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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Center for Agricultural and Rural DevelopmentWhat Do Livestock Feeders Want from Seed Corn Companies?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary areas: trade and agricultural policy, resource and environmental policy, food and nutrition policy, and agricultural risk management policy. The contents of this report may be cited with proper attribution to the authors and to the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University. An on-line version of this paper may be found at www.card.iastate.edu. For a current list of CARD publications, please contact: Betty Hempe, Circulation Manager, Iowa

Dermot J. Hayes; Noah Wendt; Dermot J. Hayes; Noah Wendt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Livestock and Meat International Trade Data | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livestock and Meat International Trade Data Livestock and Meat International Trade Data Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Livestock and Meat International Trade Data Dataset Summary Description The Livestock and Meat Trade Data Set contains monthly and annual data for imports and exports of live cattle, hogs, sheep, and goats, as well as beef and veal, pork, lamb and mutton, chicken meat, turkey meat, and eggs. The tables report physical quantities, not dollar values or unit prices. Data on beef and veal, pork, and lamb and mutton are on a carcass-weight-equivalent basis. Breakdowns by country are included. Tags {trade,"U.S. imports","U.S. exports",livestock,meat,cattle,beef,hogs,pork,lamb,mutton,broilers,turkeys,eggs,ERS,USDA}

3

Livestock and Grain Market News Search | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livestock and Grain Market News Search Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities ...

4

County-level Estimates of Carbon Dioxide Release from Livestock, 2000-2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livestock, 2000-2008 Livestock, 2000-2008 Tristram O. West Joint Global Change Research Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Craig C. Brandt Oak Ridge National Laboratory These data represent carbon dioxide release by livestock in the United States. Emissions are based on livestock population data from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service and the Census of Agriculture. Livestock in this analysis include dairy cows, non-dairy cows, swine, poultry, sheep, goats, and horses. Additional details on datasets and methods used in this analysis can be found in the following publication: West, T.O., V. Bandaru, C.C. Brandt, A.E. Schuh, and S.M. Ogle. 2011. Regional uptake and release of crop carbon in the United States. Biogeosciences 8: 2037-2046. DOI: 10.5194/bgd-8-2037-2011.

5

Livestock and Grain Market News LMR Web Services | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livestock and Grain Market News LMR Web Services Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities...

6

1981 Winter Meeting - American Society of Agricultural Engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 13 volumes contain 372 papers presented at the meeting. Subjects covered include agricultural machinery developments and applications, irrigation, drainage, water supply, water pollution control, farm buildings, energy conservation, agricultural wastes management, biogas and other biomass fuels production, food products and good products plants, grain drying, solar energy applications, engineering economics, crop yield studies, agronomy, agrometeorology, livestock production and management, computer applications, field and laboratory studies, engineering education, and others. 108 papers are abstracted separately.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality This statute establishes the animal feeding operation permitting program and gives the Department of Environmental Quality the authority to administer the state permitting program. Permits are required for the

8

Investigating the Operational Capabilities of Custom and Pedestrian Portal Monitoring Systems for Screening Livestock for Radioactive Contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Livestock and companion animals are valuable economically and emotionally in the economy of many states and to their citizens. In a radiological emergency situation, the loss of a large amount of livestock could be devastating to a state or national economy. If such an event occurred, there are currently no screening and decontamination protocols for the handling of livestock. This research investigated current policies and procedures for monitoring and decontamination of livestock and companion animals, as well as testing pedestrian portal monitors and a newly designed livestock portal capable of radionuclide identification. It was discovered that only ten states addressed companion animals or livestock anywhere in their emergency planning. Of the ten, only North Carolina, Washington, and a Massachusetts K9 unit had detailed decontamination procedures to report for companion animals. None of the states included detailed procedures for livestock. To address livestock screening, three pedestrian portal monitoring systems were tested in the field and lab trials the Johnson AM801, TSA TPM903A, and Ludlum 52-1-1. The systems were tested for position and count rate sensitivity with 1 and 5 Ci 137Cs sources placed on four locations on a steer. Factors such as operability and ease of use were also considered. All three systems would alarm when a 5 Ci 137Cs source was used and the occupancy sensor was triggered. The Johnson AM801 system was determined to be the most appropriate for use in livestock screening due to sensitive alarm algorithms, greater position discrimination with four detectors, and ease of adjustment for agricultural purposes. The last phase of this project included designing and constructing a portal system that included radionuclide identification capabilities. An array of six sodium iodide detectors was mounted on a panel and field-tested beside a cattle chute and in a walkway. The custom portal, the Bovine Screening Portal (BSP), observed increased count rates (>10?) from a 5 Ci 137Cs source in live time. The BSP demonstrated better detection and localization of the source and spectral identification capabilities compared to the commercially available pedestrian systems.

Erchinger, Jennifer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Analysis of Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options within a Multi-sector Economic Framework  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National-scale analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options is generally carried out using top-down economic models with moderate energy detail but very limited detail in agriculture and forestry. However, a complete analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options requires an improved representation of agriculture within the top-down economic models used for analysis of climate policy. Greenhouse gas mitigation options within the agricultural sector include changes in afforestation of agricultural lands, crop and livestock management practices, harvesting of biomass crops for fuel, and the sequestration of carbon in agricultural soils. Analysis of such options is usually carried out in a bottom-up model such as the Agricultural Sector Model (ASM). We report on activities to combine the bottom-up agricultural detail from ASM with the top-down economic and energy structure used at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which has been used extensively for analysis of alternative carbon mitigation strategies.

Sands, Ronald D.; Mccarl, Bruce A.; Gillig, Dhazn; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Gale, J.; Kaya, Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas (GLiPHA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GLiPHA Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: kids.fao.org/glipha/ GLiPHA Screenshot References: GLiPHA[1] About "GLiPHA is a highly interactive electronic atlas that provides a scaleable overview of spatial and temporal variation in quantitative information related to animal production and health. Against a back-drop of selected maps of livestock densities, land-use or elevation, sub-national statistics relating to the livestock sector can be mapped, or displayed as tables and

11

Deepening Treatment of the Low C/N Ratio Biogas Slurry at Mountainous Region Livestock Farming by Using Modified Two-Stage A/O System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensive and fast development of livestock farming with ecological pattern of raisingCbiogasCirrigating is widely applied in China. After anaerobic fermentation the agricultural wastes can provides clean energy. However, there is problem by lacking ... Keywords: livestock farming, biogas slurry, low C/N ratio, deepening treatment

Wei-wei Yu; Zhi Zhang; Sheng-lan Bi; Shu-yang Li; Chao Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Opinions of persons from outside the livestock industry on the practice of hot-iron jaw branding as perceived by persons from within Texas livestock show industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine how opinions of persons from outside the livestock industry on the practice of hot-iron jaw branding are perceived by persons from within the Texas livestock show industry. The key-informant interviews conducted revealed interesting findings. The persons interviewed from within the Texas livestock show industry personally did not feel that there was a problem with the practice of hot-iron jaw branding, but they did feel that persons from outside the livestock industry would obtain a negative image of the livestock industry from hearing about or witnessing the practice. The majority of the respondents felt the time for a change had come. The issues which surfaced during every interview centered on more efficient education and good sound reasons for every practice. From within, the livestock show industry must spot and mark for change or justify areas of potential or emerging concern. If a practice can be justified by persons within the livestock industry, it adds validity to the action. If a practice cannot be justified by persons within the livestock industry, the practice should be discontinued. Modern technology now gives us alternatives to hot-iron jaw branding with different perceptions of pain and effectiveness associated with them. Therefore, there is no longer an excuse for using a practice by reasoning that there are no alternatives. Persons from within the Texas livestock show industry perceive that persons from outside the livestock industry would have a negative experience when exposed to the practice of hot-iron jaw branding. If an individual found the practice negative, it could affect future buying choices and some respondents thought it would trigger the individual to continue to discover negative practices. It behooves the Texas livestock show industry to change from the current method of permanent marking at the livestock shows (hot-iron jaw branding) to a method which would be seen as more acceptable to persons from outside the livestock industry. Alternatives which should be considered by livestock shows in Texas include ear tattooing. hoof branding, electronic identification, non-removable eartags, nose printing, nontamperable neck chains, and no permanent marking.

Schlink, Suzanne Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Agency/Company /Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Training materials Website: mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/10568/167/1/Innovation_System_Agric_LM.pdf Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Screenshot References: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module[1] Preface "Sustained agricultural growth requires, among others, increased

14

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures: A current opportunities casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates new opportunities for proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products, including a renewable fuel. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, based on estimates of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

Lusk, P.D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Factors affecting the permanence of livestock projects undertaken by Heifer International-Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heifer International-Mexico (HI-M), a hunger-relieving non-profit organization, collaborates with the Direccin? General de Educacin? Tecnolg?ica Agropecuaria-Durango (DGETA) to establish livestock projects involving resource-poor families in the state of Durango, Mexico. This study identified and analyzed the factors affecting the permanence of hog and dairy cow projects in four communities in the state of Durango, Mexico. The researcher interviewed seven project managers and 35 beneficiaries to identify the factors affecting the permanence of livestock projects. From their responses, the researcher developed a list of 22 factors that promoted the permanence of the livestock projects. Key points included personal interaction between beneficiaries in the group(s) and project manager(s), knowledge and skills obtained from workshops, and household economics. The researcher developed a separate list of 20 factors that inhibited the permanence of the livestock projects. Key points included difficulties in livestock production and poor personal interaction and communication between beneficiaries and project managers. Two diagrams illustrate the commonalities and differences advocated by the two groups for both lists. Beneficiaries and project managers shared eight of the 14 factors advocated to promote the permanence of livestock projects. Beneficiaries had four factors unique to their group and the project managers had two factors unique to their group. Beneficiaries and project managers shared seven of the 13 factors advocated to inhibit the permanence of livestock projects. Four factors were unique to beneficiaries while two factors were unique to project managers. The researcher used a force field analysis based concept labeled the "line of permanence," to illustrate the factors affecting the permanence of HI-M's livestock projects in the communities. Community A was the only location where the interviewees identified more factors inhibiting the permanence of a livestock project. Community A was also the only community that no longer had animals HI-M donated to the community. In contrast to Community A, project managers and beneficiaries in Communities A, B, and C each identified more factors that promoted the permanence of the livestock projects. The author made recommendations based on the findings of the study for HI-M and DGETA to improve the manner by which they undertake livestock projects.

Arispe, Sergio Adrian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Wind energy applications in agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstract are included for each of the papers presented concerning the use of wind turbines in agriculture.

Kluter, H.H.; Soderholm, L.H. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Agricultural Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Agricultural Energy Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of installed costs Geothermal Heat Pumps: 20 tons General: See equipment brochure for specific technology incentive caps Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Indoor Agricultural Lighting: Varies; see program web site Dairy/Livestock: Varies

19

Nonlinear robust temperature-humidity control in livestock buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical environment of farm animals inside livestock buildings is primarily characterised by hygro-thermal parameters and air quality. These parameters are influenced by the interaction with the outdoor situation on one hand, and the livestock, ... Keywords: Humidity control, Livestock buildings, Robust control, Temperature control

A. G. Soldatos; K. G. Arvanitis; P. I. Daskalov; G. D. Pasgianos; N. A. Sigrimis

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative SELC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative SELC Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative SELC Jump to: navigation, search Name Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative (SELC) Place Sioux Center, Iowa Zip 51250 Product Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative (SELC) is owned by 391 farmer members and is a closed cooperative. SELC was formed for the purpose of building, owning and operating an ethanol plant near Sioux Center, Iowa. References Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative (SELC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative (SELC) is a company located in Sioux Center, Iowa . References ↑ "Siouxland Energy and Livestock Cooperative (SELC)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An evaluation of the 4-H master livestock volunteer program in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of Master Livestock Volunteer program participants regarding the effectiveness of the program, their role in the county 4-H volunteer program, and the role of various stakeholders in livestock project decision making. A census was attempted of the 242 possible participants. Using recommendations from Dillman (2000), master volunteers were contacted by email if available and via mailed questionnaire. This process yielded a 38% response rate. Follow-up methods increased the response rate to 52.4%. The volunteers indicated the programs was of high importance and effective. Findings included that volunteers perceived their most influence came in the selection of feeds. The educator role was the one most involved in the decision making process of the livestock projects, followed by the manager role, leader role, and various servant-type leadership roles. Volunteers ranked stakeholders' influence on livestock project decisions, with the youth and the parents as most influential followed by the CEA, the volunteer, and the breeder. The average participant reported nine years of overall volunteer service and two years of service as a Master Livestock Volunteer. Participants in this study were between 38 and 47 years of age.

Smith, Joe Douglas

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Adoption Barriers in a High-Risk Agricultural Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To lessen the threat of an intentional or naturally occurring livestock disease, the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture introduced the National Animal Identification System NAIS, encouraging the use ... Keywords: Diffusion of Innovation, National Animal Identification, Opinion Leaders, Organizational Communication, Risk Communication

Shari R. Veil

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Agriculture, technology, and conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized. Agriculture and its related technologies are often affected by conflict, but rarely acknowledged as a cause or solution to conflict. Literature reviews in six topic areas illustrate various facets of the relationship between agriculture and conflict. Research conducted in Santa Cruz del Quich, Guatemala illustrates the ways farmers were impacted by the countrys civil war. It also examines farmer survival strategies during the war, and reveals the presence of minor localized conflict over water resources. Conflict over land is not a major concern at present. Market access for inputs and outputs are shown to have been a problem for a number of farmers during the civil war. The poverty of Santa Cruz farmers indicates that much could be gained by rural development. Research is unable to support the hypotheses that agricultural technologies have prevented or caused conflict in Santa Cruz del Quich, or that they have played a large role in recovery from the countrys civil war. The author recommends that future research be undertaken in regions with a diverse set of agricultural technologies, and/or a recent history of significant technological change in agriculture. Policy recommendations include providing secure access to markets during war time, increasing capacity for home-based rural production, and continuing research into resilient crops. Finally, the author suggests that the responsible decision to develop, adopt, or introduce an agricultural technology must take into account the social consequences of that decision, including how the new technology may alleviate or contribute to conflict.

Zilverberg, Cody John

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Potential of biogas production from livestock manure in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With great change of food pattern on Chinese peoples table, livestock production has been expanded to meet increasing demand of meat, egg and dairy products. (more)

Liu, Gougou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

MINOR: Livestock Production A minor in Livestock Production consists of at least 19 credits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation....................................... 4 ANSC 304 and Wool Production; ANSC 415, Horse Production; ANSC 416, Beef Production; ANSC 417, Dairy Production BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life, and BIOL 211G, Cellular and Organismal Biology

Castillo, Steven P.

26

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

27

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

28

Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioresources are generated in a variety of environments and each presents unique risks and benefits associated with land application. Bioresources from livestock, urban and bioenergy systems were selected and evaluated through field, greenhouse and laboratory studies of potential risk and benefits of recycling to agricultural and urban landscapes. The waste stream, including feedstock sources and treatment processes, affects composition and properties of bioresources and effects on biogeochemical cycles of amended soils. Variation of decomposition and nutrient mineralization rates among bioresources used to amend soil for turfgrass and forage reflected variation among contrasting feedstock sources and treatments prior to application. During turfgrass establishment, plant available nitrogen and nitrogen mineralized from a bioresource from livestock waste streams, (Geotube! residual solids, supplied N in excess of crop uptake potential and contributed to leaching loss of N. In contrast, N mineralization rates from bioresources generated during methane production from dairy manure (manure solids) were not sufficient to maximize crop production, necessitating N fertilizer application. In addition to variation of composition, bioresource effects on crop productivity and environmental quality vary among management practices and between forage and turfgrass cropping systems. Large application rates of bioresources increase soil nutrient concentration and potential crop productivity, but contribute to increased nutrient loss in drainage and surface runoff. Yet, incorporation or Alum treatment of bioresources will reduce runoff loss of dissolved P and protect water quality without sacrificing crop productivity. Alum treatment of bioresources prior to land application effectively reduced runoff loss of dissolved P to levels observed for control soil. For situations in which large, volume-based bioresource rates are top-dressed or incorporated, export of applied nutrients environmental impacts were compared between forage and turfgrass systems. Starting during the initial year of production, annual export of applied N and P in Tifway bermudagrass sod was greater than export through forage harvests of Tifton 85. Low forage yield limited N and P export from Tifton 85 during the year of establishment, but increased forage yield during the second year increased export of manure N and P to levels more comparable to sod. As variation between compost sources, turfgrass and forage production systems, and application methods indicated, effective management of bioresources is necessary to balance benefits and risk in cropping systems. Integrated assessment of bioresource composition and crop-specific management of application method and rate will enable sustainable bioresource cycling and crop productivity.

Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

32

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

33

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

34

Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relations Act: Report. Sacramento, CA: Office of the AuditorLabor Relations Law. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural1975-76 and 1976-77. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural

Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Agriculture Sector the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Kenya, Mexico, Vietnam Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, South-Eastern Asia References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of

36

Animal Agriculture Compliance Act (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sections of this chapter (311-312) describe the minimum manure management requirements to be followed by owners of livestock confinement feeding operations.

37

Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while offering environmental benefits. Dairy farmer use of anaerobic digesters is not widespread due to various challenges, including high costs and inadequate return. A cooperative approach could address the challenges through improved negotiating strength; technical assistance for digester design, installation, and operation; management and marketing services; and/or financial guidance and assistance. Cooperative efforts may allow milk producers to remain focused on milk production

Carolyn Betts Liebr; K. Charles Ling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications References: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research[1] "IISD's work related to climate change and agriculture has been supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada." It include the two following publications: Expanding Agriculture's Role in a Post-2012 Regime (PDF - 712 kb) and Climate Change Mitigation through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors References ↑ "IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research"

39

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

40

Livestock Risk Protection-Lamb: New Insurance Program to Help Ranchers Manage Lamb Price Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USDA is offering a new insurance program to help livestock producers manage lamb price risk. This publication explains requirements of the program and the way it works.

Pena, Jose G.; Thompson, Bill; Bevers, Stan; Anderson, David P.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

42

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

43

The national livestock identification system: the importance of traceability in E-business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to explore how Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) can be utilized on dairy farms to enhance total farm management. There is a growing worldwide trend for countries to implement whole-of-life traceability systems for livestock, and ... Keywords: livestock, radio frequency identification, total farm management, traceability

Adam Trevarthen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

46

Publications Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2012). Economics of IPM Decisions. Stored Product Protection (1- 9). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State (1-11). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State. http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/finished- chapters/s156-ch-27 of Food and Agriculture­ Conservation Effects Assessment Project. How to Build Better Agricultural

47

An Economic Analysis of Agricultural Soil Loss in Mitchell County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, Public Law 92-500, established a national goal of eliminating the discharge of pollutants into the nation's waterways by 1985. As a step toward that goal an interim water quality standard of "fishable, swimmable waters nationwide" by July 1, 1983 was set. Under section 208 of this law, each state was required to establish a "continuing planning process" to define controls for agricultural nonpoint sources of water pollution. Section 208 calls for the development of state and area-wide water quality management plans. The plans are to include "a process to (i) identify if appropriate, agriculturally and silviculturally related non-point sources of pollution, including runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set forth procedures and methods (including land use requirements) to control to the extent feasible such sources." In an earlier group of technical reports (TR 87, 88, 90, 93) in this series a model was developed to measure the net social benefits from controlling agricultural sediment given various policy options. This was done by contrasting benefits to be gained from reducing the sediment load in a watershed against costs involved in achieving that reduction using various voluntary or mandatory policies to accomplish the reduction. It was a major conclusion of these studies that no policy that restricted soil loss to less than that which was economically desirable from the farmers own viewpoint would generate benefits greater than the costs involved. This finding, in the watersheds of major sediment control concern lead to a decision to change the base area for this report to a county instead of a watershed and to only deal with the on-farm consequences of various management practices. These on-farm consequences would include the changes in topsoil loss and the yield losses that result from losing topsoil. Also included are profit levels that could be expected from different management practices and how the present value of a stream of these profits would vary over different planning horizons.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Economic Analysis of Agricultural Soil Loss in Crosby County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, Public Law 92-500, established a national goal of eliminating the discharge of pollutants into the nation's waterways by 1985. As a step toward that goal an interim water quality standard of "fishable, swimmable waters nationwide" by July 1, 1983 was set. Under section 208 of this law, each state was required to establish a "continuing planning process" to define controls for agricultural non-point sources of water pollution. Section 208 calls for the development of state and area-wide water quality management plans. The plans are to include "a process to (i) identify if appropriate, agriculturally and silviculturally related non-point sources of pollution, including runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set forth procedures and methods (including land use requirements) to control to the extent feasible such sources." In an earlier group of technical reports (TR 87, 88, 90, 93, 94) in this series, a model was developed to measure the net social benefits from controlling agricultural sediment given various policy options. This was done by contrasting benefits to be gained from reducing the sediment load in a watershed against costs involved in achieving that reduction using various voluntary or mandatory policies to accomplish the reduction. It was a major conclusion of these studies that no policy which restricted soil loss to less than that which was economically desirable from the farmers own viewpoint would generate benefits greater than the costs involved. This finding, in the watersheds of major sediment control concern lead to a decision to change the base area for this report to a county instead of a watershed and to only deal with the on-farm consequences of various management practices. These on-farm consequences would include the changes in topsoil loss and the yield losses that result from losing topsoil. Also included are profit levels that could be expected from different management practices and how the present value of a stream of these profits would vary over various planning horizons.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

College of Agriculture Departments and Degree Programs Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Education Animal & Range Sciences Land Resources & Environmental Sciences Immunology & Infectious Diseases Multi Disciplinary Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Natural Resources & Rangeland Ecology Environmental Sciences Pre-Vet Program (non-degree) Biotechnology Sustainable Foods

Lawrence, Rick L.

50

Overshooting of agricultural prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Agricultural Meteorology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nearly five weeks in China (MayJune 1981), the author visited scientific institutions and experiment stations engaged in agricultural meterology and climatology research and teaching. The facilities, studies, and research programs at each ...

Norman J. Rosenberg

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Trends in Texas youth livestock exhibition and County Extension agent perceptions and adoption of quality counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each year, County Extension Agents dedicate many hours toward educational programs to serve clientele. One of the largest programs in 4-H is the youth livestock project. Livestock projects take a significant amount of time and there is a variety of programs offered to youth exhibitors. One of these educational programs offered though Texas Cooperative Extension is Quality Counts. Quality Counts focuses on teaching character education and quality assurance to youth livestock exhibitors. The purpose of this study was to determine the total number of youth livestock projects entered in Texas during 2006 and identify any apparent educational trends. The second objective of this study was to determine how Quality Counts is perceived by County Extension Agents. To complete this study, a web based survey was sent administered to every County Extension office in Texas. 250 of 254 counties responded to the survey (98.43% response rate). From data collected, it was revealed that there were a total of 89,839 total livestock projects entered in 2006 at the county level (76,225 market and 13, 614 breeding). This data was compared to a previous study completed in 2001 by Boleman, Howard, Smith, and Couch. This data compared market livestock entry numbers. Based upon the comparison, market livestock projects have increased by 7.06% since 2000. Beef cattle and goats have increased, while sheep and swine have slightly decreased. Roughly a third of Texas counties will be utilizing the Quality Counts curriculum during the year 2007. Qualitative analysis reveals that Quality Counts is seen as educationally useful and easy to implement into traditional livestock educational programming, and is most often used as part of ongoing project clinics. Most importantly, program participants are increasing their knowledge of livestock projects, character, and ethics. Respondents are also beginning to see program participants behaviors change because of participating in Quality Counts.

Coufal, Dustin Wayne

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Final report for the Iowa Livestock Industry Waste Characterization and Methane Recovery Information Dissemination Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes analytical methods, characterizes Iowa livestock wastes, determines fossil fuel displacement by methane use, assesses the market potential, and offers recommendations for the implementation of methane recovery technologies.

Garrison, M.V.; Richard, Thomas L

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Agriculture Residues Recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Saudi Arabia, as well as other countries in the Near East region, is characterized by erratic weather conditions, limited area of fertile arable lands, and with acute water shortage. Although agricultural residues (AGR) production in the region is huge (more than 440 million tons), most of these residues are either burned in the field or utilized in an inefficient way. Utilization of AGR as compost may contribute to expansion of arable lands through its use for reclamation of soil and reduce irrigation requirements. This study was conducted at Al Khalidiah farm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to assess compost production at large commercial scale using several types of agricultural and animal by-products with addition of a BZTCompost Activator (based mainly on microorganism, enzymes and yeast). In this study, two types of compost piles were made at the farm. The first pile of compost was made of different agriculture residues, namely: animal wastes (quail, goat and sheep manure), brownian agricultural wastes (windbreaks residues, date trees, citrus and olive trees pruning) and green landscape grasses (50%, 25 % and 25%, respectively) and was treated with a tested compost activator. The same agriculture residues combination was also made for the second pile as traditional compost

M. W. Sadik; H. M. El Shaer; H. M. Yakot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Mexico Central America References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of climate change policies, development of climate change policies, and

57

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

58

Agriculture | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture Agriculture Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption transportation industry UN Data application/xml icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XML (xml, 95 KiB) text/csv icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XLS (csv, 21.6 KiB)

59

28 / AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 2006-2007 AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Castillo, Steven P.

60

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lines, and becoming an international benchmark in some of them. Incentives will be given to those (elimination of wastes genera- ted by society, decontamination of soils, clean agriculture, etc change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies Tad Patzek, Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering, UT Austin of Conclusions, cntd. The main energy crops I have looked at are maize, sugarcane, soybeans, and oil palms are witnessing a global move away from food to energy crops. Diverting more land to pure energy crops

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

62

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

63

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

64

A study of biogas digesters as an animal waste management tool on livestock farming systems in Fiji.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ever since 1976, livestock farmers in Fiji have been intrigued about biogas digesters as an animal waste management measure, but the concept has never evolved (more)

Tukana, Andrew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Impacts of livestock grazing on soil physical quality and phosphorus and suspended sediment losses in surface runoff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Livestock grazing is considered a major contributor in the loss of phosphorus (P) and suspended sediment (SS) from soil in surface runoff, which in turn (more)

Curran Cournane, Fiona

66

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

67

The national livestock identification system: The importance of traceability in e-business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper aims to explore how Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) can be utilized on dairy farms to enhance total farm management. There is a growing worldwide trend for countries to implement whole-of-life traceability systems for livestock, and RFID is clearly the dominant technology being chosen to achieve this aim. In line with this global trend, and to meet the requirements of key trading partners (such as the EU), Australia has implemented the National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) to provide whole-of-life traceability for livestock a system based on the use of RFID devices. As such, it is proposed that dairy farmers utilise RFID so as to not only comply with NLIS requirements, but to extend the use of RFID onto their farms so as to provide additional benefits for themselves through subsequent enhancements in farm management practices.

Adam Trevarthen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Kenya-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Kenya-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Kenya Eastern Africa References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of

69

Information and its management for differentiation of agricultural products: The example of specialty coffee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prices of most of agricultural commodities show a long-term declining trend. Increasingly markets are signaling demand for differentiated products and in order to increase their incomes farmers and traders are looking to higher value options, including ... Keywords: Agricultural product differentiation, Agricultural supply chains, Information management, Internet-based, Specialty coffee

Norbert Niederhauser; Thomas Oberthr; Sibylle Kattnig; James Cock

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

California Agriculture: Dimensions and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture 1959. California, Vol. 1, Part 48. ----------.of Population, California, Vol. 1, Part 6. ----------. 1990Vol. 12, No. 67, 1888. California Committee to Survey the

Siebert,, Jerome Editor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Energy for agriculture. A computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

Energy may come from the sun or the earth or be the product of plant materials or agricultural wastes. Whatever its source, energy is indispensable to our way of life, beginning with the production, processing, and distribution of abundant, high quality food and fiber supplies. This specialized bibliography on the subject of energy for agriculture contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Originally issued by Michigan State University (MSU), it is being reprinted and distributed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The literature citations will be incorporated into AGRICOLA (Agricultural On-Line Access), the comprehensive bibliographic data base maintained by Technical Information Systems (TIS), a component of USDA's Science and Education Administration (SEA). The citations and the listing of research projects will be combined with other relevant references to provide a continuously updated source of information on energy programs in the agricultural field. No abstracts are included.

Stout, B.A.; Myers, C.A. (comps.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info Funding Source Efficiency Vermont Public Benefit Fund Expiration Date 06/30/2013 State Vermont Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies according to technology; prescriptive and custom rebates available Provider Efficiency Vermont In Vermont, agricultural operations are eligible for prescriptive and customized incentives on equipment proven to help make farms more efficient. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting (free to $175 per fixture, depending on the type of fixture or lighting) and for a variety of equipment including plate coolers, variable speed milk transfer

73

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin, Graduate Research Assistant; Allan Rae, Professor at Massey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin livestock trade, which has been relatively neglected. China is a net exporter of livestock products of total trade reflects a steady deterioration of China's com- parative advantage in pork and poul- try

74

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural and Rural Communities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

and Rural Communities and Rural Communities Wind Powering America continues to develop and strengthen alliances with the agricultural sector and organizational alliances, including 25x'25, the American Corn Growers Foundation, the National Association of Counties, and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters. Agricultural lands in the United States are ripe for generating and utilizing renewable energy resources. With net farm and ranch income down and drought conditions throughout much of the United States, farmers and ranchers and others in the agricultural community are taking a serious look at how wind energy can become their new cash crop. The agricultural community includes not only farmers and ranchers, but also rural community leaders such as banks, rural economic development

75

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editor Janet White accepted the awards during the 2012 ACEa noxious weed. Three ACE awards for California AgricultureAgriculture team has won three awards from the Association

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

77

Sustainable Agriculture Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Sustainable Agriculture Network" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSustainableAgricultureNetwork&oldid312235" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations...

78

Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research July...

79

Renewable Agricultural Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Agricultural Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Agricultural Energy...

80

Agriculture and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Establishment and evaluation of a livestock early warning system for Laikipia, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new zone was added to the existing Livestock Early Warning System (LEWS), which is a subproject of the USAID Global Livestock Collaborative Research Support Program. LEWS uses the PHYGROW model and satellite imagery of weather and vegetation to estimate the availability of forage to livestock and wildlife. Drought advisories are then distributed to governments, development organizations, and pastoralists via the Internet, satellite radios, and written reports. The Laikipia zone was established in 2001 to provide drought early warning for the arid pastoral rangelands of the Ewaso Ngiro ecosystem in the Laikipia and southern Samburu Districts, Kenya. Field verification of PHYGROW estimates of standing crop was conducted in 2002. In addition, research was conducted to determine the ability of the warning system to provide significant advance notice of emerging drought conditions. Results of this study indicate that LEWS is capable of providing accurate estimates of forage availability on East African rangelands. There is also evidence that the use of LEWS advisories could accelerate drought response by pastoralists as much as three to seven weeks.

Ryan, Zola

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fate of pathogens in a simulated bioreduction system for livestock carcasses  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioreduction is a novel on-farm storage option for livestock carcasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Legislation demands that pathogens are contained and do not proliferate during carcass storage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the survival of key pathogens in lab-scale bioreduction vessels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pathogen numbers reduced in the resulting liquor waste and bioaerosols. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results indicate that bioreduction should be validated for industry use. - Abstract: The EU Animal By-Products Regulations generated the need for novel methods of storage and disposal of dead livestock. Bioreduction prior to rendering or incineration has been proposed as a practical and potentially cost-effective method; however, its biosecurity characteristics need to be elucidated. To address this, Salmonella enterica (serovars Senftenberg and Poona), Enterococcus faecalis, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and a lux-marked strain of Escherichia coli O157 were inoculated into laboratory-scale bioreduction vessels containing sheep carcass constituents. Numbers of all pathogens and the metabolic activity of E. coli O157 decreased significantly within the liquor waste over time, and only E. faecalis remained detectable after 3 months. Only very low numbers of Salmonella spp. and E. faecalis were detected in bioaerosols, and only at initial stages of the trial. These results further indicate that bioreduction represents a suitable method of storing and reducing the volume of livestock carcasses prior to ultimate disposal.

Gwyther, Ceri L.; Jones, David L. [School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Golyshin, Peter N. [School of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Edwards-Jones, Gareth [School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Williams, A. Prysor, E-mail: prysor.williams@bangor.ac.uk [School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA is a voluntary program that promotes the reduction of diesel exhaust emissions from agricultural equipment and vehicles by encouraging proper operations and maintenance by farmers, ranchers, and

84

Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience produced by Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/agricultural/podcasts.asp Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 MST Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 Tue, 29

85

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign animal disease can cause serious damage to the United States (US) agricultural sector and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), in particular, poses a serious threat. FMD causes death and reduced fecundity in infected animals, as well as significant economic consequences. FMD damages can likely be reduced through implementing pre-planned response strategies. Empirical studies have evaluated the economic consequences of alternative strategies, but typically employ simplified models. This dissertation seeks to improve US preparedness for avoiding and/or responding to an animal disease outbreak by addressing three issues related to strategy assessment in the context of FMD: integrated multi region economic and epidemic evaluation, inclusion of risk, and information uncertainty. An integrated economic/epidemic evaluation is done to examine the impact of various control strategies. This is done by combining a stochastic, spatial FMD simulation model with a national level, regionally disaggregated agricultural sector mathematical programming economic model. In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts, national economic impacts, prices, regional producer impacts, and disease control costs under the alternative strategies. Results suggest that, including trade restrictions, the median national loss from the disease outbreak is as much as $17 billion when feed can enter the movement restriction zone. Early detection reduces the median loss and the standard deviation of losses. Vaccination does not reduce the median disease loss, but does have a smaller standard deviation of loss which would indicate it is a risk reducing strategy. Risk in foreign animal disease outbreaks is present from several sources; however, studies comparing alternative control strategies assume risk neutrality. In reality, there will be a desire to minimize the national loss as well as minimize the chance of an extreme outcome from the disease (i.e. risk aversion). We perform analysis on FMD control strategies using breakeven risk aversion coefficients in the context of an outbreak in the Texas High Plains. Results suggest that vaccination while not reducing average losses is a risk reducing strategy. Another issue related to risk and uncertainty is the response of consumers and domestic markets to the presence of FMD. Using a highly publicized possible FMD outbreak in Kansas that did not turn out to be true, we examine the role of information uncertainty in futures market response. Results suggest that livestock futures markets respond to adverse information even when that information is untrue. Furthermore, the existence of herding behavior and potential for momentum trading exaggerate the impact of information uncertainty related to animal disease.

Hagerman, Amy Deann

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Vietnam-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Vietnam-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of climate change policies, development of climate change policies, and

89

Science & Research Agriculture & Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to environmentalists, who want the funding diverted to renewable energy research. The initiative began as a US-Russian project in the 1980s but now includes the EU, China, India, Japan and South Korea. 45% of the funding

90

Energy for agriculture: a computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Some of the subjects covered include: accounting, agriculture, animal production, conservation, drying, fertilizer, food processing, greenhouses, home, international, irrigation, organic, solar, storage, tillage, and wind. Author and keyword indexes are included. (MHR)

Stout, B A; Myers, C A [comp.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A farm-focused calculator for emissions from crop and livestock production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture and deforestation contribute approximately one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. Major sources of emissions in this sector are from loss of soil carbon due to repeated soil disturbance under typical crop cultivation, fossil fuel use ... Keywords: Agriculture, Cool farm tool, Emissions, GHG

Jonathan Hillier; Christof Walter; Daniella Malin; Tirma Garcia-Suarez; Lloren Mila-i-Canals; Pete Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this trend will continue, especially if the prices for fossil fuels continue to increase. Other direct, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological iomass energy is energy derived from organic matter of recent biological origin. Common forms of biomass

Lee, Dongwon

93

Autonomous farming: modelling and control of agricultural machinery in a unified framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant challenges faced by the farming industry, including a reduced labour workforce and a corporate style of farming. Such factors demand an increase in farming efficiency and productivity. This paper describes future autonomous farming ... Keywords: agricultural machinery, agricultural robotics, agronomy data, articulated farm vehicles, autonomous farming, autonomous robots, autonomous vehicles, intelligent systems, precision agriculture, precision farming, tracking control, trajectory tracking, uncertainty, vehicle control, vehicle modelling

Ray Eaton; Jay Katupitiya; Kheng Wah Siew; Blair Howarth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

95

Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry By: Richard Newell, Administrator...

96

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA Draft Findings) Richard Grotjahn Professor of Climate Dynamics University of California, Davis 6 March 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture

Grotjahn, Richard

97

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Irrigation Training Program For Texas Agricultural Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Irrigation Training Program, funded by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) through an Agricultural Water Conservation Grant, began in 2006. Administered by the Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB), the local Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs), United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS), Texas AgriLife Extension Service (Extension) and Texas AgriLife Research (Research) worked together to build a multi-disciplinary Irrigation Training Program (ITP) that included development of a core manual and training conferences that were designed to meet regional needs. The three year project was divided into four main tasks with separate objectives and deliverables. Under Task 1, the TSSWCB, SWCDs and USDA-NRCS supported the development and implementation of the Irrigation Training Program. Task 2 required TWRI, Extension and Research, in cooperation with the TSSWCB and USDA-NRCS to identify primary agency personnel to provide training and the key conference sites. To meet the objective of Task 3, TWRI, Extension and Research, in cooperation with the TSSWCB and USDA-NRCS developed the Irrigation Training Program manual and promoted irrigation training conferences. And finally, TWRI, Extension and Research, in cooperation with the TSSWCB and USDA-NRCS implemented the Irrigation Training Program through the delivery of six irrigation conferences to meet the task 4 goals.

Harris, B.L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Research on Agricultural Information Service Platform Based on Information Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For exiting problems of information technology in agriculture, modern information technologies are used to make agricultural information service platform, which can integrate information resources, then agricultural network information service sharing ... Keywords: modern information technology, agricultural information, service platform

Zhang Yubin; Liu Zhiguo; Lin Lizhong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The livestock mandatory price reporting system: Lamb industry perceptions and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The livestock mandatory price reporting system was approved by Congress in July of 1999, signed into law on October 22, 1999, and launched on April 2, 2001. In announcing the implementation of the mandatory price reporting system, the USDA claimed that it would provide information on 80% to 95% of the volume of all cattle, boxed beef, slaughter hogs, sheep and lamb meat, and imported lamb meat transactions. The new law had three explicit objectives: (1) facilitate price discovery, (2) make livestock markets more open, and (3) provide all market participants with market information that can be easily understood (USDA 2001a). This study attempts to determine if the new mandatory price reporting system had achieved these objectives in the perspective of the sheep and lamb industry during the period of the study. Survey questionnaires were developed to determine the perceptions of lamb producers and feeders regarding the effect of the mandatory price reporting system on: (1) the price discovery process, (2) the openness and transparency of lamb buying and selling transactions in the market, and (3) the quantity, accuracy, availability, and timeliness of information needed to make production and marketing decisions. First, the cross-tabulation or descriptive categorical analysis provided the basis for an aggregate evaluation of the perceptions of the survey respondents. Second, a logit regression analysis based on the ordinal regression models was built to consider the relationship between the perceptions of the responding sheep and lamb producers and feeders regarding the new mandatory price reporting system and key characteristics of those respondents (such as age, gender, years of experience, size of operations, etc.). During the period of the study, most respondents believed that the new Mandatory Price Reporting Act has not facilitated or enhanced their power to negotiate prices. Although producers from bigger ranches and feeders from larger capacity ranches reported some improvement in the price discovery process, most respondents believed that packers and feeders were still manipulating the sheep and lambs markets. Neither producers nor feeders perceived any improvements in the availability and openness of private transactions. The mandatory livestock price reports about the sheep and lamb market prices are considered the least useful information source for majority of respondents, as well as the most difficult to understand. The most useful and understandable source is perceived to be the voluntary USDA market reports and other ranchers and feeders.

Poghosyan, Artak Vahagn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Eligibility...

103

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Selling Texas: an internship at the Texas Department of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"SELLING TEXAS," an overview of the Texas Department of Agriculture and its Marketing and Agribusiness Division, takes a look at how the organization promotes Texas as the best of the best, and considers what would make the campaign better. Enriched by abundant resources and industrious people, Texas is a modem worldwide leader in the export of many raw and processed agricultural products ... Your market is our market ... Supply, quality and diversity--that's Texas agriculture" (TDA, 1996a). The Texas Department of Agriculture's Marketing and Agribusiness Development Division has a unique opportunity to encourage businesses to locate in Texas (and thereby boost the Texas economy) as a result of the State's mystique. For instance, the number of brand names including "Texas" places it in the top five-among other U.S. states in terms of popularity as an advertising tool. "Savor all the flavors of Texas ... Bred to survive and flourish in the unique Texas climate ... The vast ranges and fertile soils of Texas produce the world's finest fibers..." (TDA, 1996c). The division's BLJY TEXAS cwnpaign also promotes Texas products to its residents with whom Texas pride and loyalty are an arguable second only to American patriotism. The BUY TEXAS initiative is an umbrella consumer marketing effort that "encourages ocnsumers to seek and purchase products grown, sewn, and processed in Texas" (Marketing and Agribusiness Development, 1996) including Taste of Texas foods, Vintage Texas wines, TEXAS GROAN plants, and Naturally TEXAS apparel.

Cross, Kelly D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

106

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has been conducted under the auspices of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, and universities. This report describes work conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 20082012 as part of that effort. Two separate ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) This is the approved revision of this page, as...

108

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

109

AGRICULTURAL REPORT SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Secure America's energy future through renewable biofuels 5. Mitigate and adapt agriculture to variations will harvestprocessor will harvest and process theand process the product for wholesaleproduct for wholesale

110

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

111

Charles County - Agricultural Preservation Districts - Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Siting & Permitting Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas...

112

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

113

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loan Program Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category...

114

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a short-term or long-term ability to stimulate agriculture development and diversification in rural, urban,...

115

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on 2012/09/03 "Co-organized by Viet Nam and the Netherlands, in close collaboration with other partners, including FAO and the World Bank, the conference will allow global leaders, practitioners, scientists, civil society and the private sector to share experiences and demonstrate how early action on how Climate-Smart Agriculture can act as a driver of green growth." Event Details Name Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Date 2012/09/03 Location Hanoi, Vietnam Tags LEDS, training, CLEAN Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

116

he concentration of large numbers of livestock and poultry confinement facilities, which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considered to be com- mon throughout the United States: · Carbon monoxide (CO), · Lead (Pb), · Nitrogen and Brent W. Auvermann* Standards and Nuisance Issues for Animal Agriculture #12;crops, vegetation ) and micro- grams per cubic meter (µg/m3 ) of air. Table 1 shows that all criteria pollutants except carbon

Mukhtar, Saqib

117

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

118

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of A

119

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Minerals of Agric

120

Evaluating Precipitation Modification under Drought Conditions for Utah Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of the 1934 and 1977 droughts in the seven Climatological regions of Utah were examined using a linear programming model that simulated crop and livestock production in Utah for 1979. Crop and range production equations wee developed ...

Gregory M. Perry; Terrence F. Glover

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

List of Agricultural Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Equipment Incentives Agricultural Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 90 Agricultural Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 90) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Boilers Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Dishwasher Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) State Rebate Program Vermont Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Custom/Others pending approval Lighting

122

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

123

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

124

Agricultural Trade Liberalization and Poverty in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural research centers that receive principal funding from governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations, most of which are members of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS AND PARTNERS IFPRIs research, capacity strengthening, and communications work is made possible by its financial contributors and partners. IFPRI gratefully acknowledges generous unrestricted funding from Australia,

Joachim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho; Joaquim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Optimal taxation with joint production of agriculture and rural amenities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of agriculture and rural amenities 1 Georgesof an agricultural good and rural amenities, the ?rst-besthenceforth use the generic term rural amenities to refer to

Casamatta, Georges; Rausser, Gordon C.; Simon, Leo K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

127

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

128

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California) Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California)...

129

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

130

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and...

131

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IDB-Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

132

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

133

Developer Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in...

134

Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

both domestically and internationally. Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured...

135

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...

136

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

137

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

138

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency...

139

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $10,000 per account, not to exceed 20% of cost Scroll Refrigeration Compressors: $500 Variable Speed/Frequency Drive Motor: $500 Variable Speed Compressed Air Motor: $500 Energy Audit: One in Five Years Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free General Lighting: $1 - $15/unit LED Lamps: $2/bulb

140

SOLERAS: Rural/agricultural project technical overview  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Rural and Agricultural Solar Applications Projects is to enhance the quality of rural life in hot, arid climates by providing systems that use renewable or regenerable energy sources for domestic or communal, agricultural, and local industrial applications. These systems must provide domestic services such as hot water, heat for cooking, and electric power for lighting, communications, and refrigeration. In addition, agricultural applications such as water desalination, irrigation pumping, and heat and electricity for crop or food processing and local industrial functions, can become the basis for improving the villagers' standard of living. 29 refs., 82 figs., 23 tabs.

Huraib, F.S.; Adcock, J.P.; Knect, R.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

Jackson, R.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Empire, Nevada Coordinates 40.5757352°, -119.34213° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

144

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Outreach Articles  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Articles Outreach Articles Electricity from the Wind series of articles was designed to support agricultural outreach efforts. The articles explore wind energy issues as they relate to the rural/agricultural community. These articles are available to media outlets in your state, especially agricultural media outlets. The articles may also be used as handouts when attending agricultural group meetings. Electricity from the Wind: A New Lesson for Schools Electricity from the Wind: What Landowners Should Know Electricity from the Wind: The New Cash Crop Electricity from the Wind: Wind Energy and the Natural Gas Crisis Electricity from the Wind: Economic Development for Rural Communities Electricity from the Wind: USDA Farm Bill Section 9006 Provides Funding for Farm and Ranch Wind Projects

145

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

146

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation and is chemically similar to mined gypsum. These gypsums, used as beneficial agricultural amendments, were evaluated for their effects on earthworm populations and trace element concentrations in soils and earthworms at four field sites (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). These sites are part of a network study on agricultural uses of FGD gypsum conducted at sites across the United States. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing volumes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum will become available for agricultural use as more utilities install forced oxidation scrubbers and the wallboard market for the resulting gypsum becomes saturated. This interim report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to develop a national research network to gain data and experience to support the beneficial uses of FGD products, especially FGD gypsum, in agriculture and other land applications.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of adjust- ment to biofuels. Both the introductionbioeconomy and include biofuels, biotechnology, and green-and the adoption of new biofuels by consumers will be

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effect of Pretreatment on the Properties of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural waste disposal is becoming a problem due to its increasing production and potential pollution. As a kind of biomass, agricultural waste can be used as a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Agricultural waste disposal is of great ... Keywords: agricultural waste, animal manure, acid washing, pyrolysis

Zhang Shouyu; Wang Jian; Wang Xiu-Jun; Peng Dingmao; Takayuki Takarada

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS Trade Agreement December 15, 2010 Daniel A. Sumner University of California Agricultural Issues Center d th UC D i · Korea has been a large and diversified export destination for US and California agriculture · With more

Hammock, Bruce D.

151

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 97C1C49A76ADD9BFEBDE5FF95381F911 Press Downloadable pdf...

152

Identity Preservation of Agricultural Commodities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil corn, require IP programs to channel these com- modities to specific markets to capture the added at each step, including testing and auditing points. Process Seed Testing Field history Field isolation · Retain records of field history · Isolation standards met · Borders and barriers present · Time

Bradford, Kent

153

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

154

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: gain.fas.usda.gov/Pages/Default.aspx USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Screenshot References: GAIN[1] Overview "USDA'S Global Agriculture Information Network (GAIN) provides timely information on the agricultural economy, products and issues in foreign countries since 1995 that are likely to have an impact on United States agricultural production and trade. U.S. Foreign Service officers working at

155

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

156

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

157

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

158

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Derived Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com...

159

United States Department of Agriculture NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the fur, wool or hides of passing wildlife and livestock, and on the cloths of humans. The seeds are also; reduction in market price of wool contaminated with houndstongue seeds; and increased management should target the flowering stage of its life history. Sulfonylurea herbicides are most effective

USDA, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

160

Evaluation of the Strategic Alliance for Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

local entrepreneurship, agribusiness cluster formation and the development of competitive value chains Evaluation of the Strategic Alliance for Agricultural Development in Africa (SAADA program) 2006-20092 | SAADA Evaluation 2006-2009Local entrepreneurship, agribusiness cluster formation and the development of competitive value chains

Moussiliou Alidou; Marjolein Lem; Ted Schrader; Fons De Zeeuw; Moussiliou Alidou; Marjolein Lem; Ted Schrader; Fons De Zeeuw

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management..............................................................................................10­67 (b) Gravity flow pipes Waste Management Field Handbook 10­2 (210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) 651.1006 Utilization 10­71 (a

Mukhtar, Saqib

162

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

163

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

164

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/climatesmart/en/ Program Start: 2010 References: Climate-Smart Agriculture[1] Logo: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Overview "Food security and climate change can be addressed together by transforming agriculture and adopting practices that are "climate-smart" A number of production systems are already being used by farmers and food producers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to climate change, and reduce vulnerability. This website provides examples of many of these

165

Using big data for decisions in agricultural supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is an industry where historical and current data abound. This paper investigates the numerous data sources available in the agricultural field and analyzes them for usage in supply chain improvement. We identified ...

Smith, Derik Lafayette

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Use of Weather Information for Agricultural Decision Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data from a special subsample of the National Agricultural, Food, and Public Policy Preference Survey to assess use of weather data for agricultural decision making. Responses from 284 Arizona farmers and ranchers were used to ...

George B. Frisvold; Anand Murugesan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Agricultural Advisors: A Receptive Audience for Weather and Climate Information?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the climate in the midwestern United States becomes increasingly variable because of global climate change, it is critical to provide tools to the agricultural community to ensure adaptability and profitability of agricultural cropping systems. ...

Linda Stalker Prokopy; Tonya Haigh; Amber Saylor Mase; Jim Angel; Chad Hart; Cody Knutson; Maria Carmen Lemos; Yun-Jia Lo; Jean McGuire; Lois Wright Morton; Jennifer Perron; Dennis Todey; Melissa Widhalm

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Importance of Agricultural Weather Information: A Michigan Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey was conducted across Michigan in early 1986 in an attempt to better understand the needs of the agricultural community for weather information. The sample analyzed represented 318 respondents in agricultural professions. A smaller sample ...

J. D. Carlson

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Agriculture and Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

170

Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented Sandia decontamination chemistry were developed and tested against a few surrogate pathogens under conditions of relatively heavy organic load. Tests were conducted on surfaces commonly found in agricultural environments. Wide spectrum decontamination efficacy, low corrosivity, and biodegradability issues were addressed in developing an enhanced detergency formulation. A method for rapid assessment of loss of pathogenic activity (inactivation) was also assessed. This enhanced technology will enable rapid assessment of contamination following an intentional event, and will also be extremely useful in routine assessment of agricultural environments. The primary effort during the second year was progress towards a demonstration of both decontamination and viral inactivation technologies of Foot and Mouth virus (FMDv) using the modified SNL chemistry developed through this project. Lab studies using a surrogate virus (bovine enterovirus) were conducted using DF200, modified DF200 chemistry, and decontaminants currently recommended for use in heavily loaded organic, agricultural environments (VirkonS, 10% bleach, sodium hydroxide and citric acid). Tests using actual FMD virus will be performed at the Department of Homeland Security's Plum Island facilities in the fall of 2005. Success and the insight gained from this project will lead to enhanced response capability, which will benefit agencies such as USDA, DHS, DOD, and the agricultural industry.

Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative (ecoABC) (Canada)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provides repayable contributions for the construction or expansion of transportation biofuel production facilities. Funding is conditional upon agricultural producer investment...

172

Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY/WATER USE DURING A DROUGHT YEAR (1977) Water Supply & Demand in 1977 California's agricultural industry

Ritschard, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cooperative ExtensionTHE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF AGRICULTURE IN WISCONSIN COUNTIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Wisconsin, policy makers are exploring ways to unleash the private sector to stimulate the economy with an emphasis on job creation. Historically agriculture has been an important part of the Wisconsin economy, but over the years the relative importance of agriculture in the economy has diminished as the service sector employment, such as recreation and tourism, became more predominant. With the loss of many manufacturing jobs and the recent recession, there is renewed interest in agriculture in terms of employment and as a potential source of new employment opportunities. But is this renewed interest justified? Is the agricultural sector one that can have a larger or stimulative role in the Wisconsin economy? How should local and state policy makers consider an old industry that seems to again have relevance? In an original study by Deller (2004), the contributions of agriculture to the Wisconsin economy were documented and more recently re-examined by Deller and Williams in 2009. In both of these studies agriculture was defined to include on-farm production and food processing. Using 2007 data, Wisconsin agriculture was found to contribute $59.16 billion to total business sales (about 12.5 percent of the Wisconsin total); 353,991 jobs (10 percent of total employment) and $20.2 billion of total income (about nine percent of the Wisconsin total). For the first time, the 2009 study also used clustering analysis to examine changes (2001 to 2007) in subsectors of on-farm and food processing to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the

Steven Deller; David Williams; Steven C. Deller; David Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion in cash receipts in 2010. California has been the nation's top agricultural state in cash receipts every in 1960 to about 12 percent in 2010. UniversityofCalifornia AgriculturalIssuesCenter The Measure

Ishida, Yuko

175

Agricultural Investment Risk Relationship to National Domestic Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This empirical case study investigated the uncertainty of agricultural investment schemes in Nigeria and their relationship to national domestic production. Government administrations have invested a substantial amount of money into the agricultural ... Keywords: Agriculture, Bank Credit, Investment, National Domestic Production, Risk, Uncertainty

Alex Ehimare Omankhanlen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Facts and Distinctions 2012 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facts and Distinctions 2012 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University, and an improved standard of living for everyone. Distinctions National Program Ranking Agricultural sciences program 1 1 Agriculture / Agronomy 1 1 Entomology program 3 1 Environment / Ecology 1 1 Food science

Hammock, Bruce D.

177

A review of methods and applications of the geometric characterization of tree crops in agricultural activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the foundations and applications in agriculture of the main systems used for the geometrical characterization of tree plantations, including systems based on ultrasound, digital photographic techniques, light sensors, high-resolution ... Keywords: 3D plant modeling, LIDAR, Stereo vision, Terrestrial laser scanning, Ultrasonic sensors, Variable application

J. R. Rosell; R. Sanz

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Solar energy controlled-environment agriculture in the United States and in Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of greenhouse designs proposed for use in hot climates to reduce the temperature by essentially passive means are illustrated. The project plans of the SOLERAS, solar-powered, controlled-environment agriculture are outlined. The water desalination technology being evaluated is reverse osmosis. The solar collection technologies include flat-plate thermal collectors, solar ponds, photovoltaics, and wind turbines. (MHR)

Luft, W.; Froechtenigt, J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Manure Management: Beef Cattle, Sheep, and Miscellaneous Livestock: Industry Profiles and Marketing Tool for the State of New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal agriculture is a crucial component of the food and fiber system in the State of New York and in the U.S. in general. Animal agriculture also produces a significant by-product in the form of manure. Animal manure is a valuable resource that contains essential plant nutrients, and has the potential to replace a substantial amount of chemical fertilizers in this country. Other beneficial uses of manure are as soil amendment for improving the physical and biological properties of soils, as a fuel for ...

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solar Photovoltaics for Sustainable Agriculture and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have shown their potential in rural electrification projects around the world, especially concerning Solar Home Systems. With continuing price decreases of PV systems, other applications are becoming economically attractive and growing experience is gained with the use of PV in such areas as social and communal services, agriculture and other productive activities, which can have a significant impact on rural development. There is still a lack of information, however, on the potential and limitations of such PV applications. The main aim of this study is, therefore, to contribute to a better understanding of the potential impact and of the limitations of PV systems on sustainable agriculture and rural development (SARD), especially concerning income-generating activities. It is, in fact, of paramount importance to identify the potential contribution of PV to rural development in order to gain further financial and political commitment for PV projects and programmes and to design appropriate PV projects. One of the main lessons learnt through this study is that success of PV programmes is significantly enhanced when an integrated strategy is followed. Solar photovoltaic systems, through their flexibility in use, offer unique chances for the energy sector to provide packages of energy services to remote rural areas such as for rural health care, education, communication, agriculture, lighting and water supply. It is hoped that this document contributes to the generation of ideas and discussions among the different institutions involved in providing these services to rural areas and thereby to an "informed " decision on the PV technology option.

B. Van Campen; D. Guidi; G. Best

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Benton PUD - Commercial and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Commercial and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Benton PUD - Commercial and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings Category Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Projects: Varies widely, no predetermined amount Agriculture: Varies widely, no predetermined amount Commercial Lighting: Not specified Provider Benton PUD Benton PUD offers a variety of incentives to non-residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Projects are available for commercial customers interested in energy efficient lighting and custom projects that improve efficiency or process related systems such as compressed air,

183

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1881e/i1881e00.htm References: "Climate-Smart" Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation [1] Scope "Agriculture in developing countries must undergo a significant transformation in order to meet the related challenges of achieving food security and responding to climate change. Projections based on population

184

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://globalresearchalliance. References Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases [1] Background "The Alliance is a bottom-up network, founded on the voluntary, collaborative efforts of countries. It will coordinate research on agricultural greenhouse gas emission reductions by linking up existing and new research efforts across a range of sub-sectors and work areas. It will

185

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

186

National Mitigation Planning in Agriculture: Review and Guidelines | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture: Review and Guidelines Agriculture: Review and Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search Name National Mitigation Planning in Agriculture: Review and Guidelines Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, UNIQUE Agroforestry Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 References CGIAR - CCAFS[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CGIAR - CCAFS" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=National_Mitigation_Planning_in_Agriculture:_Review_and_Guidelines&oldid=581360"

187

A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in Bangladesh | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in Bangladesh Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Name A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in Bangladesh Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Government of Bangladesh Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.un-bd.org/pub/unpub Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in Bangladesh[1] Overview "There is a plethora of policy/ strategy documents relevant to broad agriculture and rural development in Bangladesh. These can be classified in three sub-categories- crops, noncrops and cross cutting policies (Table 1). As one would expect, about a half of the policy documents deal with crop

188

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Dominican Republic Caribbean References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

189

Does the Introduction of RFID Technology Improve Livestock Subsidy Management?: A Success Story from an Arab Country  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the expected benefits and challenges of RFID technology have been well studied in the manufacturing and service sectors at the private organization level, little understanding exists of these two issues when exploring RFID adoption in the agricultural ... Keywords: Electronic Commerce, Information System, RFID Advantages, RFID Application, RFID Cost, RFID Investment, RFID Obstacles, Top Management Support

Kamel Rouibah; Abdulaziz Al Ateeqi; Samia Rouibah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

Radiological considerations of phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiological concerns associated with phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture have been placed in perspective by considering the consequences of a hypothetical case involving heavy long term applications of phosphogypsum. In California, such a schedule might consist of an initial gypsum application of 10 tons/acre followed by alternate year applications of 5 tons/acre. If the radium content of the gypsum were 15 pCi/g and the till depth 6 inches, this schedule could be maintained for more than 100 years before the radium buildup in the soil would reach a proposed federal concentration limit of 5 pCi/g. An agricultural worker spending 40 h a week in a field containing 5 pCi/g of radium would be exposed to terrestrial radiation of about 7 ..mu..R/h above background. This exposure would result in an annual radiation dose of about 15 mrem, which is 3% of the recommended limit for an individual working in an uncontrolled area. Five pCi/g of radium in the soil could generate airborne radon daughter concentrations exceeding the concentration limit proposed for residential exposure. However, as residential exposure limits are predicated on 75% of continuous occupancy, these limits should not be applied to agricultural workers because of the seasonal nature of their work. Radium uptake by food crops grown in the hypothetical soil would result in a 50 year integrated dose to the bone surface of 1.4 rem. This dose is conservatively based on the assumption that an adult's total vegetable diet comes from this source and that consumption was continuous during the 50 year period.

Lindeken, C.L.

1980-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsone which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Agricultural scientists cut alcohol fuel costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists at the US Department of Agriculture have succeeded in lowering the cost of making alcohol from corn by 15 cents to $1.64 per gallon. The cost of drying distillers' solubles dropped because at the end of each cooking/fermenting/distilling run, the solubles are used for cooking, cooling and fermenting in the next run. One evaporation of solubles is required after 10 runs, so energy cost is cut from 17 cents to 1.7 cents. The protein by-products recovered, can be used as swine and poultry feeds and as human food.

Not Available

1981-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy and US agriculture: 1974 and 1978  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural production used approximately 8.5 billion gallons of liquified fuel in 1978. This was up from the nearly 8 billion gallons in 1974. Fuel oil and liquified petroleum (LP) gas usage remained relatively constant between 1974 and 1978. The most dramatic changes were in diesel and gasoline usage. Gasoline use dropped about 0.2 billion gallons and diesel fuel use increased almost 0.7 billion gallons, accounting for the net 0.5 billion gallon increase in liquid fuel usage. On farm business use of natural gas and electricity showed virtually no change between 1974 and 1978.

Torgerson, D.; Cooper, H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Search a standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1. Agricultural Production - Crops. 2. Agricultural Production - Livestock and Animal Specialties. ... 12. Coal Mining. 13. Oil and Gas Extraction. ...

196

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

197

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

199

Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture and Home Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Scientist NMSU's Extension Plant Sciences Lupe Garcia Owner Garcia Farms Ed Hughs Research Leader in Chile Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile of a Prototype Mechanical Gap Sorter for Mechanically Harvested Red Chile Report 26: Good Agricultural Practices

Castillo, Steven P.

200

Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture and Home Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

President Rezolex, Ltd. Co. Ed Curry President Curry Seed and Chile Co. Robert Flynn Soil Scientist NMSU Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile Report 21 of a Prototype Mechanical Gap Sorter for Mechanically Harvested Red Chile Report 26: Good Agricultural Practices

Castillo, Steven P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina) Randolph EMC - Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Contact Randolph EMC Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of upgrade cost Provider Randolph Electric Membership Corporation Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficient CFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The cooperative will cover 25% of the cost of the lighting upgrade. The program targets the adoption of CFL lighting technology specifically. Contact REMC for questions regarding

202

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Agency/Company /Organization: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: ictsd.org/downloads/2010/06/agricultural-technologies-for-climate-chan Language: English Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Screenshot

203

Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Agency/Company /Organization International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://ictsd.org/downloads/201 Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China's Ag Impacts [1] Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Screenshot "The overall goal of this paper is to review and document the likely impacts of climate change on China's agricultural production, efforts

204

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/39/39/42122112.pdf Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Screenshot References: Modelling Ag Policy[1] Overview "The role of agricultural policies in addressing the development needs of poorer countries is high on the political agenda, for both structural reasons and as a result of recent market developments. In the first place,

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Based Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

206

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

208

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and impact orientation need to be integrated into the agricultural research process. The R&D system should think in terms of contributing to innovation. The Improving Productivity...

212

Biowaste and vegetable waste compost application to agriculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The landfilling of biodegradable waste is proven to contribute to environmental degradation. Compost use in agriculture is increasing as both an alternative to landfilling for (more)

Kokkora, Maria I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Beneficial Use in Water Conservation Policy PricingNovember 1976. Water Conservation in Cali- 10. CaliforniaService, Agricultural Water Conservation Conference -

Ritschard, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Inc (AWS)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAgriculturalWasteSolutionsIncAWS&oldid341893" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

215

Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions : costs associated with farm level mitigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions within New Zealand account for 48 percent of all national greenhouse gas emissions. With the introduction of the emissions trading scheme (more)

Wolken, Antony Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The 'Watcher's Stage' in Lower Colorado River Indian Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primitive Subsistence on the Lower Colorado and Gila Rivers.Watcher's Stage' in Lower Colorado River Indian AgricultureIndian tribes along the Colorado River to various interior

Lawton, Harry W.; Wilke, Philip J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) (New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Type Corporate Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Incentive Inactive Date 12312019 Implementing Sector State...

218

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) (New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Type Personal Tax Credit Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Biomass Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable...

219

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Agricultural Podcasts Wind Powering America Podcasts Handout Wind Powering America provides this printable postcard as an outreach tool. Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produces a series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience. To subscribe, click on the PODCAST button below to open up the feed. Copy the URL from your browser's address bar into your podcast subscription software. For a list of podcast software, see Podcasting News' list of podcast software clients. Podcast Title: Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production

220

Radiological Impact of Phosphogypsum Application in Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum (PG) contains radionuclides from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th decay series. Due to the presence of these radionuclides, many countries restricted the use of PG in agriculture, however there is not such restriction in Brazil. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of PG application on {sup 226}Ra ({sup 238}U) and {sup 228}Ra ({sup 232}Th) concentrations in soil. Gamma-spectrometry was carried out using HPGe detector. No increment of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra was observed for increasing PG doses. Average values found for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra were respectively 37 Bq kg{sup -1} and 57 Bq kg{sup -1}. The results showed that the increasing PG doses in the specific conditions of the experiment did not cause a significant increment of radionuclides.

Dias, Nivea M. P.; Caires, Eduardo F.; Pires, Luiz F. [State University of Ponta Grossa (UEPG), Ponta Grossa, PR, 84.030-900 (Brazil); Bacchi, Marcio A.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. N. [Nuclear Energy Center for Agriculture (CENA), Piracicaba, SP, 13.400-970 (Brazil)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Kelley Hot Spring Geothermal Project: Kelly Hot Spring Agricultural Center conceptual design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed core activity in the Kelly Hot Spring Agricultural Center is a nominal 1200 sow swine raising complex. The swine raising is to be a totally confined operation for producing premium pork in controlled environment facilities that utilize geothermal energy. The complex will include a feedmill for producing the various feed formulae required for the animals from breeding through gestation, farrowing, nursery, growing and finishing. The market animals are shipped live by truck to slaughter in Modesto, California. A complete waste management facility will include manure collection from all raising areas, transport via a water flush sysem to methane (biogas) generators, manure separation, settling ponds and disposition of the surplus agricultural quality water. The design is based upon the best commercial practices in confined swine raising in the US today. The most unique feature of the facility is the utilization of geothermal hot water for space heating and process energy throughout the complex.

Longyear, A.B. (ed.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integration of agricultural and energy system models for biofuel assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a coupled modeling framework to capture the dynamic linkages between agricultural and energy markets that have been enhanced through the expansion of biofuel production, as well as the environmental impacts resulting from this expansion. ... Keywords: Agricultural markets, Biofuels, Energy systems, Environment, Modeling

A. Elobeid, S. Tokgoz, R. Dodder, T. Johnson, O. Kaplan, L. Kurkalova, S. Secchi

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

McCarl, Bruce A.

225

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Platform 2010 -2015 Accounting Building/Data Mining · Aim: improve the UK's greenhouse gas inventory by replacing generic IPCCC emission inventory #12;Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Platform ­ missing data #12;AC0115 ­ led by IBERS

Edinburgh, University of

226

The role of RFID in agriculture: Applications, limitations and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent advances in RFID offer vast opportunities for research, development and innovation in agriculture. The aim of this paper is to give readers a comprehensive view of current applications and new possibilities, but also explain the limitations ... Keywords: Animal identification, Cold chain, Food traceability, Precision agriculture, RFID

Luis Ruiz-Garcia; Loredana Lunadei

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

United States Department of Agriculture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Department of Agriculture Name United States Department of Agriculture Address U.S. Department of Agriculture 1400 Independence Ave., S.W. Place Washington, DC Zip 20250 Year founded 1862 Website http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal Coordinates 38.887546°, -77.032038° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.887546,"lon":-77.032038,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

International Fund for Agricultural Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fund for Agricultural Development Fund for Agricultural Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Fund for Agricultural Development Name International Fund for Agricultural Development Address International Fund for Agricultural Development Via Paolo di Dono, 44 00142 Place Rome, Italy Phone number 39-0654591 Website http://www.ifad.org/ Coordinates 41.8299626°, 12.4944539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8299626,"lon":12.4944539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Water Heaters: $100 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $150 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,000 Provider Farmers Electric Cooperative Farmers Electric Cooperative offers incentives for its residential and agricultural members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. In order to receive rebates, equipment and installation must meet program requirements. Rebates are available for qualifying air

231

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

232

Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Horticultural Society of South Australia and Horticultural Society of South Australia Jump to: navigation, search Name Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia Place South Australia, Australia Zip SA 5034 Sector Buildings, Solar Product South-Australia-based agricultural and horticultural society. The society is installing 1MW solar power systems on six separate buildings. References Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia is a company located in South Australia, Australia . References ↑ "Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South

233

Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Agricultural Biomass Income Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Statewide annual limit of 5 million in total credits Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State New Mexico Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 5 per wet ton Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0171.pdf House Bill 171] of 2010 created a tax credit for agricultural biomass from a dairy or feedlot transported to a facility that uses agricultural biomass to generate electricity or make biocrude or other liquid or gaseous fuel for commercial use. For the purposes of this tax credit, agricultural biomass means wet manure. The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department may

234

Agriculture Work Space/Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Work Space/Tools Work Space/Tools < Agriculture Work Space Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts How We Work > Work Streams and Working Groups > Agriculture > Tools Agriculture Tools Add an Impact Assessment Program Add an Agriculture Tool Guides Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a

235

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.fao.org/tc/exact/ex-act-tool/en/ Country: Brazil RelatedTo: Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) Cost: Free South America Coordinates: -14.235004°, -51.92528°

236

AgExcellence 2009The College of AgriCulTure And MonTAnA AgriCulTurAl experiMenT STATion in review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;ACAdeMiC progrAMS College of Agriculture Minor: Entomology MasterofScience: Entomology Agricultural Economics and Economics BachelorofScience: Agricultural Business Concentrations: AgribusinessManagement FarmandRanchManagement Economics Minor: Agricultural Business Economics MasterofScience: Applied

Maxwell, Bruce D.

237

VERSION 1, 23 NOVEMBER 2006 THEME 6: ENVIRONMENT (INCLUDING CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- operation partner countries Development and testing of innovative concepts for integrated water/agriculture/energy initiative (Group on Earth Observation) which is endorsed by the large number of European countries technologies for maximising material and energy recovery/recycling of the organic (humid) fraction of municipal

Meju, Max

238

Considering the normative, systemic and procedural dimensions in indicator-based sustainability assessments in agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a framework for evaluating sustainability assessment methods by separately analyzing their normative, systemic and procedural dimensions as suggested by Wiek and Binder [Wiek, A, Binder, C. Solution spaces for decision-making - a sustainability assessment tool for city-regions. Environ Impact Asses Rev 2005, 25: 589-608.]. The framework is then used to characterize indicator-based sustainability assessment methods in agriculture. For a long time, sustainability assessment in agriculture has focused mostly on environmental and technical issues, thus neglecting the economic and, above all, the social aspects of sustainability, the multi-functionality of agriculture and the applicability of the results. In response to these shortcomings, several integrative sustainability assessment methods have been developed for the agricultural sector. This paper reviews seven of these that represent the diversity of tools developed in this area. The reviewed assessment methods can be categorized into three types: (i) top-down farm assessment methods; (ii) top-down regional assessment methods with some stakeholder participation; (iii) bottom-up, integrated participatory or transdisciplinary methods with stakeholder participation throughout the process. The results readily show the trade-offs encountered when selecting an assessment method. A clear, standardized, top-down procedure allows for potentially benchmarking and comparing results across regions and sites. However, this comes at the cost of system specificity. As the top-down methods often have low stakeholder involvement, the application and implementation of the results might be difficult. Our analysis suggests that to include the aspects mentioned above in agricultural sustainability assessment, the bottom-up, integrated participatory or transdisciplinary methods are the most suitable ones.

Binder, Claudia R., E-mail: claudia.binder@geo.uzh.c [Social and Industrial Ecology, Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute for System Science, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz (Austria); Feola, Giuseppe [Social and Industrial Ecology, Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Steinberger, Julia K. [Social and Industrial Ecology, Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Social Ecology, Faculty for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Klagenfurt, Schottenfeldgasse 29, A-1070 Vienna (Austria)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Three Essays on International Agricultural Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many factors that affect international agricultural trade. One of them is international transportation costs. Another important factor is non-tariff barriers such as sanitary and phytosanitary regulations caused by animal disease outbreaks. The main purpose of this dissertation was to analyze how these factors interfere in the international agricultural trade by examining three cases. In Chapter II, a spatial price equilibrium model of the international cotton sector was utilized to evaluate the effects of the Panama Canal expansion (PCE) on the world cotton industry. Three scenarios were evaluated by reducing ocean freight rates from U.S. Gulf and Atlantic ports to Asian destinations. All scenarios suggested that cotton exports from U.S. Gulf and Atlantic ports would considerably increase. On the other hand, the West Coast ports decreased its participation in total U.S. cotton exports. Overall, total U.S. cotton exports were expected to increase due to the PCE. By using the same model which was used in Chapter II, the third chapter analyzes port improvements in Brazil. By March of 2012, the port of Salvador is expected to have undergone relevant improvements. As a result, the port of Salvador is expected to attract ocean shipping companies which are willing to export directly to Asian importing markets. Scenarios with different reductions in cotton export cost for this port were examined. In general, results indicated a shift in Brazil cotton export flows from the port of Santos to the port of Salvador as well as an increase in exports and producer revenues for the country. Finally, in Chapter IV, the impacts of the 2005 FMD outbreak on the Brazilian meat market was examined. The imposition of an import ban by Russia on Brazilian meat exports was also investigated. By using time series methods, it was found that the outbreak along with the import ban caused a temporary negative price shock to the Brazilian meat market. Export pork and export chicken prices were found to not fully recover after the removal of the import ban by Russia. On the other hand, the export beef price was indicated to undergo a complete recovery.

Costa, Rafael

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy-related impacts on Great Plains agricultural productivity in the next quarter century, 1976--2000. Great plains agricultural council publication  

SciTech Connect

Contents: The food demand dimension; Agriculture's relationship to national energy goals; Assumptions relating to great plains agriculture; Agricultural energy usage in perspective; The emerging energy usage transition agenda; General energy related agricultural adjustment concepts; Operational and technological adjustments in energy intense components; Agribusiness impacts and adjustments; Forests and energy; Effects of great plains energy resource development on agriculture; Institutional and agency program demands.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Conversion of agricultural land to urban use  

SciTech Connect

The large amount of land lost each year to urbanization has led nearly all states to adopt legislation that grants tax preferences to agricultural land use. Several studies have analyzed the effects of such policies on the rate of land development and on the total amount of land eventually developed. However, these studies have only analyzed permanent tax-rate changes despite the fact that most such changes are temporary. A distinction is made in this study between temporary, permanent, anticipated, and unanticipated tax-rate increases. Using a hedonic approach, the elasticity of supply of urban fringe land in McHenry County, Illinois is estimated to be approximately 0.30, which indicates that the amount of land converted to urban use is unlikely to be affected much by these polices. The hedonic approach as usually implemented is shown to lead to inconsistent parameter estimates. A consistent estimation procedure is proposed that produces testable cross-equation restrictions. A restriction is implied in the empirical section of this study by the use of the Box-Cox transformation to generalize functional form; it is tested and is not rejected. However, little is known about the small-sample properties of this transformation. To rectify this, a Monte Carlo study is conducted of the performance of Lagrange Multiplier tests for incorrect functional form and heteroskedasticity in a model that uses this transformation.

McMillen, D.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Rebecca Thistlethwaite: TLC Ranch and the Agriculture & Land-Based Training Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Agriculture & Land-Based Training Association With herthe Agriculture & Land-Based Training Association (ALBA) asDevelopment Center and Farm Training & Research Center.

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Essays on U.S. agricultural policy : subsidies, crop insurance, and environmental auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the unintended consequences of government policy, specifically policy meant to benefit agricultural producers. The first chapter asks how agricultural subsidies affect farmland rental rates. Chapter ...

Kirwan, Barrett E., 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprise Development (AREED) Enterprise Development (AREED) Jump to: navigation, search Name Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Finance Website http://www.areed.org/ Country Ghana, Mali, Tanzania, Senegal, Zambia Western Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Africa References AREED[1] Agriculture Rural Energy Enterprise Development (AREED) Screenshot "The United Nations Environment Programme's Rural Energy Enterprise Development (REED) initiative operates in Africa as AREED to develop new

247

Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Estimating the Overall Impact of A Change in Agricultural Practices on Atmospheric CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Overall Impact of A Change the Overall Impact of A Change In Agricultural Practices on Atmospheric CO 2 T.O. West (westto@ornl.gov; 865-574-7322) G. Marland (marlandgh@ornl.gov; 865-241-4850) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 Introduction One option for sequestering carbon in the terrestrial biosphere is to increase the carbon (C) stocks in agricultural soils. There is now an extensive literature on the amount of C that has been lost from soils as a consequence of humans disturbing natural ecosystems, and of the amount of C that might be returned to soils with improved management practices. Improvements in management practices could include efficient use of fertilizers and irrigation water, use of crop rotations, and changing from conventional tillage (CT) to conservation tillage

249

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products July 25, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce America's reliance on imported oil and leverage our domestic energy supply, while also supporting rural economies, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy today announced a $41 million investment in 13 projects that will drive more efficient biofuels production and feedstock improvements. "If we want to develop affordable alternatives for oil and gasoline that

250

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Jump to: navigation, search Name Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Partner Program on Forests Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Country Niger, Malawi, Zambia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

251

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence May 4, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - TOMORROW, May 5, 2011, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a media conference call to highlight Obama Administration efforts to move the nation towards a clean energy future and reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Secretaries Vilsack and Chu will be announcing biomass research and development grants to the following states: Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, and South Carolina.

252

Is Florida's Growth Management Act protecting agricultural lands?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Florida has experienced more population growth over the past half century than any other state, which has led to some of the most extensive urban development on valuable agricultural lands. To address this and other impacts ...

Lloyd, Stephen (Stephen Charles Rhys)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Joint Agricultural Weather Facility's Operational Assessment Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF), a cooperative effort between the Climate Analysis Center, NMC/NWS/NOAA (National Meteorological Center/National Weather Service/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and the World ...

Raymond P. Motha; Thomas R. Heddinghaus

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence May 4, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - TOMORROW, May 5, 2011, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a media conference call to highlight Obama Administration efforts to move the nation towards a clean energy future and reduce America's dependence on imported oil. Secretaries Vilsack and Chu will be announcing biomass research and development grants to the following states: Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, and South Carolina.

255

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development.

256

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Keith Paustian (keithp@nrel.colostate.edu; 970-491-1547) Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 Bruce Babcock (babcock@iastate.edu; 515-294-6785) Cathy Kling (ckling@iastate.edu; 515-294-5767) Center for Agriculture and Rural Development Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-1070 Jerry Hatfield (hatfield@nstl.gov; 515-294-5723) USDA - National Soil Tilth Laboratory Ames, IA 50011 Rattan Lal (lal.1@osu.edu; 614-292-9069) School of Natural Resources The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1085 Bruce McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu; 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-2124 Sandy McLaughlin (un4@ornl.gov; 865-574-7358)

257

LEDSGP/Agriculture Work Space/Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Agriculture Work Space/Tools < LEDSGP Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts How We Work > Work Streams and Working Groups > Agriculture > Tools Agriculture Tools Add an Impact Assessment Program Add an Agriculture Tool Guides Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up

258

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products July 25, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce America's reliance on imported oil and leverage our domestic energy supply, while also supporting rural economies, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy today announced a $41 million investment in 13 projects that will drive more efficient biofuels production and feedstock improvements. "If we want to develop affordable alternatives for oil and gasoline that

259

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom capital projects: $0.25/kWh, up to 50% of cost; $2/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Custom operation and maintenance projects: $0.08/kWh or $0.40/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Lighting projects: custom lighting incentives get 35% of project cost; prescriptive incentives also available. Total incentive capped at

260

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Model April 3, 2013 The important relationships between climate change and agriculture are uncertain, particularly the feedbacks related to the carbon cycle. Nevertheless, vegetation models have not yet considered the full impacts of management practices and nitrogen feedbacks on the carbon cycle. We are working to meet this need. We have integrated three crop types (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) into the Community Land Model (CLM). In developing the agriculture version of CLM, we added plant processes related to management practices and nitrogen cycling. A manuscript documenting our changes to CLM has been accepted for publication in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions ("Modeling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Agriculture Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development. chinamou.pdf

262

Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate $250,000 per farm Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge (SBC) Expiration Date 12/01/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount General: 75% of project costs Energy Audits: up to $2,500 (cost share may be required for audit costs exceeding this amount) Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers incentives for electric and natural gas efficiency improvements made

263

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Aq Dryers Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

264

Inland Power & Light Company- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Inland Power offers a variety of incentives for agricultural/irrigation customers to save energy on participating farms. Rebates are available for a variety of sprinkler equipment (nozzles, gaskets...

265

Pesticide Exposures in an Agricultural Community: Sources and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pesticide Exposures in an Agricultural Community: Sources and Pathways (Division Review Presentation) Speaker(s): Thomas McKone Date: June 26, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

266

Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for both production staff who need advice on specific problems and development personnel who seek directions. Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition Methods and Analyses Methods - Analyses Books Soft Bound Books Methods - An

267

Effect of agricultural practices on biofuels' environmental footprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased fuels from renewable resources has gained high research and development priority due to national security and environmental concerns. To ensure resilience and sustainability of the nation's agricultural and fuel sectors, it is essential to evaluate ...

Xiaobo Xue; Amy E. Landis

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Agricultural and Industrial Process-Heat-Market Sector workbook  

SciTech Connect

This workbook summarizes the preliminary data and assumptions of the Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Market Sector prepared in conjunction with the development of inputs for a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy.

Shulman, M. J.; Kannan, N. P.; deJong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG) Uwe A. Schneider Bruce A. Mc Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG Taxes and Sequestration Subsidies...............................66 3.8.2.4 Special Greenhouse Gas

McCarl, Bruce A.

270

Performance of Drought Indices for Ecological, Agricultural, and Hydrological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors provide a global assessment of the performance of different drought indices for monitoring drought impacts on several hydrological, agricultural, and ecological response variables. For this purpose, they compare the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguera; Jorge Lorenzo-Lacruz; Jess Julio Camarero; Juan I. Lpez-Moreno; Cesar Azorin-Molina; Jess Revuelto; Enrique Morn-Tejeda; Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Using Landsat to Identify Thunderstorm Damage in Agricultural Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 12 and 18 August 1999, severe thunderstorms produced damaging winds and hail that caused an estimated $50 million in damage to agriculture in west-central Illinois. Landsat-7 imagery was obtained to determine the arealextent of damage and ...

Mace L. Bentley; Thomas L. Mote; Paporn Thebpanya

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Control of agricultural nonpoint source pollution in Kranji Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singapore's Kranji Reservoir is highly sensitive to nutrient and bacterial pollution, both of which can be directly traced to agricultural runoff. Water quality samples were collected along the main drainage channel in the ...

Hoff, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Wind energy applications in agriculture: executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the potential use of wind turbine generator systems (WTGS) in US agriculture. In particular, this report presents the number of WTGS's economically feasible for use in US agriculture and the conditions which yielded economic feasibility of WTGS's for certain agricultural applications. In addition, for each case, i.e., set of assumed conditions, under which WTGS's were found to be economically feasible, this report identifies (1) the agricultural WTGS applications in terms of location, type and size (complete farm and dedicated-use applications); (2) the number of WTGS's by wind machine and generator size category; (3) aggregate energy conversion potential; and (4) other technical and economic WTGS performance data for particular applications. This report also describes the methodology, data and assumptions used for the analysis. A major part of the study was the development and use of a rigorous analytical system to assess an application's wind power generation and use potential.

David, M.L.; Buzenberg, R.J.; Glynn, E.F.; Johnson, G.L.; Shultis, J.K.; Wagner, J.P.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Agriculture and the Recent Benign Climate in Minnesota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A little noticed but remarkably consistent and agriculturally favorable climatic period existed for approximately 18 years, beginning in the mid-1950s in the U.S. Corn Belt and perhaps even earlier in Minnesota. The full application of technology ...

Donald G. Baker; David L. Ruschy; Richard H. Skaggs

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Geothermal Food Processors Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Fernley, Nevada Coordinates 39.6079683°, -119.2518349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

277

Inland Power and Light Company - Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Energy Efficiency Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Inland Power and Light Company - Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 70% or project cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Flow controlling type nozzle for impact sprinklers: $4 Rebuilt or New Impact Sprinklers: $3.75 Nozzle for Impact Sprinkler: $1.50 Rotating Type Sprinklers: $4 Gasket: $2.75 Low-Pressure Regulators: $5 Low-Pressure Sprinklers: $4 Multiple Configuration Nozzles: $3 Multi-Trajectory Sprays: $4 Drains for Lines: $1 Hubs for Wheel-Lines: $14.50 "Goose Neck" Elbow for New Drop Tubes: $1.65 Drop Tubes: $3 Center Pivot Base Boot Gasket: $175

278

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

279

Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this correlational and descriptive study was to examine the influence of an agricultural dual credit course curriculum on student self-efficacy of college readiness as students matriculate to post-secondary education. To evaluate the personal characteristics, postsecondary plans, program perceptions and college readiness self-efficacy, a quantitative survey and online instrument was used to gather data and analyze information on high school students enrolled in agricultural education in both dual credit and non-dual credit courses primarily in the Middle Tennessee Region. The target population (N = 543) for this study was defined as students at 16 schools where the dual credit course was offered with the Middle Tennessee State University, School of Agribusiness and Agriscience in the 2011-2012 academic year. A total of 245 students from 16 secondary agricultural programs in seven different school districts across Tennessee, primarily in the Middle Tennessee region, participated in the study for a response rate of approximately 45%. This study examined college readiness of student participation in an agricultural dual credit course and sought to determine the relationship between student participation in a dual credit course offering and college readiness self-efficacy as well as student perceptions of the course offering. Course self-efficacy was higher among dual credit participants versus non-dual credit participants. Social self-efficacy was also higher for dual credit participants. Females had higher Course self-efficacy, and there was a positive relationship between GPA and each construct of the college readiness self-efficacy inventory. Participant perceptions of the agricultural dual credit program were also high. This study indicates that dual credit participants can confidently approach post-secondary options, and that they are more likely to be successful in college due to level of self-efficacy as they matriculate into college. Recommendations from the study include: Using the MTSU dual credit model in future dual credit course developments and collaborations; using findings as a basis for training future agricultural education teachers on how to improve CRSE; and additional and longitudinal studies to track dual credit students success in college.

Neely, Alanna L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessment of classification and indexing of an agricultural journal based on metadata in AGRIS and CAB Abstracts databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural thesauri and classification schemes are being increasingly upgraded as ontologies, prompting end-user awareness of the concept of structured taxonomies and metadata. Related agricultural databases, such as Agris and CAB Abstracts, exhibit ... Keywords: agricultural classification, agricultural journals, agricultural thesauri, agriculture, databases, descriptors, information retrieval, journal classification, journal indexing, metadata, ontology, scientific papers, semantics, subject categories, subject headings, terminology

Tomaz Bartol

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sonny Ramaswamy Director of Agricultural Research Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oxford. He has taught Persian language and literature as well as history and politics of Iran interests include Iran's contemporary foreign policy as well as the study of political and religious discourses in Iran's modern history. His publications include `Anglo-Iranian Conflict over the Disputed

282

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Energy Markets and their Implications on Agriculture Howard Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator, Energy Information Administration

283

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ........................................................................................................................................................... 17 Animal Science ............................................................................................................................................................. 29 Dairy Science

Sze, Lawrence

284

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ........................................................................................................................................................... 16 Animal Science ............................................................................................................................................................. 28 Dairy Science

Sze, Lawrence

285

Three Essays on U.S. Agriculture under Climate Change: Active Engagement in Mitigation and Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigates: (1) the implications of including high-yielding energy sorghum under the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS2) program; (2) the effects of RFS2 with and without projected climate change scenarios on U.S. agriculture; (3) the spatial distribution of cattle breeders in Texas to quantify how climate factors influence cattle breed selection. In the RFS2 energy sorghum work, the ability of the agriculture sector to meet the fuel requirements of RFS2 is examined with and without energy sorghum being a possibility using an agricultural sector model. The results show that energy sorghum would be a valuable contributor that would be used as a feedstock producing over 13 billion gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol. Without the presence of energy sorghum it is found that switchgrass serves as the major cellulosic ethanol feedstock. Findings also indicate that the presence of high-yielding energy sorghum does relax commodity prices and export reductions except for grain sorghum as energy sorghum competes with grain sorghum production. In addition, the results show that the introduction of energy sorghum has minimal effects on GHG mitigation potential in the agricultural sector. In the RFS2 and climate change research, the analysis shows that climate change eases the burden of meeting the RFS2 mandates increasing consumer welfare while decreasing producer welfare. The results also show that climate change encourages a more diversified use of biofuel feedstocks for cellulosic ethanol production, in particular crop residues. In the cattle breed research, summer heat stress is found to be a significant factor for breed selection: positive for Bos indicus and negative for Bos taurus and composite breeds. The estimation results also indicate a price-driven trade-off between Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds.

Zhang, Yuquan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

College of Agriculture ASC Animal Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by departmental personnel include: Our scientific history" ­ Kelly Allred "Treated vs untreated understory forest was recognized for his 30 years of implementing sheep and wool educational programs throughout Montana. Rodney

Kim, Mi-Ok

287

Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs? Agency/Company /Organization: World Agroforestry Centre Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Agriculture, Land Use Topics: Implementation, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Publications/files/workingpaper/WP0144-1 Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Asia Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs? Screenshot References: MRV NAMAs[1] Logo: Agricultural Monitoring and Evaluation Systems: What can we learn for the MRV of agricultural NAMAs?

288

AgExcellence 2008The College of AgriCulTure And MonTAnA AgriCulTurAl experiMenT STATion in review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;ACAdeMiC progrAMS College of Agriculture Bachelor of Science: Agricultural Education Options: Ag Relations Teaching Master of Science: Agricultural Education Bachelor of Science: Biotechnology Options: Animal Systems Microbial Systems Plant Systems Minor: Entomology Master of Science: Entomology

Maxwell, Bruce D.

289

Agricultural Issues Center University of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment. Most studies have utilized models with the demand side of the market characterized by Mussa-Rosen to materials and ingredients to be included or left out, packaging, thickness, flexibility, flamability, bio between fuel economy and vehicle size and power. 1 Increasingly stringent MQS will eventually drive

California at Davis, University of

290

Michigan State University Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a number of projects in 1999, including education and research on pesticide/ integrated pest management this request, Project GREEEN funded the restructuring of several entities on campus in 1999. The Pesticide and production by Jamie DePolo, MAES information officer, ANR Communications. All illustrative photos by Kurt

Liu, Taosheng

291

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS...

293

Low Temperature Direct Use Agricultural Drying Geothermal Facilities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Temperature Direct Use Agricultural Drying Geothermal Facilities Low Temperature Direct Use Agricultural Drying Geothermal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":800,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":"Geothermal

294

The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices and economically impact the well-being of the agricultural sector. An U.S. agricultural sector model, a dynamic, nonlinear, mathematical program, determined the economic effects of using increased supplies of agricultural biomass for energy. The model incorporated production and use of potential biomass energy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and short rotation poplar. Also, the model introduced future biomass technologies, based on current research involving more productive biomass crops and more efficient conversion activities which produce ethanol and biomass electricity. The forced supply of new biomass crops, along with corn, involves several levels of energy production. This forced supply was based on projected ethanol demands and land capability for biomass production. The model determined the optimal mix of corn and energy crops to meet the biomass feedstock goals for energies. The resultant model appraises the effects of increasing biomass feedstocks for the years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results show that initially, fuel prices using biomass feedstocks may be as much as 50 % greater than equivalent fossil fuel supplied energy. But due to technology the price of biomass feedstocks decreases over time. The analysis predicts that the agricultural feedstock price and the price of fossil fuels may equalize between the years 201 0 and 2020. The forced production of agricultural energy crops changes cropping patterns and prices for conventional crops as well. The agricultural energy crops and corn receive a greater allocation of farm land to meet the forced biomass energy supplies. Most conventional crop prices rise and all biomass feedstock prices rise with increasing feedstock production. As a consequence, farmers receive increased profits. Consumers, however, experience a loss in well-being due to the higher cost of energy feedstock and food products. National well-being experiences a net loss.

Jerko, Christine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides background information on the agroenergetic potential of 65 countries and offers summaries of major crops planted, total area planted, yield per hectare, and total production. Total land area is categorized as to agriculture, forest, and woodland, and is discussed with demographic statistics for each country. The potential for agricultural by-products and biomass to contribute to energy availability is explored, with reference to each major crop. Vegetation and/or economic activity, or soil maps are presented for most countries, as are climatic data, with crop yields and residues which are compared with production elsewhere.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Agency/Company /Organization: Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.cgiar.org/pdf/CCAFS_Strategy_december2009.pdf Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Screenshot References: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity[1] References ↑ "Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate,_Agriculture_and_Food_Scarcity:_A_Strategy_for_Change&oldid=328536"

297

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on mined lands in Virginia's coalfields. When active coal mines are being preparing for graz- ing use after concern on coal surface mines is pH. Generally, water used to support livestock should have a pH that is no less than 6.0. Highly acidic (low pH) water from coal mines can often be recognized visually from

Liskiewicz, Maciej

298

Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Research and Development Center Agricultural Research and Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center Place Wooster, Ohio Zip OH 44691-4096 Product Its mission is to enhance the well-being of the people of Ohio, the nation and world through research on foods, agriculture, family and the environment. Coordinates 40.80566°, -81.934379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.80566,"lon":-81.934379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

299

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Name Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Address Viale delle Terme di Caracalla Place Rome, Italy Year founded 1945 Phone number (+39) 06 57051 Website http://www.fao.org/about/en/ Coordinates 41.8792066°, 12.4952115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8792066,"lon":12.4952115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

300

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural and Rural Resources and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools This page lists resources and tools specifically for the agricultural community. Currently the page lists an online calculator that provides quick, detailed economic evaluation of potential utility-scale wind energy projects and the page links to other Web sites. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 137 records found. Page 1 of 28, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Agricultural 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Consultive Group on International Agricultural Research Name Consultive Group on International Agricultural Research Address 1818 H Street NW Place Washington, DC Zip 20433 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Phone number (202) 473-8951 Coordinates 38.899458°, -77.042447° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.899458,"lon":-77.042447,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

Kheti: mobile multimedia in an agricultural co-operative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kheti is a mobile phone-based, multimedia communication system to support sharing of agricultural knowledge and advice within a producers' co-operative. The first version of this system was designed with, and was tested by, the Sironj Crop Producers ...

Andy Dearden; Paul Matthews; Haider Rizvi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for agricultural production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the paper a multidimensional data model called CULTEH is built. In the model are defined the dimensions, the hierarchies and the facts. Based on this model an OLAP cube called CUBECTH is built. The OLAP cube accepts queries on several dimensions and ... Keywords: OLAP operations, agricultural production, data cube, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP)

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Adrian Turek Rahoveanu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

DRIVING DIRECTIONS South Carolina Commissioner's School for Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 6 DRIVING DIRECTIONS South Carolina Commissioner's School for Agriculture Directions://www.clemson.edu/campusmap/index.html Directions from Interstate 85 Take exit 19B, Clemson University (Hwy 76/28). Merge onto Hwy 76/28 and follow sign, go to the right. Follow the signs to the registration area in Barnett Hall. Directions to Friday

Bolding, M. Chad

305

Advances in solar assisted drying systems for agricultural produce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical directions in the development of solar assisted drying systems system for agricultural produce are compact collector design, high efficiency, integrated storage, and long-life drying system. Air based solar collectors are not the only available ... Keywords: V-groove solar collector, double-pass solar collector, photovoltaic thermal collectors, solar assisted chemical heat pump system, solar dehumidification system

Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Mohd Yusof Sulaiman; Mohd Yusof Othman; Sohif Mat; Muhamad Yahya; Mohamad A. Alghoul; Baharudin Ali; Lim Chin Haw; Mohd Hafidz Ruslan; Azami Zaharim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A handy imaging system for precision agriculture studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive imaging system able to take various narrow-band images and placed on platforms of various heights can be very useful to many remote-sensing studies, particularly for researchers in precision agriculture areas. A handy imaging system, composed ...

Y. J. Lee; K. W. Chang; Y. Shen; T. M. Huang; H. L. Tsay

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Global change and agricultural management options for groundwater sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the general circulation models (CGMs) for future climate projections, a temperature increase, precipitation decrease, and an increase in the variability of extreme events may be expected in the future, likely reducing available water resources. ... Keywords: Agricultural management, Climate change, Ecosystems, Groundwater, Natural recharge

Lucila Candela; F. Javier Elorza; JoaquN JimNez-MartNez; Wolf Von Igel

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Romanian e-learning experience in ecological agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecolearning is the first research project to test the methodology for e-learning training to organic producers in Romania. Given the necessary equipment (computer + software properly) and opportunities for farmers in Romania, Ecolearning address to: ... Keywords: e-learning, ecological agriculture, training courses

Daniela Cristiana Alexandrescu; Ion Toncea; Valentina Ofelia Robescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Department of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering Credit Unit Reduction Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Department of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering Credit Unit Reduction Proposal M.Sc., M for fully qualified students consist of a minimum of 15 credit units for the Masters program. In addition Engineering: 12 CUs) at the University of Saskatchewan. The proposed credit unit reduction for the Department

Saskatchewan, University of

310

IMPROVING THE REPRESENTATION OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT IN LAND SURFACE MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the challenging task of increasing food production to keep up with growing population, growing per-capita consumption and the use of agricultural products as biofuels. Climate change, and the associated increases and energy. I estimated that the trend to longer-season corn cultivars over the last three decades can

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

311

Agricultural Research l September 20114 ThreeyearsaftertheDeepFireBurn,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. "The type of aerial survey we did can be repeated to keep checking on whether the pesticides Sagebrush Using this survey method, called Very Large Scale Aerial (VLSA) imagery, Agricultural Research in drainage areas and up canyon slopes. During a 2008 aerial survey of streamside vegetation in Nevada, Joe

312

Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Opportunities for agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Industry Opportunities for agriculture R. Blaauw J. van Haveren E. L International Certification Services EESV according to ISO 9001:2000. Title Biomass for the Dutch Chemical for biomass 18 3.1 General developments 18 3.2 Developments of the Dutch chemical industry towards a bio

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

313

A survey on wireless sensor network infrastructure for agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid wireless sensor network is a promising application of wireless sensor networking techniques. The main difference between a hybrid WSN and a terrestrial wireless sensor network is the wireless underground sensor network, which communicates ... Keywords: Agriculture, Hybrid wireless sensor network, Information collection, Monitoring, Wireless underground sensor network

Xiaoqing Yu; Pute Wu; Wenting Han; Zenglin Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of environmentally friendly and renewable energy sources, and 3) promoting industrial uses of agricultural products service). Renderers who filter out the solids and remove enough moisture to meet industry specifications soybean oil, yellow grease and fats recycled from the restaurant industry, and rendered animal fats

Radeloff, Volker C.

315

Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

Colburn, Jr., John W. (Houston, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken. 5 figures.

Colburn, J.W. Jr.

1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Evaluating News Bias in Agriculture: The Salmonella Outbreak of 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the United States is considered to have one of the safest food supplies in the world, consumers have become increasingly alarmed with the subject of food safety as each crisis-related outbreak is scrutinized. With the onset of an agricultural-related food crisis, the media plays a vital role in publicizing both facts and opinions. Because of the relationship between agricultural risk communication and the media, it is essential to study the level of bias in the news reporting of these agricultural risk-associated events. The purpose of this study was to analyze the coverage and level of bias of the Salmonella outbreak associated with tomatoes in associated press (AP) newswires during a six-month period in 2008 through a descriptive content analysis. A comprehensive search yielded 57 usable articles written during a six-month period surrounding the outbreak; these articles were analyzed using the Hayakawa-Lowry News Bias categories. A total of 1,444 sentences were coded into nine categories: (a) report attributed, (b) report unattributed, (c) inference labeled, (d) inference unlabeled, (e) judgment attributed favorable, (f) judgment attributed unfavorable, (g) judgment unattributed favorable, (h) judgment unattributed favorable, and (i) other. Data indicated a significantly higher number of report sentences as compared to judgment sentences. Report sentences are considered both verifiable and factual. Thus, data indicated a low level of bias. Additionally, although journalists were objectively reporting information regarding the Salmonella outbreak, per capita tomato consumption for 2008 decreased. In the wake of a crisis, objective reporting is crucial. Journalists have an obligation to report information that is objective, factual, and verifiable. Understanding how the media tells agricultures story can help bridge the gap between the industry and those reporting the issues.

Schroeder, Charlsie Lauren

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Economic Analysis of Energy Crop Production in the U.S. - Location, Quantities, Price, and Impacts on Traditional Agricultural Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

POLYSYS is used to estimate US locations where, for any given energy crop price, energy crop production can be economically competitive with conventional crops. POLYSYS is a multi-crop, multi-sector agricultural model developed and maintained by the University of Tennessee and used by the USDA-Economic Research Service. It includes 305 agricultural statistical districts (ASD) which can be aggregated to provide state, regional, and national information. POLYSYS is being modified to include switchgrass, hybrid poplar, and willow on all land suitable for their production. This paper summarizes the preliminary national level results of the POLYSYS analysis for selected energy crop prices for the year 2007 and presents the corresponding maps (for the same prices) of energy crop production locations by ASD. Summarized results include: (1) estimates of energy crop hectares (acres) and quantities (dry Mg, dry tons), (2) identification of traditional crops allocated to energy crop production and calculation of changes in their prices and hectares (acres) of production, and (3) changes in total net farm returns for traditional agricultural crops. The information is useful for identifying areas of the US where large quantities of lowest cost energy crops can most likely be produced.

Walsh, M.E.; De La Torre Ugarte, D.; Slinsky, S.; Graham, R.L.; Shapouri, H.; Ray, D.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

TRENDS IN AGRICULTURE PRICE DECLINES AND ANALYSIS OF THE CONDITIONALITIES IN THE DECEMBER 2008 WTO AGRICULTURE CHAIRS TEXT SYNOPSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper begins by highlighting the frequency of price declines experienced by developing countries. It then touches on the use of the price-based Special Safeguard Provision (SSG) by developed countries. The paper then looks at the conditionalities of the WTO Agriculture Chairs December 2008 text (TN/AG/W/4/Rev.4). These include exclusion of en route shipments from the price-based SSM coverage; the trigger and remedy, and the omission to take into account the value declines in ad valorem duties when prices drop; the cross-check; and the exclusion of preferential trade from SSM coverage. An analysis of these conditionalities is provided. Some of these clauses, if agreed upon, will severely curtail countries ability to invoke the price-based SSM. In addition, once invoked, the remedies, as they are currently drafted, are not likely to be effective in shielding domestic producers from price volatilities.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Books and book chapters (last 10 years only) 16. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. Ch. 5 (invited). Forages in Organic Crop-Livestock Systems. pp. 85-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Books and book chapters (last 10 years only) 16. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. Ch. 5 (invited). Forages, Agriculture, and Engineering Service, Cooperative Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. (Peer-reviewed book chapter) 12 Service, Cooperative Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. (Peer-reviewed book chapter) 11. Clark, E. Ann. 2004 . GM

Clark, E. Ann

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Photos credits for front cover: Top photos Comstock and Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also proposed a long-term target of a 10% biofuels blend in total fuel consumption by 2030. In order, conserve oil stocks, and enhance the agricultural sector [18]. The Nigerian government set a biofuel target have set biofuels consumption targets of 2% of total fuel usage. However, these countries have little

322

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Air Pollution Regulation Agencies (SAPRAs) issue and enforce permits that limit particulate matter emissions from all sources including layer and broiler facilities, cattle feedyards, dairies, cotton gins, and grain elevators. In this research, a process was developed to determine distances from emitting sources to where the estimated concentrations were less than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). These distances are a function of emission rates and meteorological conditions. Different protocols were used to develop emission factors for cattle feedyards and layer houses. Dispersion modeling with American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was conducted to determine the emissions of particulate matter. These data were used to determine the distances from the sources to where the concentrations of particulate matter (PM) would be less than the NAAQS. The current air-permitting process requires that concentrations from a source do not exceed the NAAQS at the property line and beyond for the facility to be in compliance with its permit conditions. Emission factors for particulate matter less than 10 micrometers (PM10) were developed for cattle feedyards using a reverse modeling protocol and Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) sampler data. Corrections were applied to the TEOM measurements to account for TEOM vs. filter-based low-volume (FBLV) sampler bias and over-sampling of PM10 pre-collectors. Invalid concentrations and dust peaks larger than mean 3 times the standard deviation were excluded from this study. AERMOD predictions of downwind concentrations at cotton gins were observed for compliance with 24-hour PM10 and PM2.5 NAAQS at property lines. The emissions from three cotton gins were analyzed at 50 m and 100 m distances. TEOM and FBLV samplers were used to collect 24-hour PM10 measurements inside a laying hen house. The distances to the property lines at which the emissions of PM10 were below the 24-hour average PM10 standards were estimated using AERMOD. The results suggested that the special use of the NAAQS for as the property-line concentration not to be exceeded, could be problematic to agriculture. Emission factors that were comparable of published emission factors were obtained in this study. Large distances to property lines were required when minimum flow rate recommendations were not considered. Emission factors that are representative of the emissions in a particular facility are essential; else facilities could be inappropriately regulated.

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

324

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

325

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate, Land, Water Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/mosaicc/66705/en/ FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Screenshot References: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC)[1] "FAO-MOSAICC (for MOdelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change) is a system of models designed to carry out each step of the impact

326

G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture Monday, April 29, 2013 - 8:00am to Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 5:00pm Timezone: EST Open access to publicly funded agriculturally relevant data is critical to increasing global food security. At the 2012 G-8 Summit leaders committed to the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, the next phase of our shared commitment to achieving global food security. As part of this commitment we agreed to "Share relevant agricultural data available from G-8 countries with African partners and convene an international conference on Open Data for

327

Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

Neher, Deborah A.

329

The economic impacts of climate change : evidence from agricultural profits and random fluctuations in weather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on US agricultural land by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural profits. Using ...

Deschnes, Olivier

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations of Weather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on agricultural land in the United States by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural ...

Deschenes, Olivier.

331

Remote sensing as a tool for monitoring plasticulture in agricultural landscapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural landscapes are changing their appearance with the increasing use of man-made plastic materials in covered agriculture (plasticulture) all around the world. As these affect the landscape visually, increase pollution and decrease local biodiversity, ...

N. Levin; R. Lugassi; U. Ramon; O. Braun; E. Ben-Dor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

333

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Indiana Kingman Research Station (Corn and Soybeans)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO42H2O) that is created when sulfur dioxide is removed from the exhaust gases during the combustion of coal for energy production. Research on FGDG has been conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. EPA, the United States Department of Agricultures Agricultural ...

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

335

Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present, wild hogs exist in Texas in free-ranging populations numbering in the millions. These populations continue to expand, and now are pervasive in almost all land resource areas of the state. Wild hogs have a noted presence in the ranching and farming industry. This presence is both biophysical and socioeconomic in nature. The hogs financially influence agriculture as both a valuable asset and expensive liability. The economic presence of this influence reflects opposing personal preferences which play an important part in opposing valuations. Biological information is available which concerns the hogs, but no research has centered specifically around the economic effects of the hog's presence upon agricultural producers. To properly perform any economic analysis of wild hog impacts on the state's agricultural producers, good data was needed and became a primary focus of this study. A second need and focus of the study was the employment of enterprise budgeting as an economic research method to discover values for the positive and negative financial effects of the hogs. These methods were used to yield sound values for the economic effects of the wild hogs on the Texas agriculture producers which were the focus of this study. This research effort demonstrates the economic effects of wild hogs on eight selected Texas agricultural producers. An intensive survey was conducted which involved gathering primary data which focused on the effects the hogs have on the respondent's operations. This data was used to construct both full and partial combination effect enterprise budgets for the respondent's agriculture enterprises. These budgets yield values for the benefits and damages that result from the hog's growing influence on landowners / managers. The values for the economic effects of the hogs are presented and discussed in an attempt to offer information and alternatives which may help efficiently manage populations of the hogs in Texas. This information can be used to evaluate biophysical and socioeconomic options for that management effort in several areas. These are the establishment of legal ownership of the hogs, legal liability, and creation of rules, regulations, and programs which increase the efficiency of management efforts.

Bach, Joel Paul

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A self-adapting fuzzy inference system for the evaluation of agricultural land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inference rules relating land characteristics to suitability class are crucial to the estimation of agricultural land suitability. In fuzzy logic modeling for agricultural land evaluation, the fuzzy inference, based on membership functions and rule ... Keywords: Agricultural land evaluation, Cross-validation, Fuzzy inference system, Genetic algorithm, Self-adapting

Yaolin Liu; Limin Jiao; Yanfang Liu; Jianhua He

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion in cash receipts in 2010. California has been the nation's top agricultural state in cash receipts every in 1960 to about 12 percent in 2010. UniversityofCalifornia AgriculturalIssuesCenter The Measure

California at Davis, University of

338

Design and control of a heavy material handling manipulator for agricultural robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a manipulation system for agricultural robots that handle heavy materials. The structural systems of a mobile platform and a manipulator are selected and designed after proposing new knowledge about agricultural robots. Also, ... Keywords: Agricultural robots, Evaluation index, Manipulator, Robust control

Satoru Sakai; Michihisa Iida; Koichi Osuka; Mikio Umeda

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES: Agricultural Economics #12;AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States. (December 2000) Uwe Schneider, M.Ag., Humboldt

McCarl, Bruce A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 3. Battelle Columbus Laboratories pilot plant preliminary design and Phase 2 definition study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary design for an engineering field test project of a solar controlled environment agriculture system with 0.37 hectare of growing area is presented. Specifications and requirements of system components are outlined as are the instrumentation and control systems. System support facilities are briefly discussed. The program management plan and an economic analysis are included. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Essays on the Impact of Development on Agricultural Land Amenities and Values in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market land prices ignore the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services; hence, too much agricultural land may be developed. Correct land valuation must include these non-market values. Values of ecosystem services provided by the Richland-Chambers constructed wetlands are assessed through meta-analysis to derive confidence intervals for the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for wetland services. Replacement costs are also used to estimate cost savings of creating wetlands to cleanse river water instead of constructing a conventional wastewater treatment facility. Benefit transfer is used to estimate WTP for non-market agricultural land amenities. Ecosystem services of runoff in the western and recharge in the eastern part of Comal County based on hydrological models are also calculated. Finally, seemingly unrelated regression is used to quantify the effects of growth on current agricultural land values in Texas. Using two different meta-analysis transfer functions, mean WTP for the Richland-Chambers wetlands are $843 and $999 / acre / year. Estimated 95% confidence interval is $95 to $7,435 / acre / year. This confidence interval clearly indicates the uncertainty associated with valuing ecosystem goods and services. The replacement cost of the Richland?Chambers constructed wetlands is estimated to be $1,688 / acre / year. Aggregate WTP to preserve farm and ranchland non-market amenities in Comal County is estimated to be $1,566 / acre. Using hydrologic models, the runoff is valued at $79 / acre, whereas, recharge value is $1,107 / acre. Development will cause a change in recharge, runoff, and pollution which will decrease societal welfare by $1,288 / acre. Seemingly unrelated regression results show that a percentage increase in population growth in the closest metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is associated with increases in land values of approximately $2 / acre. A one-mile increase in distance from the nearest MSA decreased land values by $4 / acre in 1997, $6 / acre in 2002, and $8 / acre in 2007. The diversity of studies illustrates that a cookbook type of methodology is not appropriate for valuing ecosystem goods and services. On the other hand, development contributes positively to land values through encroachment on agricultural lands.

Machingambi, Memory

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Performance characteristics of PM??? samplers in the presence of agricultural dusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EPA revised the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in 1997 to include a standard for fine particulates (PM???), and was unanimously upheld by the US Supreme Court in February of 2001. The long-term standard was set at 15 mg/scm, and the short-term standard was set at 65 mg/scm. A PM??? sampler was developed for the Federal Reference Method shortly after the revision of the NAAQS, and was mandated "by design" rather than "by performance," due to the limited available performance data. Methods for determining PM??? concentrations in the ambient air are designated as either reference or equivalent methods. Accuracy of the subject method is determined by collocating the subject method with a FRM sampler in an urban environment. However, these samplers are not tested in the presence of agriculture dusts, which have a larger mass median diameter (MMD) than urban dusts. This research addressed the performance characteristics of PM??? samplers in the presence of agricultural dusts. Tests in a controlled laboratory environment were performed on three PM??? samplers: a FRM sampler with Wells Impactor Ninety-Six, a FRM sampler with Sharp-Cut Cyclone, and a High-Volume PM??? Sampler. Three dusts were used for sampling: alumina, corn starch, and wheat flour. Ten replications were performed for each sampler in each dust for a total of ninety replications. Performance characteristics, by way of fractional efficiency curves, could not be determined for all of the samplers. The cut-point and slope for the FRM sampler with WINS were found to be 1.95 0.10 [u]m and 1.31 0.04, respectively. Concentration measurements for the test samplers were compared to the "true" PM??? concentrations, determined by multiplying the fraction less than 10 [u]m from the Coulter Counter PSD times the TSP concentration. The results showed the percent error of the PM??? samplers increased with the MMD of the dust sampled. The hypothesis was that the PM??? samplers used to monitor PM??? concentrations in the ambient air will not accurately perform in an agricultural environment. It was concluded that the use of these PM??? samplers would result in unfair regulation of the agricultural industry.

Pargmann, Amber Rae

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 29-30, 2013 | International Finance Corporation | Washington, D.C. April 29-30, 2013 | International Finance Corporation | Washington, D.C. Open access to publicly funded, agriculturally-relevant data is critical to increasing global food security G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture 2 Auditorium WiFi Name (SSID): GUEST Password: civod3wrad Monday-April 29, 2013 Tuesday-April 30, 2013 Quick-Reference Agenda 6:30-8:30am Registration 8:30-9:30am Welcome 9:30-10:15am Lightning Presentations 10:15-10:45am Networking Break 10:45-11:30am Lightning Presentations 11:30-1:00pm Lunch 1:00-2:15pm Policy Track: Technical Track: G-8 Heads of Delegation Meeting Introduction to Open Data - The Technical Details 2:15-2:45pm Networking Break

345

Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture uses large quantities of energy to pump groundwater for irrigation. This means the cost of energy has important implications for the industry in terms of costs and profitability. Increases in the prices of energy sources such as natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas and diesel can cause economic hardship for irrigators, particularly if those increases are unanticipated. The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize important trends in the current domestic energy situation that could have significant impacts on the future cost and availability of energy, and to show what the implications of those trends are for irrigated agriculture. The primary focus of this study will be on trends in natural gas, since natural gas is the major fuel used for irrigation in the Great Plains states.

Patton, W. P.; Lacewell, R. D.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

National program plan for research and development in solar heating and cooling for building, agricultural, and industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main feature of the directed program is the focus on specific approaches, called paths, to the application of solar energy. A path is the linking of a method of energy collection or rejection with a particular application. Eleven such paths are identified for building applications and eleven for agricultural and industrial process applications. Here, an overview is given of the program plan. The 11 paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and the 11 paths for agricultural and industrial process applications are described. Brief descriptions of these tasks and of the non-engineering tasks are included. The importance of each non-engineering task to the overall R and D program is indicated. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Agricultural Stakeholder Listening Workshops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 14, 2010, American Farmland Trust held a listening workshop in Sardinia, Ohio, to provide information to and collect feedback from farmers and agricultural representatives on the Ohio River Basin Trading Project. The session began with a basic primer on water quality trading given by Jim Klang of Kieser & Associates. The presentation was followed by facilitated discussions. Participants were prompted with a variety of questions developed from earlier listening workshops held in other regions o...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mountain Home Geothermal Project: geothermal energy applications in an integrated livestock meat and feed production facility at Mountain Home, Idaho. [Contains glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home Geothermal Project is an engineering and economic study of a vertically integrated livestock meat and feed production facility utilizing direct geothermal energy from the KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) southeast of Mountain Home, Idaho. A system of feed production, swine raising, slaughter, potato processing and waste management was selected for study based upon market trends, regional practices, available technology, use of commercial hardware, resource characteristics, thermal cascade and mass flow considerations, and input from the Advisory Board. The complex covers 160 acres; utilizes 115 million Btu per hour (34 megawatts-thermal) of geothermal heat between 300/sup 0/F and 70/sup 0/F; has an installed capital of $35.5 million;produces 150,000 hogs per year, 28 million lbs. of processed potatoes per year, and on the order of 1000 continuous horsepower from methane. The total effluent is 200 gallons per minute (gpm) of irrigation water and 7300 tons per year of saleable high grade fertilizer. The entire facility utilizes 1000 gpm of 350/sup 0/F geothermal water. The economic analysis indicates that the complex should have a payout of owner-invested capital of just over three years. Total debt at 11% per year interest would be paid out in 12 (twelve) years.

Longyear, A.B.; Brink, W.R.; Fisher, L.A.; Matherson, R.H.; Neilson, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Economic and environmental impacts of the corn grain ethanol industry on the United States agricultural sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the impacts of increased ethanol production from corn starch on agricultural land use and the environment in the United States. The Policy Analysis System simulation model was used to simulate alternative ethanol production scenarios for 2007 through 2016. Results indicate that increased corn ethanol production had a positive effect on net farm income and economic wellbeing of the US agricultural sector. In addition, government payments to farmers were reduced because of higher commodity prices and enhanced net farm income. Results also indicate that if Conservation Reserve Program land was converted to crop production in response to higher demand for ethanol in the simulation, individual farmers planted more land in crops, including corn. With a larger total US land area in crops due to individual farmer cropping choices, total US crop output rose, which decreased crop prices and aggregate net farm income relative to the scenario where increased ethanol production happened without Conservation Reserve Program land. Substantial shifts in land use occurred with corn area expanding throughout the United States, especially in the traditional corn-growing area of the midcontinent region.

Larson, J.A.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; Menard, R.J.; Hellwinckel, C.M.; West, Tristram O.

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Roadmap for Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee established a goal that biomass will supply 5% of the nations power, 20% of its transportation fuels, and 25% of its chemicals by 2030. These combined goals are approximately equivalent to 30% of the countrys current petroleum consumption. The benefits of a robust biorefinery industry supplying this amount of domestically produced power, fuels, and products are considerable, including decreased demand for imported oil, revenue to the depressed agricultural industry, and revitalized rural economies. A consistent supply of highquality, low-cost feedstock is vital to achieving this goal. This biomass roadmap defines the research and development (R&D) path to supplying the feedstock needs of the biorefinery and to achieving the important national goals set for biomass. To meet these goals, the biorefinery industry must be more sustainable than the systems it will replace. Sustainability hinges on the economic profitability of all participants, on environmental impact of every step in the process, and on social impact of the product and its production. In early 2003, a series of colloquies were held to define and prioritize the R&D needs for supplying feedstock to the biorefinery in a sustainable manner. These colloquies involved participants and stakeholders in the feedstock supply chain, including growers, transporters, equipment manufacturers, and processors as well as environmental groups and others with a vested interest in ensuring the sustainability of the biorefinery. From this series of colloquies, four high-level strategic goals were set for the feedstock area: Biomass Availability By 2030, 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock is needed annually to achieve the power, fuel, and chemical production goals set by the Biomass Research and Development Technology Advisory Production Committee Sustainability Production and use of the 1 billion dry tons annually must be accomplished in a sustainable manner Feedstock Infrastructure An integrated feedstock supply system must be developed and implemented that can serve the feedstock needs of the biorefinery at the cost, quality, and consistency of the set targets System Profitability Economic profitability and sustainability need to be ensured for all required participants in the feedstock supply system. For each step in the biomass supply processproduction, harvesting and collection, storage, preprocessing, system integration, and transportationthis roadmap addresses the current technical situations, performance targets, technical barriers, R&D needs, and R&D priorities to overcome technical barriers and achieve performance targets. Crop residue biomass is an attractive starting feedstock, which shows the best near-term promise as a biorefinery feedstock. Because crop residue is a by-product of grain production, it is an abundant, underutilized, and low cost biomass resource. Corn stover and cereal straw are the two most abundant crop residues available in the United States. Therefore, this roadmap focuses primarily on the R&D needed for using these biomass sources as viable biorefinery feedstocks. However, achieving the goal of 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock will require the use of other biomass sources such as dedicated energy crops. In the long term, the R&D needs identified in this roadmap will need to accommodate these other sources of biomass as well.

J. Richard Hess; Thomas D. Foust; Reed Hoskinson; David Thompson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energetics of a Symmetric Circulation Including Momentum Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of available potential energy (APE) for symmetric circulations, which includes momentum constraints, is presented. The theory is a generalization of the classical theory of APE, which includes only thermal constraints on the circulation. ...

Sorin Codoban; Theodore G. Shepherd

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

356

Scheduling optimization of a real flexible job shop including side ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 19, 2013 ... including side constraints regarding preventive maintenance, fixture availabil- ...... Engineering and Engineering Management, pp. 787791.

357

Toy Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Agency (ANVISA), Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply (MAPA), the National Petroleum Agency, Natural Gas and Biofuels (ANP), the ...

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices...

359

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Uruguay South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

360

Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Chile South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Argentina UN Region South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

362

OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/38/10/48224529.pdf OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Screenshot References: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture[1] "This preliminary report outlines a broad strategy for green growth in the food and agriculture sector. It is part of the OECD's Green Growth Strategy that seeks to define an economic development path that is

363

Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Colombia South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

364

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass, Agriculture Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.fao.org/bestpractices/index_en.htm Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Screenshot References: FAO Best Practices[1] Logo: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Summary "FAO's new model is based on a determination to learn from the Organization's experience and will require new mechanisms that allow and

365

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

367

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

368

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

369

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination ...

370

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

371

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will be diverse and widespread, including renewables, distributed generation, and energy storage. And they will increase rapidly all along the value chain, from suppliers to...

372

Stocks of Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Including SPR)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

373

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.2 Retro-Cx in Federal ESPCs Including Retro-Commissioning In Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Retro-commissioning generally reduces operating and maintenance costs,...

374

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

376

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to...

377

A Social Semiotic Discourse Analysis of Film and Television Portrayals of Agriculture: Implications for American Cultural Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. farm populace is declining rapidly, and the majority of Americans are generations removed from food and fiber production. Society now receives the majority of its information about agriculture-related topics from sources removed from the industry itself, including entertainment media such as films and television programs. To better understand how these entertainment media influence societal perceptions of the food and fiber industry, the researcher sought to explicate the content of entertainment media texts related to agricultural production and to compare that content to previously recorded public perceptions of the industry. Using themes outlined by the Kellogg Foundations 2002 survey of perceptions of rural lifethe pastoral fantasy, the traditional family farm, and the decline of the agrarian traditiona social semiotic content analysis of 23 films and television programs released between 1950 and 2012 was conducted to identify parallels between the content of those media texts and the findings of the Kellogg study. Films and television programs released between 1950 and 1990 contained narrative and visual elements that closely linked those texts to the three themes identified by the Kellogg researchers, indicating that those perceptual elements could have been influenced by pervasive images of traditional agricultural production practices. Films and programs released after 1990 also contained components strongly tying them to the Kellogg study themes with added emphasis on the decline of the agrarian tradition theme.

Specht, Annie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Feasibility Report -- Agricultural and Forestry Solid Wastes Power Generation Demonstration, December 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report on feasibility of using agricultural and forestry wastes for power generation in China

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Source choice in agricultural news coverage: impacts of reporter specialization and newspaper location, ownership, and circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examined coverage of the December 2003 bovine spongiform encephalopathy event to discover reporters sources for breaking agricultural news, the impact of reporter specialization on source choices, and the impact of newspaper differences, including location, circulation, and ownership, on coverage. Quantitative content analysis was performed on 62 stories selected through a keyword search for the period December 23, 2003 through October 31, 2004 from U.S. newspapers included in the LexisNexis database. These stories were divided into two equal groups based on reporter work-role identity and were analyzed by length, number of sources, and source variety, and by location, circulation, and ownership of the newspapers in which they appeared. ANOVA, bivariate correlation, and forced entry regression were statistical techniques used. Results indicated numbers of stories, story length, and numbers of sources per story appear related to newspaper location, and use of scientists and agricultural scientists as sources to be correlated with type of newspaper. Newspaper circulation and ownership type were found to explain a statistically significant amount of variance in number of sources used. No statistically significant differences between mean length or mean number of sources used were found between stories written by science-specialty beat reporters and those written by reporters not assigned to such beats, contradicting previous research. However, while mean overall source variety did not differ between the two reporters groups, work-role identity was found to be correlated with use of scientists and agricultural scientists as sources. Extrapolation from this study suggests it is open to question whether (a) reporters would be well-advised to pursue courses of study or to seek additional training to build defined areas of expertise, better equipping themselves to cover more complex issues; (b) editors should seek candidates with such special training and structure their newsroom routines to accommodate specialty reporters when considering adding employees to their reporting staffs; and (c) universities should offer journalism curricula that facilitate both acquisition of basic reporting skills and registration for substantive electives which build subject-matter knowledge. Answers to these questions should be actively pursued, since they may shape the future of journalism education and practice.

White, Judith McIntosh

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

382

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

383

Validation of a novel expressed sequence tag (EST) clustering method and development of a phylogenetic annotation pipeline for livestock gene families  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prediction of functions of genes in a genome is a key step in all genome sequencing projects. Sequences that carry out important functions are likely to be conserved between evolutionarily distant species and can be identified using cross-species comparisons. In the absence of completed genomes and the accompanying high-quality annotations, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from random cDNA clones are the primary tools for functional genomics. EST datasets are fragmented and redundant, necessitating clustering of ESTs into groups that are likely to have been derived from the same genes. EST clustering helps reduce the search space for sequence homology searching and improves the accuracy of function predictions using EST datasets. This dissertation is a case study that describes clustering of Bos taurus and Sus scrofa EST datasets, and utilizes the EST clusters to make computational function predictions using a comparative genomics approach. We used a novel EST clustering method, TAMUClust, to cluster bovine ESTs and compare its performance to the bovine EST clusters from TIGR Gene Indices (TGI) by using bovine ESTs aligned to the bovine genome assembly as a gold standard. This comparison study reveals that TAMUClust and TGI are similar in performance. Comparisons of TAMUClust and TGI with predicted bovine gene models reveal that both datasets are similar in transcript coverage. We describe here the design and implementation of an annotation pipeline for predicting functions of the Bos taurus (cattle) and Sus scrofa (pig) transcriptomes. EST datasets were clustered into gene families using Ensembl protein family clusters as a framework. Following clustering, the EST consensus sequences were assigned predicted function by transferring annotations of the Ensembl vertebrate protein(s) they are grouped to after sequence homology searches and phylogenetic analysis. The annotations benefit the livestock community by helping narrow down the gamut of direct experiments needed to verify function.

Venkatraman, Anand

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sources of information utilized by California agricultural interest groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing interest group theory describes legislative decision-making as a communication process whereby interest groups research information on issues, combine this information with constituent opinions, and present the resulting information to legislators. Legislators then use this information in developing legislation. The original source of information used by lobbyists greatly impacts the interest groupâ??s ability to effectively represent its policy objectives in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study was to identify and evaluate sources of information utilized by selected California agricultural interest groups. This study determined common sources used among selected California agricultural interest groups, how and why groups choose their sources, the role of trust in information source selection, and what purposes interest groups have for using the information. Data from this study suggest lobbyists of California agricultural interest groups are primarily researching for lobbying purposes. Lobbyists acknowledged the importance of research in their lobbying work. Specifically, two main themes developed from the intervieweesâ?? responses: 1) lobbyists gather the political and technical information needed to thoroughly understand an issue before lobbying on it, and 2) lobbyists find the appropriate information to support their organizationâ??s policy objectives. The purpose of their research and the type of information needed drive how lobbyists research an issue and what information sources they utilize. Lobbyists rely on their previous experiences to determine which sources will provide them with the necessary information. Data from this study suggest four main factors that impact which information sources lobbyists choose to utilize: 1) what information is needed, 2) who their contacts and personal relationships are with, 3) how much they trust potential sources, and 4) other characteristics of the sources such as accessibility, quality and accuracy, brevity and readability, experience of source, current information, scientifically-based, sincere, and/or a source that provides needed pictures or graphics.

Noble, Elisa Lynn

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

386

Logging and Agricultural Residue Supply Curves for the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report quantified the volume of logging residues at the county level for current timber harvests. The cost of recovering logging residues was determined for skidding, yearding, loading, chipping and transporting the residues. Supply curves were developed for ten candidate conversion sites in the Pacific Northwest Region. Agricultural field residues were also quantified at the county level using five-year average crop yields. Agronomic constraints were applied to arrive at the volumes available for energy use. Collection costs and transportation costs were determined and supply curves generated for thirteen candidate conversion sites.

Kerstetter, James D.; Lyons, John Kim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Co-processing of agricultural and biomass waste with coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major thrust of our research program is the use of waste materials as co-liquefaction agents for the first-stage conversion of coal to liquid fuels. By fulfilling one or more of the roles of an expensive solvent in the direct coal liquefaction (DCL) process, the waste material is disposed off ex-landfill, and may improve the overall economics of DCL. Work in our group has concentrated on co-liquefaction with waste rubber tires, some results from which are presented elsewhere in these Preprints. In this paper, we report on preliminary results with agricultural and biomass-type waste as co-liquefaction agents.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, Ji-Perng [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

SOLERAS solar-energy controlled-environment agriculture project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three commercial-size (5-ha), solar-powered, controlled-environment agriculture systems for hot, dry climates are described. The systems use brackish well water for cooling. The well water is desalinated for irrigation using reverse osmosis. Produce output ranges from 44 to 78 kg/m/sup 2/.yr with an overall water consumption of 8 to 139 L/kg produce and electric energy consumption of 111 to 790 Wh/kg produce. The levelized cost ranges from $1.14 to $8.07 per kg of produce.

Luft, W.; Froechtenigt, J.; Falatah, A.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Soleras solar energy controlled-environment agriculture project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three commercial-size (5-ha), solar-powered, controlled-environment agriculture systems for hot, dry climates are described. The systems use brackish well water for cooling. The well water is desalinated for irrigation using reverse osmosis. Produce output ranges from 44 to 78 kg/m/sup 2/. yr with an overall water consumption of 8 to 139 L/kg produce and electric energy consumption of 111 to 790 Wh/kg produce. The levelized cost ranges from $1.14 to $8.07 per kg of produce.

Luft, W.; Falatah, A.; Froechtenigt, J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

391

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

393

Characterizations of Aircraft Icing Environments that Include Supercooled Large Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft icing environments that include supercooled large drops (SLD) greater than 50 ?m in diameter have been made during 38 research flights. These flights were conducted during the First and Third Canadian Freezing Drizzle ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; J. Walter Strapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Farming First-Agriculture and the Green Economy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farming First-Agriculture and the Green Economy Farming First-Agriculture and the Green Economy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Farming First-Agriculture and the Green Economy Agency/Company /Organization: Farming First Sector: Land, Water, Climate Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply, Water Conservation, Land Use Topics: Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Case studies/examples User Interface: Website Website: www.farmingfirst.org/green-economy/ Cost: Free UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Central America, South America Farming First-Agriculture and the Green Economy Screenshot References: Farming First-Agriculture and the Green Economy[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References

397

Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index: Proof of Concept | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index: Proof of Concept Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index: Proof of Concept Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index: Proof of Concept Dataset Summary Description The index tracks change in women's empowerment that occurs as a direct or indirect result of Feed the Future interventions in targeted geographic zones within the initiative's 19 focus countries. Data for the WEAI will be collected every two years in all 19 countries, and baselines were collected in 2011 and 2012. USAID and partners will conduct data analyses to understand the relationships among empowerment, livelihoods, and food security, as well as relationships among the various components of the index.

398

Mexico-Country Note on Climate Change Aspects in Agriculture | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Country Note on Climate Change Aspects in Agriculture Mexico-Country Note on Climate Change Aspects in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Country Note on Climate Change Aspects in Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www-wds.worldbank.org/e Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Mexico-Country Note on Climate Change Aspects in Agriculture[1] Summary "Mexico is the only developing country to have submitted three national communications to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), indicating strong commitment by the government for addressing climate change across sectors. Agriculture contributes little, in relative

399

Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

Scherr, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

402

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

403

Agriculture in an area impacted by past uranium mining activities  

SciTech Connect

The shallow aquifer near the old Cunha Baixa uranium mine (Viseu, Portugal) was contaminated by acid mine drainage. Concentration of radionuclides in water from irrigation wells and in the topsoil layer of the agriculture fields nearby display enhanced concentrations of uranium, radium and polonium. Two types of agriculture land in this area were selected, one with enhanced and another with low uranium concentrations, for controlled growth of lettuce and potatoes. Plants were grown in replicate portions of land (two plots) in each soil type and were periodically irrigated with water from wells. In each soil, one plot was irrigated with water containing low concentration of dissolved uranium and the other plot with water containing enhanced concentration of dissolved uranium. At the end of the growth season, plants were harvested and analysed, along with soil and irrigation water samples. Results show the accumulation of radionuclides in edible parts of plants, specially in the field plots with higher radionuclide concentrations in soil. Radionuclides in irrigation water contributed less to the radioactivity accumulated in plants than radionuclides from soils. (authors)

Carvalho, F. P.; Oliveira, J. M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Neves, O.; Vicente, E. M. [Instituto Superior Tecnico Centro de Petrologia e Geoquimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M. M. [Dept Ciencias do Ambiente, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda 1399-017 Lisboa (Portugal)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Composition and utilization of cellulose for chemicals from agricultural residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken for several reasons. Firstly, because of the scarcity of data on the composition of certain agricultural residues generated predominantly in California, it could only be inferred from the published composition of agricultural grains and wood what the carbohydrate composition of the residue straw, stems, and roots might be. Published methods of analysis on wood and grains were adapted or modified to suit these materials, resulting in an analytical system applicable to these residues. Secondly, a series of chemical pretreatments were studied to see if sugar production by enzymatic hydrolysis might be improved. Also these studies are used as a basis of generating the data for chemical engineering parameters of the Berkeley process. Since lignin is ultimately used as a feed back energy source in the Berkeley process, it is not necessary for it to be in the form of a relatively low weight polymer. Therefore, a study on the use of recoverable chemical solvents for dilignification by solution, rather than by a depolymerization reaction is indicated.

Sciamanna, A.F.; Freitas, R.P.; Wilke, C.R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Bibliography of Texas State and Local Agricultural Literature From 1820-1945.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This bibliography was compiled for the Texas state and local literature component of the United States Agriculture Information Network (USAIN) Preservation Project Plan. The USAIN Preservation Project Plan is a national coordinated effort to preserve United States agricultural literature. This bibliography is an attempt to identify all Texas agricultural literature published by state and local entities, both governmental and commercial, prior to 1946. There are 1970 monographic and 685 serial titles listed in this bibliography.

Sandall, Sharon K.; McGeachin, Robert B.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Design of large-scale agricultural wireless sensor networks: email from the vineyard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and implementation of a large-scale Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for agriculture monitoring. As a part of validation we have deployed a prototype of 64 sensors to monitor a commercial vineyard. The system provides ... Keywords: WSN testbed, agricultural WSNs, agriculture monitoring, commercial vineyards, data collection, data storage, geographical coverage, large-scale WSNs, spatial resolution, vineyeard monitoring, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Christine Jardak; Krisakorn Rerkrai; Aleksandar Kovacevic; Janne Riihijarvi; Petri Mahonen

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

TrAgLor, an implementation of IEEE LOM draft standard in agriculture and life sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Turkish Agricultural Learning Objects Repository (TrAgLor) is a multilingual IEEE LOM Draft Standard compatible Learning Objects (LO) repository. It has been developed as a test-bed to enable the storage, search and retrieval ... Keywords: LOM, Turkey, agricultural metadata, agriculture, e-learning, electronic learning, environmental sciences, food sciences, interoperability, learning object metadata, learning objects, learning repositories, online learning, searching, veterinary sciences

Zeynel Cebeci; Yoldas Erdogan; Murat Kara

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Agricultural Technology Adoption: A Panel Analysis of Smallholder Farmers Fertilizer use in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Market Liberalization in Kenya. Tegemeo Working Paper:Malawi, Zambia, and Kenya. Regional Strategic AgriculturalTechnologies in Embu District, Kenya. Mexico, D.F. : CIMMYT

Olwande, John; Sikei, Geophrey; Mathenge, Mary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Identifying perceptions associated with agricultural chemical use: Implications for pesticide applicator training programs in Illinois.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dichotomy was found to exist between how pesticide applicators have perceived issues related to agricultural chemical use and what applicators have believed to be (more)

Thompson, Dennis Ray

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Multifunctionality of Agriculture in the European Union: Is there substance behind the discourse's smoke?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

public support to trade liberalisation: The EC believe thatprocess of further liberalisation of trade in agriculture.further substantial liberalisation on a fair and equitable

Garzon, Izabelle

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Impact of Agricultural Trade Liberalisation on the welfare of rural communities in Bangladesh .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study was to analyse the impact of agricultural trade liberalisation on the welfare of rural households in Bangladesh. The study used (more)

Talukder, Dayal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Impacts of renewable fuel regulation and production on agriculture, energy, and welfare.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this dissertation is to study the impact of U.S. federal renewable fuel regulations on energy and agriculture commodity markets and welfare. We (more)

Mcphail, Lihong Lu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

414

Characteristics and influence of advisory committees on program planning in Texas scondary agricultural programs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To be in accordance with state and federal law, secondary agricultural programs must involve parents, academic career and technical (CTE) teachers, administrators, and local business (more)

Barbour, Joseph C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Texas agricultural producers' perceptions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is a trade agreement between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico that encompasses the agricultural industry in Texas. However, (more)

Spraberry, Jennifer L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nano-structures of ?-SiC Formed by Pyrolosis of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... be obtained from agricultural waste such as rice husks, corn husks, and sorghum leaves by controlled conditions of temperature and surrounding atmosphere.

417

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

420

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

422

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

423

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

SciTech Connect

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Environmental effects of planting energy crops at larger scales on agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing from research-scale to larger-scale plantings of herbaceous and short rotation woody crops on agricultural land in the United States has raised questions about the positive and negative environmental effects of farmland conversion. Research currently underway at experimental plot scales enables us examine runoff quality and quantity, erosion, and changes in soil characteristics associated with these energy crops compared to conventional row crops. A study of the fate of chemicals applied to the different crop types will enhance our knowledge of uptake, release, and off-site movement of nutrients and pesticides. Ongoing biodiversity studies in the North Central US allow us to compare differences in scale of plantings on bird and small mammal populations and habitat use. Plantings of 50--100 or more contiguous acres are needed to allow both researchers and producers to determine the benefits of including temporal energy crop rotations in the landscape. Results from these larger-scale plantings will help identify (1) the monitoring requirements needed to determine environmental effects of larger-scale plantings, (2) the best methods to determine the environmental effects of rotation length and the best crop management strategies for full-scale production. Because of the variations in soils, temperature, rainfall and other climatic conditions, as well as differences in the types of energy crops most suited for different regions, monitoring of large-scale plantings in these different regions of the US will be required to predict the environmental effects of regional agricultural land-use shifts for full-scale plantings.

Tolbert, V.R.; Downing, M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental effects of planting biomass crops at larger scales on agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing from research-scale to larger-scale plantings of herbaceous. and short rotation woody crops on agricultural land in the United States has raised questions about the positive and negative environmental effects of farmland conversion. Research currently underway at experimental plot scales enables us examine runoff quality and quantity, erosion, and changes in soil characteristics associated with these energy crops compared to conventional row crops. A study of the fate of chemicals applied to the different crop types will enhance our knowledge of uptake, release, and off-site movement of nutrients and pesticides. Ongoing biodiversity studies in the North Central US allow us to compare differences in scale of plantings on bird and small mammal populations and habitat use. Plantings of 50--100 or more contiguous acres are needed to allow both researchers and producers to determine the benefits of including temporal energy crop rotations in the landscape. Results from these larger-scale plantings will help identify (1) the monitoring requirements needed to determine environmental effects of larger-scale plantings, (2) the best methods to determine the environmental effects of rotation length and the best crop management strategies for full-scale production. Because of the variations in soils, temperature, rainfall and other climatic conditions, as well as differences in the types of energy crops most suited for different regions, monitoring of large-scale plantings in these different regions of the US will be required to predict the environmental effects of regional agricultural land-use shifts for full-scale plantings.

Tolbert, V.R.; Downing, M.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An analysis of agricultural education faculty compensation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Federation of Teachers (2001) noted that to ensure all students are successful, teacher salaries must be commensurate with teacher performance. Studies, however, have shown this is not occurring. In order to recruit, retain, and reward the best agricultural education faculty, research on this topic is needed to ensure faculty are compensated fairly and compensation systems are aligned with merit, motivation, performance, retention, environmental and financial needs of educators. The purpose of this descriptive and correlational research was to examine agricultural education faculty perceptions of faculty compensation levels and compensation practices. Systematic sampling procedures were used to identify participants (N=196) for the study. 154 post-secondary agricultural education faculty members participated in the study. Faculty compensation level scores and compensation practice scores were computed and compared to personal characteristics. Over 60% of participants indicated their compensation level was too low. Overall, faculty compensation level scores tended to be negative. Faculty compensation level scores tended to increase when: faculty perceived interdepartmental salary to be fair; faculty perceived salary by rank to be similar at their university; faculty perceived internal equity of salaries at their department across rank; and faculty perceived salary by rank to be similar at other universities. Overall, faculty compensation practice scores tended to be negative. Faculty compensation practice scores tended to be higher when: yearly evaluations were conducted; counteroffers were considered; interdepartmental salary was fair; salary by rank was fair; and merit based pay systems were used. Recommendations for pay for performance are provided. Faculty members with low compensation level scores may also want to consider other employment opportunities, ask for a raise, or garner counteroffers. Recommendations for ensuring internal and external equity of salaries are provided. Administrators should not wait for problems to occur before attempting to align compensation practices with employee needs and performance. Failure to ensure internally and externally fair wages may result in increased frustration, low job satisfaction, and demotivation at best, and job-hopping, counteroffer hunting, resentment, and disruptions in the workplace at worse.

Wicks, Aaron-Marie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

Hummel, J.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

432

Major initiatives in materials research at Western include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in nuclear reactors; and a third in Engineering- J. Jiang, supported by UNENE, working on control in the theory of condensed matter, including its applications to polymers, optical, electronic, and magnetic NSERC Industrial Research Chairs who together make Western a leading university in nuclear power

Christensen, Dan

433

Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

This analysis is one of 10 technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) (i.e., the biosphere model). It documents development of agricultural and environmental input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters.

K. Rasmuson; K. Rautenstrauch

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

435

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

436

Coordination). Participants include representatives from Balancing Authorities (BAs), Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MRO Subject Matter Expert Team is an industry stakeholder group which includes subject matter experts from MRO member organizations in various technical areas. Any materials, guidance, and views from stakeholder groups are meant to be helpful to industry participants; but should not be considered approved or endorsed by MRO staff or its board of directors unless specified. Page | 2 Disclaimer The Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) Standards Committee (SC) is committed to providing training and non-binding guidance to industry stakeholders regarding existing and emerging Reliability Standards. Any materials, including presentations, were developed through the MRO SC by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from member organizations within the MRO region. In 2012, SMEs in the field of System Operator Communications were brought together to prepare a guide for complying with NERC Reliability Standard COM-002-2 (Communications and

Will Behnke; Alliant Energy; Jacalynn Bentz; Great River Energy; Marie Knox Miso; Jacalynn Bentz; Marie Knox; Terry Harbour

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) including a continuous mixture of active and sterile neutrinos, 4) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 5) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favored solutions are robust, but the presence at 3 sigma of individual sterile solutions and the active Just So2 solution is sensitive to the analysis assumptions.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE TEXAS A&M DISTINGUISHED TEXAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE TEXAS A&M DISTINGUISHED TEXAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD The agricultural teaching, research, extension and service entities within Texas A&M AgriLife of The Texas A&M University System have. It is this strong tradition that distinguishes Texas A&M AgriLife throughout the nation and many other parts

442

Definition and analysis of new agricultural farm energetic indicators using spatial OLAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural energy consumption is an important environmental and social issue. Several diagnoses have been proposed to define indicators for analyzing energy consumption at large scale of agricultural farm activities (year, farm, family of production, ... Keywords: energetic indicators, spatial OLAP, spatial data warehouses

Sandro Bimonte; Kamal Boulil; Jean-Pierre Chanet; Marilys Pradel

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) memorandum on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supersedes CEQ's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1976.

444

Mining pixel evolutions in satellite image time series for agricultural monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a technique to help the experts in agricultural monitoring, by mining Satellite Image Time Series over cultivated areas. We use frequent sequential patterns extended to this spatiotemporal context in order to extract sets of ... Keywords: agricultural monitoring, constraints, satellite image time series, spatiotemporal patterns

Andreea Julea; Nicolas Mger; Christophe Rigotti; Emmanuel Trouv; Philippe Bolon; Vasile L?z?rescu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Agricultural productivity potential assessment by using rainfall contribution index in Sub-Sahara Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food deficit alleviation is the most important aspect for poverty reduction in the entire Sub-Sahara African (SSA) region. This alleviation can be achieved by increasing agricultural productivity. The deficit is in one way or the other attributed to ... Keywords: agricultural water, effective rainfall, food deficit, planting period, productivity, rainfall contribution index

Yu-Min Wang; Seydou Traore; Willy Namaona; Tienfuan Kerh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

447

Networked control system for the guidance of a four-wheel steering agricultural robotic platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A current trend in the agricultural area is the development of mobile robots and autonomous vehicles for precision agriculture (PA). One of the major challenges in the design of these robots is the development of the electronic architecture for the control ...

Eduardo Pacincia Godoy; Giovana Tangerino Tangerino; Rubens Andr Tabile; Ricardo Yassushi Inamasu; Arthur Jos Vieira Porto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Book Review Conserving biodiversity in agricultural landscapes: Model-based planning tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Conserving biodiversity in agricultural landscapes: Model-based planning tools Robert K of conservation within agricultural landscapes. The book's authors and case studies are predominantly from developed United States and European countries, and as such, the book's application in some ways is lim

Moore, Jeffrey E.

449

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa Steven Met Office C-130 within a distinct biomass burning plume during the Southern AFricAn Regional science, and P. R. Buseck, Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern

Highwood, Ellie

450

Agricultural Sciences in China 2005, 4(1): 101-105  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Sciences in China 2005, 4(1): 101-105 http://www.ChinaAgriSci.com Studies on the Situation of Soil Organic Carbon Storage in Croplands in Northeast of China QIU Jian-jun1, WANG Li, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, P.R.China 2 Meteorology Study of Earth, Oceans

451

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

452

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

Bawendi, Moungi G. (Boston, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (New York, NY)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture Property Type Number Description Number of Low Emissions development planning(ProgramTopics) and Agriculture(Sector) programs for a country Pages using the property "NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 3 + Armenia + 1 + Aruba + 0 + Australia + 0 + Austria + 0 + Azerbaijan + 0 + B Bahamas + 0 + Bahrain + 0 + Bangladesh + 3 + Barbados + 0 + Belarus + 0 + Belgium + 0 + Belize + 0 + Benin + 0 + Bermuda + 0 + Bhutan + 1 +

456

Energy and Agriculture Depts. Provide $8.3 Million in Funding for Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Agriculture Depts. Provide $8.3 Million in Funding for and Agriculture Depts. Provide $8.3 Million in Funding for Biofuels Research Energy and Agriculture Depts. Provide $8.3 Million in Funding for Biofuels Research June 7, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced that the Department of Energy and the Department of Agriculture have jointly selected 11 projects for awards totaling $8.3 million for biobased fuels research that will accelerate the development of alternative fuel resources. "These research projects build upon DOE's strategic investments in genomics and biotechnology and strengthen our commitment to developing a robust bioenergy future vital to America's energy and economic security," Secretary Bodman said.

457

Open Data for Agriculture Offers Lift-Off for Global Food Security |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Agriculture Offers Lift-Off for Global Food Security for Agriculture Offers Lift-Off for Global Food Security Open Data for Agriculture Offers Lift-Off for Global Food Security Submitted by Data.gov Administrator on Mon, 04/29/2013 - 3:54pm Log in to vote 0 Posted by Dr. Catherine Woteki, USDA's Chief Scientist and Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics, on April 29, 2013 at 2:45 PM. The opening day of the G-8 International Conference on Open Data for Agriculture was action-packed and inspiring. From the moment the doors opened at 7:30 am, the air was punctuated with the sound of languages from across the globe. Scientists, policy makers, and leaders from the non-profit and development community all shared a day of discovery and connection around the unlimited opportunity in open data for agriculture.

458

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach M. Sperow Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 M. Eve US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit Fort Collins, Colorado 80522 K. Paustian Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 Abstract Field studies across the U.S. have been used to estimate soil C stock changes that result from changes in agricultural management. Data from these studies are not easily extrapolated to reflect changes at a national scale because soils and climate vary locally and regionally. These studies are also limited to addressing existing changes in

459

Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-CDKN-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/ Country Colombia UN Region South America References CDKN Site[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CDKN Site" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Colombia-The_Development_of_a_Climate_Compatible_Agriculture_Plan&oldid=699762"

460

CDKN-Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/ Country Colombia UN Region South America References CDKN Site[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CDKN Site" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CDKN-Colombia-The_Development_of_a_Climate_Compatible_Agriculture_Plan&oldid=4075

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

462

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six limiting factors are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Programmatic environmental assessment of the DOE Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program's potential environmental impacts are evaluated to ensure that environmental issues are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process. The existing environment is studied for the following: grain drying; crop drying; livestock shelter heating; food processing; textile products; lumber and wood products; paper products; chemicals; petroleum refining; stone, clay, and glass products; and primary metals industries. Environmental impacts of the proposed action on the following are studied: air quality, water quality, ecosystems, health and safety, land use, esthetics, and social and institutional impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

466

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

468

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

469

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

SciTech Connect

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

Marriott, Craig D

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

472

A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Texas agricultural drought losses reach record $5.2 billion http://agrilife.org/today/2011/08/17/texas-agricultural-drought-losses-reach-record-5-2-billion/[8/18/2011 4:33:03 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas agricultural drought losses reach record $5.2 billion http://agrilife.org/today/2011/08/17/texas-agricultural-drought-losses-reach-record-5-2-billion/[8/18/2011 4:33:03 PM] CATEGORY WE'RE SOCIAL Science & Tech World Ag Twitter Facebook Texas agricultural drought losses reach record $5.2 billion

Wilkins, Neal

475

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management intensity, and boost equilibrium commodity prices. Later a major empirical modeling section uses the U.S. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model with Greenhouse Gases (FASOMGHG) to simulate land use and production responses to various biofuel and climate policy scenarios. Simulations are performed to assess the effects of imposing biofuel mandates in the U.S. consistent with the Renewable Fuels Standard of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2). Simulations are run for several climate mitigation policy scenarios (with varying GHG (CO2) prices and eligibility restrictions for GHG offset activities) with and without conservation land recultivation. Important simulation outputs include time trajectories for land use, GHG emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production shifts that can influence water consumption and nutrient use in regions already plagued by water scarcity and quality concerns. Results suggest that the potential magnitude of climate mitigation on commodity markets and exports is substantially higher than under biofuel expansion in isolation, raising concerns of international leakage and stimulating the Food vs. Carbon debate. Finally, a reduced-form dynamic emissions trading model of the U.S. economy is developed using simulation output from FASOMGHG and the National Energy Modeling System to test the effect of biofuel mandate expansion and domestic offset eligibility restrictions on total economy-wide GHG abatement costs. Findings are that while the RFS2 raises the marginal costs of offsets, full abatement costs depend on a number of policy factors. GHG payment incentives for forest management and non-CO2 agricultural offsets can increase full abatement costs by more than 20%.

Baker, Justin Scott

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

478

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

479

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

480

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agriculture including livestock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

482

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The e...

Eggenberger, P; Carrier, F; Fernandes, J; Santos, N C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Analysis of alpha Centauri AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of alpha Cen A and B based on new seismological data for alpha Cen B by Carrier & Bourban (2003) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including atomic diffusion. Taking into account the numerous observational constraints now available for the alpha Cen system, we find a stellar model which is in good agreement with the astrometric, photometric, spectroscopic and asteroseismic data. The global parameters of the alpha Cen system are now firmly constrained to an age of t=6.52+-0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.275+-0.010 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0434+-0.0020. Thanks to these numerous observational constraints, we confirm that the mixing-length parameter alpha of the B component is larger than the one of the A component, as already suggested by many authors (Noels et al. 1991, Fernandes & Neuforge 1995 and Guenther & Demarque 2000): alpha_B is about 8% larger than alpha_A (alpha_A=1.83+-0.10 and alpha_B=1.97+-0.10). Moreover, we show that asteroseismic measurements enable to determine the radii of both stars with a very high precision (errors smaller than 0.3%). The radii deduced from seismological data are compatible with the new interferometric results of Kervella et al. (2003) even if they are slightly larger than the interferometric radii (differences smaller than 1%).

P. Eggenberger; C. Charbonnel; S. Talon; G. Meynet; A. Maeder; F. Carrier; G. Bourban

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

484

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the me