian; Angela Winkler; Martha Dlugaj; Tamara Schikowski; Mohammad Vossoughi; Kateryna Fuks; Gudrun Weinmayr; Barbara Hoffmann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effects of diesel injection pressure on the performance and emissions of a HD common-rail diesel engine fueled with diesel/methanol dual fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The diesel/methanol dual fuel (DMDF) combustion mode was conducted on a turbo-charged, inter-cooling diesel engine with 6-cylinder for the heavy duty (HD) vehicle. In DMDF mode, methanol is injected into the intake port to form lean air/methanol premixed mixture, and then ignited by the direct-injected diesel fuel in cylinder. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of diesel injection pressure on the characteristics of performance and exhaust emissions from the engine with common-rail fuel system. The experimental results show that at low injection pressure, the IMEP of DMDF mode is lower than that of pure diesel combustion (D) mode. COVIEMP of DMDF mode firstly decreases and then increases with increasing injection pressure, and it remains under 2.1% for all the tests. It is found that the combustion duration in DMDF mode becomes shorter, the maximum cylinder pressure and the peak heat release rate increase, and CA50 gets close to the top dead center as the injection pressure increases. BSFC of DMDF mode decreases with the increase of injection pressure, and is lower than that of D mode for injection pressure over 115MPa. Both of NOX and smoke emissions are reduced in DMDF mode. But smoke decreases and NOX increases as the diesel injection pressure increases in DMDF mode. DMDF generates lower NO and CO2 emissions, while produces higher HC, CO, andNO2 emissions compared to D mode. As the diesel injection pressure increases, CO and HC emissions are decreased, however, CO2 and NO2 emissions are slightly increased.

Junheng Liu; Anren Yao; Chunde Yao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nebraska Air Quality Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to ambient air quality standards, pollution source operating permits, emissions reporting,...

382

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP;of chemistryclimate models with RCP emissions thus projectto project air quality responses to future climate change

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of the effectiveness of the first European Pollutant Emission Register (EPER)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of the first European Pollution Emissions Register (EPER), a regulatory instrument based on the publication of the environmental performance of firms exceeding specified pollution limits. The Multivariate Regression Model (MVRM) is applied to capture the disciplinary effect of the EPER. So, we first perform an analysis to determine whether the publication of the EPER has a negative effect on the market value of the listed firms. Secondly, we consider the possibility of the publication of the EPER affecting the market value of firms which could be included in the EPER but are not because their emissions do not exceed the specified pollution limits. Finally, we prepare an index to compare the environmental results of the firms and analyse whether the consequences of publishing the EPER are worse for firms with high relative pollution records.

Joaqun Can-de-Francia; Concepcin Garcs-Ayerbe; Marisa Ramrez-Alesn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

THE BALDWIN EFFECT IN THE NARROW EMISSION LINES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anti-correlations between the equivalent widths of emission lines and the continuum luminosity in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), known as the Baldwin effect, are well established for broad lines, but are less well studied for narrow lines. In this paper we explore the Baldwin effect of narrow emission lines over a wide range of ionization levels and critical densities using a large sample of broad-line, radio-quiet AGNs taken from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. These type 1 AGNs span three orders of magnitude in continuum luminosity. We show that most narrow lines show a similar Baldwin effect slope of about -0.2, while the significant deviations of the slopes for [N II] {lambda}6583, [O II] {lambda}3727, [Ne V] {lambda}3425, and the narrow component of H{alpha} can be explained by the influence of metallicity, star formation contamination, and possibly by the difference in the shape of the UV-optical continuum. The slopes do not show any correlation with either the ionization potential or the critical density. We show that a combination of 50% variations in continuum near 5100 A and a lognormal distribution of observed luminosity can naturally reproduce a constant Baldwin effect slope of -0.2 for all narrow lines. The variations of the continuum could be due to variability, intrinsic anisotropic emission, or an inclination effect.

Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ting-Gui; Dong, Xiao-Bo [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Gaskell, C. Martin, E-mail: zkdtc@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: twang@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xbdong@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: martin.gaskell@uv.cl [Centro de Astrofisica de Valparaiso y Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Effects of Future Climate and Biogenic Emissions Changes on Surface Ozone over the United States and China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future projections of near-surface ozone concentrations depend on the climate/emissions scenario used to drive future simulations, the direct effects of the changing climate on the atmosphere, and the indirect effects of changing temperatures and ...

Jin-Tai Lin; Kenneth O. Patten; Katharine Hayhoe; Xin-Zhong Liang; Donald J. Wuebbles

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The effect of precooling inlet air on CHP efficiency in natural gas pressure reduction stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Almost all pressure reduction stations in Iran use expansion valves to reduce the natural gas pressure, which leads to wasting large amount of exergy. In this paper, a system is proposed which includes the modification of a conventional pressure reduction station with the addition of a turbo expander and a gas turbine for power recovery and generation. The next step is investigating the effect of heat exchanger on proposed combined heat and power system. The objective of the simulation is first to investigate the effects of modifying components performance equations on system efficiency and performance at a set operating condition. Secondly, to conduct feasibility study of using a heat exchanger at gas pressure reduction station to boost station efficiency in terms of energy saving and economic value. The result demonstrates that by precooling inlet air of gas turbine, station efficiency increases specially when the turbine works at full load.

Mahyar Kargaran; Mahmoood Farzaneh-Grod; Mohammad Saberi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effect of steam injection location on syngas obtained from an airsteam gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For a fluidized-bed gasifier, reaction conditions vary along the height of the reactor. Hence, the steam injection location may have a considerable effect on the syngas quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of steam injection location and steam-to-biomass ratio (SBR) on the syngas quality generated from an airsteam gasification of switchgrass in a 25kg/h autothermal fluidized-bed gasifier. Steam injection locations of 51, 152, and 254mm above the distributor plate and \\{SBRs\\} of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 were selected. Results showed that the syngas H2 and CO yields were significantly influenced by the steam injection location (pgasifier efficiencies (cold gas efficiency of 67%, hot gas efficiency of 72%, and carbon conversion efficiency of 96%) were at the steam injection location of 254mm and SBR of 0.2.

Ashokkumar M. Sharma; Ajay Kumar; Raymond L. Huhnke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SYSTEM CYCLING, EVAPORATOR AIRFLOW, AND CONDENSER COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Effect of hydrogen addition on criteria and greenhouse gas emissions for a marine diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrogen remains an attractive alternative fuel to petroleum and a number of investigators claim that adding hydrogen to the air intake manifold of a diesel engine will reduce criteria emissions and diesel fuel consumption. Such claims are appealing when trying to simultaneously reduce petroleum consumption, greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. The goal of this research was to measure the change in criteria emissions (CO, NOx, and PM2.5) and greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), using standard test methods for a wide range of hydrogen addition rates. A two-stroke Detroit Diesel Corporation 12V-71TI marine diesel engine was mounted on an engine dynamometer and tested at three out of the four loads specified in the ISO 8178-4 E3 emission test cycle and at idle. The engine operated on CARB ultra-low sulfur #2 diesel with hydrogen added at flow rates of 0, 22 and 220 SLPM. As compared with the base case without hydrogen, measurements showed that hydrogen injection at 22 and 220 SLPM had negligible influence on the overall carbon dioxide specific emission, EF CO 2 . However, in examining data at each load the data revealed that at idle EF CO 2 was reduced by 21% at 22 SLPM (6.9% of the added fuel energy was from hydrogen) and 37.3% at 220 SLPM (103.1% of the added fuel energy was from hydrogen). At all other loads, the influence of added hydrogen was insignificant. Specific emissions for nitrogen oxides, EF NO x , and fine particulate matters, EF PM 2.5 , showed a trade-off relationship at idle. At idle, EF NO x was reduced by 28% and 41% with increasing hydrogen flow rates, whilst EF PM 2.5 increased by 41% and 86% respectively. For other engine loads, EF NO x and EF PM 2.5 did not change significantly with varying hydrogen flow rates. One of the main reasons for the greater impact of hydrogen at idle is that the contribution of hydrogen to the total fuel energy is much higher at idle as compared to the other loads. The final examination in this paper was the system energy balance when hydrogen is produced by an on-board electrolysis unit. An analysis at 75% engine load showed that hydrogen production increased the overall equivalent fuel consumption by 2.6% at 22 SLPM and 17.7% at 220 SLPM.

Hansheng Pan; Sam Pournazeri; Marko Princevac; J. Wayne Miller; Shankar Mahalingam; M. Yusuf Khan; Varalakshmi Jayaram; William A. Welch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Economic impact analysis for proposed emission standards and guidelines for municipal waste combustors: A description of the basis for, and impacts of, proposed revisions to air pollutant emission regulations for new and existing municipal waste combustors under Clean Air Act Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA is proposing revised and expanded air pollutant emission standards for new, and guidelines for existing, municipal waste combustors (MWCs), pursuant to Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129 of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The regulations will replace or supplement those promulgated by EPA on February 11, 1991. The standards and guidelines will apply to MWCs with a capacity to combust 35 or more Mg of municipal solid waste per day. The pollutants to be regulated are particulate matter (total and fine), opacity, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, lead, cadmium mercury, and dibenzofurans and dioxins. The report describes the standards and guidelines, their potential economic impacts, and related matters. EPA estimates the national annual cost of the standards in 1994 will be $44 million, plus the cost of the 1991 standards, $157 million, for a total of $201 million. EPA estimates the equivalent cost of the guidelines at $280 million plus $168 million for a total of $448 million.

Jellicorse, B.L.; Dempsey, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effects of the injection parameters and compression ratio on the emissions of a heavy-duty diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) cases are compared for improvements on the combustion chamber design of the engine to achieve near zero particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions. Therefore combustion simulations of the engine have been performed to find out emission generation in the cylinder. The interaction of air motion with high-pressure fuel spray has also been analysed. Finally, a comparison has been made considering the performance of the engine for various configurations such as compression ratio, injection timing, and cone angle. The results are widely in agreement qualitatively with the previous similar experimental and computational studies in the literature.

Mustafa Yilmaz; Hasan Köten; M. Zafer Gul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Air Pollution from Mobile Sources: Formation and Effects and Abatement Strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An overview of the issue of air pollution from mobile sources is presented in the ... contains a general introduction on specific aspects of air pollution from internal combustion engines. The topics covered ... ...

Neal Hickey; Ilan Boscarato; Jan Kaspar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Modelling the Effects of Urban Morphology, Traffic and Pedestrian Dynamics on Students Exposure to Air Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The United Nations Environment Programme stated that the human exposure to air pollutants primarily emitted by road traffic is ... tracked and profiled with a GPS. Ambient air pollutant concentrations of CO and P...

Jorge Humberto Amorim; Joana Valente

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effect of helium injection on diffusion dominated air ingress accidents in pebble bed reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary objective of this thesis was to validate the sustained counter air diffusion (SCAD) method at preventing natural circulation onset in diffusion dominated air ingress accidents. The analysis presented in this ...

Yurko, Joseph Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Air flow effects in the piston ring pack and their implications on oil transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 different flow regimes of piston blowby air and their influences on oil transport are studied. It is found that air mainly interacts with oil close to the ring gaps and directly below the ring-liner contacts. Geometric ...

Wang, Yuan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

What is the impact of systematically missing exposure data on air pollution health effect estimates?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-series studies reporting associations between daily air pollution and health use pollution data from monitoring stations that vary in the frequency of recording. Within the Air Pollution and Health: A Europe...

Evangelia Samoli; Roger D. Peng; Tim Ramsay

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effect of Fuel Injection Pressure on a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Nonvolatile Particle Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Fuel Injection Pressure on a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Nonvolatile Particle Emission ... (4, 9, 10) Recently, we have found nonvolatile core particles in the exhaust of heavy-duty diesel vehicles and engines also at high load conditions. ... On the basis of the thermodynamic behavior, particle core material has been inferred to be solid in room temperature,(4, 6, 10) but the character of the particles in general is still an open question. ...

Tero Lhde; Topi Rnkk; Matti Happonen; Christer Sderstrm; Annele Virtanen; Anu Solla; Matti Kyt; Dieter Rothe; Jorma Keskinen

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

399

Climate change effects on red spruce decline mitigated by reduction in air pollution within its shrinking habitat range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigated the potential effects of projected climate change on red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) growth in the Great Smoky Mountains of Southeastern USA. A model called Annual Radial Increment Model (ARIM) was used to capture ecosystem complexity manifested as direct and indirect effects in multifactorial within- and across-scale interactions. The model was run under different scenarios, including projected climate change under reduced, no change, and increased atmospheric pollution. Modeled red spruce growth at end of 21st century (20802099) was compared to modeled growth at end of the 20th century (19801999). Red spruce growth at high elevations (?1700m) declined by 10.8% when climate change interacted with a 10% increase in air pollution, but red spruce growth increased by 8.4% when air pollution decreased by 10%. In contrast, red spruce growth at low elevations (air pollution, 8.9% with no change, and 6.4% with a 10% decrease in air pollution. Our results suggest that red spruce populations at high-elevation may grow more rapidly under climate change if air pollution decreases, but populations at low-elevation may decline irrespective of air pollution changes as habitats shrink.

Kyung Ah Koo; Bernard C. Patten; Robert O. Teskey; Irena F. Creed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy--ORNL/TM-2009/021  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

021 021 Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy February 2009 Prepared by Kevin Norman Shean Huff Brian West DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume I. Recent airport measurement programs, data analyses, and sub-model development. Final report Jan78-Jul 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

Britter, Rex E.

403

EXHALE Exploration of Health and Lungs in the Environment Exposure to poor air quality is recognised to have a detrimental effect on children's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is recognised to have a detrimental effect on children's respiratory health and air pollution is London, the air pollutants which damage lungs and are linked to respiratory problems such as asthma. A Low symptoms, inflammation in the lung, exposure to traffic-related air pollution, and genetic susceptibility

Applebaum, David

404

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 2: NO{sub x} Adsorber Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report discusses the results of the DECSE test program that demonstrates the potential of NOx adsorber catalyst technology across the range of diesel engine operation with a fuel economy penalty less than 4%.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Air Quality/Emissions Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum...

406

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2030 A1B emissions from bio-fuel and transportation sourcesand a simulation where bio-fuel and transportation sourcesin transportation and bio-fuel based carbonaceous emissions

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) project major changes in anthro- pogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone precur- sors over the 2Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy; published 27 September 2008. [1] We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) driven by a general

Mickley, Loretta J.

408

Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon and metal surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon ­ and metal surfaces, 20080 San Sebastián, Spain Abstract Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined of carbon­fiber inforced graphite used as first­wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data

Muiño, Ricardo Díez

409

Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon-and metal surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal surfaces, 20080 San Sebastián, Spain Abstract Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data

Muiño, Ricardo Díez

410

Effect of Advanced Aftertreatment for PM and NOx Reduction on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Ultrafine Particle Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CARBs mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy. ... Compared to the baseline vehicle, particles from vehicles with controls (except of the Hybrid-CCRT) had a higher mass sp. ... California Air Resources Board, MLD Method 139 - Procedure for Organic Carbon and Elemental Carbon (OC/EC) Analysis of Vehicular Exhaust Particulate Matter (PM) on Quartz Filters. ...

Jorn Dinh Herner; Shaohua Hu; William H. Robertson; Tao Huai; M.-C. Oliver Chang; Paul Rieger; Alberto Ayala

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Clean air act and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean air act and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Ozone: Sources/Environmental Effects Particulates (PM): Sources/Environmental Effects #12;National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards for pollutants considered

Weber, Rodney

412

Effect of anode shape on pinch structure and X-ray emission of plasma focus device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of anode shapes on pinch structure and X-ray emission of plasma focus device operated with cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips is reported. The pinch structure in the radial compression phase has been investigated by employing a triple pinhole camera. It has been observed that pinch structure as well as the X-ray emission of PF device strongly depends upon anode tip designs. For the first time the studies were carried out in two new shapes of anode tips that is the oval and the divergent one. It has been observed that the oval and diverging anode tips are more conducive for the formation of instabilities and hotspot generation. The studies of X-ray emission were also carried out by employing three channels of a p-i-n diode X-ray spectrometer in entire anode designs to corroborate the results of a triple pinhole camera. Additionally, the effective hard X-ray photon energy was also estimated by the radiography method for all the anode tip designs, which indirectly provide a qualitative idea of the generation of induced accelerating field in the pinched column during compression.

N. Talukdar; N.K. Neog; T.K. Borthkur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effects of invisible particle emission on global inclusive variables at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the effects of invisible particle emission in conjunction with QCD initial state radiation (ISR) on quantities designed to probe the mass scale of new physics at hadron colliders, which involve longitudinal as well as transverse final-state momenta. This is an extension of our previous treatment, arXiv:0903.2013, of the effects of ISR on global inclusive variables. We present resummed results on the visible invariant mass distribution and compare them to parton-level Monte Carlo results for top quark and gluino pair-production at the LHC. There is good agreement as long as the visible pseudorapidity interval is large enough (eta ~ 3). The effect of invisible particle emission is small in the case of top pair production but substantial for gluino pair production. This is due mainly to the larger mass of the intermediate particles in gluino decay (squarks rather than W-bosons). We also show Monte Carlo modelling of the effects of hadronization and the underlying event. The effect of the underlying event is large but may be approximately universal.

Andreas Papaefstathiou; Bryan Webber

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Influence of Mobile Air-Conditioning on Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption:? A Model Approach for Modern Gasoline Cars Used in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, apart from studies involving MOBILE6 in the United States (1) and other U. S. studies (2?5), air-conditioning activity in relation to meteorological conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. ... For manual air conditioners, a good setting was sought before the test and the knobs for cooling and ventilation were readjusted if the temperature drifted more than 1 C. ... The temperatures of the conditioned air range from 5 to 11 C. ...

Martin F. Weilenmann; Ana-Marija Vasic; Peter Stettler; Philippe Novak

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

The effect of ethanol-water fumigation on the performance and emissions from a direct-injection diesel engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effect of ethanol fumigation and water injection on the performance and exhaust emissions from a 1.9-liter Volkswagen TDI diesel engine was investigated. The engine (more)

Olson, Andr Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued revised draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) reviews on December 18, 2014

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality information Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management District (BAAQMD). For more detailed information, see Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions... Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and...

418

Acute cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution: components, vascular mechanisms and protecting the public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to air pollution, particularly fine and ultrafine particulate matter derived from combustion sources, has been consistently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent controlled exposure ...

Langrish, Jeremy Patrick

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

The effect of density and lint percentage on the resistance of cottonseed to air flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to air flov (air fl. ow dovnvard). . 28 LIST VF TABLKS Table Page I. Values of C and n for the Equation, V ~ CP II. Data for Acid Delinted Seed Density 31. 85 pounds per cubic foot 37 III. Data for Nachine-Delknted Seed Density 26. 6 pounds per.... As these graphs were plotted on logarithmic paper, the relation between air flow rate and pressure drop may be expressed by equations of the form, V w CP ? where "V" is velocity of air flow in feet per minute (sometimes expressed es cubic feet per minute per...

Brashears, Alan Dale

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effects of Levels of Automation on Air Traffic Controller Situation Awareness and Performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??To meet the increasing demands of air traffic, the Joint Planning and Development Office has proposed initiatives to modernize the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS). (more)

Sethumadhavan, Arathi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pressure effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure, and for modeling the change in system pressure as function of compressed air storage volume... of this method for estimating energy savings ... Source: Kissock,...

422

Regional air pollution study: effects of airborne sulfur pollutants on materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of galvanized steel, weathering steel, A1 2014 and 7079 stress samples, silver, marble, nylon and two types of house paint were exposed at nine sites of the Regional Air Monitoring System in the St. Louis area. Wind speed and direction, temperature, dew point, total sulfur, SO2, H2S, O3, NOx, total hydrocarbons, total suspended particulate matter, sulfate and nitrate were recorded. For galvanized steel a pronounced effect of time of first exposure was observed. The corrosion behavior of weathering steel was not seasonally dependent. House paint showed discontinuous erosive behavior. Exposure to the south was more erosive than exposure to the north. Rates for latex paint were higher than for oil based paint. The erosion rate of marble decreased with time. At some sites 50% reflectance loss of silver occurred after 3 months exposure. All samples of A1 7079 at 25 Ksi failed in less than 255 days, while complete failure at 15 Ksi occurred between 277 and 630 days. For A1 2014 more scatter was observed. The pollution levels in St. Louis were found to be rather low. Ozone showed similar seasonal changes as the temperature. Sites close to the center of St. Louis had lower ozone but higher NOx and total hydrocarbon levels. Sulfate was about twice as high in summer as in winter. A first attempt at multiple regression analysis was made. Apparent inconsistencies in the estimated effects are believed to be due to multicollinearity.

Mansfeld, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evolution of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of air pollutants at global and regional scales during the 1980-2010 period  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several different inventories of global and regional anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are assessed for the 1980-2010 period. The species considered in this study are carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black carbon. The inventories considered include the ACCMIP historical emissions developed in support of the simulations for the IPCC AR5 assessment. Emissions for 2005 and 2010 from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are also included. Large discrepancies between the global and regional emissions are identified, which shows that there is still no consensus on the best estimates for surface emissions of atmospheric compounds. At the global scale, anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 show the best agreement in most years. The agreement is low for BC emissions, particularly in the period prior to 2000. The best consensus is for NOx emissions for all periods and all regions, except for China where emissions in 1980 and 1990 need to be better defined. Emissions of CO need a better quantification in the USA for all periods; in Central Europe, the evolution of emissions during the past two decades needs to be better determined. The agreement between the different SO2 emissions datasets is rather good for the USA, but better quantification is needed elsewhere, particularly for Central Europe and China. The comparisons performed in this study show that the use of RCP8.5 for the extension of the ACCMIP inventory beyond 2000 is reasonable, until more global or regional estimates become available. Concerning biomass burning emissions, most inventories agree within 50-80%, depending on the year and season. The large differences are due to differences in the estimates of burned areas from the different available products, as well as in the amount of biomass burnt.

Granier, Claire; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bond, Tami C.; D'Angiola, Ariela; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Frost, G. J.; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Kinne, Stefan; Klimont, Z.; Kloster, Jean; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liousse, Catherine; Masui, Toshihiko; Meleux, Frederik; Mieville, Aude; Ohara, Toshimasa; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Riahi, Keywan; Schultz, Martin; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; van Aardenne, John; van der Werf, Guido R.; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Measurement of Enthalpies of Vaporization of Isooctane and Ethanol Blends and Their Effects on PM Emissions from a GDI Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of Enthalpies of Vaporization of Isooctane and Ethanol Blends and Their Effects on PM Emissions from a GDI Engine ... The enthalpy of vaporization is very important for the performance of spark ignition engines, especially those that use gasoline direct injection (GDI). ... However, measurements reported here show that the increased enthalpy of vaporization has an adverse effect on the particulate matter (PM) emissions from a GDI engine. ...

Longfei Chen; Richard Stone

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

Demonstration abstract: PiMi air box: a cost-effective sensor for participatory indoor quality monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultra-fine particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 microns, namely Particulate Matter 2.5 (PM 2.5), are capable of penetrating the lung cells and circulating the circulatory system, and compose a major health threat to people. Although the ... Keywords: cost-effective pm 2.5 sensors, indoor air quality

Linglong Li, Yixin Zheng, Lin Zhang

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the experiments in this work.

Dolanimi Ogunkoya; William L. Roberts; Tiegang Fang; Nirajan Thapaliya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

428

The effect of air blowing on the properties of rubber-modified asphalt binder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and use. Air blowing, accompanied by high shear mixing at elevated temperatures, was used to produce many asphalt-rubber blends in an attempt to discover a binder which resists phase separation. These air-blown, rubber-modified binders were...

Bauer, Shauna Erin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effectiveness of Germicidal UV Radiation for Reducing Fungal Contamination within Air-Handling Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems and is a potential...been found growing on air filters, insulation, and cooling...bioaerosols or when the HVAC system itself is contaminated...maintained high-quality filters within HVAC systems as well as portable...

Estelle Levetin; Richard Shaughnessy; Christine A. Rogers; Robert Scheir

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Experimental Study of Diesel Fuel Effects on Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Performance and Pollutant Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Study of Diesel Fuel Effects on Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Performance and Pollutant Emissions ... The test fuels indicate variable hydrocarbon composition and physical and chemical properties, and they were prepared under a European Union research program aiming to identify future fuel formulations for use in modern DI diesel engines. ... 1,2,4-9,13,14,16,17,24-26 In general, there is an interrelation between the molecular structure (paraffins, olefins, napthenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons), the chemical properties (cetane number, ignition point, etc.), and the physical properties (density, viscosity, surface tension, etc.) of the diesel fuel. ...

Theodoros C. Zannis; Dimitrios T. Hountalas; Roussos G. Papagiannakis

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

Wind Effect, Recirculation and Thermal Flow Field of a Direct Air?cooled Condenser for a Large Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal effect experiments were carried out of a direct air?cooled system in the low speed wind tunnel. The influence of effect factors on recirculation is also discussion after that the relationship between the thermal flow field structure and recirculation ratio under the cooling tower is analyzed. At last the engineering measures to reduce or avoid recirculation are proposed. For certain conditions the experimental measurement shows close agreement with numerical values.

W. L. Zhao; P. Q. Liu; H. S. Duan; J. Y. Zhu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Speaker(s): Julian Marshall Date: May 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone It is well documented that exposure to ambient air pollution at concentrations typically found in U.S. cities causes significant health effects. Reducing exposure to air pollution is a large, long-term goal for the environmental health community. In this talk, I will address three questions: 1) How should we prioritize emission reduction efforts? 2) Can urban planning help reduce exposure to air pollution? 3) Are there correlations between exposure to air pollution and demographic attributes such as ethnicity and income? I use three case studies to address these

433

Syngas production from burner-stabilized methane/air flames: The effect of preheated reactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of preheated reactants on syngas production from a methane/air flame was investigated over a range of inlet temperatures up to 630K. In addition to experimental measurements, the results from a burner-stabilized flame and freely-propagating flame models are presented. A comparison of the modeling and experimental results in terms of flame standoff distance, stability limit conditions and species yields show excellent agreement across a broad range of equivalence ratios and preheat temperatures. Preheating of reactants increased the rich limit for stable operation from 1.26 to 1.75 for a given inlet velocity, and syngas yields were shown to increase with equivalence ratio. The preheat temperature of the reactants was shown to have little impact on syngas yields beyond extending the limits of stable operation. The results of this study are useful for the design and analysis of heat recirculating reactors and other reactors that are designed for producing syngas through the combustion of rich mixtures.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel I. Pineda; Janet L. Ellzey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effect of focal size on the laser ignition of compressed natural gasair mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laser ignition of compressed natural gasair mixtures was investigated in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC) as well as in a single cylinder engine. Laser ignition has several potential advantages over conventional spark ignition system. Laser ignition relies on the fact that optical breakdown (plasma generation) in gases occurs at high intensities of ?1011W/cm2. Such high intensities can be achieved by focusing a pulsed laser beam to small focal sizes. The focal spot size depends on several parameters such as laser wavelength, beam diameter at the converging lens, beam quality and focal length. In this investigation, the focal length of the converging lens and the beam quality were varied and the corresponding effects on minimum ignition energy as well as pressure rise were recorded. The flame kernel was visualized and correlated with the rate of pressure rise inside the combustion chamber. This investigation will be helpful in the optimization of laser and optics parameters in laser ignition. It was found that beam quality factor and focal length of focusing lens have a strong impact on the minimum ignition energy required for combustion. Combustion duration depends on the energy density at the focal spot and size of the flame kernel.

Dhananjay Kumar Srivastava; Ernst Wintner; Avinash Kumar Agarwal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Estimating the effect of air pollution from a coal-fired power station on the development of children's pulmonary function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using geographical information systems (GIS) tools, the present study analyzed the association between children's lung function development and their long-term exposure to air pollution. The study covered the cohort of 1492 schoolchildren living in the vicinity of a major coal-fired power station in the Hadera sub-district of Israel. In 1996 and 1999, the children underwent subsequent pulmonary function tests (PFT) (forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume during the first second (FEV1)), and the children's parents completed a detailed questionnaire on their health status and household characteristics. A negative association was found between changes in the results of PFT and the estimated individual levels of air pollution. A sensitivity test revealed a FEV1 decline from -4.3% for the average pollution level to -10.2% for the high air pollution level. The results of a sensitivity test for FVC were found to be similar. Association with the reported health status was found to be insignificant. As we conclude, air pollution from a coal-fired power station, although not exceeding local pollution standards, had a negative effect on children's lung function development. As argued, previous studies carried out in the region failed to show the above association because they were based on zone approaches that assign average concentration levels of air pollutants to all individuals in each zone, leading to a misclassification bias of individual exposure.

Dubnov, J.; Barchana, M.; Rishpon, S.; Leventhal, A.; Segal, I.; Carel, R.; Portnov, B.A. [Ministry of Health, Haifa (Israel). Haifa District Health Office

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Variable-property effects in laminar aiding and opposing mixed convection of air in vertical tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed convection flow in tubes is encountered in many engineering applications, such as solar collectors, nuclear reactors, and compact heat exchangers. Here, a numerical investigation has been conducted in order to determine the effects of variable properties on the flow pattern and heat transfer performances in laminar developing ascending flow with mixed convection for two cases: in case 1 the fluid is heated, and in case 2 it is cooled. Calculations are performed for air at various Grashof numbers with a fixed entrance Reynolds number of 500 using both the Boussinesq approximation (constant-property model) and a variable-property model. In the latter case, the fluid viscosity and thermal conductivity are allowed to vary with absolute temperature according to simple power laws, while the density varies linearly with the temperature, and the heat capacity is assumed to be constant. The comparison between constant- and variable-property models shows a substantial difference in the temperature and velocity fields when the Grashof number {vert_bar}Gr{vert_bar} is increased. The friction factor is seen to be underpredicted by the Boussinesq approximation when the fluid is heated (case 1), while it is overpredicted for the cooling case (case 2). However, the effects on the heat transfer performance remain negligible except for cases with reverse flow. On the whole, the variable-property model predicts flow reversal at lower values of {vert_bar}Gr{vert_bar}, especially for flows with opposing buoyancy forces. The deviation in results is associated to the difference between the fluid bulk and the wall temperature.

Nesreddine, H.; Galanis, N. [Univ. de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada). Faculty of Applied Sciences; Nguyen, C.T. [Univ. de Moncton, New Brunswick (Canada). School of Engineering

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Design of oil consumption measuring system to determine the effects of evolving oil sump composition over time on diesel engine performance and emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The automotive industry is currently struggling because of the increasingly stricter emissions standards that will take effect in the near future. Diesel engine emissions are of particular interest because they are still ...

Ortiz-Soto, Elliott (Elliott A.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dispersion models and air quality data for population exposure assessment to air pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluating the extent of exposure to chemicals in absence of continuous measurements of their concentration in air and direct measures of personal exposure is crucial for epidemiological studies. Dispersion models can be a useful tool for reproducing spatio-temporal distribution of contaminants emitted by a specific source. However, they cannot easily be applied to short-term epidemiological studies because they require precise information on daily emission scenarios for a long time, which are generally not available. The aim of this study was to better assess the exposure in the industrial area of Brindisi, which suffers from various critical epidemiological situations, by integrating air pollution concentration data, emissions and model simulations concerning a specific point source. The results suggest that in the absence of direct exposure data and detailed information on specific pollutants associated to an emission, population exposure may be better assessed by taking into account proxy pollutants and the wind (direction and speed) as a potential health effects modifier.

Cristina Mangia; Marco Cervino; Emilio Antonio Luca Gianicolo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air Conditioning ... CHEMISTS and engineers use air conditioning as a valuable tool in more than two hundred industries. ... Air conditioning is a tool with many facets. ...

MARGARET INGELS

1938-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Estimated 2017 Refrigerant Emissions of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (HFC-1234yf) in the United States Resulting from Automobile Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of MAC systems also consumes significant quantities of fuel as compared to similar driving conditions without operating the air conditioning. ... However, turning off the air conditioner and rolling-down the windows also decreases fuel economy due to increased air drag but this scenario is not considered in these studies (1, 2). ... In 2006, the European Commission issued Directive 2006/40/EC (commonly known as the F-Gas Directive) (3), which requires new types of air-conditioned cars sold in the EU to have a refrigerant with a GWP of 150 or less starting in 2011, and all new vehicles to have a refrigerant with a GWP of 150 or less by 2017. ...

Stella Papasavva; Deborah J. Luecken; Robert L. Waterland; Kristen N. Taddonio; Stephen O. Andersen

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Impact of Sea Spray on AirSea Fluxes. Part II: Feedback Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents estimations for the transfer of momentum, heat, and water mass between the air and the sea. The results from Lagrangian stochastic simulations of sea spray drops (see Part I), along with two sea spray generation functions, are ...

James A. Mueller; Fabrice Veron

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modeling the effects of Refrigerant Charging on Air Conditioner Performance Characteristics For Three Expansion Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pump and air conditioner commonly used in residential applications. The simulated results were compared with laboratory tests at two outdoor temperatures. It was found that the ORNL model estimates were within an average of 3% of the experimental...

Farzad, Mohsen

443

Kerosenes Price Impact on Air Travel Demand: A Cause-and-Effect Chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of rising fuel prices on future air traffic. Using route and ... specific data the short-term impact of higher fuel prices on airline operating costs, passenger fares and ... advers...

Prof. Dr Richard Klophaus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Wood Products, California Air Resources Board.in Air and Emission Rates from Wood Products Using a LargeComposite Wood Products, California Air Resources Board.

Maddalena, Randy L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section...

449

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Air Quality / Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Air Quality / Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

451

Using a Regional Chemical Transport Model for the Analysis of Gaseous and Particulate Air Pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air quality in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is the subject of many studies due to concerns from high emissions and their adverse effects on public health and the environment. In this study, a high resolution simulation is performed...

Ali, Sajjad Ghulam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

Effect of plasmonic losses on light emission enhancement in quantum-wells coupled to metallic gratings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experimental work has shown significant luminescence enhancement from near-surface quantum-well (QW) structures using metallic grating to convert surface plasmon (SP) modes into radiative modes. This work introduces a detailed theoretical study of plasmonic losses and the role of SPs in improving light extraction from grated light-emitting QW structures, using the fluctuational electrodynamics method. The method explains experimental results demonstrating emission enhancement, light scattering, and plasmonic coupling in the structures. We study these effects in angle-resolved reflectometry and luminescence setups in InGaN QW structures with silver grating. In contrast to experiments, our model allows direct calculation of the optical losses. The model predicts that the plasmonic coupling and scattering increases light emission by a factor of up to three compared to a flat semiconductor structure. This corresponds to reducing the absorption losses from approximately 93% in the ungrated metallic structure to 75% in the grated structure. Lower losses are associated with a significant emission enhancement enabled by the SPs of silver/GaN interfaces, which are present in the blue/green wavelength range, and can be optimized by carefully nanostructuring the metal layer and by the positioning of the QW. In general, the enhancement results from the interplay of mode scattering, conversion of SP energy directly into light, and losses in the metallic grating. The reported losses are very high when compared to the losses present in modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Albeit, our work provides tools needed for further optimization of plasmonic light extraction, eventually leading to highly efficient LEDs.

Sadi, Toufik; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Sciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cool roofsroofs that stay cool in the sun by minimizing solar absorption and maximizing thermal emissionlessen the flow of heat from the roof into the building, reducing the need for space cooling energy in con...

Ronnen Levinson; Hashem Akbari

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Inhalation intake of ambient air pollution in California's South Coast Air Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the impacts on air pollution and health of urban areaas a proxy for air pollution health effects (Bennett etFuel combustion, air pollution exposure, and health: The

Marshall, Julian D.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; Nazaroff, William W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Field emission effects of nitrogenated carbon nanotubes on chlorination and oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With reference to our recent reports [Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192107 (2007); Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 202102 (2007)] about the electronic structure of chlorine treated and oxygen-plasma treated nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs), here we studied the electron field emission effects on chlorination (N-CNT:Cl) and oxidation (N-CNT:O) of N-CNT. A high current density (J) of 15.0 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved on chlorination, whereas low J of 0.0052 mA/cm{sup 2} is observed on oxidation compared to J=1.3 mA/cm{sup 2} for untreated N-CNT at an applied electric field E{sub A} of {approx}1.9 V/{mu}m. The turn-on electric field (E{sub TO}) was {approx}0.875. The 1.25 V/{mu}m was achieved for N-CNT:Cl and N-CNT:O, respectively, with respect to E{sub TO}=1.0 V/{mu}m for untreated one. These findings are due to the formation of different bonds with carbon and nitrogen in the N-CNT during the process of chlorine (oxygen)-plasma treatment by the charge transfer, or else that changes the density of free charge carriers and hence enhances (reduces) the field emission properties of N-CNTs:Cl (N-CNTs:O)

Ray, S. C.; Palnitkar, U.; Pao, C. W.; Tsai, H. M.; Pong, W. F.; Lin, I-N. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [NRI, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim BT37OQB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ganguly, Abhijit; Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Adaptive wave cancelation by acceleration feedback for ramp-connected air cushion-actuated surface effect ships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We solve the problem of cargo transfer in high sea states over a ramp from a large, medium-speed, roll-on/roll-off (LMSR) vessel to a smaller connector vessel of a surface effect ship (SES) type. Our aim is to reduce ramp motion between the LMSR and SES in order to provide a safer environment for cargo transfer. We design an air cushion actuated controller to estimate and cancel the wave disturbance and stabilize the heave of the SES via heave acceleration feedback with actuation of the louver area for the case where the hydrodynamic and other parameters of the SES are not known a priori and the pressure dynamics of the air cushion contains nonlinearly parameterized unknown terms. We demonstrate the effect of our control design in simulations in a time-domain seakeeping code, named AEGIR.

Halil I. Basturk; Miroslav Krstic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Comparing the climate effect of emissions of short- and long-lived climate agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formation of gases and particles...change. These gases and particles...Earth's energy budget...stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations...limits on emissions of six different...Many issues related to the impact...practicalities of reducing emissions...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The effect of an enclosure retrofit on air leakage rates for a multi-unit residential case-study building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a relatively new, simple and robust, method for air leakage testing. A thirteen-story multi-unit residential building was tested for air leakage before and after an enclosure retrofit. The building suites had a pre-retrofit NLA50 average of 6.77cm2/m2 and an average post-retrofit NLA50 of 2.82cm2/m2a 58% betterment. The effect of the retrofit on air leakage rates was assessed and compared to other multi-unit residential buildings across Canada and USA. The case study building was significantly tighter than other multi-unit residential buildings included in published studies. Recommendations were made for field-testing procedures in order to maximize the potential for accurate measured flow characteristics. Field-testing for air-tightness needs to be standardized in order for useful comparative results to be generated in order to inform future research and operational considerations for the multi-unit residential building stock across North America.

Robin Urquhart; Russell Richman; Graham Finch

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Traffic air quality index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Vehicle emissions are responsible for a considerable share of urban air pollution concentrations. The traffic air quality index (TAQI) is proposed as a useful tool for evaluating air quality near roadways. The TAQI associates air quality with the equivalent emission from traffic sources and with street structure (roadway structure) as anthropogenic factors. The paper presents a method of determining the TAQI and defines the degrees of harmfulness of emitted pollution. It proposes a classification specifying a potential threat to human health based on the TAQI value and shows an example of calculating the TAQI value for real urban streets. It also considers the role that car traffic plays in creating a local UHI.

Zbigniew Bagie?ski

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-01-0474 -01-0474 The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions Thomas Wallner and Henry K. Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert W. Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham Copyright © 2007 SAE International ABSTRACT Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising future energy carriers and transportation fuels. Because of the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations, widespread introduction of vehicles powered by pure hydrogen is not likely in the near future. Blending hydrogen with methane could be one solution. Such blends take advantage of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and, at the same time, reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. In this paper, the authors analyze the combustion properties of hydrogen/methane

464

The effect of thin ceramic coatings on petrol engine performance and emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study of the effects of thin ceramic coatings on the performance and emissions of a spark-ignited petrol engine was conducted. A modified 2.5 litre GM engine with ceramic-coated pistons, liners, head, valves and ports was used. Experimental results obtained from the ceramic engine were compared with baseline metal engine data. It was shown that at low-speed, part-load conditions encountered in typical driving cycles, the ceramic engine could achieve up to 18% higher brake power and 5% lower specific fuel consumption. The ceramic coating did not produce any observable knock in the engine and showed no significant wear during testing. It was concluded that judicious application of thin ceramic coatings to petrol engines could be a useful means for improving performance and fuel economy.

D.N. Assanis

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Effect of the counterrotating-wave terms on the spontaneous emission from a multilevel atom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?3#4; and it was recently found that, for the short time, the dynamic evo- lutions of the spontaneous emission without and with the rotating wave approximation #1;RWA#2; are different #3;1,4#4;. In this time regime, the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects #3;5.... BASIC THEORY The interaction between a multilevel atom and the vacuum reservoir can be described by the Hamiltonian #1;set- ting #1;=1#2; H = H0 + H1, #1;1#2; H0 = #5; i #2;i#6;i#7;#8;i#6; + #5; k #2;kbk ?bk, #1;2#2; H1 = #5; i,j#1;i,k gk...

Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Da-Wei; Zheng, Hang; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Effect of Air Pollution on Lung Development from 10 to 18 Years of Age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...children's characteristics, including race, presence or absence of Hispanic ethnic background, level of parental education, presence or absence of a history of asthma diagnosed by a doctor, exposure to maternal smoking in utero, and household exposure to gas stoves, pets, and environmental tobacco smoke.... Between the ages of 10 and 18 years, the lung undergoes major growth. There has been reason to believe that exposure to air pollution during this period of lung growth leads to a restriction of lung growth, but strong supporting data have been lacking. In this study, conducted in southern California, children from communities with greater air pollution had significantly poorer lung function than children from communities with cleaner air.

Gauderman W.J.; Avol E.; Gilliland F.

2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Yankee hood performance studies; The effect of air balance on thermal efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With today's ever-increasing production rates on tissue-grade machines, many mills experience a need to increase the contribution of Yankee hoods to drying. Until the cylinder is replaced, its contribution to drying is fixed at its maximum drying rate. Consequently, the hoods should be checked routinely to ensure that they run optimally. Most air systems are not gas-or oil-fired, in contrast to the original steam-heated designs. As a result, Yankee air systems are energy intensive. A proper hood balance ensures minimum thermal consumption, or optimum thermal efficiency. Thermal efficiency is defined as the Btu's consumed by the burner per pound of water evaporated by hood. A simple engineering survey, or system examination, allows the papermaker to verify hood performance and balance the air system. In this paper typical data from a such a survey are shown. These surveys can often lead to considerably savings in burner fuel.

Schukov, V. (Yankee Air Systems (US)); Wozny, J. (Enerquin Air Inc., Montreal, Quebec (CA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

469

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

Barnett, J. M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Selected Studies. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,of Selected Stu&es. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,and Health Effects. Health Effects Institute, Cambridge,

McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Determination of naval medium speed diesel engine air exhaust emissions and validation of a proposed estimation model. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady state marine diesel engine exhaust emissions are being reviewed by the Environmental Protection Agency for possible regulation. In anticipation of future regulation, the United States Navy is developing appropriate emissions models for naval vessels. A procedure for collecting this data from an U. S. Navy ship with medium speed main propulsion diesels is presented. It is based on similar testing conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard for measuring patrol boat diesel engine emissions and International Standards Organization methodology. The primary challenge of the experiment design was to minimize interference with the engineering plant as the assigned ship was concurrently tasked for other operations. Data gathered allowed calculation of engine rpm, engine load, exhaust gas flow rate, and determination of pollutant amounts. The tests were conducted at a series of predetermined speeds to reflect an 11-Mode duty cycle developed previously for the LSD 41 Class propulsion diesel engines.

Mayeaux, A.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Emissions from marine diesel engines are mainly uncontrolled and affect regional air quality and health of people living near ports. Many emission control strategies are (more)

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In China the thermal comfort standard that regulates the indoor air velocity cannot exceed 0.15m/s in winter. But many scholars doubt this regulation. This paper presents the results of an experimental research project on thermal comfort...

Wang, J.; Chen, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Investigation of Transpiration Cooling Effectiveness for Air-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= Coolant Fluid P = Pressure w = Wall T = Temperature m = Matrix TPS = Thermal Protection System i = Initial The thermal management of air-breathing vehicles presents formidable challenges. The high dynamic pressure and the need for a reusable Thermal Protection System (TPS) are stringent requirements. The work presented

Texas at Arlington, University of

475

Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation; California Air Resources Board

476

Statistical Analysis of Diesel Fuel Effects on Particle Number and Mass Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, they received a higher recognition during the 1990s as clean air additives in the frame of the Oxyfuel program (25). ...

Leonidas Ntziachristos; Zissis Samaras; Panayotis Pistikopoulos; Nikolas Kyriakis

2000-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

477

Cost-Effective Reciprocating Engine Emissions Control and Monitoring for E&P Field and Gathering Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses continuing work in the testing phase of the project that evaluates emission control technologies applied to a two-stroke cycle natural gas-fueled engine. In this phase, a one cylinder Ajax DP-115 (a 13.25 in bore x 16 in stroke, 360 rpm engine) is used to assess a sequential analysis and evaluation of a series of engine upgrades. As with most of the engines used in the natural gas industry, the Ajax engine is a mature engine with widespread usage throughout the gas gathering industry. The end point is an assessment of these technologies that assigns a cost per unit reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. This report describes potential emission reduction technologies, some of which have already been tested, and describes progress toward completing remaining tests to evaluate further synergies between some of the more promising technologies. While the end-goal is a closed-loop control system coupled with a low cost NO{sub x} retrofit package, additional work remains. Technologies including pre-combustion chambers, in-cylinder sensors, the means to adjust the air-to-fuel ratio, and modification of the air filter housing have been evaluated in previous reports. Current work focuses on preparing the test cell for tests using a 180 psig fuel valve. By using the Ajax DP-115 these tests are completed in a low-cost and efficient manner. The various technologies can be quickly exchanged with different hardware, and it is inexpensive to run the engine.

Sarah R. Nuss-Warren; Kirby S. Chapman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Will export rebate policy be effective for CO2 emissions reduction in China? A CEEPA-based analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract China has adopted cancellation of export tax rebate policies on many occasions to push ahead energy conservation and emission reduction since 2007. By applying a CEEPA (China Energy & Environmental Policy Analysis system) model, this paper simulates the impacts of the cancellation of export rebates on CO2 emissions and socio-economic consequences in different scenarios so as to figure out whether it works. This paper covers three export rebate scenarios and makes comparisons between the impacts of export rebates on emission reduction effects and that of carbon tax policies. The conclusions are: 1) the current policy which cancels export rebates for key sectors can cut emissions at huge economic cost, yet it is unsustainable; 2) the policy which cancels export rebates for key sectors and meanwhile subsidizes sectoral outputs yields double dividends in the short term, thus can facilitate emission reduction yet the boost is limited; 3) the policy which cancels export rebates and boosts domestic demand helps improving residents' welfare in the short term while it may inflict pronounced social and economic impacts in the long run. So policy of this kind should be adopted with great caution; 4) export rebates generate far more economic costs than carbon tax policies in the long term, and don't contribute to optimizing the energy mix as well as the latter. In summary, canceling export rebates should not be regarded as a priority to encourage emission reduction.

Jing-Li Fan; Qiao-Mei Liang; Qian Wang; Xian Zhang; Yi-Ming Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Cost analysis of air cargo transport and effects of fluctuations in fuel price  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study developed a model with cost functions formulated for different stages of cargo transport operation. A case analysis was performed with actual data from four air cargo traffic routes and eight aircraft types to validate the applicability of the model. The results show that the optimal payloads for various aircraft types vary with fuel price fluctuations. Furthermore, this study determined optimal types of freighter aircraft for different routes. Freight rates increase with rises in fuel price due to the corresponding increase in the fuel surcharge, thus bringing in higher total revenue. When the increase in total revenue exceeds the rise in fuel cost, the optimal payload will drop. Not only can the cost functions reveal the impact of fuel price fluctuations on different aspects of air cargo transport, they can also assist airlines in selecting the aircraft type with the best fuel economy for different route distances and cargo volumes.

Ching-Cheng Chao; Ching-Wen Hsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Results show that fuel-injection timing is the dominant factor contributing to PN emissions from this wall-guided GDI engine.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "air emission effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Effect of co-combustion of coal and biomass on combustion performance and pollutant emissions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass has been regarded as a major form of renewable energy due to its neutral position in the emission of green house gases such as (more)

Kwong, Chi Wai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Effects of excitation laser wavelength on Ly-a and He-a line emission from nitrogen plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are soft x-ray lasers,6,7 laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources,8­11 and higher har- monics from laser heatedEffects of excitation laser wavelength on Ly-a and He-a line emission from nitrogen plasmas S. S November 2012; accepted 27 December 2012; published online 11 January 2013) Laser-produced nitrogen plasmas

Harilal, S. S.

483

Emissions and fuel economy of a prechamber diesel engine with natural gas dual fuelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four-cylinder turbocharged prechamber diesel engine (Caterpillar 3304) was operated with natural gas and pilot diesel fuel ignition over a wide range of load and speed. Measurements were made of fuel consumption and the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and the oxides of nitrogen. Improvements in fuel economy and emissions were found to be affected by the diesel fuel-gas fraction, and by air restriction and fuel injection timing. Boundaries of unstable, inefficient and knocking operation were defined and the importance of gas-air equivalance ratio was demonstrated in its effect on economy, emissions and stability of operation.

Ding, X.; Hill, P.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z