Sample records for agriculture forest service

  1. United States Department of Agriculture / Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    United States Department of Agriculture / Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Research Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 8 p Sciences Laboratory of the Rocky Mountain Research Station (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service

  2. agriculture forest service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agricultural Extension Service--Bexar County Offices, Bexar County Master Gardeners, San Antonio Water Systems and Texas A&M University Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  3. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM): Model structure and policy applications. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.M.; Alig, R.J.; Callaway, J.M.; McCarl, B.A.; Winnett, S.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest and Agricultural Sector Opimization Model (FASOM) is a dynamic, nonlinear programming model of the forest and agricultural sectors in the United States. The FASOM model initially was developed to evaluate welfare and market impacts of alternative policies for sequestering carbon in trees but also has been applied to a wider range of forest and agricultural sector policy scenarios. The authors describe the model structure and give selected examples of policy applications. A summary of the data sources, input data file format, and the methods used to develop the input data files also are provided.

  4. Forest density mapping in the lower 48 states: A regression procedure. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) research unit conducted a project to map the distribution of forest lands for the entire United States. Forest types and forest densities were mapped, and a new forest type group map for the country was produced (Powell and others, in press; Zhu and Evans 1992). The project supported the 1993 Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Update program, by which the Forest Service was required to provide statistics on current forest land and rangeland conditions.

  5. ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACRONYMS ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs BLM Bureau of Land Wetlands Inventory ODA Oregon Department of Agriculture ODEQ Oregon Department of Environmental Quality ODF Department of Agriculture USDI United States Department of the Interior USFS United States Forest Service

  6. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    1976 . Disturbance during logging stimulates re- generation of koa. USDA Forest Servo Res. Note PSW-306 and distribution of Acacia koa re- genera tion after logging were studied on a 500-acre (202-ha) tract of koa forest heavily infested with Passi- /1ora mol/issima vines on the island of Hawaii. Koa seedling density

  7. FACT SHEETUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM SERVICE AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    and forest lands will be rededicated to new shrub willow planting for biomass purposes. To support shrub enrollment. The 3,500 acres will be planted in 2013 and 2014 to provide a steady supply of this biomassFACT SHEETUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM SERVICE AGENCY Page 1 June 2012 Biomass Crop

  8. Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  9. Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets...

  10. Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry -Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-988 Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry - Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service United States Department of Agriculture - Forestry Service Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Natural Resources Conservation Service Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food

  11. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  12. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  13. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  14. agricultural information services: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ductive (R) stages. Table 1 lists Mukhtar, Saqib 3 United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  15. Forest Service Patrol Captains and Patrol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means and public property. Nationally, a successful program was characterized as one with sufficient resources of Agriculture is dedicated to the principle of multiple use management of the Nation's forest resources

  16. Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    University Extension Service has drawn up best practices for schools to imple- ment to reduce their pesticide are qualified to run Coast Guard-required safety drills on their own vessels. Oregon's commercial fishing

  17. Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla Grundy (University of Zimbabwe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla and a variety of other ecosystem services. However the expansion of agricultural land and the curing of tobacco is accelerating deforestation and forest degradation rates. These structural changes to the ecosystem threaten

  18. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use and burning of agricultural waste in the developingsa- vanna, forest, agricultural waste, and peat fires toex- tratropics, 15%), agricultural waste burning (3%), and

  19. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing June 18, 2008 - 4:29pm Addthis In an effort to encourage...

  20. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Research Participation Program -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973Managed by ORAU Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

  1. Expanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Forest Service research on recycling is being led by scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPLExpanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology Theodore L. Laufenberg, Program Manager Forest Products Conservation and Recycling Said Abubakr

  2. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

  3. Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets of possible deleterious effects of climate change on agricultural and forest productivity has been raised

  4. agricultural extension service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operators... Huett, Buffy K. 2012-06-07 5 Cooperative Extension Service College of Agriculture and Engineering Websites Summary: E R SI T YT Managing Weeds in Alfalfa Guide A-325...

  5. agricultural extension services: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operators... Huett, Buffy K. 2012-06-07 5 Cooperative Extension Service College of Agriculture and Engineering Websites Summary: E R SI T YT Managing Weeds in Alfalfa Guide A-325...

  6. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-1010 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Research Associate, Natural Resource Ecology and Management Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook Oklahoma

  7. Markets for Ecosystem Services from Agriculture: Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Credit Trading, potential for but does not exist yet for agriculture in FL · Renewable Energy: ­ Growing from Agriculture: Policy & Market Trends · Increased federal funding in recent years dedicated Participates in ES Markets? BUYERS - Government agencies - NGOs - Private individuals - Corporations

  8. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  9. FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY FORESTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    FORESTRY United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Area #12;Page 2 D R AFT BACKGROUND AND MISSION The Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry was estab- lished in October. The Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry responds to urban and community forestry information needs

  10. Forest and Soil Ecosystem Services SOS 4932/SOS 6932

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    life. These services include carbon sequestration, biodiversity, stabilization of hydrologic cycles treatment, biological filtering, plant remediation) b. Air quality c. Nutrient Cycling d. Carbon Sequestration Topic 6 ­ Biologically related Forest and Soil ESs (November 10 to November 19) a. Biodiversity

  11. Forest plantations in the Midsouth, USA. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plantation forestry is one means of controlling the temporal and spatial aspects of stand regeneration after harvest. Intensive plantation forestry can ultimately reduce harvesting pressure and disturbance on natural stands and and stands intended to be set aside for esthetics, recreation, or watershed protection. Reported here is the status of forest plantations in the Midsouth States. It is important to know if plantations are meeting their fullest potential and what shortcomings, if any, need to be addressed. Information gathered includes plantation area, forest type, ownership, volume, site class, and stockings. Additionally, comparisons were made to see if there was a difference between plantation and natural-stand volumes.

  12. Cooperative Extension Service College of Agriculture and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    marketing area, · Visual estimates were difficult to substantiate, and · Grades were not related to animal grades are based on estimated net energy and are classified as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Visual, established in 1933, were revised in 1944 and again in 1949 under the authority of the Agricultural Marketing

  13. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesiaforest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997–2009) G. R. vanin 2004: Importance of peat burn- ing and pyroconvective

  14. Potential impacts of tighter Forest Service log export restrictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal law restricts the export of unprocessed timber cut from national forests in the western half of the United States. Also, purchasers of national forest timber are restricted from substituting timber harvested from federal lands for privately owned timber that they export. GAO reviewed the magnitude of and the potential impacts from extending the substitution restriction to cover third parties who subsequently acquire Forest Service timber from the original purchasers - an export industry practice commonly referred to as third-party substitution. According to the Forest Service and timber industry associations, third-party substitution approximates 100 million board feet annually in the western United States. They said that if the practice were banned, some companies could acquire national forest timber at lower prices because of decreased demand and competition, and the lower prices would result in less government revenues. Also, a ban could disrupt traditional log markets and business practices. The Forest Service believes it could not enforce a ban on third-party substitution without additional legal authority and staff.

  15. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Habitat Evaluation Guide for the Lesser Prairie

  16. Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program and Training #12;Acknowledgments The Indian Forest Service Officer Training program coordinators at Colorado University Center for Protected Area Management and Training · Colorado State University Warner College

  17. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 7690 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack covariance flux sites across China, and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and water useDirect Agricultural and Forest Meteorology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agrformet Carbon fluxes

  18. An Exploration of forest service partnerships from an interorganizational relations perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Erik D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sector involvement in public services delivery was appealing. The United States Forest Service (USFS) has worked cooperatively with a number of entities throughout its history. It was one of the first federal agencies to explicitly recognize public.... The growth of Forest Service partnerships with the private sector is due, in part, to the Challenge Cost Grant Program. First funded in 1988, the program provides grants for recreation and conservation projects in which the Forest Service matches actual...

  19. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General. in the aircraft nuclear propulsion department at the National Reactor Testing Station in Idaho. In 1961 Rothermel.S. Department of Agriculture, Fire Laboratory at Missoula was conceived in the aftermath of the Mann Gulch fire

  20. Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl at Western Economics Association Meetings, July 5-8, 2001, San Francisco #12;2 Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Alterations in agricultural and forestry (AF) land use and

  1. Comparison of AVHRR classification and aerial photography interpretation for estimation of forest area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lannom, K.B.; Evans, D.L.; Zhu, Z.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service Southern Forest Experiment Station`s Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) unit uses a dot count method to estimate the percentage of forest area in counties or parishes from aerial photographs. The research reported in this paper was designed to determine whether Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data could be used to estimate forest area at the county or parish level. For this study, AVHRR data for three parishes in central Louisiana were extracted from a 1991 AVHRR forest type map of the United States. Photo interpretation data were obtained from a digital mosaic of aerial photography of the parishes. Forest area estimates obtained by means of photo interpretation did not differ significantly from those obtained by analyzing AVHRR data.

  2. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-203. 2007. 67 Reintroducing Fire to the Oak Forests of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of Pennsylvania: Response of Striped Maple1 Patrick H. Brose,2 Gary W. Miller,3 and Kurt W. Gottschalk3 Abstract throughout eastern North America, including the mid-Atlantic region (Abrams 1992, Brose et al. 2001, Yaussy, WV. #12;Management Strategies--Reintroducing Fire to Oak Forests--Brose et al. USDA Forest Service

  3. Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: EnergyCoeur dColmar,US Forest Service Program

  4. Old growth in northwestern California National Forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, D.; Warbington, R.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates old-growth forest area and summarizes stand characteristics of old growth in northwestern California National Forests by forest type. Old-growth definitions for each forest type are used.

  5. Soil and vegetation response to soil compaction and forest floor removal after aspen harvesting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alban, D.H.; Host, G.E.; Elioff, J.D.; Shadis, D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced soil porosity and organic matter removal have been identified as common factors associated with loss of forest productivity (Powers et al. 1990). In both agriculture and forestry, management activities can modify soil porosity and organic matter with resultant impacts on vegetative growth. As part of a nationwide long-term soil productivity (LTSP) study soil porosity and organic matter are being experimentally manipulated on large plots to determine the impacts of such manipulations on growth and species diversity for a wide range of forest types.

  6. agricultural research service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center in Florence, South Carolina, is seeking a POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE, Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: The USDA, Agricultural Research...

  7. Tropical Forestry Researchat the USDA Forest Service's Instituteof Pacific Islands Forestry1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Tropical Forestry Researchat the USDA Forest Service's Instituteof Pacific Islands Forestry1 C greater emphasis on tropical forestry management and research was provided by the International Forestry Islands Forestry in Hawaii, the Institute of Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico, and the U S . Forest

  8. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 45 Effects of Forest Harvest on Stream-Water Quality and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 45 Effects of Forest Harvest on Stream-Water:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract: The effects of forest harvest on stream-water quality and nitrogen cycling were examined for a redwood to gain insights into changes in nitrogen cycling after harvesting activities. Stream-water nitrate

  9. Session K--Fuel Loadings in Forests, Woodlands, and Savannas--Ffolliott, Gottfried, DeBano USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Session K--Fuel Loadings in Forests, Woodlands, and Savannas--Ffolliott, Gottfried, DeBano USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 271 Fuel Loadings in Forests, Woodlands, and Savannas to increase the loadings of downed woody fuels. Ecologists and land managers are reintroducing fire

  10. Forested tract-size profile of South Carolina`s NIPF landowners. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information gathered from 3078 permanent forest survey sample plots showed that nearly 0.9 million acres, or 10 percent of the nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) timberland in South Carolina is in forested tracts 10 acres or less. Forested tracts ranging from 11 to 100 acres accounted for the largest proportion of NIPF timberland. Forested tract size varied significantly by NIPF-ownership group. By NIPF-ownership group, the other corporate group recorded the highest average forested tract size of 3,802 acres. Volume of softwood growing stock as significantly higher in the larger tract size categories. Hardwood growing-stock volume per acre was significantly higher in the largest and smallest forested tract-size classes. Softwood growing-stock removals exceeded growth across all forested-parcel categories, whereas hardwood growing-stock growth surpassed hardwood removals in two tract-size classes.

  11. Assistant Professor Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences (SAFES), within the College of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnhoff, David

    Assistant Professor ­ Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural Professor level in the area of Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering. The position is a 9-month.S. News and World Report. The successful candidate will be expected to develop a nationally

  12. Forest statistics for Michigan's eastern upper peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) is a continuing endeavor as mandated by the Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978. The objective of FIA is to periodically inventory the Nation's forest land to determine its extent, condition, and volume of timber, growth, and removals. Up-to-date resource information is essential to frame forest policies and programs.

  13. Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    results are from four 1999 studies that were conducted in cooperation among West Texas Guar ContractorTexas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System 1999 Studies for Guar, Texas growers and Calvin Trostle, Texas Ag. Extension Service, Lubbock. Each study represents the results

  14. Estimating lake susceptibility to acidification due to acid deposition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, D.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Forest System lands contain a wide variety of surface waters ranging from small, sensitive, remote wilderness lakes to large, heavily used recreational reservoirs. The USDA Forest Service is responsible for the management and protection of these diverse water resources. Considerations of impacts on water quantity and quality are an integral part of most land-use decisions made by Forest Service land managers. The paper describes a graphical method of using lake chemistry data and rates of sulfur (and nitrogen) deposition to estimate the likelihood of lakes becoming acidified if subjected to increased levels of deposition.

  15. Changing national forest values: A content analysis. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, D.N.; Xu, Z.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This evolution of forest values is currently being widely discussed and debated in the forestry community. It is often claimed that a fundamental shift in forest values has taken place in recent decades. Gordon argued that a shift in public values is part of the explanation for the declining influence of the multiple-use sustained-yield paradigm of forest management. It is increasingly recognized that the values people hold about forest ecosystems are an important part of the social underpinning of ecosystem management, the emerging forest management paradigm. In either case, values play a critical role in identifying ecosystem management goals, setting the context for decisionmaking, and guiding our choices.

  16. Author's personal copy Valuing pollination services to agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    Keywords: Apis mellifera biodiversity-ecosystem function ecosystem services native bee pollinator valuation ecosystem service valuation wild bee Crop pollination by animal pollinators is an important ecosystem service for which there is no generally ac- cepted valuation method. Here, we show that two existing

  17. Valuing pollination services to agriculture Rachael Winfree a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    biodiversity-ecosystem function ecosystem services native bee pollinator valuation ecosystem service valuation wild bee Crop pollination by animal pollinators is an important ecosystem service for which there is no generally ac- cepted valuation method. Here, we show that two existing valuation methods, previously thought

  18. Notes on Forest and Ornamental Trees on the Grounds of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, H. (Helge)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38.2- ruis-lorn TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO. 105. JUNE, 1908. NOTES ON FOREST AND ORNAMENTAL TREES ON THE GROUN1)S OF THE RAL AND MECHANICAL CO LLEGE OF TTE H. NESS, ASSISTANT HORTLCULTURIST. POSTOFFICE COLLEGE... and quite luxuriant character. The annual rainfall at College varies between 36 and 40 inches, or about the same as that of the western half of the great forest belt of East Texas. The temperature has varied during the time that our trees have been under...

  19. agricultural advisory services: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statement of Service Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: University or ICWS and their dependants, as well as to prospective students, educational...

  20. Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service West Lafayette, Indiana Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Legal Affairs Introduction Besides the discovery of new accumulations, changes in the price of oil the rights to oil and gas exploration and produc- tion. Granting of rights to test-drill and to produce oil and gas is an important transfer of property rights. One might say that the oil and gas producer/ lessee

  1. Review of an internship with Ouray District United States Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caddy, Mark W

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Uncompahgre National Forest Z. Record of Vegetative Development 3. Record of Utilization by Height-Weight Method Percent of Height Grazed Computation Table Height-Weight Table APPENDIX H. Aspen Management Guidelines. APPENDIX C. Results of CDOW Survey...-winter range (Map 3). Wildlife work was not limited to revegetation and water improvements. The Forest Service also conducts habitat manipulation in the form of aspen (~Po ulus tzemuloides) management, burning, and Knutson-Vandenbuzg (K-V) work. The percent...

  2. Pacific northwest region vegetation and inventory monitoring system. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, T.A.; Schreuder, H.T.; Hazard, J.W.; Oswald, D.D.; Teply, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid sampling strategy was adopted for broad-scale inventory and monitoring of forest and range vegetation on National Forest System lands in the Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service. This paper documents the technical details of the adopted design and discusses alternative sampling designs that were considered. The design is flexible and can be used with many types of maps. The theory of point and change estimation is described, as well as estimates of variation that assess the statistical precision of estimates.

  3. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Center brought artwork and clients to the event. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Fresh Food Mississippians Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry

  4. FACT SHEETUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM SERVICE AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Crop Disaster Assistance Program for 2009 and Subse- quent Years Overview USDA's Farm Service Agency's (FSA) Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) provides financial assistance to producers of producing an eligible crop. As authorized by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act

  5. Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    far in West Texas). Potassium in West Texas normally exceeds the minimum needed for guar (and most that fertilizer requirements, particularly for dryland guar in West Texas, are low, but we don=t have muchTexas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Soil Test Information and Soil

  6. Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Common Concerns in West Texas-6101 February 27, 2001 Sunflower acreage in West Texas may more than double in 2001 as growers facing high production in West Texas, both confectionary and oilseed, has been the subject of several recurring concerns

  7. Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Rhizobium Inoculation for implementing or adjusting an N fertilizer program to compensate for loss of fixed N to the peanut. A good time products packaged for other crops, such as peanuts, to guar. I can=t recommend this practice until I see

  8. TexasAgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    TexasAgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System SCS-1999-23Soil and Crop Sciences in less than ideal conditions. Due to the relative success in achieving good stands under optimum rainfall conditions, farmers in the higher rainfall regions of the state may traditionally use practices which

  9. Woody biomass resource of Alabama. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.; Thomas, C.E.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extent of total live biomass in a forest ecosystem is summarized by an equation. If forest biomass becomes a substantial component of fuel supply, certain resource supply/demand issues become evident. This, in effect, will impact on the future of forest biomass as a renewable-resource element. To supply a growing demand for biomass fuel, certain limited management options are available to managers. It is clear that benefits and risks are associated with all phases of any form of energy production. The direct and indirect costs and benefits of utilizing biomass for energy need to be identified and evaluated. The first step in the process involves identification of the resource and its quantity, composition, distribution, and potential availability.

  10. FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS Community-based tree and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS ROME, 2011 Community-based tree of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development

  11. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  12. Managing Sierra Nevada Forests Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees with decay, hollows or brooms, snags, and brush. 1 Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Eldorado--Live tree with hollow structure. The tree has an old dead top with cavity nests and a new healthy top

  13. alaska forest service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Airlines NANA Management Services Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Alaska Tour Company Alaska Center for Energy and Power Norton Sound Health Corp Alaska Earth Sciences...

  14. Forest and Soil Ecosystem Services University of Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . These services include carbon sequestration, biodiversity, stabilization of hydrologic cycles, removal of air filtering, plant remediation) b. Air quality c. Nutrient Cycling d. Carbon Sequestration Topic 4

  15. Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department & Center for Protected Area Management and Training #12;Report Authors This training program summary report was produced by Andrew W. Don Carlos, Tara L. Teel

  16. IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant on the ecosystem, even though the available scientific literature is scanty and somewhat contradictory and other infestants. A simple mathematical model may explain these data. 1 IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM

  17. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree Guy7 Abstract New dangerous tree assessment guidelines have recently been developed by the Wildlife snag was replaced with "dangerous tree." According to section 26.1 of these regulations, a dangerous

  18. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 61 Predation Risk and Elk-Aspen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 61 Predation Risk and Elk-Aspen Foraging Patterns Clifford A. White1 and Michael C. Feller2 Abstract--Elk-aspen foraging patterns may be influenced by cover, or predator), and two general states of aspen condition (open-grown or thicket). Pellet group and browse

  19. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 117 Prescribed Fire, Elk, and Aspen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 117 Prescribed Fire, Elk, and Aspen in Grand Teton--InGrandTetonNationalPark,alandscape-scaleassessmentofregeneration in aspen has assisted park managers in identifying aspen stands that may be at risk due to a number of interrelated factors, including ungulate browsing and suppression of wildland fire. The initial aspen survey

  20. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 441 Summary: Aspen Decline in the West?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 441 Summary: Aspen Decline in the West? Dennis H. Knight1 No other tree in the Rocky Mountain region is more highly valued for its amenities than aspen (Populus tremuloides). In Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and southern Utah, aspen covers entire mountain

  1. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 387 Aspen Response to Prescribed Fire and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 387 Aspen Response to Prescribed Fire and Wild, regenerate aspen, and improve overall watershed functions. Treated clones are susceptible to extensive at fire-induced aspen regeneration in the area indicate various levels of success due to existing

  2. New perspectives in forest management: Background, science issues, and research agenda. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, D.J.; Grant, G.E.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific, management, and social factors that have contributed to the changes in United States forest management are examined in the report. Principles underlying new approaches are developed and implications are considered at various spatial and temporal scales. A general framework for a research program is outlined.

  3. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    , attended the Cloverbud Caper Camp, sponsored by the MSU Extension Service. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4. Jackson Director, MSU Extension Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director, Mississippi

  4. Aboveground tree biomass on productive forest land in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarie, J.; Mead, D.R.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total aboveground woody biomass of trees on forest land that can produce 1.4 cubic meters per hectare per year of industrial wood in Alaska is 1.33 billion metric tons green weight. The estimated energy value of the standing woody biomass is 11.9 x 10 Btu's. Statewide tables of biomass and energy values for softwoods, hardwoods, and species group are presented.

  5. Sediment production and downslope sediment transport from forest roads in granitic watersheds. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketcheson, G.L.; Megahan, W.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study from highly erodible Idaho soils and provides information necessary to develop road design criteria and evaluate risks and trade-offs. Objectives of the study were to: quantify the volume of sediment deposition on slopes in relation to road features; determine the probability distribution of sediment travel distance; evaluate how sediment deposition occurs with respect to forest site conditions and downslope location of streams; determine the volume and particle size distribution of sediment deposits on slopes in relation to sediment travel distance; and investigate time trends in sediment deposition.

  6. 139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1, in part or collectively, changed many forests. However well- meaning at the time, in some ecosystems the role of fire in ecosystem management and it answers these three questions: 1) what is ecosystem manage

  7. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 185 Do Pine Trees in Aspen Stands Increase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 185 Do Pine Trees in Aspen Stands Increase Bird Hills of South Dakota, quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is being replaced by conifers through fire (primarily ponderosa pine [Pinus ponderosa]) to increase the aspen communities in some mixed stands, Forest

  8. Wilderness threats matrix: A framework for assessing impacts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, D.N.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes the framework represented as a matrix of potential threats and attributes of wilderness character. Cells in the matrix represent the impacts of threats on each attribute. Potential application of the matrix are described. An application of the matrix to the wildernesses in the Forest Service's Northern Region (northern Idaho and Montana) suggests that fire management is the most significant threat to those wildernesses and that aquatic systems are the most threatened wilderness attribute.

  9. Patterns of Habitat Use By California Spotted Owls in Logged Forests of the Northern Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and private timber companies. This information. Methods The cutting history within the study area was determined using records and timber sale maps from

  10. Sesso Temtica: Uso de satlites, modelos de ecossistemas e inventrios florestais para apoio s polticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    políticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory a calibrated carbon cycle model, ORCHIDEE, using optical and radar remote sensing and forest inventory data

  11. Valuing Groundwater Services and Water Portfolio in Irrigated Agriculture with a Hedonic Pricing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Monobina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture inimpact of climate change on irrigated agriculture inimpacts of climate change in agriculture, it is essential to

  12. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences 5 May 2010 Department of forest resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the master's program Environmental Monitoring and Assessment! Dear student, We are pleased to welcome you to the master's program Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, administered by the Faculty of Forest, please visit the following websites http://utbildning.slu.se/vara_utbildningar/Master- _och_magisterprogram/Environmental_Monitoring_and_Assessment

  13. 267USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. About 886.5 Mha in Russia is occupied by forests, including 763.5 Mha of tree stands and 123 Mha of non-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    possible trends caused by global climate change. Forest Health Status and Factors of Disturbance Climate Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest Ecosystems, February 5-9, 1996, Riverside, California. 2267USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract About 886.5 Mha in Russia

  14. Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,IIMettler,Information Forest Service

  15. 5 Putting Science into Action on Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Putting Science into Action on Forest Service Lands William M. Block u.s. Forest Service, Rocky into Action on Forest Service Lands t':: Research and Development, National Forest Systems, State and Private Forestry, International Programs

  16. Biomass yields for small trees, shrubs, and herbs in northern lake states forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass yield information by forest type is presented for lesser vegetation in northern Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota based on data from recent field inventories.

  17. Tracking changes in the susceptibility of forest land infested with gypsy moth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gansner, D.A.; Quimby, J.W.; King, S.L.; Arner, S.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report questions the forest land subject to intensive outbreaks of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) which become less susceptible to defoliation. A model for estimating the lifelihood of gypsy moth defoliation has been developed and validated. It was applied to forest-inventory plot data to quantity trends in the susceptibility of forest land in south-central Pennsylvania during a period of intensive infestation. Results show that even though susceptibility of the region's forest apparently has declined, the potential for future infestations remains relatively high.

  18. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Famcor Oil, Inc. Well Pads and Pipeline in the Sam Houston National Forest, San Jacinto County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William; Bradle, Michael

    2015-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of Polk and San Jacinto Counties, Texas. Published by the United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station... 31. Nunley, John P. 1963 Appraisal of the Archeological Resources of the Livingston Reservoir, Polk, San Jacinto, Trinity, and Walker Counties, Texas. Report submitted to the National Park Service by the Texas Archeological Salvage Project...

  19. University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Volume 4 Number 1 2000 Calendar of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    from Oviedo High School in 1980. In 1985, she graduated from the University of Florida with a bachelor1 University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences of the University of Florida Department of Fisheries andAquatic Sciences Continued on page 3. January 12 General

  20. Inventory-Measurements Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Inventory-Measurements 289 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Hardwood Inventory or region, or developing statewide hardwood policy guidelines. A physical inventory, while by no means

  1. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    . Sterilizing food containers (for example, by irradiation) without cleaning them eliminates biological hazards Resources FAPC-165 Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACT SHEET 405-744-6071 · www.fapc.bizAdding Value to Oklahoma f a p c Timothy J. Bowser Food Processing Engineer Introduction

  2. Beneficial Bees and Pesky Pests: Three Essays on Ecosystem Services to Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Brian James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region considered. Ecosystem service valuations can usefullyand valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services.

  3. 83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40-to 90-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40- to 90- Year. Bledsoe2 Jerry Tecklin3 Abstract: This research examined biomass of blue oak (Quercus douglasii Hook root biomass outside the root ball. Root ball mass ranged from 7 to 184 kg, and estimated total root

  4. 65USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Soil Characteristics of Blue Oak and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    65USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Soil Characteristics of Blue Oak and Coast, California, soils associated with blue oaks (Quercus douglasii) are slightly more acidic, have finer textures are richer in organic matter than those associated with blue oaks. Blue oaks seem to grow more frequently

  5. 3USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Biochemical Reactions of Ozone in Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    3USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Biochemical Reactions of Ozone in Plants1 Abstract Plants react biochemically to ozone in three phases: with constitutive chemicals in the apoplastic, plant reactions with ozone result in constitutive molecules such as the ozonolysis of ethylene

  6. 189USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRSP13. 2000 Abstract.--New computer technologies facilitate the storage, retrieval,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an immediate action program. In response to this demand, the USDA Forest Service's Arizona Water Program and implementing watershed management practices, educators when learning about hy- drologic processes, and decisionmakers when selecting the best course of action from a set of alternatives. Data sets from the Beaver

  7. Illegal Logging The US Forest Service, through its International Programs office, actively works around the globe to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illegal Logging The US Forest Service, through its International Programs office, actively works around the globe to reduce illegal logging. Illegal logging is a complex problem with myriad implications in various discrete aspects of the fight against illegal logging (for example, The US Department

  8. 49USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-52. 2008 Abstract--Over the past several decades, cheatgrass (Bromus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittaker, Bruce Roundy, Jeanne Chambers, Susan Meyer, Robert R. Blank, Stanley G. Kitchen, and John Korfmacher In: Kitchen, Stanley G.; Pendleton, Rosemary L.; Monaco, Thomas A.; Vernon, Jason, comps. 2008, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Reno, NV. Susan Meyer is a Research Ecologist, U.S. Forest Service

  9. 45USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. Legal Barriers to Fuel Management1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Ecosystems, February 15-17, 1994, Walnut Creek, California. 2Fire and Hazardous Materials Program Manager45USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. Legal Barriers to Fuel Management1 Anita E resources and resource management is low on the list of priorities for this state's lawmakers. BEWARE

  10. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 517 Snag Recruitment in Subalpine Forests of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    ). With the exception of large-scale outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) and spruce beetle (D. rufipennis Kirby), most of the conifer mortality caused by biotic agents in subalpine forests

  11. Impact of in-woods product merchandizing on profitable logging opportunities in southern upland hardwood forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, D.M.; LeDoux, C.B.; Tansey, J.B.; Widmann, R.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report estimates profitable logging opportunities existing in upland hardwood forests in 14 Southern States and demonstrates the impact of three alternative product-merchandizing options on profitable logging opportunities and profit margins.

  12. FOREST SERVICE Forest andRangeU. S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P. 0.BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Experime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , Riverside, California Dry bulb temperature range Dry bulb temperature control tolerance Dry bulb temperature. to 120' F. 1loF. Min. 40° F./hr. -23' F. to +20° F. @ 25' F. dry bulb, and 39' F. to 90' F. @ 120° F. dry bulb with comparable limits between these dry bulb temperatures. rt l0F. Min. lo0F./hr. 3.5 to 100ft

  13. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. G. : Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forest fires,O. , and Merlet, P. : Emission of trace gases and aerosolsEstimating direct carbon emissions from Canadian wildland

  14. Genetic variation and seed zones of douglas-fir in the Siskiyou National Forest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.K.; Sugano, A.I.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Siskiyou National Forest in southwestern Oregon. Zones were based on maps of genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 260 locations in the region. Genotypes controlling growth vigor and growth rhythm were assessed in the common garden. Within the Forest, three breeding blocks were recommended, with different numbers of elevational bands in each block: from 0 to 610 meters, from 611 to 838 meters, and then a series of bands 152 meters wide at higher elevations.

  15. Monitoring firefighter exposure to air toxins at prescribed burns of forest and range biomass. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhardt, T.E.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of potent air toxins are in the smoke produced by burning forest and range biomass. Preliminary data on firefighter exposures to carbon monoxide and formaldehyde at four prescribed burns of Western United States natural fuels are presented. Formaldehyde may be correlated to carbon monoxide emissions. The firefighters' exposures to these compounds relative to workplace standards are discussed.

  16. Oregon Agriculture and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

  17. Federal and state forestry cost-share assistance programs: Structure, accomplishments, and future outlook. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, T.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost-share assistance programs have been an effective policy mechanism for increasing productivity on nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) lands. In light of reduced harvests from Federal lands, timber productivity on these lands has become increasingly important to ensure sufficient timber supplies in the future. Productivity of other forest resources has also been enhanced through these programs. Four Federal programs, the Forestry Incentives Program, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the Stewardship Incentives program, and the Conservation Reserve Program, provided cost-share assistance for tree planting on 467,000 acres in 1993. During the course of this study, the provisions of the individual State programs, funding levels, accomplishments, and outlook for continuation or expansion, were examined. Federal programs were reviewed as well, with respect to their interaction with State-level programs. The results of the study are presented in this paper.

  18. Intensive agriculture to semi-natural grassland: evaluating changes in ecosystem service provision to help determine costs and benefits of agri-environment schemes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrocks, Claire Alice

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive agriculture has led to an increase in production; however this has often coincided with a decline in the provision of other Ecosystem Services (ES). ES affected include those regulated by soil chemical, physical ...

  19. Valuing Groundwater Services and Water Portfolio in Irrigated Agriculture with a Hedonic Pricing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Monobina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2647-2668. Surface and Groundwater. 2012. U.S. EnvironmentalEstimating the Value of Groundwater in Irrigation, SelectedAgricultural adaptation to groundwater and climate. NBER

  20. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 325 Modeling Aspen Responses to Climatic Warming and Insect Defoliation in Western Canada Hogg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 325 Modeling Aspen Responses to Climatic Warming Aspen Responses to Climatic Warming and Insect Defoliation in Western Canada E. H. (Ted) Hogg1 Abstract change on boreal aspen forests may not become evident until after major insect outbreaks have occurred

  1. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

  2. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the United States Forest Service: Caribou-Targhee National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect and evaluate data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest (CTNF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. ITSNA acknowledges the support of Idaho National Laboratory and CTNF for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by enthusiasm and support from the Forest Service and CTNF personnel.

  3. Harvesting intensity influences the carbon distribution in a northern hardwood ecosystem. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong, T.F.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies the effects of five cutting methods on soil and vegetative carbon after 40 years of management in a northern hardwood forest in Wisconsin.

  4. Factors affecting the availability of wood energy from nonindustrial private forest lands in the Northeast. Forest Service Resource Bulletin (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, J.J.; Gilbert, A.H.; Birch, T.W.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the factors that affect the availability of fuelwood from NIPF lands in the Northeastern United States (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania). It is part of a comprehensive wood-for-energy study entitled 'The Production, Consumption, and Marketing of Wood for Energy in the Northeast (Northeast Regional Study 142).'' The study is designed to: (1) Estimate the demand for wood energy in the Northeast by consuming sectors, state, and region; (2) Analyze the managment and supply of wood for energy processing as well as marketing structures; (3) Identify goals and effectiveness of actual and alternative local, state, and Federal forest policies and contrast these with the objectives of forest owners with regard to the use of wood for energy. The objective of the study is to analyze the supply of wood energy, that is, to identify and describe the factors that influence NIPF owners to harvest, or permit the harvest, of fuelwood from their land.

  5. Test of four stand growth simulators for the northeastern United States. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.; Marquis, D.A.; Ernst, R.L.; Simpson, B.T.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SILVAH, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and OAKSIM simulators, commonly used in the northeastern United States, were evaluated by comparing predicted stand development with actual stand development records for periods ranging from 15 to 50 years. Results varied with stand parameter, forest type, projection length, and geographic area. Except in the spruce-fir forest type where FIBER stands out as the best simulator, no single simulator is clearly superior to the others for all locations within a forest type. In general, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and SILVAH performed best in the northern hardwood (beech-birch-maple) forest type: NE-TWIGS and SILVAH performed best in the Allegheny hardwood (cherry-maple) forest type; SILVAH and OAKSIM performed best in the oak-hickory forest type; and SILVAH was most suitable in the transition hardwood (mixture of northern hardwoods and oaks) forest type. The results give growth and yield model users more information for selecting the simulator most suitable for their particular needs. The results also can be used as a diagnostic tool for growth and yield model development.

  6. 456 USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. Author Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , CO 80523-1499 970-491-5630 fax: 970-491-1965 barnett@nrel.colostate.edu Elisabeth Bartlett University Sciences Laboratory 860 North 1200 East Logan, UT 84321 dbartos@fs.fed.us Sarah Benanti Forest Resources

  7. Timber resource statistics for the north coast resource area of California, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the North Coast Resource Area of California, which includes Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, and Sonoma Counties. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest Research Station as part of a State wide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of North Coast National Forests. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of volume and area on timber land are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  8. Status of precommercial-sized softwoods in Louisiana, 1991. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on precommercial-sized softwoods in seedling- and sapling-sized stands are presented and discussed. Inadequate levels of softwood stocking in NIPF (Nonindustrial private forest) lands could diminish long-term supplies of softwood in the State.

  9. Kriging direct and indirect estimates of sulfate deposition: A comparison. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reams, G.A.; Huso, M.M.P.; Vong, R.J.; McCollum, J.M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to logistical and cost constraints, acidic deposition is rarely measured at forest research or sampling locations. A crucial first step to assessing the effects of acid rain on forests is an accurate estimate of acidic deposition at forest sample sites. The authors examine two methods (direct and indirect) for estimating sulfate deposition at atmospherically unmonitored forest sites. The direct method only uses directly measured deposition data, while the indirect method additionally incorporates precipitation measurements from a spatially denser network of monitoring sites. Sulfate deposition values were estimated by point kriging using both the direct and indirect methods. By using the supplemental data from the precipitation monitoring network, estimates of sulfate deposition improved substantially, particularly at sites that are relatively isolated to the acid deposition monitoring network. Cross-validated procedures indicate that by using the indirect method, a reduction of approximately 20 to 25 percent in the predicted error sum of squares occurred.

  10. Sapstreak disease of sugar maple: Development over time and space. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, D.R.

    1994-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The sapstreak disease is a potentially serious problem of sugarbushes and forest stands. It is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis virescens, which invades sapwood of roots and bases of stems through wounds created during logging, saphauling, or other activities. The publication describes the results of observations and experiments to learn more about the patterns of disease development and the factors that affect them, within individual trees and within representative forests and sugarbushes.

  11. Quantifying foliar responses of white ash to ozone and simulated acid precipitation: An assessment proposal for forest exposure studies. Forest Service research paper. (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dochinger, L.S.; Jensen, K.F.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seedlings populations represent an important linkage for assessing the effect of air pollution on forests. The study examines the foliar responses of white ash seedlings to ozone and acid precipitation as a means of identifying atmospheric deposition effects on forests.

  12. Producing seed crops to naturally regenerate southern pines. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J.P.; Haugen, R.O.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural regeneration is a practical and inexpensive option for many existing southern pine forests, provided there is an adequate seed source and other stand conditions are controlled. However, seed production in natural stands of southern pines varies due to a wide range of environmental and biotic influences. It is important, then, to understand the biological processes that affect seed production in natural stands. The physiology of cone and seed production is reviewed here, and this information is applied to natural stand situations. With this knowledge, foresters will be better able to manipulate stands to improve and predict seed production and, therefore, make natural regeneration more reliable.

  13. Timber management and use-value assessment. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendak, P.E.; Huyler, N.K.

    1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes timber management activity and estimates timber harvest from forest land enrolled in Vermont`s Use Value Appraisal (UVA) Forest Land property tax program. Data were compiled from the mandatory management plans and annual conformance reports filed for each property enrolled in the Program. Overall, 31 percent of the UVA properties reported a commercial harvest during 1989. The harvest on enrolled lands represented 18 percent and 24 percent, respectively, of the reported total sawlog and pulpwood-fuelwood harvest in Vermont in 1989, while enrolled lands represented about 16 percent of the total timberland in the State.

  14. Payments for Forest Environmental and Social Services: organisational models and related experiences in Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    international timber markets Background 1 · Confronting fragmentation of forest estates and therefore of domestic timber supply Forestry in Italy at the dawn of the new millennium: Background 2 · Coping = trade of "credits" between companies and landowners for exceeding the requirements on water use

  15. Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Region, 1911-2012 Dan Loeffler Nathaniel Anderson Keith Stockmann Ken Skog Sean Healey J. Greg Jones, Missoula, MT. and cooperator with the Rocky Mountain Research Station, Missoula, MT. Nathaniel Anderson down stand on the Chippewa National Forest in north central Minnesota. Photo courtesy of Mary Nordeen

  16. New Mexico State University COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE U.S. Dept of Agriculture 300.A3 (R 2013) Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico State University COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE U.S. Dept of Agriculture 300.A3 (R 2013) Page 1 of 2 New Mexico 4-H Youth Medical and Liability Release Code of Conduct: New Mexico 4-H Code of Conduct I pledge my Head to clearer thinking, means a 4-H'er is committed

  17. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. 2008 61 Introduction ____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Nonnative Invasive Plants in the Northeast Bioregion Alison C. Dibble Kristin Zouhar Jane Kapler Smith occur in scattered areas and on abandoned farm land (old fields) (Garrison and others 1977; Smith and others 2001).Standsofeasternwhitepineoftenoccupyformer agricultural fields. Fire History in the Northeast

  18. Session D--Geographic Variation in Mixed Conifer Fire Regimes--Beaty, Taylor USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    in California1 R. Matthew Beaty2 and Alan H. Taylor3 Abstract This paper reviews recent research from CaliforniaSession D--Geographic Variation in Mixed Conifer Fire Regimes--Beaty, Taylor USDA Forest Service.g., Spies and Franklin 1989, Veblen and others 1992, Shinneman and Baker 1997, Taylor and Skinner 1998). Yet

  19. Poster Session--Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage--Wright, Ottmar USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 363

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Poster Session--Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage--Wright, Ottmar USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 363 Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage Ecosystems1 Clinton S. Wright2 and Roger D. Ottmar2 Introduction Fuel consumption was evaluated for a series

  20. Financial aspects of partial cutting practices in central Appalachian hardwoods. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unveven-aged silvicultural practices can be used to regenerate and manage many eastern hardwood stands. Single-tree selection methods are feasible in stands where a desirable shade-tolerant commercial species can be regenerated following periodic harvests. A variety of partial cutting practices, including single-tree selection and diameter-limit cutting have been used for 30 years or more to manage central Appalachian hardwoods on the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia. Results from these research areas are presented to help forest managers evaluate financial aspects of partial cutting practices. Observed volume growth, product yields, changes in species composition, and changes in residual stand quality are used to evaluate potential financial returns. Also, practical economic considerations for applying partial cutting methods are discussed.

  1. Biomass relations for components of five minnesota shrubs. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buech, R.R.; Rugg, D.J.

    1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The tall shrub stratum is an important component of upland forests in the Lake States, especially of deciduous forest communities. The prevalance of tall shrubs has produced a recurring research interest in this stratum both in ecological studies and wildlife habitat surveys within the region. For such purposes, estimates of the biomass of tall shrubs or their component parts are often needed. The authors examine goodness of fit of two predictor variables (shrub height and stem diameter class) in three relations. The authors provide equations that use stem diameter class or stem diameter class and height to estimate biomass of six components of five shrub species, as well as generalized equations derived from a composite of all five species. Finally, the authors provide the information needed to construct standard errors for biomass estimates.

  2. Plant biomass in the Tanana River Basin, Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, B.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation biomass tables are presented for the Tanana River Basin. Average biomass for each species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in the 13 forest and 30 nonforest vegetation types is shown. These data combined with area estimates for each vegetation type provide a tool for estimating habitat carrying capacity for many wildlife species. Tree biomass is reported for the entire aboveground tree, thereby allowing estimates of total fiber content.

  3. Hardwood supply in the Pacific northwest: A policy perspective. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raettig, T.L.; Connaughton, K.P.; Ahrens, G.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy framework for the hardwood resource and hardwood industry in western Oregon and Washington is examined. Harvesting trends, harvesting behavior of public and private landowners, and harvesting regulation are presented to complete the analysis of factors affecting short-run hardwood supply. In the short term, the supply of hardwoods is generally favorable, but in the long term, the supply is uncertain and cause for concern. Hardwoods need to be recognized in forest management in the Pacific Northwest.

  4. Current stand characteristics of Louisiana Timberland Harvested between 1975 and 1991. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study population, using 1,216 forest survey continuous forest inventory (C.F.I.) plots, was constructed to analyze the current stocking trends and performance of timberland harvested in Louisiana between 1975 and 1991. A total of 6,888,000 acres was harvested; 4,011,600 acres by partial harvest, 219,900 acres by seed tree and shelterwood methods, 2,562,000 acres by clearcut, and 94,500 acres by salvage cut. Of the 2,454,700 acres of clearcut upland forest types, 640,500 acres converted to the oak-hickory type. It is taking 6 to 7 years, after harvesting, for softwoods to reach the 3.0-inch diameter threshold. Additionally, softwood stand volume 13 to 17 years after clearcut harvest is below that expected for normal sites. Low softwood stocking levels and lengthy regeneration lag time are cited as two possible reasons for low yields at this stage of stand development.

  5. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Paper Company Sara Kendall Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn Professor

  6. Predicting regeneration establishment with the prognosis model. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, D.E.; Carlson, C.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conifer establishment following regeneration timber harvests is predicted by version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model, a submodel of the Prognosis Model. The regeneration model covers 10 species for forests in Montana, central Idaho, and northern Idaho. Most harvest and site preparation methods can be simulated so that alternative treatments can be evaluated. Also included in the model is the influence of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on regeneration success. The model predicts the probability of stocking, seedling density, species composition, and seedling heights 2 to 20 years after harvest. The paper describes the study design, equation development, model formulation, and model behavior for the Regeneration Establishment Model.

  7. Grazing on regeneration sites encourages pine seedling growth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratliff, R.D.; Denton, R.G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of season-long, deferred-rotation, and rest-rotation grazing, on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedling growth and herbaceous vegetation control were studied in regeneration sites at Boyd Hill, Modoc National Forest, California. Seedlings were planted in 1989. Pine seedling survival and damage did not differ, but the seedlings were significantly taller, with longer leaders with season-long grazing than without grazing. Treatment comparisons for plant group and non-plant percent cover differed only for litter and bare soil, but cover and composition of bottlebrush squirreltail (Elymus elymoides (Raf.) Swezey) were greater without grazing.

  8. Managing lodgepole pine to yield merchantable thinning products and attain sawtimber rotations. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, D.M.; Koch, P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper suggests solution for a longstanding problem in managing lodgepole pine forests- that of managing individual stands to reach their planned rotation age, despite serious hazard from bark beetles and wildfire. The management regimes presented yield merchantable thinning products. The 80-year sawtimber rotation can be achieved using these management recommendation. Thinning at 30 years of age is central to achieving the recommended alternative management regimes. The authors suggest that agencies give roundwood operators a portion of the thinning stemwood as payment. Management regimes that provide attainable rotations are presented in summary tables, by three site index classes and a number of initial stand density classes.

  9. Population dynamics of the major north American needle-eating budworms. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes data from six western States provided 1,251 life tables representing western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis. These data provided projection capabilities for defoliation and successive budworm densities, as well as a basis for comparing survival rates among the three principal North American needle-eating budworms (western and eastern spruce budworms, and the jack pine budworm). Several modifications are suggested in current methods for managing budworm susceptible forests, and suggestions are provided for further studies on the budworm life systems.

  10. Leguminous ground covers could reduce herbicide use in forestry. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponder, F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishing tree seedlings in mixed stands after harvesting is difficult without adequate vegetation control. Artificial regeneration can be used to ensure desirable future stands, but competing vegetation decreases survival and growth. Vegetation control can be costly and laborious. Large amounts of herbicides are used annually in forest management to reduce vegetation that competes with trees for growing space, nutrients, water, light, and other essential components. Using herbicides to control weeds is economical, but may not always be environmentally acceptable. One alternative is to establish nitrogen-fixing (legume) ground covers, which may suppress the more competitive weeds and enrich the soil.

  11. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof EnergyBILIWG: Consistentof Energy and Forest

  12. Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

  13. Funding Source Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Funding Source General Research Agricultural Experiment Station Instruction Public Service,145,610$ 3,716,162DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE $ 1,799,873 $ 8,322,303 $ 30,128,910 $ 0$ 85,000$ 2,127 $ 0$ 4,920,977$ 0US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / HATCH $ 0 $ 0 $ 4,920,977 $ 15,348,823FOUNDATION

  14. Using column lysimetry to evaluate acid-precipitation effects. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, A.R.; Stone, D.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the experimental design and approach used to solve problems encountered with soil column collection, instrumentation, materials and methods, and maintenance of natural soil temperatures. Some preliminary results are presented. Also, basic data on the soil and vegetation of the sampled sites are included to form a database for use by forest soil scientists and land managers. The specific objective of the study was to determine the sensitivity of soils with low base-saturation to increased anion loadings and the susceptibility of these soil solutions to pH depression and negative alkalinities. A secondary objective was to determine whether reduced sulfate deposition will reverse the acidification processes and return soil water alkalinities from negative to positive.

  15. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the piedmont. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 16 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Piedmont. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,753 trees sampled in the Piedmont and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  16. Summary Findings Fishermen Focus Group Loiza, Puerto Rico Armando Gonzlez-Cabn, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary Findings Fishermen Focus Group ­ Loiza, Puerto Rico Armando González-Cabán, USDA Forest was conducted at the Río Grande de Loiza Fishermen Association in Canovanas, Puerto Rico. The objective

  17. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

  18. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    43 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Scienc- es (CAFLS) supports Clemson University's land-grant mission to provide education, research and service to the public. The College of Agriculture

  19. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    42 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  20. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  1. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    20 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  2. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  3. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    41 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  4. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    20 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

  5. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  6. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations · 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation · Average age

  7. Seedfall, regeneration, and seedling development in group-selection openings. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Abbott, C.S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forty-eight openings of 30, 60, and 90 feet in diameter were created in previously unmanaged mixed conifer-hardwood stands on a high-quality site in northern California in 1963. They were an attempt to convert an essentially even-aged forest to an uneven-aged arrangement and comprised the initial cut in the group-selection system. Five conifer and three hardwoods produced 36 seed crops that ranged from very light to heavy during the 10-year study period (1964-1973). Sound seed for four conifer species combined (not sugar pine) for 10 years amounted to the equivalent of more than 302,900 seeds per acre and, in general, did not differ significantly among opening sizes. Shade and roots from bordering trees were major influences on seedling survival and development in the openings. Density of established conifer and hardwood seedlings (at least 4 years old) ranged from 12 per acre for incense-cedar in 90-foot openings to about 9,600 ponderosa pines per acre in 60-foot openings after 10 years, and did not differ significantly among opening sizes. Conifer seedling heights ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 feet after 9 years. Average height of ponderosa pines and hardwoods differed significantly between the largest and smallest opening size with height being best in the largest. Normally multi-stemmed and wide-crowned shrubs were conspicuous by their single spindly stems.

  8. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was with the General Electric Co. and worked on thermal and nuclear instrumentation from 1951 to 1961. His B.S. degree Station Ogden, UT 84401 General Technical Report INT-122 April 1982 Aids to Determining Fuel Models Forest Service Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Ogden, UT 84401 General Technical Report

  9. Contingent valuation study of the value of reducing fire hazards to old-growth forests in the Pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, J.B.; Gonzalez-Caban, A.; Gregory, R.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contingent valuation methodology was applied to old-growth forests and critical habitat units for the Northern Spotted Owl in Oregon to esimate the economic value to the public in knowing that rare and unique ecosystems will be protected from fire for current and future generations. Generalizing to the whole state, the total annual willingness-to-pay of Oregon residents ranges from $49.6 to $99 million. In terms of old-growth forests protected from fire, the value is $28 per acre.

  10. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    and Bureau of Land Management field units in 1978 following development, test, and evaluation activities to relay the data to some central or subcentral office. The data may then be entered, through a suitable allocations, repeater site availability, and people at a station to acquire and relay the data

  11. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    America, Africa and Asia, however, are not monitored and remain unreported. Only a few spectacular-30, 1987, South Lake Tahoe, California. approaches towards solving this problem. A brief background are developing countries and mainly those within the tropics. 2. Energy crisis limiting economic growth

  12. Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension · Collaborate with farmers

  13. Agricultural and Forest Entomology (2011), 13, 197204 DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-9563.2010.00511.x Arthropod food webs in organic and conventional wheat farming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arthropod food webs in organic and conventional wheat farming systems of an agricultural long, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstraße, 5070 Frick, Switzerland, Department (15N/14N and 13C/12C) of fertilizers, plants, prey and generalist predators in organic

  14. Agricultural and Forest Entomology (2013), 15, 212226 DOI: 10.1111/afe.12007 Predicting the distribution of a novel bark beetle and its pine hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Steven E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    role in coniferous forest dynamics in Central and North America (Bentz et al., 2010; Salinas-Moreno et al., 2010; Evangelista et al., 2011). Under certain conditions, such as extreme drought and where

  15. EXTENSION CENTER FOR FOOD, AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCES Strengthening Minnesota's food, agriculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    -increasing list of goods, services, and aesthetic values. RESOURCES: Extension's Center for Food, Agricultural agricultural and forestry practices that are economically and environmentally sustainable · Finding solutionsEXTENSION CENTER FOR FOOD, AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCES Strengthening Minnesota

  16. The Future of Forest Certification in A Roundtable Discussion by Forest Stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and respect people's rights. · Multiple forest certification upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services they provide. Rather than remain mired in win

  17. For Immediate Release: January 30, 2008 Sustaining Virginia's Forests through Forest Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and products processed in ways that sustain forest health, minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and the people and communities that depend upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services

  18. Tongass National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two long-term timber contracts in the Tongass National Forest require private companies to harvest prescribed amounts of timber within agreed upon time frames during the 50-year contract life. This report has reviewed the accuracy of Forest Service figures for the volume of timber actually harvested under the two contracts, timber deleted from the private companies' operating plans, and backlogged timber. The author was unable to verify the first two figures because the Forest Service had not complied with all of its internal controls and because documentation and records were incomplete. The author was able to verify the figure for backlogged timber. While the Forest Service has tried to better account for timber prepared for harvesting through improved internal controls, this report believes additional actions are needed to ensure that forest supervisors comply with the internal controls for documenting harvested timber volumes and the information needed to support and report changes in timber sale activities is accurately reported.

  19. Agricultural Research for Development Innovations & Incentives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research for Development Innovations & Incentives The Swedish research network Agricultural Research for Development (Agri4D) organises an annual multi/inter-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder conference on agriculture, livestock and forest research in an international development context. Since

  20. Biomass and nutrient distributions in central Oregon second-growth ponderosa pine ecosystems. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.N.; Shainsky, L.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the distributioin of biomass and nurtrients in second-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) ecosystems in central Oregon. Destructive sampling of aboveground and belowground tree biomass was carried out at six sites in the Deschutes National Forest; three of these sites also were intensively sampled for biomass and nutrient concentrations of the soil, forest floor, residue, and shrub components. Tree biomass equations were developed that related component biomass to diameter at breast height and total tree height.

  1. Fuel-supply structure of wood-fired power plants in the Northeast: Loggers' perspective. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huyler, N.K.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study gauges loggers' perceptions of the impact of large biomass demand centers (electrical power generation) on the forest resource base in the Northeast. The loggers who supply these demand centers are business people with large capital investments in highly mechanized harvesting systems. Most of the loggers surveyed strongly believed that the post-harvest stand has improved as a result of fuel-wood chipping; however, the impact of chip harvesting on the forest resource base was not clear.

  2. ESTIMATION OF FOREST CARBON VOLUME AND VALUE IN TENNESSEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ¨ Acknowledgement INTRODUCTION ¨ U.S. Forest ¤188 Million Acres ¤16% carbon sequestration occurred in forest ¤310Carl. 2001. "The Economics of Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils." Department of Agricultural of The Potential for Carbon Sequestration by Forests: Evidence from Southern Mexico." Ecological Economics 33

  3. Agricultural Cooperatives' Self-Inflicted Wounds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, William E.; Knutson, Ronald D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tooe Z TA245.7 8873 NO.1537 s vi' 8-1537 ~xas Agricultural Extension Service VJtk HU'f1Urt; PIYJ/ltk -----.-- Agricultural Cooperatives' 8elf-1 nfl icted Wounds LIBRARY JUl 1986 1 exas A iversity Texas Agricultural Extension Service.... Zerle L. Carpenter, Director The Texas A&M University System. College Station, Texas [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVES' SELF-INFLICTED WOUNDS William E. Black and Ronald D. Knutson * Agricultural cooperatives...

  4. United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications (202) 720-4623

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Reports Synthesize Literature on Climate Change Effects and Adaptation Strategies for U.S. Agriculture strategies for U.S. agriculture and forests. The reports, entitled Climate Change and Agriculture: Effects.S. agriculture and forests will face in this century from global climate change," said William Hohenstein

  5. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  7. Forest Service Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -made platform from which the speed of true unobstructed wind can be measured, then reduced to equiva- lent of 20 measurement can be obtained only from in- struments exposed above the obstructions. A lookout tower provides.86 or 34 .4 m.p .h. at 20 feet above obstruction. The factors are based on 1/7 power law recommended

  8. agricultural research center: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leistikow, Bruce N. 4 GENERAL MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (MAFES) Forest & Wildlife Research Center (FWRC) Environmental...

  9. agricultural soil revisited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of logged forests is essential to conserving Vermont, University of 3 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Environmental Sciences and...

  10. Updated November 1, 2013 Division of Agriculture, Forestry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Updated November 1, 2013 Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Administrative, & Aquaculture Dr. Eric Dibble (Interim) Forest Products Dr. Rubin Shmulsky Forestry Dr. Andrew Ezell Associate Turner Assistant Dean Vacant Director, Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station Dr. George Hopper

  11. Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

  12. Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Management provides many of the services that keep the Department of Energy Headquarters offices operational.  Other Program Offices also provide services to the employees at...

  13. agricultural research knowledge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that most secondary science teachers Rambaut, Andrew 2 United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  14. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James A. Burger

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

  15. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  16. EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote) or the United States Forest Service (USFS) via the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (SFIA

  17. 148 USDA Forest Service RMRS-P-53CD. 2008. The Hill Plots: A Rare Long-Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of soil types and elevations. Materials associated with the Hill plots in- clude historical data, plant, historical personnel who worked on them, threats they have experienced, ecological insights they haveCoconinoNationalForest(J.Rolf,pers.comm.).Codes:PB=prescribed burn;PCT=pre-commercialthinning;PL=power/phonelinebuiltt

  18. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 89 Abstract: We summarize available information on Marbled Murrelet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    on Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) productivity and sources of mortality compiled from known tree falling from nests (n = 3), and nestlings dying (n = 1). The major cause of nest failure was predation (56 of predation on Marbled Murrelet nests in this study appear higher than for many seabirds and forest birds

  19. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-63. 2011. 207 Abstract--I examined the regeneration of whitebark pine (Pinus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Kootenay and Banff national parks, and the Rock Canyon Creek fire of 1960, located approximately 125 km, and distance to the mature forest edge. I measured stand structural variables within each plot, including associated with this species largely excluded the other tree species' establishment. Distance to seed source

  20. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  1. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme The Forestland Group Ralph Grossi American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home

  2. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling Chadwick Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest

  3. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  4. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  5. Discriminant-function approach to ecological site classification in northern New England. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fincher, J.; Smith, M.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes one approach to ecologically based classification of upland forest community types of the White and Green Mountain physiographic regions. The classification approach is based on an intensive statistical analysis of the relationship between the communities and soil-site factors. Discriminant functions useful in distinguishing between types based on soil-site factors most strongly correlated with their distribution over the landscape are presented.

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  7. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  8. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  9. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

  10. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  11. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 57 1 Research Wildlife Biologist, Oregon Cooperative Wildlife Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    to maintain or increase ecosystem goods and services while protecting downstream and coastal ecosystems be inflicted on the ecosystem. Fifthly, both pre- and post- assessment must be completed and data made publicly

  12. Highly stocked coniferous stands on the Olympic Peninsula: chemical composition and implications for harvest strategy. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.N.; Waddell, D.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment of macronutrients and their distribution within highly stocked, stagnant stands of mixed conifers on the Quilcene Ranger District, Olympic National Forest, northwest Washington. These stands consisted of predominantly three species: western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menzeisii), and western redcedar (Thuja plicata). Preliminary investigation suggests that the living crown contains a small portion of the nutrient capital on the site. Extracting this material from the site during harvest or site preparation should not pose a threat to future production of biomass. Bioassays suggested that no macronutrients were deficient for growth of Douglas-fir seedlings.

  13. Allometric biomass estimators for aspen-dominated ecosystems in the upper Great Lakes. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perala, D.A.; Alban, D.H.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors recently described the climate, geology, soils, and the biotic structure and dynamics of four contrasting ecosystems dominated by quaking and bigtooth aspen (Populus tremuloides and P. grandidentata). Other papers describe how those ecosystems responded to perturbation. Common to most of those papers were biomass estimates for the tree and shrub layers. The authors derived the estimators from weight and dimensional analysis of a subsample of stems measured on sample plots. They found much variability among sites that could not be adequately explained by stand or soils data. These equations should be useful in estimating woody plant components of similar forests on upland soils in the Upper Great Lakes region.

  14. Poverty, Islamist Extremism, and the Debacle of Doha Round Counter-Terrorism: Part Two of a Trilogy – Non-Agricultural Market Access and Services Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhala, Raj

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    organizations (VEOs) in the name (but, in fact, abuse) of Islam. Part One of the Trilogy advanced this argument in the context of trade liberalization in agriculture, namely, efforts to reduce agricultural tariffs, discipline domestic support, and eliminate...

  15. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  16. Forest biomass as a source of renewable energy in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuerker, M.F.; Ayaz, H.; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Turkey illegal cutting takes place, which cannot be controlled. Legal cuttings have also been done by several state forest enterprises. As a result, the amount of wood raw material produced by forest enterprises legally and by forest villagers illegally has exceeded the potential capacity of the forest. According to the research related to Macka and other Turkish state forests, the state forests have been decreasing day by day. This is because the amount of wood raw material taken from the forests has exceeded the production potential of the forest. That study concluded that the Macka and other Turkish forests will be exhausted after 64 and 67 years, respectively. This study also examined both establishing and exploiting energy forests near the forest villages and producing fuel briquettes manufactured using the residues of agriculture, forestry, and stock breeding to diminish the demand for illegal fuel wood cutting from the state forests.

  17. Agricultural Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX Monitoring, Modeling and Decision-Making Daren Harmel USDA-ARS, Temple, TX #12;Agricultural Research Service Grassland monitoring, modeling, and decision- making #12;Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil and Water

  18. Agricultural Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX Monitoring, Modeling and Decision-Making Daren Harmel USDA-ARS, Temple, TX Agricultural Research Service Grassland monitoring, modeling, and decision- making (if time and interest!!) Agricultural Research Service Grassland

  19. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  20. Distribution of biomass and nutrients in lodgepole pine/bitterbrush ecosystems in central Oregon. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.N.; Shainsky, L.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated the distribution of biomass and nutrients in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. murryana Dougl.) ecosystems on pumice soils in south-central Oregon. Sixty-three trees were sampled to develop equations for estimating dry weights of tree crowns, boles, bark, and coarse roots from diameter at breast height and height. The concentrations of total carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur were determined for each of these components. Biomass, nutrient concentrations, and nutrient contents of the associated vegetation, forest floor, woody debris, fine roots, and soil horizons also were determined. An example stand illustrates the use of these data for determining the effects of bole versus whole-tree harvesting on nutrient capital in a lodgepole pine ecosystem.

  1. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Appalachian area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 20 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Appalachian Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,670 trees sampled in the Appalachian Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  2. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 14 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,728 trees sampled in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  3. Development of a mixed shrub-tanoak-douglas-fir community in a treated and untreated condition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a medium site in northern California, a tanoak-mixed shrub community was given several treatments (manual release two and three times, a combination chainsaw and cut surface herbicide treatment, two foliar herbicides, and a tank mix of the two herbicides) to study its development in both a natural (control) and treated condition. The herbicides were 2,4-D, Garlon 3A, and Garlon 4, each applied two times. Survival of planted Douglas-fir seedlings was recorded for 11 years and growth was quantified for 9 years after the last treatment application. In addition to Douglas-fir, data are presented individually for the two most abundant species (tanoak and snowbrush), for greenleaf manzanita, and for the hardwood tree and shrubs combined. The treatment response data, cost information, and plant community relationships provides the forest land manager with knowledge on how to attain some specific plant communities in the future, and their developmental potentials.

  4. Interactions of fire regimes and land use in the central Rio Grande Valley. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baisan, C.H.; Swetnam, T.W.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present evidence of dramatic modifications of pre-existing ecological systems by human activities. Our research group at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has conducted extensive studies of fire history in forested ecosystems at more than 60 sites throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Our studies suggest that most of these areas existed in a semi-natural state, litte affected by human populations, before the introduction of large numbers of livestock around the turn of the 20th century. Natural dynamics of biomass accumulation, climatic regimes, and lightning ignitions can account for fire frequencies documented at most sites studied. Recognizable human impacts before the 20 century were probably limited to high use areas and high value resources.

  5. Size of clearcut opening affects species composition, growth rate, and stand characteristics. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.E.; Smith, H.C.; Pearcy, J.N.

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1950`s and early 1960`s, a series of studies was installed in the central hardwood forest to determine if size of clearcut opening affects the growth rate and species composition of new stands. In 1991, about 30 years after cutting, stand data were collected in 89 openings ranging in size from 0.04 to 1.61 acres. The number of stems per acre increased with opening size; however, the number of shade-tolerant species constituted a greater proportion of the stand in small openings (<0.5 acre), while the porportion of shade-intolerant species increased in larger openings. Results of this study indicate that opening size has a major influence on stand characteristics after about 30 years.

  6. Solar energy for wood drying using direct or indirect collection with supplemental heating: a computer analysis. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschernitz, J.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to judge solar drying on a more quantitative basis, the Forest Products Laboratory has developed a computer analysis for calculating the energy demands in the restricted cases of direct and indirect solar wood dryers using supplemental energy. Calculated energy balances are reported including percent fuel savings compared to the net energy used in conventional dryer operation. Six dryer sizes are considered. Seasonal variation of performance is noted for each of 12 months, in 96 locations throughout the United States. Also discussed is variation of cover thermal properties as these influence the effectiveness of operation. The report attempts to organize these economic elements so that the reader can make reasonable choices for any wood-drying requirements.

  7. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Arkansas area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 9 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Arkansas Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 1,417 trees sampled in the Arkansas Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination woth total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  8. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Delta area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 13 species and 6 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Delta Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 990 trees sampled in the Delta Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on diameter outside of the bark (d.o.b.) in combination with height with to a 9-inch d.o.b. top.

  9. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 December 2012 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 J............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

  10. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0604 BREC Report # 2008-17 June 2008 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

  11. Agriculture INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    1 Agriculture INTRODUCTION 1.1 Although its share in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has declined from over half at Independence to less than one-fifth currently, agriculture remains the predominant sector in it as the principal occupation. Agriculture still contributes significantly to export earnings and is an important

  12. Global integration for metals, mining and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as coils, bars and sheets. · Forest and paper companies own or lease forests, cut timber, process woodBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial commitment by IBM Global Business Services to provide analysis and viewpoints that help companies realize

  13. ATCF-GRADFORM-01-011 Arthur Temple College of Forestry & Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coble, Theresa G.

    ATCF-GRADFORM-01-011 Arthur Temple College of Forestry & Agriculture Master of Science (MS courses: Forestry Biology, Forest Res. Inventory, Social Forestry, Forestry Ecosystem Mgt, Forest Resource

  14. Stability and change in minerotrophic peatlands, Sierra Nevada of California and Nevada. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolome, J.W.; Erman, D.C.; Schwarz, C.F.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minerotrophic peatlands or fens in California's Sierra Nevada are small wet meadows surrounded by mixed conifer forest. The dynamics of vegetation change at the meadow edge and the ages and development of fens were investigated, in the Sagehen Creek Basin near Truckee, California, through the use of radiocarbon dating of peat, pollen studies, examination of processes of peat development and accumulation, stand age analysis of trees around peatlands, and evaluation of tree-ring variation. These approaches were used to evaluate both short- and long-term changes. Fens varied in age from more than 8000 years to less than 1000 years old. Results suggest that overall fen development proceeds rapidly, with peat buildup dependent upon adequate moisture supply. During fen development trees repeatedly invade and retreat from the fen edges. The timing of invasions appear unrelated to events such as human disturbance and climatic change. Instead, changes are most likely to result from alterations in groundwater supply in interaction with tree establishment, longevity, and water uptake. Little evidence was found that accepted successional models which emphasize predictable and gradual vegetational development apply to fens in the Sagehen Basin.

  15. Mechanical and chemical release in a 12-year-old ponderosa pine plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiddler, G.O.; McDonald, P.M.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 12-year-old ponderosa pine plantation on the Tahoe National Forest in northern California was mechanically treated with a Hydro-Ax in an attempt to increase the survival and growth of the planted seedlings. Other release methods were not feasible because the shrubs in the mixed-shrub community (greenleaf manzanita, mountain whitethorn, bittercherry, coffeberry) were too large (3 to 5 feet tall) and well developed. Additional treatments were a chemical treatment, in which 2,4-D was applied to a portion of the study site that had been treated with the Hydro-Ax 1 year previously, and control. Eleven growing seasons after treatment (1993), average pine crown cover was statistically higher in the mechanical treatment (Hydro-Ax alone) than in the control. This was the only significant enhancement of pine growth by the Hydro-Ax alone. Mean pine diameter and height did not differ statistically from the control after 11 years. In contrast, the Hydro-Ax plus herbicide (chemical) treatment statistically increased pine crown cover, height, and diameter over the Hydro-Ax alone and the control. Mean crown cover was 104 percent greater in the treated trees than for pines in the control, height was 45 percent greater, and diameter was 47 percent greater. Relative costs were $225 per acre for the Hydro-Ax alone (mechanical) and $273 per acre for the Hydro-Ax + herbicide (chemical). Altogether, the most cost-effective treatment was Hydro-Ax + herbicide (chemical).

  16. Winter sowings produce 1-0 sugar pine planting stock in the Sierra Nevada. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkinson, J.L.; McCain, A.H.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seed source and sowing date effects on first-year seedling growth and Fusarium root and collar rot of sugar pine were analyzed in two consecutive nursery tests at the Pacific Southwest Research Station's Institute of Forest Genetics, near Placerville in the western Sierra Nevada. The experimental design in both tests consisted of four replications of a randomized complete block of split-split plots, with sowing date split for disease treatment and seed source. Seed sources were natural stands at low, middle, and high elevations on the western slope of the northern Sierra Nevada. Seeds were soaked 36 hours in aerated water at 25 deg (77 deg F), chilled 90 days at 1 deg C (34 deg F), and sown in fumigated soil in February, March, April, and May. Treatment plots were drenched with fungicides just before sowing in the first test, and were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum at time of sowing in the second test. Seedling emergence averaged 96 to 99 percent, regardless of sowing date.

  17. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  18. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;7/30/2006 IGARSS_2006 Integrated Systems for Agriculture 2 Convergence of Evidence, All Gov't Policy Makers Reference Model: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service PECAD:Production Estimates

  19. College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

  20. Adaptation Options for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. A Report to the UNFCCC Secretariat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Climate change effects on agriculture, forestry, and fisheries...................................12 3 adaptation employed to offset climate change effects in an agricultural, forest and fisheries (AFF 4 Basic forms of Climate change adaptation

  1. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    speeches 1305-1310 Welcome by Chair of IUFRO Group 1.01.08 Ulf Johansson, SLU, Sweden 1310-1325 Opening-1440 The challenges of sustainability delivering multiple ecosystem services in a private sector commercial forest of Edinburgh, UK 1600-1620 Early thinning of energy wood in dense mixtures of Norway spruce and birch

  2. Impacts of disturbance initiated by road construction in a subtropical cloud forest in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico Lydia P. Olandera,* , F.N Scatenab , Whendee L. Silverc a Department Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Call Box 25000, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, 00928-2500, USA c Ecosystem tropical forests, were evaluated in the subtropical cloud forests of Puerto Rico. The vegetation, soil

  3. ANALYTICAL SERVICE FEES AGRICULTURAL DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    .......................................................................................................... $ 7.00 F3 Crude Protein (CP) ........................................................................................ $ 7.00 F4 Crude Fat (EE

  4. 20 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 U.S. Forest Service Helps Fund Harvard Forest Green Energy Project in a recent U.S. surge in the use of this form of green energy. Since 2005, the Forest Service's woody biomass more than $1 million per year. As we look toward America's future of green energy and energy

  5. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    that encompasses land-use change processes such as forest regrowth resulting from abandon- ment of agricultural & Hall 1998), the sink is thought to be largely in the world's forests, which are large reservoirs

  6. Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-Organic Frameworks |Services

  7. Institutional change in the forest sector : the Russian experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulybina, Olga

    of corporate responsibility, forest certification, model forests, foreign forest management practices and visions of sustainability. The results of both state and non-state activities aimed at reforming the forest sector are debatable and yet to be seen... ecological crisis of his day’, namely the problem of soil fertility within capitalist agriculture, the antagonism of town and country, and the necessity of ecological sustainability. Idealist Structuralism Similarly to materialist structuralists, Emile...

  8. Forest Plan A summary of a forum explor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  9. acuminata forests affected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  10. austrocedrus chilensis forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  11. argentinean yungas forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  12. alnus acuminata forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  13. Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

  14. Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: Conduct research related to the prevention of occu- pational disease and injury of agricultural workers and their families. Develop, implement, and evaluate educational and outreach programs for promoting health and safety for agricultural

  15. Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

  16. Agriculture and the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

  17. Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin Economy Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2009 An annual report by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department

  18. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver RedirectResponses | Open

  19. United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures and Guidance

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver RedirectResponses | Open|

  20. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Schedule of Proposed Actions

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver RedirectResponses | Open||

  1. FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    agencies. In 2006-2007, the number of service contracts reached 12 with a total funding of over USD 950 for the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences for the academic period 2001 ­ 2007 Service Contracts Research and academic year Breakdown of FAFS Grants by Donor 2001 - 2007 Service Contracts 34% Regional & International

  2. FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    ;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research funds and income from service contracts amounted to 3,885,726 US$. Research funds)/Initiative for Biodiversity Studies in Arid Regions (IBSAR) at AUB, Service Contracts and International Agencies accounted and wild life. Service contracts involved agricultural extension, crop production, dairy stock improvement

  3. Forest Grove Light & Power- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest Grove Light & Power offers a variety of rebates through Conservation Services Department. Rebates vary based on technology, and are available to residential, commercial, and/or...

  4. PACIFIC SOUTHWESTt (-A FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the National Resources Management Corporation, Lafayette, Calif. A native of Ellenville, N.Y., he earned., he earned three degrees at the University of California, Berkeley: a bachelor's in forestry (1959- variate analysis. To assess their value as predictors, fluctuations in growth of white fir (Abies concolor

  5. C'SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the sprayed trees was apparently reduced. Oxford: 145.7x19.66 Dendroctonus ponderosae: 147.7 Pinus contorta (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) to western white pines (Pinus monticola Dougl.) sprayed with lindane. Knopf. rufipennis Kirby) to attack white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) and En- gelmann spruce (P. engelmannii

  6. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  7. agricultural residues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Food and Agriculture Organization, United Nations Environment Program, and many private of most of the world's people, yet many communities are...

  8. Discounts, Fungibility and Agricultural GHG Offset projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    in MMT of Carbon Equivalents Soil Carbon Sequestration Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting of Carbon Equivalents Carbon Sequestration from Trees Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting 0.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration," 2003. #12;FungibilityFungibility A number of concepts have

  9. 2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    renew- able natural resources, including forests, soils, water, and wildlife. These missions involve.Theresearchgoalofthedepartmentistoobtainbasicandapplied information leading to wise and effective management of our natural resources. Forestry extension seeks2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University

  10. A Study to Determine the Effectiveness of Agriculture/Natural Resource Program Area Committees on the Texas AgriLife Extension Service Program Planning Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weems, Whit Holland

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    for over 50 years, serving on program area committees to develop programs that meet the needs of local clientele. This study evaluated Agriculture and Natural Resource Program Area Committee (Ag/NR PAC) members located in 36 Texas counties... accepted for 45 days. The data was analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for Windows software. iv The findings of this study showed that Ag/NR PAC members have an overall understanding of the purpose, responsibilities and qualifications of PAC?s. Overall...

  11. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, The

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Form 3579” to California Agriculture at the address above. ©Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewour Writing CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 66 , NUMBER 4

  12. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 2Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  13. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 1Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  14. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 February 2009 #12;2 #12;3 Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 buildings. By consuming solar energy in the process of evapotranspiration and blocking winter winds

  15. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 161GTR-NRS-P-105 TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF THE FOREST CARBON INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 161GTR-NRS-P-105 TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF THE FOREST CARBON INVENTORY OF THE UNITED STATES: RECENT PAST AND NEAR FUTURE Abstract.--The Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service has explicitly assumed

  16. Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

  17. Pennsylvania Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    - mental regulations cover industrial pollution as well as pollution controls for agriculture. Two of PA but must be kept on the farm and made available upon request. Plans NPDES Permits The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is a requirement for construction activities that disturb 1 acre

  18. Age-class structure of old growth ponderosa pine/douglas-fir stands and its relationship to fire history. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arno, S.F.; Scott, J.H.; Hartwell, M.G.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes age structure of nine old growth ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir stands in western Montana. Interprets the influence of past fires and 20th century five exclusion on stand structure. Gives implications for management to restore and maintain these forests for multiple resource values.

  19. FOREST CERTIFICATION IN BRAZIL: TRADE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of traded goods is evident from Brazil's experience with forest certification by both businesses of appropriate logging practices, further deflating prices and quality. Much of Brazil's tropical timber originates from deforestation: about 2.3 million hectares of forests are cut annually for agricultural

  20. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  1. Condition and fate of logged forests in the Brazilian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305; U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest resulted in high levels of canopy damage suffi- cient to leave forests susceptible to drought and fire. We the management regimes in effect at the time of our study in the Brazilian Amazon, selective logging would

  2. Economic Value of Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Value of Agricultural Research Public Investment in Texas Agricultural Research Yields Significant Economic Returns #12;Texas agricultural producers and especially consumers benefit directly from public investment in agricultural research. According to a 2006 study (Huffman and Evenson), the overall

  3. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 1. Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    , but measurements of the runoff and erosion at the rill scale are uncommon. Simulated rill erosion experiments were and agricultural use, and forest disturbances that increase erosion have a broad human impact. [3] Various forms of agriculture, timber harvest, wildfire, and construction. Ero- sion experiments under natural

  4. Forestry Policies (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delaware's forests are managed by the State Forest Service (DFS), within the State Department of Agriculture. In 2010, the Forest Service issued its Resource Assessment and Strategy documents:

  5. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Science Equine UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Horticulture Environmental Horticulture

  6. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Agricultural Literacy Entomology

  7. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office for Research UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Environmental Horticulture

  8. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    forests and trees are to our state's economy. While the statistics in this publication focus on economic Acknowledgements: Funding for this report was provided by the Public Service Company of NH and the U.S. Endowment products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  9. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  10. Services Bldg. Veterinary Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    of Agriculture--138 Curtiss Hall--D4 Cy-Ride--Ames Bus Facility--I3 Financial Aid--12 Beardshear Hall--C4--A4 Student Services Building--B4 University Book Store--Memorial Union--D5 College of Agriculture Nuclear Engineering Sweeney Hall Durham Center Coover Hall Snedecor Hall Atanasoff Communications Building

  11. Old growth ponderosa pine and western larch stand structures: Influences of pre-1900 fires and fire exclusion. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arno, S.F.; Smith, H.Y.; Krebs, M.A.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from two old growth stands on Lolo National Forest representing habitats that contrast with larch stand. One of the stands is a mixture of pine and larch on a steep upland slope and the other is larch dominated in a frost-prone valley bottom evidently at the cold limits of ponderosa pine. We also synthesize and compare age-class data, basal areas (BA), and Stand Density Indexes (SDI) for the entire range of old growth stands that we have sampled to represent the historical frequent fire types in western Montana.

  12. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

  13. Agricultural Leadership, Education, & Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Leadership, Education, & Communications ALEC 102 Fall 2006 Course Title: Critical Issues in Agricultural Leadership and Education Credit: 1 Hour Instructors: Ms. Summer Felton; 119A! This introductory course is designed for students entering in the Agricultural Leadership & Development degree

  14. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in douglas-fir: Report No. 13. The Francis study, 1963-90. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, G.E.; Andersen, N.A.; Marshall, D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels-of-growing-stock studies in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), were designed to test the influence of treatment regimes by using a wide range of retained growing stock on the development of forest growth, yield, and stand structure. Results of the Francis installation located in the headwaters of the Willapa River in Pacific County, Washington, are summarized from calibration at age 15 through age 42 (completion of 60 feet of height growth from calibration, and the planned course of the experimental thinnings plus 5 years). In addition to the eight basic treatments and control common to the other eight study installations in the region, five additional treatments were added at Francis; four late first thinnings (at age 25), which matched the level of growing stock of four standard fixed treatments, and an unthinned western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.). Estimated Douglas-fir site index (50-year base) of this plantation is 124, a mid site II.

  15. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  16. Robust regression analysis of growth in basal area of natural pine stands in Georgia and Alabama, 1962-1972 and 1972-1982. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueng, C.Y.; Gadbury, G.L.; Schreuder, H.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Net growth and gross growth in basal area of selected plots of natural pin stands in Georgia and Alabama are examined under previously used models. We use a procedure based on a linear model that is resistant to the influence of outliers. Our objective is to determine if the results of a previously used model hold when a linear model is fit to the data using our robust procedures. The data are drawn for forest inventory analysis measurements over two period (cycle 4 and cycle 5). The analysis includes a bootstrap testing procedure. Growth of the three species studied in Georgia consistently showed a significant decline from the first period to the second period. A similar but less consistent decline in growth was observed in Alabama.

  17. Early survival and height growth of douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedling and variations in site factors following treatment of logging residues. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopushinsky, W.; Zabowski, D.; Anderson, T.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logging residues were (1) broadcast burned, (2) piled and burned, (3) removed, or (4) left in place after clearcutting in a high elevation subalpine fir/lodgepole pine forest in north-central Washington. Survival, height growth, and nutrient content of foliage of planted Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedlings, and variations in soil factors (nutrients, temperature, moisture, and compaction) and air temperature were compared for the four treatments. Little height growth occurred the first year, and it was similar for all treatments, probably due to transplant shock. Height growth the second year increased the most in the burned treatments, and the least in the slash-left treatment. Levels of nutrients in foliage were similar for all treatments and above threshold-deficiency levels except for sulfur. Extractable soil nutrients increased with burn treatments but returned to levels in other treatments within 3 years, best performance of seedlings during the first 2 years was in burn treatments.

  18. FGD gypsum's place in American agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, C. [US Department of Agriculture (United States). Agricultural Research Service

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface cracks and soil clumps form when saline-sodic, high-clay soil dries out. Treatment with FGD gypsum and irrigation water flowing into these cracks leaches salts until the aggregates swell and the cracks close up. The article describes research projects to develop agricultural uses of FGD gypsum from coal-fired power plants that have been conducted by university researchers and USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists.

  19. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (virtual- nity and Economic Development Concentration; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization

  20. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  1. agriculture-agricultural research service: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parvinder Aley Contracts Administrators Yolande Monger Gillian Jacobs Research Funding Manager Julie Oxford, University of 20 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name...

  2. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  3. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;88 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers aims to offer specialized training in a variety of fields in food and agriculture, and to prepare

  4. environment and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

  5. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers-level courses in agriculture were offered by the School of Arts and Sciences at AUB as early as 1914. Between

  6. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ALS 3133 Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry://lss.at.ufl.edu Overview: Analysis of the effects of agriculture on environmental quality with emphasis on agricultural wastes and practices, the potential for using agricultural systems for disposal of other wastes

  7. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ALS 3133 Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry Website is through E-Learning: http://lss.at.ufl.edu Overview: Analysis of the effects of agriculture on environmental quality with emphasis on agricultural wastes and practices, the potential for using agricultural

  8. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  9. Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Animal Sciences, Equine Sciences, economics, business, and communications. The program in Agricultural Education recently has been renovated

  10. Environment News Service for the latest environmental news, current issues, climate, water, food, forests, species, energy, education. RSS feed. | | | | |Home About News Index Services My Account Events | Search February 2, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment News Service for the latest environmental news, current issues, climate, water, food negotiation on the joint implementation agreement of ITER was concluded December 6, 2005, in Jeju, South Korea as in fitter) is based around a hydrogen plasma torus operating at over 100 million degrees Celsius

  11. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  12. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  13. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  14. Agriculture, Forestry expand outreach programs UBC's two renewable-resources fac-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Agriculture, Forestry expand outreach programs UBC's two renewable-resources fac- ulties by providing ad- ministrative services and classroom spaceforanexpandedagricultural sciences

  15. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment FOR Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment FOR Forestry KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 FOR 100 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY;developmentandimportance;treegrowth;principalforestregionsandimportanttimber species; forest management practices; utilization and products; state and federal forestry programs

  16. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    for Organic Agriculture 7 Center for Remote Sensing 7 Center for Renewable Chemicals and Fuels 7 Center Nutrition 16 Forest Resources and Conservation, School of 16 Horticultural Sciences 17 Microbiology and Cell ­ Diagnostic Laboratories 19 Florida Extension Plant Disease Clinic ­ Gainesville 19 Florida Extension Mycology

  17. 2013-2014Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    sustained management of our renew- able natural resources, including forests, soils, water, and wildlife.Theresearchgoalofthedepartmentistoobtainbasicandapplied information leading to wise and effective management of our natural resources. Forestry extension seeks2013-2014Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and School of Human Environmental

  18. Research Summary Cultural values of trees, woods and forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between economic, social and environmental factors, as well as provide `ecosystem services' including of particular aspects of cultural benefit ­ contemporary and heritage. Methods o The study began of forest management and policy, including the valuation of forests. The research highlights a distinction

  19. Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1 David A. Cleaves,2 Service's National Forest System prescribed burning activity and costs are examined. Fuels management officers from 95 National Forests reported costs and acreage burned for 4 types of prescribed fire

  20. adjacent coniferous forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: , Ontario, Canada P6A 2E5 c Canadian Forest Service, Great Lakes Forestry Centre, P.O. Box 490, Sault Ste; accepted 30 March 2002 Abstract Ensuring successful...

  1. agricultural sector spatialisation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BDS to agro-processing businesses under the USAID RAMP project. Later this year, we plan to broaden our service offering to non-agricultural sectors. UNDP is also working with...

  2. agricultural management systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agricultural Extension Service--Bexar County Offices, Bexar County Master Gardeners, San Antonio Water Systems and Texas A&M University Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  3. agriculture planning part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agricultural Extension Service--Bexar County Offices, Bexar County Master Gardeners, San Antonio Water Systems and Texas A&M University Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  4. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  5. Immigration reform and California agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Philip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reform and California agriculture Philip Martin Professor,proposals for California agriculture. Immigration reformCenter. 196 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4

  6. Networks, Local Institutions and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udry, Chris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working Paper Series Agriculture for Development Paper No.Institutions and Agriculture. Chris Udry Yale UniversityMay 2009 Conference on “Agriculture for Development in Sub-

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    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

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    Johnson, Eric E.

    establishment, and erosion control in the intermountain region of northwestern New Mexico; the use of coalRichard N. Arnold College Professor, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, New Mexico State-1979 Experience: Technical Service Director for the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry, Farmington, New Mexico

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    Anonymous

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    DOC TA24S.7 1 ,873 0.1313 8-1313 Food It Agriculture POlicI Issues for LIBRARY .0,:R 0 1 19~1 the 1980s Tex<1s A!1M University The Texas A&M University System Texas Agricultural Extension Service Daniel C. Pfannstiel . Director...

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    Resource Assessment (assessment). The assessment and strategy identify important forest lands and provideColorado Statewide Forest Resource Strategy #12;June 2010 Acknowledgments The Colorado State Forest Forest Resource Strategy. We also offer our thanks and acknowledgement to Greg Sundstrom, assistant staff

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    for Agriculture and Rural Development invited SERG to lead Key Action 12 of the European Union Forest Action Plan, the Forestry Commission has long played leadership and facilitation roles enabling private, community and third. These priorities are now a key element of both European policies (EU Forest Action Plan, theme 3) and national

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    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture KEY: # = new course * = course IN AGRICULTURE. (3) Anintroductorycourserequiringcriticalanalysisofthemajorsocial. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfers

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    Rodriguez, Carlos

    #12;Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), Library Avenue, Pusa, New Delhi-110012 : July 2011 All Rights Reserved 2011, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), New Delhi

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    European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5. Sustainable mobilisation of wood: good practices Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B ­ 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32

  19. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

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    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

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    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... forests can be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence...

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    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

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    International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

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    Noble, James S.

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    Ray, David

    DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

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    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Prepare... yourself for a career in integrating life and engineering for systems in agriculture, food, environment, and energy, and to contribute to the world's largest industry. COLLEGE OF ACES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

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    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

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    Boas, Harold P.

    · · · · ·t t ·t ·t t t ·t . ~ t · · Process· Manual Biological & Agricultural Engineering MANUAL FOR THE BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TexasA&MUniversity Article I. NAME The name ofthis organization shall be the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (abbreviated

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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    Rutledge, Steven

    \\ AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Curriculum Checksheet 123 Credits This checksheet describes the curricular requirements for both the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Education with a concentration in "Teaching" and for the teacher licensing program in agricultural education. The courses listed are courses

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    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

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    Boone, Randall B.

    of the disappearing glacier, see Hemp 2005); (ii) there is a push in the group ranches to sub-divide the communally

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    Market land prices ignore the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services; hence, too much agricultural land may be developed. Correct land valuation must include these non-market values. Values of ecosystem services provided by the Richland...

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    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

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    Standiford, Richard B.

    forest N status: foliar nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P), foliar nitrate (NO3 -), foliar growth response to N of atmospheric N. In many forests the levels of available soil N are in excess of biotic demand, and N losses with available N over and above the biotic and abiotic retention capacities are considered N saturated (Aber

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    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

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    Agricultural Economics • University of California Animal WasteAgricultural and Food Markets Gordon Rausser..4 Animal Waste

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    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forecasting drought effects on agriculture based on waterEffects of 2009 Drought on San Joaquin Valley Agriculture

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    Migliaccio, Kati White

    AE429 Sustainability of Agriculture in Miami-Dade County: Considering Water Supply1 Kati W. Migliaccio2 1. This document is ABE 380, one of a series of the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University

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    Watson, Craig A.

    PI-59 Agricultural and Related Pest Control Applicator License Classifications under the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS)1 Frederick M. Fishel2 1. This document is PI-59, one Gainesville, FL 32611. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity

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    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

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    March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

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    March 2010 Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Collaboration Case Study #12;Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as ecosystem services, climate change, forest certification, and natural disturbances. It is expected) Good interpersonal and communication skills enabling collaboration with a broad spectrum of students

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    Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census The U.S. Forest Inventory Monitoring Symposium November 4, 2008 #12;Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census FIA Program Perspectives · Only comprehensive forest inventory for each of the 50 States, Puerto

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    Mladenoff, David

    Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

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    Hung, I-Kuai

    GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF REFLECTANCE AND NDVI VALUES IN THE ANGELINA FOREST ECOSYSTEM* Peter P. Siska International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry, Denver, Colorado, 5-7 November

  5. http://earthtrends.wri.org/updates/node/156January 2007 Monthly Update: Forest Certification and the Path to Sustainable

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    for certified products). Importantly, certification schemes offer international standards that define: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 2005. Global Forest Resources Assessment 2005. #12;Figure 2 may be realized through various means, and there has been significant international debate

  6. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

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    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

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    ER-038 5-06 Selecting a Consulting Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent... forest management experience does the for- ester have and in what capacity? ? In what professional or forestry-related organizations is the forester an active member? Recognized professional organizations include the Association of Consulting...

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

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  11. Forest Lifeautumn | winter 2004 the forest!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valley, near the spectacular Cornish coast Outdoor delights on your doorstep Come to the heart of Britain, rivers and streams, dramatic mountains, deep valleys and peaceful forest glades - they're all of exciting news, events, information and a great competition. Happy reading! In this issue of Forest Life we

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    Working Party 1.01.08 ­ Ecology and Silviculture of Spruces; co-hosted by the EU Interreg Project Forest of Alberta, Canada "Ecology and Silviculture of White Spruce in the Canadian Boreal Forest for Multiple Forest Integrity; Why Spruce is a Good Option" Kristina Blennow, SLU, Sweden "Perception of Risks

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    lead to a more efficient model to achieve and document high levels of forest stewardship by Oregon comes from well-managed forests. For wood products companies that do business with the likes of Home by the State of Oregon to be less competent or protective of forest resources than those landowners who become

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    Johnson, Edward A.

    Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

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    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

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    Chave, Jérôme

    . Introduction Tropical forests offer a broad range of ecosystem services, from carbon sequestration to potential valuation of biodiversity compo- nents. But, forest conversion in the tropics has dramatically altered and verifiable", and this prompted renewed interest in providing standardized and reproducible methods of forest

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    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty .............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

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    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................18 Research Projects School of Agriculture

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    ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY Research Projects School of Agriculture

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Aravind

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change on Indian agriculture. ” Manuscript,study of climate change impacts on Indian agriculture hasclimate change on agricultural output, because of the relevance of agriculture

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TO SPRAY - Based on the tested residual of materials registered for preventive bark beetle spraying in many formulations. The liquid concentrates designed for use on large trees require dilution with water effective when the pH of water used for dilution is 6 (slightly more acidic than neutral). When using water

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and east. Modele and Scalet (1985) demonstrated that largemouth bass record weiplS recognized by state fish Bass Management in South Dakota: Comparison with Waters Further South and East1 David W. Willis and Christopher S. Guy2 Absttacl.-A series of investigations were IIIIdenakal 10 better wuIerswId largemouth bass

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    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prices for red alder (Alnus rubra) hardwood logs are published and analyzed for reliability, consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions about land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the last 11 years.

  5. US Forest Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypefor Africa |Green6 Product: USUS

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    Buehrer, R. Michael

    1 University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science DN250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production Dn Engineering Technology DN250FAM Food and Agribusiness Management #12;1 Contents Agricultural Science DN250 1

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    Saskatchewan, University of

    Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY > Agriculture Building Parkade** > Pay Parking Lots** > Stadium Parkade** > Diefenbaker Lot > Health Sciences Parkade** Disabled Persons' Parking* Motorcyle Parking* Faculty & Sta Parking Lots* Student Parking Lots

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    Ray, David

    as they keep their gins going. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Past Remembered A glimpse of what life was like, MSU Extension Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Director, Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Interim Dean, College

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    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

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    ) - Implications and challenges of decentralized China's collective forest management Heng Sok (National Forest:00-10:30 Moderator: Heng Sok (Forestry Administration, Cambodia) Session: Forests and the market for timber products

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    Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

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    MacAdam, Keith

    ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment KEY: # = new course or first semester transfer students in Agricultural Biotechnology. ABT 120 GENETICS AND SOCIETY. (3 with the common experimental methods used in agricultural biotechnology. Students will be presented with several

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    Stuart, Steven J.

    46 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 46 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

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    Stuart, Steven J.

    44 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

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    Stuart, Steven J.

    39 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (www.clemson.edu/CAFLS) offers a broad. The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics with a Community and Economic

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering KEY: # = new course of engineering systems, earthwork computations, and introduction to boundary surveys for Agriculture students in the College of Agriculture and/or consent of instructor. AEN 220 FARM TRACTORS AND ENGINES. (3) Principles

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer & Environmental Protection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture) described Biofuel Quality Testing in Kentucky.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment A Foundation for Strategic Discussion and Private Forestry Redesign Initiative 2 National Guidance for Statewide Forest Resource Assessments 4 The Colorado Statewide Resource Assessment and all appendices are available online on the Colorado State Forest

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy 2007 ­ 2012 November 2006 #12;Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOOTHILLS MODEL FOREST Business Strategy for April 2007 to March 2012 1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................... 4 2.4 Foothills Model Forest Values

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .V.Birnie * Forest Research 1 #12;This document has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the ISO 9001

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    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

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    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

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    Purdue Agriculture Research Works Annual Statistical Report 2005-2006 Purdue AGrICuLTure Read the full report on the Web www.ag.purdue.edu/arp/stat_report_05-06 #12;Purdue AGrICuLTure Purdue Agriculture Research Works Here's why. We are riding the wave of revolutionary changes brought about

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

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  8. Deep in the Forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    try to promote these practices to the entire forest sector.? Since the beginning, the forest industry and landowners have supported the adoption of BMPs, and implementation has grown annually. As of December #25;#24;#24;#18;, Simpson said, #19...20 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Kathy Wythe The Texas Forest Service works with forestry professionals to implement best management practices to help protect water quality, which is critical for people and wildlife to survive. Photo courtesy...

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    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    try to promote these practices to the entire forest sector.? Since the beginning, the forest industry and landowners have supported the adoption of BMPs, and implementation has grown annually. As of December #25;#24;#24;#18;, Simpson said, #19...20 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Kathy Wythe The Texas Forest Service works with forestry professionals to implement best management practices to help protect water quality, which is critical for people and wildlife to survive. Photo courtesy...

  10. An Evaluation of the Perceived Effectiveness of the Municipal Forester Institute on its Participants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie Rena'

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE ON ITS PARTICIPANTS A Dissertation by MELANIE RENA? KIRK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE...

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    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

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    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  13. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term management strategies and management options for sustaining ecosystems and preserving high-value trees are presented. This information provides forest managers with knowledge and resources needed to detect WPBR Technical Report RMRS-GTR-206 March 2008 Options for the Management of White Pine Blister Rust in the Rocky

  14. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    RMRS-P-61 December 2010 Integrated Management of Carbon Sequestration and Biomass Utilization management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate: Proceedings Forests are important for carbon sequestration and how they are manipulated either through natural

  15. Coffee landscapes as refugia for native woody biodiversity as forest loss continues in southwest Ethiopia

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    Zavaleta, Erika

    Ethiopia Getachew Tadesse , Erika Zavaleta, Carol Shennan Environmental Studies Department, University and ecosystem services. Some of the last remaining forest frag- ments in Ethiopia, and the world's only habitats

  16. ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerospace Science Laboratory C11 AGAD Agricultural Administration Building G8 AHF Animal Holding Facility G Pete Dye Clubhouse C1 EE Electrical Engineering Building H6 EEL Entomology Environmental Laboratory G8 F9 FOPN Flight Operations Building B11 FORS Forestry Building G8 FPRD Forest Products Building G8

  17. nAturAl resources School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    the opportunity to focus on the multi-resource manage- ment of forests and associated ecosystems for the sustainednAturAl resources MAnAgeMent School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences 907-474-7083 www.uaf.edu/snras/ Bs Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 130 credits Natural resources management involves making

  18. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Steven Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Steven Anderson. In Oklahoma, bottomland hardwood forests are good examples of riparian areas. Riparian areas have many, and suggest appropriate management practices to help maintain them. Riparian Areas in Oklahoma A diversity

  19. Indigenous livelihoods, slash-and-burn agriculture, and carbon stocks in Eastern Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    , and agricultural intensification. Based on soil and biomass carbon measurements, estimated annual sequestration aimed at sequestration of carbon in the community are likely to be rather unequally distributed within., 2001; FAO, 1996). Annual carbon (C) sequestration rates in tropical forest fallow are estimated

  20. Economics issues in global climate change: Agriculture forestry and natural resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.; Anderson, M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a collection of 26 papers from a 1990 conference concerning the interface between greenhouse warming and agriculture and forestry. Areas of particular emphasis include methane's importance as a greenhouse gas and agricultural production of methane; agriculture's importance as a response to climatic change; forestry as a potentially powerful abatement method, because forests sequester carbon as part of their natural growth. The book is divided into three parts. First, the implications of examining the full set of greenhouse gases versus just looking at carbon dioxide are discussed. Second, the role of agriculture and forestry in producing greenhouse gases is covered. Third, a series of articles tackles the difficult task of measuring the damages to agriculture that would result if climates do change.

  1. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    /schedule, language, safety and health, and time away from home; finally, benefits included experience in international agriculture and natural resources, culture, international travel, global perspective, and education. This study found that international agriculture...

  2. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

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    Buehrer, R. Michael

    College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

  3. Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fixen, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

  4. Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Aravind

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change on Indian agriculture. ” Manuscript, Department ofJ. Parikh. “Indian agriculture and climate sensitivity. ”3):353–368, 1979. Food and Agriculture Organization of the

  5. Farm Workers and Unions in California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Unions in California Agriculture Philip Martin June 30,unions and immigration in California agriculture 2. scanningbargaining agreements signed in CA agriculture (http://

  6. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, by

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012): Can Cali- fornia Agriculture disprove the allegedweed. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture TheCalifornia Agriculture team has won three awards from the

  7. Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Released: November 20, 2014 Enzyme insights may help agriculture, biofuels Plant...

  8. Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture Spotlight on Rutgers NJAES EcoComplex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture April 2009 Spotlight on Rutgers NJAES Eco and economic growth," notes David Specca, assistant director for bioenergy technologies and controlled-environment agriculture at the EcoComplex. "By offering services and resources to entrepreneurs that are not available

  9. Science & Research Agriculture & Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science & Research Agriculture & Food Climate & Environment Consumers EU Priorities 2020 EU Treaty for nuclear fusion project ITER | EurActiv http://www.euractiv.com/en/science/funding-crisis-for-nuclear for nuclear fusion project ITER A multi-billion euro international research project has run into deep

  10. AGRICULTURAL REPORT FEBRUARY 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trading framework. The largest GHG market in the world is the European Union-Emissions Trading Scheme' sulfur diox- ide (SO2) emissions trading program Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets from Agriculture and states have enacted policies individually or in cooperation to reduce GHG emissions through an emissions

  11. AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply will shape the future of the agricultural industry. We will discuss each in turn. Ethanol and energy Ethanol will be using almost 30% of the U.S. corn crop by 2009 with total ethanol production reaching almost 14 billion gallons. Numerous analysts have suggested that total demand for ethanol longer

  12. AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as Indiana agriculture enters the energy business in a big way. The advent of four new Indiana ethanol plants. Ethanol means theres a monstrous increase in the need for corn production in 2007, and beyond. Acres have of the process to produce ethanol from cellulose (plant material). Indiana biofuels are both ethanol (corn

  13. 2012 Annual Report Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Covered iii Funding Sources; Expenditure Breakdown Commercial Agriculture 1 Putting New Jersey Vintages for Librarians Economic Development 25 Food Industry Gateway 26 New Jersey Clean Energy Resource Network counties: Rutgers Cooperative Extension Statistics NJAES plays a significant role in the state's economic

  14. Agriculture Residential College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture Students Design Build Solar Pavilion in Old South Baton Rouge Louisiana Sustainable BuildingAgriculture Residential College LSU Sustainability Denise Newell LSU Planning, Design-year institutions Denise S. Newell, PE LEED AP Sustainability Manager scribner@lsu.edu Contact Info "If you had

  15. futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that Michigan's climate has been following a global trend toward warming. Other MAES scientists are studying how this warming trend will affect agricultural crops, weeds, insects and diseases. One component of global warming Leadership Council to study and identify trends, causes and consequences of urban sprawl, and to provide

  16. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  17. Assistant Professor Agricultural Systems Modeler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Assistant Professor Agricultural Systems Modeler Department of Plant and Soil Sciences Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University ­ Stillwater, Oklahoma POSITION DESCRIPTION The Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University is seeking applicants

  18. Imported Fire Ants: An Agricultural Pest and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Western States. These pests pose serious threats to people, small animals, and agricultural equipment) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) for advice about how to manage imported fire ants their targets with powerful jaws and sting their victims repeatedly. Each sting injects a dose of venom

  19. Oklahoma State University Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-979 Oklahoma State University Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma. Bartholomew Big Game Biologist Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation White-tailed Deer Habitat-Soil Conservation Service (now NRCS) in Oklahoma. The authors greatly appreciate Dr. Teels' efforts in initiating

  20. Forest products and services, international trade Trade in forest products and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , particularly in Europe, bio-energy is gaining in importance. On the other hand, wood is facing stiff to be geared to markets in the United States, Canada, Japan and Europe. However, major markets such as China political attention and promotion of this instrument by important institutions and constituencies

  1. Economic Contributions of Florida Agriculture, Natural Resources, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20061 Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and W. David range of other economic sectors for food and kindred products manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input suppliers, support services, and nature-based recreation. In addition to farms, forests

  2. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    despite globalization tendencies elsewhere in the economy.globalization in the non-agricultural sectors of the world economy.

  3. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  4. The research programme Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The research programme Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

  5. Agricultural Sciences for Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Sciences for Global Development ­ SLU's contribution Research Capacity building Provision of expertise The mission of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) is "to develop in rural areas, and agriculture plays an essential role in their livelihoods. Nevertheless, FAO estimates

  6. A Guide to Brazil's Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    to the preparation of technical regulations, in 2007, Brazil adopted the Guide of Good Regulatory Practices, whichA Guide to Brazil's Agricultural Machinery Compliance Requirements #12;A Guide to Brazil's Agricultural Machinery Compliance Requirements July 2012 #12;1 A Guide to Importing Agricultural Machinery

  7. AG IN THE CLASSROOMHELPING THE NEXT GENERATION UNDERSTAND THEIR CONNECTION TO AGRICULTURE R e a d e r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    graciously provided by: Colorado Nonpoint Source Management Program, Colorado State Forest Service Written, property and can kill people. Because of this, sometimes forest managers clear away this dry material, the Missionary Ridge fire consumed more than 68,000 acres and 80 buildings. It was also started by a person

  8. Community work in vocational agriculture in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickery, Clarence Percell

    1926-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agriculture traiaing I Suspioioa oa the part oS ~ that there will be oharges iJ azy services are rcmdere4 3 That o14 problea? Ot staging in the sons 014 Rut Chat pa4 en4 Qxank pak " before hia fbllowe4 4 Skeptieisa as to the wins oC agrioulture training... that is simple and gives infomation tbat is of most uso to hia 2 (Sapor) (minor ) (Xone) Do you have difficultp in helping the farmer to solve his farm ~ment pxoblems 2 (Sapor) (Hinor) (Sons) Do you have diffioulty in assuring the best max)cote at the right...

  9. THE TOTAL ECONOMIC VALUE OF ITALIAN FOREST LANDSCAPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tempesta, Tiziano

    Valuation (CV) and other traditional appraisal approaches. This was the method used in earlier national and being affected by a considerably subjective choice in the valuation methods used and in the costs to supply a flow of products and services. Moreover, the benefits of forest ecosystems go beyond timber

  10. Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Kurt Richter Agricultural Issues Center University of California March 2011 #12;Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Extension Specialist Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

  11. AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles · Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies · Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture · The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

  12. Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Purdue Climate Change Research Center, 2010 #12;Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Presentation Overview: Global Climate Change...and Agriculture Policy Landscape: US and International Agricultural Offsets and Policy

  13. REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES ANALYSIS SYSTEM Kaimeng Sun Institute of Agricultural Information, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing,P. R. China 100081 Abstract: In this paper, a system for analyzing the strategic adjustment of regional agricultural

  14. CURRENT SITUATION AND COUNTERMEASURES OF AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CURRENT SITUATION AND COUNTERMEASURES OF AGRICULTURAL INFORMATION CONSTRUCTION IN JIAMUSI AREA of agricultural information construction in Jiamusi area, the achievements obtained from agricultural information, the existing problems of agricultural information construction are found. The reasons of these problems

  15. Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low...

  16. Agriculture Taxes in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Lonnie L.; Stallmann, Judith I.

    2002-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    farmers, ranchers and agribusiness firms, including: a73 Exemption from state and local sales and use taxes on purchased farm inputs and products. a73 The provision for local property tax pro- ductivity valuation for open space land. a73 Exemption from... and local level and the provision for open space productivity valuation of land used in agriculture, timber or wildlife production. Sales tax exemptions Farmers and ranchers are exempt from state and local sales taxes for several items, including most...

  17. Agriculture, technology, and conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilverberg, Cody John

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Research CIIDH Centro Internacional para Investigaciones en Derechos Humanos (International Center for Human Rights Research) CPR Comunidad de Poblaci?n en Resistencia (Community in Resistance) departamento A Guatemalan political unit similar... the guerrillas were active. Among the victims were ?men, women and children of all social strata: workers, professionals, church members, politicians, peasants, students and academics; in ethnic terms, the vast majority were Mayans? (Tomuschat, et al., 1999...

  18. Forest Clearing in the Ecuadorian Amazon: A Study of Patterns Over Space and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    on a farm (finca) leads to more deforestation; (2) rates of forest clearing surrounding four primary to deforestation; and deforestation rates W. Pan (&) Department of International Health, The Johns Hopkins to increase agricultural intensification. Keywords Deforestation Á Ecuador Á Land use Á Population policy Á

  19. The spectral/temporal manifestation of forest succession in optical imagery The potential of multitemporal imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Conghe

    fundamental types of change occur in forest ecosys- tems: deforestation and regeneration. Deforestation since the rise of agriculture-based civilizations and the rate of deforestation was at 13 million was released to the atmosphere due to deforestation (Detwiler & Hall, 1988; Dixon et al., 1994; Houghton et al

  20. Abrupt watercourse formation in a semiarid sedimentary landscape of central Argentina: the roles of forest clearing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    load of salts (~0.7g lÀ1 ). Nil recharge and large vadose accumulation of salts in dry forests stands contrasted with recharge rates of ~16mm yÀ1 and salt-leached profiles under agriculture. Although the process salinity; vadose soil profiling; piping; sapping Received 25 March 2012; Revised 9 July 2012; Accepted 10

  1. Scale dependence in multitemporal mapping of forest fragmentation in Bolivia: implications for explaining temporal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale dependence in multitemporal mapping of forest fragmentation in Bolivia: implications, Bolivia Received 8 April 2002; accepted 21 October 2002 Abstract Landsat TM and ETM data were used building, agricultural colonisation and hydrocarbon exploration in Chapare (Bolivia) since the 1980s were

  2. METRO will conduct a public meeting to receive comments on proposed service adjustments for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    reliable service. 20 Canal ­ 7 days/week ­ Due to construction, remove service from portions of Harrisburg ­ Due to construction, remove service from portions of Harrisburg. Reroute permanently via Forest Hills and Capitol. 38 Manchester ­ Weekday ­ Due to construction, remove service from portions of Harrisburg

  3. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    and increasing deadwood, increasing recreation activities in forests, climate change, ... ) need for multi and Merlo, 2005 - Mediterranean Forest Values:37-68 133 ha-1 (overall average value in 18 Mediterranean

  4. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    effects of NH3 volatization, good litter management practices are key to a successful operation. Applying.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating. The Cooperative Extension service officers work force.. The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service College of Agricultural

  5. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    the pre-HACCP and principles of HACCP steps. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and Sanitation Standard.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating. The Cooperative Extension service officers work force.. The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service College of Agricultural

  6. AGRICULTURAL VOL. 26 NO. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Ray Miller, MAES U.P. forest properties manager, recently added forest biomass development coordinator in bioeconomy research -- Pueppke isn't the only person to wear two hats. MAES scientist Bruce Dale serves understand the implications of many of the programs contained in the farm bill and assisting them in figuring

  7. agriculture agricultural research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application I areas that apply) Discipline Areas Outcome Areas Populations Animal Science Chronic Disease Children Leistikow, Bruce N. 49 Saskatchewan Agricultural...

  8. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and management. The program emphasizes sustainable, multiple-use management and includes substantial field work work, etc.) Fall FNR 4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems 3 credits FNR 4660 NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Forest Resource Management Forest

  9. National Forest Inventory of Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory of Great Britain Survey Manual #12;2 Remember to Save your Edit Session Regularly, Validate the information and Backup the Data NFI Survey Manual National Forest Inventory Survey in the surveys contributes to the National Forest Inventory (NFI) of Great Britain. With the information from

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NFI: Mensuration protocol for the National Forest Inventory June 2010 E. D. Mackie, R. W. Matthews and A. Brewer1 FR Biometrics Division 1 IFOS, Forestry Commission #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI or square boundary. In the case of a section 2 #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI): Mensuration Protocol

  11. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  12. ForestDevelopment Community Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    in Africa as a basis for developing applied integrated, multiple use forest resource management for timber and non-timber forest products from these systems, and for forest rehabilitation af- ter degradation from to Fusarium circinatum. Forestry companies worldwide have tried to hybridise P. radiata with other Pinus

  13. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

  14. EA-1629: Herbicide Application within Transmission Line Rights-of-Way in the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest, Arkansas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Interior, U.S. Forest Service, with DOE’s Southwestern Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of applying herbicide within transmission line rights-of-way in the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest in Arkansas. NOTE: SWPA's involvement in this EA has ended.

  15. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  16. Forest structure of the big Thicket Scenic Area, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Daniel Harrison

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of vascular plants from the study area. Appreciation is also given to Mr. H. McEwen of the Soil Conser- vation Service, Livingston, Texas for his assistance in surveying the soils. Dr. P. Harcombe is acknowledged for the use of his unpublished data. Mr...-hardwood forest which originally encompassed an area of two million acres (McLeod 1967). It contains elements of the oak-pine and southeastern ever- green forest regions of Braun (1950) and represents the westernmost extent of the southern mixed hardwood...

  17. Free membership Agriculture Alzheimer Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Membership Free membership signup! Categories Agriculture Alzheimer Astronomy Astrophysics Bacteria that was released to the environment as a result of ore milling, nuclear fuel fabrication or processing activities

  18. atlantic forest state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 credits FORT 110* Forest Inventories (3) FORT 140 Forest Surveying (3) FORT 160 to Forestry 1 FORT 105 - Forest Mensuration* 3 FORT 110 - Forest...

  19. Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communications 301 Topics in Agricultural Leadership & Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communications 301 Topics in Agricultural Leadership@aged.tamu.edu; 862-3693 "While scholars may disagree on the origins of leadership, there's a strong consensus." Kouzes, J. & Posner, B. 1995. The Leadership Challenge. p. 337 NATURE OF THE COURSE: This course

  20. Forest Landscape Description and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Forest Landscape Description and Inventories a basis for landplanning and design Pacific Southwest landscape description and inventories ­ a basis for land plan- ning and design. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Illustrates their application in two inventories made to aid managers and landscape architects in planning

  1. Extension Note Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based harvesting systems led to the development of the "Site Degradation Guidelines for the Vancouver Forest Region to validate soil disturbance guidelines, were lacking at that time. Early attempts had been made to assess, and to measure tree growth over the longer term as an indication of site productivity. The first trial

  2. Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

    Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building Whiteknights Hall Windsor Hall Students Union Shop IMA 3rd House Annexe 59 Agricultural and Food Economics D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 59 Agriculture D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 48 Allen Laboratory D5 The Allen Laboratory 41 Alumni Office D4 Whiteknights

  3. Public Policy and Agriculture Dr. Jeff Burkhardt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Public Policy and Agriculture Dr. Jeff Burkhardt With Dr. John VanSickle Food & Resource Economics & Agriculture? #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture? · Economic instability #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture? · Economic instability · Globalization #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture

  4. Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Danh

    Page 1 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah Biological and Agricultural Engineering UC Agricultural Ergonomics Research Center Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety WCAHS Seminar, December 5, 2011 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah

  5. AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation of the Wisconsin Cranberry Industry Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural-Extension #12;STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied

  6. AgriculturAl lAnd ApplicAtion of Biosolids in VirginiA: MAnAging Biosolids for AgriculturAl use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    AgriculturAl lAnd ApplicAtion of Biosolids in VirginiA: MAnAging Biosolids for AgriculturAl use Introduction Although biosolids supply some of all of the essen- tial plant nutrients and soil property for determining biosolid application rates on agricultural land can be summa- rized as follows: 1) Determine

  7. ~ SEFS Student and Academic Services ~ Anderson 116/130 ~ sefsadv@uw.edu ~ 2065433077~ Updated 3/13/2013 Restoration Ecology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    in the Environmental Science and Resource Management major http such as environmental education or pursue graduate studies in biology, forest resources, agriculture, environmental@uw.edu ~ 2065433077~ Updated 3/13/2013 Restoration Ecology and Environmental Horticulture Option

  8. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photographs were digitized into an Arc/Info GIS. This was used to determine the area under crops and grazing. Range forage production figures in kilograms per hectare for the area were obtained from Agricultural Technical and Extension Services inventories...

  9. What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information about forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information is the information gathered? Data for the National Forest Inventory is being collected using ground surveys, aerial representative picture of the state of Britain's forests and woodland. National Forest Inventory #12;Has

  10. FCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 Forest operations and red squirrels in Scottish forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts on red squirrels. The survey, forest design and operational planning practices set outFCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 1 Forest operations Guidance Note: Forest operations and wildlife in Scottish forests. This note sets out further advice on how

  11. actSheetFFood, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 590 Woody Hayes Drive, Columbus, OH 43210 What is a Recall?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and state agencies. Manufacturers strive to prevent a recall. Employing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPExtension actSheetFFood, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 590 Woody Hayes Drive, Columbus Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA FSIS) share

  12. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  13. AgExcellence 2006 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    AgExcellence 2006 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review #12;ACAdEMiC pRogRAMS College of Agriculture Baccalaureate: Agricultural Education Options: AgRelations Teaching Agricultural Operations Technology MasterofScience: Agricultural Education Baccalaureate

  14. Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of AgriculturalSconSin agriculture 2012 i #12;ii StatuS of WiSconSin agriculture 2012 #12;Preface Status of Wisconsin Agriculture is an annual agricultural situation and outlook report authored (except where noted) by faculty

  15. Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor to increase. There is potential for agricultural residue fiber toThere is potential for agricultural residue. The benefits of utilizing agricultural residues for woodbenefits of utilizing agricultural residues for wood

  16. UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

  17. MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION SYSTEM OF HEILONGJIANG RECLAMATION AREA@126.com Abstract: To meet the need of agriculture management modernization of Heilongjiang reclamation area, further boost large-scale integration level of modern agriculture production and boost management

  18. Agricultural Engineering and Farm Building Collection /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Agricultural Engineering and Farm Building Collection / Leonard Staley (collector) Compiled on Agricultural Engineering File List Catalogue entry (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Collection Description Agricultural Engineering and Farm Building Collection / Leonard Staley (collector). ­ 1953-1976. 60 cm

  19. STRATEGIC PLAN THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL

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    STRATEGIC PLAN For THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY In association with Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station Colorado Cooperative Extension December 1, 2005 1 #12;STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY IN ASSOCIATION

  20. Agricultural Research for Development Scales & Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research for Development Scales & Diversity SLU, Uppsala 28-29 September 2011 28th September 2011 (morning) Agricultural Investments ..... Shenggen Fan, IFPRI Livestock production­ Global and local importance and development John McDermott, ILRI Smallholder agricultural intensification ­ means