National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for agricultural waste industrial

  1. Agricultural, industrial and municipal waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    It is right that consideration of the environment is of prime importance when agricultural and industrial processes are being developed. This book compiles the papers presented at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers conference. The contents include: The use of wastes for land reclamation and restoration; landfill, an environmentally acceptable method of waste disposal and an economic source of energy; control of leachate from waste disposal landfill sites using bentonite; landfill gas migration from operational landfill sites, monitoring and prevention; monitoring of emissions from hazardous waste incineration; hazardous wastes management in Hong Kong, a summary of a report and recommendations; the techniques and problems of chemical analysis of waste waters and leachate from waste tips; a small scale waste burning combustor; energy recovery from municipal waste by incineration; anaerobic treatment of industrial waste; a review of developments in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes; reduction of slag deposits by magnesium hydroxide injection; integrated rural energy centres (for agriculture-based economies); resource recovery; straw as a fuel in the UK; the computer as a tool for predicting the financial implications of future municipal waste disposal and recycling projects; solid wastes as a cement kiln fuel; monitoring and control of landfill gas; the utilization of waste derived fuels; the economics of energy recovery from municipal and industrial wastes; the development and construction of a municipal waste reclamation plant by a local authority.

  2. Removal of nickel(II) from aqueous solution and nickel plating industry wastewater using an agricultural waste: Peanut hulls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Periasamy, K.; Namasivayam, C. [Bharathair Univ. Tamil Nadu (India)] [Bharathair Univ. Tamil Nadu (India)

    1995-07-01

    Activated carbon prepared from peanut hulls (PHC), an agricultural waste by-product, has been used for the adsorption of Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The process of uptake obeys both Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. The applicability of Lagergren kinetic model has also been investigated. Quantitative removal of Ni(II) from 100 mL aqueous solution containing 20 mg/L Ni(II) by 85 mg PHC was observed over a pH range of 4.0 to 10.0. The suitability of PHC for treating nickel plating industry wastewater was also tested. A comparative study with a commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) showed that PHC is 36 times more efficient compared to GAC based on Langmuir adsorption capacity (Q{sub O}).

  3. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and for e?ective use of industrial exhaust heat is describedto scale up the process to industrial production levels.Waste Disassembly with Industrial Waste Heat Mengjun

  4. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10­70 10­i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  5. CORNELL QUARTERLY Agricultural Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    on fossil fuels, points out Donald R. Price, associate professor of agricultural engineering. Natural petroleum, and for the use of ethanol as liquid fuel, are discussed by Robert K. Finn, professor of chemical

  6. MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY SUMMARY REPORT - A WORKING DOCUMENT Presented on Behalf of: The Management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley Program of the Agricultural Nutrient Management in the Lower Fraser Valley program. The ideas and opinions expressed herein do

  7. Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor. The benefits of utilizing agricultural residues for woodbenefits of utilizing agricultural residues for wood a fiber source that is currentlyadded product from a fiber source that is currently not well utilized

  8. Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management in the Lower Fraser Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES Agricultural Waste management Zones Used in the management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley

  9. Industrial Wastes as a Fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, G.; Hendrix, W.

    1980-01-01

    available for coal since it was at one time a major industrial fuel and is still used extensively for electric power generation. However, combustion data for other fuels such as wood and solid materials typically generated as industrial wastes can only...

  10. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D. Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  11. Waste Management Trends in Texas Industrial Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, C. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    , including reporting. Some reporting is required of all industrial plants, but the reporting requirements and procedures differ in accordance with the type and amount of waste generated. Future changes in federal and state laws regarding waste management...

  12. Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altin, M.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

  13. Status Report of Projects in Waste Management in the Livestock Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Status Report of Projects in Waste Management in the Livestock Industry in the Interior Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 3015 Ord Rd., Kamloops, B.C. V2B 8A9 and 2 University College of the Cariboo and monitoring projects in the area of pollution prevention and waste minimization in the livestock industry

  14. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    equipment for automatic dismantling of electronic componentsthe technology acceptance for dismantling of waste printedR. Research on with dismantling of PCB mounted electronic

  15. Nevada Industrial Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Industrial Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Nevada Industrial Solid Waste Disposal Site...

  16. Accelerated carbonation treatment of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Peter J., E-mail: gunning_peter@hotmail.co [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom); Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    The disposal of industrial waste presents major logistical, financial and environmental issues. Technologies that can reduce the hazardous properties of wastes are urgently required. In the present work, a number of industrial wastes arising from the cement, metallurgical, paper, waste disposal and energy industries were treated with accelerated carbonation. In this process carbonation was effected by exposing the waste to pure carbon dioxide gas. The paper and cement wastes chemically combined with up to 25% by weight of gas. The reactivity of the wastes to carbon dioxide was controlled by their constituent minerals, and not by their elemental composition, as previously postulated. Similarly, microstructural alteration upon carbonation was primarily influenced by mineralogy. Many of the thermal wastes tested were classified as hazardous, based upon regulated metal content and pH. Treatment by accelerated carbonation reduced the leaching of certain metals, aiding the disposal of many as stable non-reactive wastes. Significant volumes of carbon dioxide were sequestrated into the accelerated carbonated treated wastes.

  17. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  18. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  19. Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis

    2004-06-15

    This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

  20. Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

  1. Waste combustion in boilers and industrial furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This set of conference papers deals with the combustion of hazardous wastes in boilers and industrial furnaces. The majority of the papers pertain specifically to cement industry kiln incinerators and focus on environmental issues. In particular, stack emission requirements currently enforced or under consideration by the U.S. EPA are emphasized. The papers were drawn from seven areas: (1) proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology rule, (2) trial burn planning and experience, (3) management and beneficial use of materials, (4) inorganic emissions and continuous emission monitoring, (5) organic emissions, (6) boiler and industrial furnace operations, and (7) risk assessment and communication.

  2. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems This presentation covers...

  3. Identifying, examining, and validating a description of the agriculture industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward Wayne

    2009-05-15

    of fundamental knowledge in mathematics and sciences, 11 percent; and sixth, peer pressure/family against agricultural sciences studies, 7 percent. These disturbing data are indicative of some of the challenges faced by many colleges and land... .................................................................. 20 Occupational Outlook Handbook ................................................... 22 Career Guide to Industries .............................................................. 24 National FFA Organization Career Explorer...

  4. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    and waste management that take place within industrialpolicies Waste management policies can reduce industrialWaste management policies.56 7.10 Co-benefits of industrial

  5. Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Feasibility Report -- Agricultural and Forestry Solid Wastes Power Generation Demonstration, December 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Subcontractor report on feasibility of using agricultural and forestry wastes for power generation in China

  6. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  7. An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world Rosemarie Yevich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    -- -- An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world an assessment of biofuel use and agricultural field burning in the developing world. We used information from and Latin America, respectively. Agricultural waste supplies about 33% of total biofuel use, providing 39

  8. Hazardous waste minimization. Part 3. Waste minimization in the paint and allied products industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorton, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    This paper looks at waste minimization practices available to the paint and coatings industry. The paper begins with an introduction to the industry and a description of the products. The steps involved in the manufacture of paints and coatings are then described. The paper then identifies the wastes generated. Source reduction and recycling techniques are the predominant means of minimizing waste in this industry. Equipment cleaning wastes are the largest category of wastes, and the paper concentrates on equipment and techniques available to reduce or eliminate these wastes. Techniques are described to reduce the other wastes from manufacturing operations. The paper concludes with a discussion of changing industry product trends and the effect that these trends will have on the generation of waste.

  9. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to recover waste heat that is exhausted in various manufacturing industries, including food processing. A large portion of unrecovered industrial waste heat is considered to be...

  10. Industrial waste needs assessment. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radel, R.J.; Willis, M.P.

    1993-10-01

    In January of 1992 a team was put together to begin the process of assessing the industrial waste needs of the Tennessee Valley. The team consisted of representatives from the various TVA Resource Group organizations. This initial team recommended as a starting point in the process a two-phase market research effort. A second team was then commissioned to conduct the first phase of this market research effort. The first phase of that marketing effort is now complete. This report contains an analysis of the data obtained through interviews of more than 168 individuals representing a similar number of organizations. A total of 37 TVA Resource Group employees were involved in the contact process from various organizations. In addition, the appendices provide summaries of the data used in designing the process and the reports of the Contact Coordinators (who were responsible for a series of visits). As a result of the data analysis, the Review Team makes the following recommendations: 1. Publish this report and distribute to the new management within TVA Resource Group as well as to all those participating as contacts, visitors, and contact coordinators. 2. The Resource Group management team, or management teams within each of the respective organizations within Resource Group, appoint Phase 2 assessement teams for as many of the problem areas listed in Table III as seem appropriate. We further recommend that, where possible, cross-organizational teams be used to examine individual problem areas. 3. Make this report available within Generating and Customer Groups, especially to the Customer Service Centers. 4. Establish a process to continue follow up with each of the contacts made in this assessment.

  11. Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law...

  12. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    for the European Pulp and Paper Industry, Confederation ofin food and pulp and paper industry wastes, turbines tocement, and pulp and paper industries and in the control of

  13. Solid Waste Management in Vietnam An Industrial Ecology Study by Thao Nguyen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Solid Waste Management in Vietnam An Industrial Ecology Study by Thao Nguyen School greatly magnified the problems with Vietnam's solid waste management system, pushing waste management ..................................................................................................................................3 3. Solid Waste Management in Vietnam 3.1 Generation and Components

  14. Fluid Bed Combustion Applied to Industrial Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, J. F.; Sneyd, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Because of its unique ability to handle a wide variety of liquids and solids in an energy efficient and environmentally acceptable manner, fluid bed combustion is being increasingly applied to the utilization of waste materials and low grade fuels...

  15. An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world Rosemarie 2003. [1] We present an assessment of biofuel use and agricultural field burning in the developing% of total biofuel use, providing 39%, 29%, and 13% of biofuel use in Asia, Latin America, and Africa, and 41

  16. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruch, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

  17. Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry's Most Widespread Health and Safety Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry demonstrated that these potentially permanently disabling injuries are readily prevented using ergonomics that agricultural work is diverse and so agricultural ergonomics must bridge many specific problems with a flexible

  18. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

  19. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 2, Industrial liquid waste processing, industrial gaseous waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, V.E. [ed.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarize the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Individual reports are indexed separately.

  20. Industrial waste in highway construction K. Aravind1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    -base material, bulk-fill, recycling [2] Colliery spoil Coal mining Bulk-fill [2] Spent oil shale Petrochemical are being emphasized, rather than the tests which estimate the individual physical properties. Figure-1, such as industrial wastes. This is because the material properties, for example, particle sizes, grading and chemical

  1. Urban agriculture as a tool for neighborhood fabric repair in post-industrial Detroit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairbank, Sandra Trubow

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on Detroit as a post-industrial city that suffers from abandonment, vacancy, and food security issues. I address this problem through the lens of agriculture, asking how urban farming can be used to ...

  2. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  3. Ramsey County commercial, industrial, institutional waste reduction and recycling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman-Onkka, C.

    1995-09-01

    The Ramsey County Commercial, Industrial, Institutional Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was developed (1) to raise awareness of waste reduction and recycling opportunities for businesses, (2) to make information available to businesses, (3) to provide technical assistance to small and medium sized businesses on waste reduction and recycling, and (4) to raise awareness of Ramsey County as a technical resource. Ramsey County was founded in 1849 and is named for Alexander Ramsey, the first governor of the Minnesota Territory. Ramsey County is the smallest, most urban of all 87 counties in Minnesota. With 170 square miles and a 1990 population of 485,000, Ramsey has the most people per square mile of any county in Minnesota. There are 19 cities within the County, the largest is Saint Paul with a 1990 population of 272,000. There are no unincorporated areas in Ramsey County. This report describes the efforts directed towards raising the awareness of the county waste management, recycling program.

  4. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    disposal routes, several countries have set incen- tives to promote the use of various wastes in industrial processes in direct

  5. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

  6. Industrial Program of Waste Management - Cigeo Project - 13033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butez, Marc [Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs - Andra, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet 92298 Chatenay-Malabry (France)] [Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs - Andra, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet 92298 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bartagnon, Olivier; Gagner, Laurent [AREVA NC Tour AREVA 1 place de la Coupole 92084 Paris La Defense (France)] [AREVA NC Tour AREVA 1 place de la Coupole 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Advocat, Thierry; Sacristan, Pablo [Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, CEA-SACLAY 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)] [Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, CEA-SACLAY 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Beguin, Stephane [Electricite de France - EDF, Division Combustible Nucleaire, 1, Place Pleyel Site Cap Ampere93282 Saint Denis (France)] [Electricite de France - EDF, Division Combustible Nucleaire, 1, Place Pleyel Site Cap Ampere93282 Saint Denis (France)

    2013-07-01

    The French Planning Act of 28 June 2006 prescribed that a reversible repository in a deep geological formation be chosen as the reference solution for the long-term management of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste. It also entrusted the responsibility of further studies and design of the repository (named Cigeo) upon the French Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), in order for the review of the creation-license application to start in 2015 and, subject to its approval, the commissioning of the repository to take place in 2025. Andra is responsible for siting, designing, implementing, operating the future geological repository, including operational and long term safety and waste acceptance. Nuclear operators (Electricite de France (EDF), AREVA NC, and the French Commission in charge of Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies (CEA) are technically and financially responsible for the waste they generate, with no limit in time. They provide Andra, on one hand, with waste packages related input data, and on the other hand with their long term industrial experiences of high and intermediate-level long-lived radwaste management and nuclear operation. Andra, EDF, AREVA and CEA established a cooperation agreement for strengthening their collaborations in these fields. Within this agreement Andra and the nuclear operators have defined an industrial program for waste management. This program includes the waste inventory to be taken into account for the design of the Cigeo project and the structural hypothesis underlying its phased development. It schedules the delivery of the different categories of waste and defines associated flows. (authors)

  7. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  8. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  9. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  10. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  11. The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    in the first place, and therefore does not requlr.~ treatment or disposal. It ensure~ that more rqw material becomes product. Hore r.estrictive environmental regulations, rising energy costs, and the requirement for more economic waste cont~ol underlie... set standards and procedures for was~e disposal. This strategy is the least cost-effective method of meeting pollution control goals and fails to encourage innovation in technology. In addition, this approach encourages industry to keep silent...

  12. United States based agricultural {open_quotes}waste products{close_quotes} as fillers in a polypropylene homopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M.; Caulfield, D.F. [Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    With the advent of modern coupling agents (MAPP or maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene), the potential use of various types of renewable, sustainable agricultural byproducts as fillers in thermoplastics is explored. Over 7.7 billion pounds of fillers were used in the plastics industry in 1993. With sharp price increases in commodity thermoplastics (i.e. approximately 25% in 94`), the amount of fillers in thermoplastic materials will increase throughout the 90`s. Various types of agricultural fibers are evaluated for mechanical properties vs. 50% wood flour and 40% talc filled polypropylene (PP). The fibers included in this study are: kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, oat hulls, wood flour (pine), corncob, hard corncob, rice hulls, peanut hulls, corn fiber, soybean hull, residue, and jojoba seed meal. Composite interfaces were modified with MAPP to improve the mechanical properties through increased adhesion between the hydrophilic and polar fibers with the hydrophobic and non-polar matrix. The agro-waste composites had compositions of 50% agro-waste/48% PP/2% MAPP. All of the agricultural waste by-products were granulated through a Wiley mill with a 30 mesh screen and compounded in a high intensity shear-thermo kinetic mixer. The resultant blends were injection molded into ASTM standard samples and tested for tensile, flexural, and impact properties. This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the twelve resultant composites and compares them to wood flour and talc-filled polypropylene composites. The mechanical properties of kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, and oat hulls compare favorably to the wood flour and talc-filled PP, which are both commercially available and used in the automotive and furniture markets.

  13. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No Name

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  14. Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendoMassachusetts:Renewable EnergyLLC Jump to:SourceWaste

  15. Exposing strategic assets to create new competencies: The case of technological acquisition in the waste management industry in Europe and North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, MA

    1999-01-01

    1991), Hazardous Waste Management Services and AssociatedPollution Control and Waste Management Industry Directory.Acquisition in the Waste Management Industry in Europe and

  16. Alumni & Industry Magazine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    grease, waste animal fats, recycled veg- etable oils and agricultural seed oils into biodiesel. BioxAlumni & Industry Magazine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry University of Toronto Volume 10

  17. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OFBarriers to Industrial EnergyThe ThomasEnergy

  18. Washington State Ergonomics Tool: predictive validity in the waste industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppes, Susan Elise

    2004-09-30

    stream_source_info etd-tamu-2004A-SENG-Eppes-1.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 67300 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name etd-tamu-2004A-SENG-Eppes-1.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... WASHINGTON STATE ERGONOMICS TOOL: PREDICTIVE VALIDITY IN THE WASTE INDUSTRY A Thesis by SUSAN EPPES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  19. Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  20. ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS of agriculture, natural resources and related industries in Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    productivity and lower food prices. Driven by innovation and new technology, agriculture and related industries provides a 40% or greater social rate of return on investment, which translates into a 10:1 benefit-cost ratio, based on the average long term cost of capital. In other words, for every $1 of public investment

  1. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

  2. Wood-waste utilization. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Forests, Family Farms, and Energy of the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, April 5, 1982, Mount Pleasant, Michigan; April 19, 1982, Springfield, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Hearings on the industrial potential and other uses of wood wastes were held in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan and Springfield, Oregon. Congressional reviews of forest resource planning and management to enhance wood and wood-product utilization have led to a series of hearings throughout the nation. Testimony by 32 witnesses included the views of universities, industry, forestry programs, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and state resource and agricultural agencies. The hearing record includes their testimony and additional material submitted for the record. (DCK)

  3. Conversion of Waste Biomass into Useful Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtzapple, M.

    1998-01-01

    Waste biomass includes municipal solid waste (MSW), municipal sewage sludge (SS), industrial biosludge, manure, and agricultural residues. When treated with lime, biomass is highly digestible by a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms. Lime...

  4. Method for Waste Control in the Building Industry Proceedings IGLC-7 325

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    in the construction industry is proposed, based on previous studies concerning waste measurement. Based Polytechnic and the Hong Kong Construction Association Ltd. (1993) conducted a research on construction waste of construction waste in order to reduce the demand for final disposal areas. Brossik and Brouwers (1996

  5. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  6. Identifying industrial best practices for the waste minimization of low-level radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, V.

    1996-04-01

    In US DOE, changing circumstances are affecting the management and disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste (LLW). From 1977 to 1991, the nuclear power industry achieved major reductions in solid waste disposal, and DOE is interested in applying those practices to reduce solid waste at DOE facilities. Project focus was to identify and document commercial nuclear industry best practices for radiological control programs supporting routine operations, outages, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The project team (DOE facility and nuclear power industry representatives) defined a Work Control Process Model, collected nuclear power industry Best Practices, and made recommendations to minimize LLW at DOE facilities.

  7. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  8. Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprinkle, Donald Lee

    1991-01-01

    This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

  9. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    developing countries, like India, adoption of efficient electricitydeveloping countries the sugar in- dustry uses bagasse and the edible oils industry uses byproduct wastes to generate steam and/or electricity (

  10. Waste Management Recommendations in the Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggebrecht, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) was one of the four Energy Analysis & Diagnostic Centers (EADC) that began providing waste management, in addition to energy and demand conservation, assessments ...

  11. Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation...

  12. Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

  13. First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-12-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

  16. Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, M.

    1998-01-01

    in these areas, these data provide practical guidance on what types of waste minimization actions could be most beneficial for facilities....

  17. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural Sign

  18. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural

  19. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery - Potential Applications, Available Technologies and Crosscutting R&D Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thekdi, Arvind; Nimbalkar, Sachin U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to explore key areas and characteristics of industrial waste heat and its generation, barriers to waste heat recovery and use, and potential research and development (R&D) opportunities. The report also provides an overview of technologies and systems currently available for waste heat recovery and discusses the issues or barriers for each. Also included is information on emerging technologies under development or at various stages of demonstrations, and R&D opportunities cross-walked by various temperature ranges, technology areas, and energy-intensive process industries.

  20. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  1. Kilowatts From Waste Wood In The Furniture Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nailen, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    recently, the Singer Furniture Co., Lenoir, N. Carolina, purchased a 450 kilowatt steam turbine/induction generator set to use extra steam - produced by 'free' waste wood fuel - in generating 15% of the plant's electrical energy demand. The turbine...

  2. A system analysis of converting non-recyclable plastic waste into value-added products in a paper industry cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desam, Padmabhushana R

    2013-01-01

    Waste plastic, both industrial and municipal sources, is posing a major environmental challenges in developing countries such as India due to improper disposal methods. Large quantities of non-recyclable plastic waste get ...

  3. First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online of the first turbine of the waste-powered electricity plant has been successful. The plant can produce 14,400KW

  4. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  5. Case studies of new waste conservation and recycle methods for the electroplating industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saltzberg, E.R.; Hunt, G.

    1995-08-01

    The paper presents case studies of new waste conservation and recycle methods for the electroplating industry. Electroplating shops can save water and substantially reduce hazardous waste generation by reducing plating solution drag-out; employing one or several still rinse tanks; and routing plating rinse tank solution to the acid dip rinse tank, and acid dip rinse tank solution to the alkaline cleaning rinse tank -- a technique termed `reactive rinsing`. See the Case Study Summaries Door for additional information.

  6. Packaging waste recycling in Europe: Is the industry paying for it?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira da Cruz, Nuno Ferreira, Sandra; Cabral, Marta; Simões, Pedro; Marques, Rui Cunha

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We study the recycling schemes of France, Germany, Portugal, Romania and the UK. • The costs and benefits of recycling are compared for France, Portugal and Romania. • The balance of costs and benefits depend on the perspective (strictly financial/economic). • Financial supports to local authorities ought to promote cost-efficiency. - Abstract: This paper describes and examines the schemes established in five EU countries for the recycling of packaging waste. The changes in packaging waste management were mainly implemented since the Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste entered into force. The analysis of the five systems allowed the authors to identify very different approaches to cope with the same problem: meet the recovery and recycling targets imposed by EU law. Packaging waste is a responsibility of the industry. However, local governments are generally in charge of waste management, particularly in countries with Green Dot schemes or similar extended producer responsibility systems. This leads to the need of establishing a system of financial transfers between the industry and the local governments (particularly regarding the extra costs involved with selective collection and sorting). Using the same methodological approach, the authors also compare the costs and benefits of recycling from the perspective of local public authorities for France, Portugal and Romania. Since the purpose of the current paper is to take note of who is paying for the incremental costs of recycling and whether the industry (i.e. the consumer) is paying for the net financial costs of packaging waste management, environmental impacts are not included in the analysis. The work carried out in this paper highlights some aspects that are prone to be improved and raises several questions that will require further research. In the three countries analyzed more closely in this paper the industry is not paying the net financial cost of packaging waste management. In fact, if the savings attained by diverting packaging waste from other treatment (e.g. landfilling) and the public subsidies to the investment on the “recycling system” are not considered, it seems that the industry should increase the financial support to local authorities (by 125% in France, 50% in Portugal and 170% in Romania). However, in France and Portugal the industry is paying local authorities more than just the incremental costs of recycling (full costs of selective collection and sorting minus the avoided costs). To provide a more definitive judgment on the fairness of the systems it will be necessary to assess the cost efficiency of waste management operators (and judge whether operators are claiming costs or eliciting “prices”)

  7. Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    , and solvent - is shipped off-site as hazardous waste to be incinerated. Paint overspray from conventional spray guns collects and dries on paint booth filters, which are landfilled. Solvent used for paint thinning and clean-up evaporates. Spent oil...,620 15,000 0.5 proportioning system Use an enclosed 90 2,210 1,750 0.8 spray gun washer Use air-=isted 9 1,300 1,300 1.0 airless paint spray guns Total ppos 31.130 18.050 0.6 Case Study: Manufacturer of Air-cooled Heat Exchangers. This plant...

  8. Implementation of Industrial Assessment Center Energy and Waste Management Recommendations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, J. D.; Eggebrecht, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

    1997-01-01

    into the shell, the liner is placed in the product, and the parts are placed in a heated, rigid mold to allow the foam to expand and cure. The final products are assembled, labeled, and hand-cleaned if necessary before shipping. Quality is maintained through.... or these recommendations. These recommend-ations along waste streams, three (mixed plastic scrap, use of a with the actual (if different from the lAC estimate in non-hazardous parts cleaning solvent, and use of oil the report) savings, implementation costs, simple...

  9. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

    1991-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. From Industrial Garden to Food Desert: Unearthing the Root Structure of Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    A Theory of Agro-Industrial Development. New York: BasilSERIES 2007-2008.32 From Industrial Garden to Food Desert:I demonstrate how flows of industrial capital and racialized

  11. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    industrial ecology projects (Hotta and Aoki-Suzuki 2010; Nakamura Japan’s Waste Managementand waste management measures), and comprehensive plant performance requirements (EC, 2011b). While requiring that industrial

  12. The use of commercial and industrial waste in energy recovery systems - A UK preliminary study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupa, Christopher J.; Ricketts, Lois J.; Sweetman, Andy; Herbert, Ben M.J.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Commercial and industrial waste samples collected. > Samples analysed for calorific value, moisture, ash and elemental composition. > Values similar to those of municipal solid waste and refuse derived fuel. > Sampled waste could be used in current energy recovery systems with minimal retrofitting. > Sampled waste could account 6.5% towards the UK's 2020 renewable electricity target if all qualifying waste is used. - Abstract: With 2020 energy targets set out by the EU fast approaching, the UK is trying to source a higher proportion of its energy from renewable resources. Coupled with this, a growing population and increasing trends in consumer demand have resulted in national waste loads increasing. A possible solution to both issues is energy-from-waste (EfW) technologies. Many studies have focused on municipal solid waste (MSW) as a potential feedstock, but appear to overlook the potential benefits of commercial and industrial waste (C and IW). In this study, samples of C and IW were collected from three North West waste management companies and Lancaster University campus. The samples were tested for their gross and net calorific value, moisture content, ash content, volatile matter, and also elemental composition to determine their suitability in EfW systems. Intra-sample analysis showed there to be little variation between samples with the exception two samples, from waste management site 3, which showed extensive variation with regards to net calorific value, ash content, and elemental analysis. Comparisons with known fuel types revealed similarities between the sampled C and IW, MSW, and refuse derived fuel (RDF) thereby justifying its potential for use in EfW systems. Mean net calorific value (NCV) was calculated as 9.47 MJ/kg and concentrations of sulphur, nitrogen, and chlorine were found to be below 2%. Potential electrical output was calculated using the NCV of the sampled C and IW coupled with four differing energy generation technologies. Using a conventional incinerator with steam cycle, total electrical output was calculated as 24.9 GWh, based on a plant operating at 100,000 tpa. This value rose to 27.0 GWh when using an integrated gasification combined cycle. A final aspect of this study was to deduce the potential total national electrical output if all suitable C and IW were to be used in EfW systems. Using incineration coupled with a steam turbine, this was determined to be 6 TWh, 1.9% of the national demand thereby contributing 6.5% towards the UK's 2020 renewable electricity target.

  13. World first in high level waste vitrification - A review of French vitrification industrial achievements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brueziere, J.; Chauvin, E. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Piroux, J.C. [Joint Vitrification Laboratory - LCV, Marcoule, BP171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    AREVA has more than 30 years experience in operating industrial HLW (High Level radioactive Waste) vitrification facilities (AVM - Marcoule Vitrification Facility, R7 and T7 facilities). This vitrification technology was based on borosilicate glasses and induction-heating. AVM was the world's first industrial HLW vitrification facility to operate in-line with a reprocessing plant. The glass formulation was adapted to commercial Light Water Reactor fission products solutions, including alkaline liquid waste concentrates as well as platinoid-rich clarification fines. The R7 and T7 facilities were designed on the basis of the industrial experience acquired in the AVM facility. The AVM vitrification process was implemented at a larger scale in order to operate the R7 and T7 facilities in-line with the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants. After more than 30 years of operation, outstanding record of operation has been established by the R7 and T7 facilities. The industrial startup of the CCIM (Cold Crucible Induction Melter) technology with enhanced glass formulation was possible thanks to the close cooperation between CEA and AREVA. CCIM is a water-cooled induction melter in which the glass frit and the waste are melted by direct high frequency induction. This technology allows the handling of highly corrosive solutions and high operating temperatures which permits new glass compositions and a higher glass production capacity. The CCIM technology has been implemented successfully at La Hague plant.

  14. Selection of melter systems for the DOE/Industrial Center for Waste Vitrification Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D.F.

    1993-12-31

    The EPA has designated vitrification as the best developed available technology for immobilization of High-Level Nuclear Waste. In a recent federal facilities compliance agreement between the EPA, the State of Washington, and the DOE, the DOE agreed to vitrify all of the Low Level Radioactive Waste resulting from processing of High Level Radioactive Waste stored at the Hanford Site. This is expected to result in the requirement of 100 ton per day Low Level Radioactive Waste melters. Thus, there is increased need for the rapid adaptation of commercial melter equipment to DOE`s needs. DOE has needed a facility where commercial pilot scale equipment could be operated on surrogate (non-radioactive) simulations of typical DOE waste streams. The DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research (Center) was established in 1992 at the Clemson University Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Clemson, SC, to address that need. This report discusses some of the characteristics of the melter types selected for installation of the Center. An overall objective of the Center has been to provide the broadest possible treatment capability with the minimum number of melter units. Thus, units have been sought which have broad potential application, and which had construction characteristics which would allow their adaptation to various waste compositions, and various operating conditions, including extreme variations in throughput, and widely differing radiological control requirements. The report discusses waste types suitable for vitrification; technical requirements for the application of vitrification to low level mixed wastes; available melters and systems; and selection of melter systems. An annotated bibliography is included.

  15. Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    'T HAVE TO BE A WASTE OF MONEY" THE AMERICAN & EFIRD HEAT RECOVERY PROJECT: A FIRST FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY STEVE W. SMITH, P.E., Program Manager Electrotechnology Sales Duke Power Company Charlotte, NC In 1989 American & Efird, Inc., decided... to upgrade their heat recovery system at its Dyeing & Finishing Plant in Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They chose an electric industrial process heat pump to enhance heat recovery and to lower operating costs. This application of the industrial process...

  16. A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

  17. Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

    2009-01-07

    This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

  18. Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane E. Hoffmann

    2003-09-12

    On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

  19. A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

  20. Minimizing Waste from the Oil Industry: Scale Treatment and Scrap Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, M.

    2002-02-26

    Naturally occurring radioactive material is technologically concentrated in the piping in systems in the oil and gas industry, especially in the offshore facilities. The activity, mainly Ra-226, in the scales in the systems are often at levels classified as low level radioactive waste (LSA) in the industry. When the components and pipes are descaled for maintenance or recycling purposes, usually by high-pressure water jetting, the LSA scales arising constitute a significant quantity of radioactive waste for disposal. A new process is under development for the treatment of scales, where the radioactive solids are separated from the inactive. This would result in a much smaller fraction to be deposited as radioactive waste. The radioactive part recovered from the scales will be reduced to a stable non-metallic salt and because the volume is significantly smaller then the original material, will minimize the cost for disposal. The pipes, that have been cleaned by high pressure water jetting can either be reused or free released by scrapping and melting for recycling.

  1. Aerobic treatability of waste effluent from the leather finishing industry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinger, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Seton Company supplies finished leather products exclusively for the automotive industry. In the process of finishing leather, two types of wastewaters are generated. The majority of the wastewater is composed of water-based paint residuals while the remainder is composed of solvent-based coating residuals. Aerobic treatability studies were conducted using water-based and solvent-based waste recirculatory waters from the Seton Company's Saxton, Pennsylvania processing plant. The specific objective was to determine the potential for using aerobic biological processes to biodegrade the industry's wastes and determine the potential for joint treatment at the local publicly owned treatment works (POTW). This study was accomplished in two phases. Phase I was conducted during the Spring Semester 1993 and consisted of aerobic respirometer tests of the raw wastes and mass balance analysis. The results of Phase I were published in a report to the Seton Company as Environmental Resources Research Institute project number 92C.II40R-1. Phase II was conducted during the Summer Semester 1993 and consisted of bench-scale reactor tests and additional aerobic respirometer tests. The aerobic respirometer batch tests and bench-scale reactor tests were used to assess the treatability of solvent-based and water-based wastewaters and determine the degree of biodegradability of the wastewaters. Mass balance calculations were made using measured characteristics.

  2. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1993--1994 interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Deverman, G.S.; Werpy, T.A.; Phelps, M.R.; Baker, E.G.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Process development research is continuing on a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system that has been demonstrated to convert organics in water (dilute or concentrated) to useful and environmentally safe gases. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEESO), treats a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from hazardous organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of continuous-feed, tubular reactors systems for testing catalysts and feedstocks in the process. A range of catalysts have been tested, including nickel and other base metals, as well as ruthenium and other precious metals. Results of extensive testing show that feedstocks, ranging from 2% para-cresol in water to potato waste and spent grain, can be processed to > 99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The product fuel gas contains from 40% up to 75% methane, depending on the feedstock. The balance of the gas is mostly carbon dioxide with < 5% hydrogen and usually < 1% ethane and higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics from 10 to 1,000 mg/l COD, depending on the feedstock. The level of development of TEES has progressed to the initial phases of industrial process demonstration. Testing of industrial waste streams is under way at both the bench scale and engineering scale of development.

  3. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry- Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry, given by Aditya Kumar of GE Global Research, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

  4. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  5. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  6. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  7. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2012-October 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  8. The Soviet Farm Complex : industrial agriculture in a Socialist context, 1945-1965

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jenny Leigh

    2006-01-01

    "The Soviet Farm Complex" is a history of food, farming and the environment in the postwar Soviet Union. It tells the story of how different technical and institutional authorities created an industrial Soviet countryside ...

  9. When the cows come home : post post-industrial urban agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Marissa A

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the industrialization of food has become increasingly influenced by the consolidation of its controlling corporations. This consolidation has isolated meat processing facilities from small farmers, ...

  10. AGRICULTURAL INVENTORY LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory Estimates 8 #12;- ii - LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Agricultural Waste Management Zones 2 Figure 2 4 Livestock Mass Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 5 Agricultural Land Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 6 Livestock Mass to Agricultural Land Ratio by Waste Management Zone 11

  11. Making Green Building Units By Using Some Wastes of Ceramic Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abd El-Ghafour, N.G.

    2010-01-01

    percentages of ceramic industry waste sludge. Plastic pastes of the clay sample as well as their mixtures with ceramic sludge (0, 15, 25 & 50%), were hand molded into cubes of 5 cm side length. The percentage of the linear shrinkage during drying... is sensitive upon drying (ASTM5) due to its high clay fraction and its montmorillonitic clay minerals. Generally, it should be noted that drying shrinkage of such low grade clay is also attributed to the amounts and the particle size of clay minerals...

  12. Hazardous Waste Contamination: Implications for Commercial/Industrial Land Transactions in Silicon Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholz, Diane

    1989-01-01

    Magazine (October). Hazardous Waste Contamination, ScholzPatton. 1 988. State Hazardous Waste and Property TransferForbes. 1 985. "Hazardous Waste Problems: Implications for

  13. Soil, Water, and the State: The Conservation-Industrial Complex and American Agriculture since 1920

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nygren, Joshua M.

    2015-05-31

    “Soil, Water, and the State” examines the history of soil and water conservation in the United States since 1920 through the lens of the conservation-industrial complex: a vast network of parties who shared economic, political, and (in some cases...

  14. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    developed technology to use wastes such as plastics (Ziebekdeveloped technologies that use wastes, such as plastics, as

  15. Impact of Flow Control and Tax Reform on Ownership and Growth in the U.S. Waste-to-Energy Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    This article analyzes two key issues that could be influencing growth and ownership (both public and private) in the waste to energy (WTE) industry.

  16. Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    chemicals and chemical processes, and are the best equipped to manage and reduce waste. It is the responsibility of all companies that manufacture a product or generate a waste to understand the meaning of proper waste management hierarchy, waste...

  17. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  18. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    Planta- tion Products and Paper Industry Council, Paper Industry, Confederationof European Paper Industries, Brussels, March 2001. CESP,

  19. Applications of risk management to waste combustion in boilers and industrial furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrostowski, P.C.; Foster, S.A.; Kimball, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    Human health and ecological risk assessments have become routine for waste combustion in boilers and industrial furnaces (BIFs) as a result of USEPA`s Combustion Strategy, questions raised by citizens about the health effects of incineration, and the desire for the regulated community to have a level playing field regarding emissions regulations. The USEPA, National Academy of Sciences, various trade organizations, and individual researchers have published widely regarding methods for facility-specific risk assessments. Often these risk assessments are highly complex, site-specific documents that use advanced techniques such as Monte Carlo simulation. However, the risks that are calculated in these risk assessments are usually only used to compare to criteria for health effects and, thereby, develop permit conditions that are protective of health and the environment. Thus, the risk assessment is only used to derive a simple set of numbers and most of the information derived in the complex risk computations is lost. The object of this paper is to demonstrate how to derive more information from risk assessments that can be used in making management decisions. This paper will discuss the theory of risk management and present applications to combustion of waste in BIFs. For example, a permit applicant needed to make a decision among alternative air pollution control (APC) equipment sequences including scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators. Limited life cycle analysis was used to determine the amount of direct and total waste produced by each of the alternatives. Monte Carlo risk assessment was used to determine the health risks associated with each of the alternatives and reliability analysis was employed to minimize both waste production and health risk.

  20. Agricultural Industry Advanced Vehicle Technology: Benchmark Study for Reduction in Petroleum Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger Hoy

    2014-09-01

    Diesel use on farms in the United States has remained relatively constant since 1985, decreasing slightly in 2009, which may be attributed to price increases and the economic recession. During this time, the United States’ harvested area also has remained relatively constant at roughly 300 million acres. In 2010, farm diesel use was 5.4% of the total United States diesel use. Crops accounting for an estimated 65% of United States farm diesel use include corn, soybean, wheat, hay, and alfalfa, respectively, based on harvested crop area and a recent analysis of estimated fuel use by crop. Diesel use in these cropping systems primarily is from tillage, harvest, and various other operations (e.g., planting and spraying) (Figure 3). Diesel efficiency is markedly variable due to machinery types, conditions of operation (e.g., soil type and moisture), and operator variability. Farm diesel use per acre has slightly decreased in the last two decades and diesel is now estimated to be less than 5% of farm costs per acre. This report will explore current trends in increasing diesel efficiency in the farm sector. The report combines a survey of industry representatives, a review of literature, and data analysis to identify nascent technologies for increasing diesel efficiency

  1. Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

    1991-01-01

    US 337. Maloney, T. R. ; Bratton, C. A. ; Embrey, K. ;Series, ed. T. R. Maloney; C. A. Bratton; K. Embrey; J. S.Series, ed. T. R. Maloney; C. A. Bratton; K. Embrey; J. S.

  2. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    pp. IEA, 2006b: Industrial motor systems energy efficiency:industrial energy efficiency. Presented at Energy Efficiency in Motorenergy-efficient electric motors and motor-systems. These include: (1) industrial

  3. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    R.R. ,et al. , 2004: Eco-industrial park initiatives in theCHP plant) form an eco-industrial park that serves as an ex-

  4. How to Put the Dollar Value on Waste Heat Recovery in the Process Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campagne, W. V. L.

    1982-01-01

    Waste heat recovery projects should be evaluated on their actual fuel savings and not on Btu recovery. By equating waste heat recovery with potential steam savings, the fuel (or dollar) values of the waste heat as function of its temperature can...

  5. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    cement and pulp and paper industries in China, and in thePulp and Paper Industry, Confederation of European Paper Industries, Brussels, March 2001. CESP, 2004: China’pulp and paper industries (GOI, 2005). There are 39.8 million SMEs in China,

  6. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  7. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

  8. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    The history of waste energy recovery in Germany since 1920.SME- Case study of bakery in Germany. Energy Conversion andFrankfurt, Germany. CEFIC, 2002: Managing energy: Voluntary

  9. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and...

  10. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    specified in the ‘Energy Technology List’ during the yearenergy consumers in the chemical industry, and list examples of technology

  11. An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borglin, S.

    2010-01-01

    industrial solid waste, and construction and demolitionof a Universal Waste Recycling Center, Construction andproduce industrial waste. Construction and Demolition (C &

  12. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    of wastes (blast furnace slag, fly ash) and geo- polymers toexample blast furnace slag, fly ash from coal- fired powerraw materials such as fly ash. Mitigation options could also

  13. Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

    1988-01-01

    of subcritical and supercritical wet oxidation technologies to chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, wood-pulping, and coal-washing wastes. Each application is evaluated for technical and economic feasibility as well as its national applicability...

  14. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste-to-value is a promising and comprehensive wastewater processing solution being pursued by GE that recovers valuable energy and purified water from the abundant wastewater generated and...

  15. Final report for the Iowa Livestock Industry Waste Characterization and Methane Recovery Information Dissemination Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, M.V.; Richard, Thomas L

    2001-11-13

    This report summarizes analytical methods, characterizes Iowa livestock wastes, determines fossil fuel displacement by methane use, assesses the market potential, and offers recommendations for the implementation of methane recovery technologies.

  16. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

  17. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    increased use of biomass and energy efficiency improvements,Moreira, J. , 2006: Global biomass energy potential. Journal1971–2004 Notes 1) Biomass energy included 2) Industrial

  18. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    of Industrial Electrical Switchgear and Control Gear in the6 from use in electrical switchgear and magnesium processinggas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production

  19. The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davol, Phebe

    1987-01-01

    compounds in the environment. Dibble and Bartha (1979) observed an increase in concentration of condensed ring fractions as oily wastes degrade in soil. The accumulation of PNAs in the soil at a land treatment facility is of concern since many... pentachlorophenol and creosote as preservative agents. The effluent from the treatment process was pumped from a concrete storage basin to a large lagoon where the solids were allowed to settle while the liquids evaporated. At the ti me the waste was collected...

  20. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations · 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation · Average age

  1. Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    in Table 2. Generalized source media included combustion gases at various temperatures from oil/gas fired furnaces, kilns, etc., condensing vapors and various liquid steams at 200 D F (90?C) or below. Generalized sink processes/media included process... applications). Potential fuel energy savings for industry level applications are pre sented in Table 7 and are derived from industry cross-correlation data similar to that shown in Table 2. Intra-industry level energy savings were used subsequent ly...

  2. AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Technologies at Multiple Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet overviewing Verso Paper Corp. project that will deploy industrial technologies to recover and reuse water and steam at pulp and paper facilities.

  3. Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

  4. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    options for combined heat and power in Canada. Office ofpolicies to promote combined heat and power in US industry.conversions, such as combined heat and power and coke ovens,

  5. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,tempera- ture range. IEA/Caddet, Sittard, The Netherlands.industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,

  6. Utilizing A.R.I.E.L., Agricultural Resources Intelligent Educational Lecturer, in the Formational Study of Understanding Before and After Perceptions of Agricultural Industry Leaders and Representational Consumers in an Applied Convenience Sampling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, Colton Allen

    2014-05-30

    This thesis aimed to determine where agricultural information was acquired by individuals in an agriculturally-related occupation in Texas and individuals 18 years of age or older involved with or within Texas agricultural ...

  7. Industrial Technology of Decontamination of Liquid Radioactive Waste in SUE MosSIA 'Radon' - 12371

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, Dmitry V.; Neveykin, Petr P.; Karlin, Yuri V.; Savkin, Alexander E. [SUE MosSIA 'Radon', 7th Rostovsky lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    SUE MosSIA 'RADON' - this enterprise was created more than 50 years ago, which deals with the recycling of radioactive waste and conditioning of spent sources of radiation in stationary and mobile systems in the own factory and operating organizations. Here is represented the experience SUE MosSIA 'Radon' in the field of the management with liquid radioactive waste. It's shown, that the activity of SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is developing in three directions - improvement of technical facilities for treatment of radioactive waters into SUE MosSIA 'RADON' development of mobile equipment for the decontamination of radioactive waters in other organizations, development of new technologies for decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes as part of various domestic Russian and international projects including those related to the operation of nuclear power and nuclear submarines. SUE MosSIA 'RADON' has processed more than 270 thousand m{sup 3} of radioactive water, at that more than 7000 m{sup 3} in other organizations for more than 50 years. It is shown that a number of directions, particularly, the development of mobile modular units for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste, SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is a leader in the world. (authors)

  8. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a systematic model-based predictive monitoring and supervisory control solution for the early detection of abnormal process variations and potential upsets in a waste-to-value wastewater processing system.

  9. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  10. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, V. V.; Davies, R. W.; Holbery, J.

    2006-04-01

    This report analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities.

  11. Can Free Entry Be Inefficient? Fixed Commissions and Social Waste in the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Chang-Tai T; Moretti, Enrico

    2002-01-01

    Commission. The Residential Real Estate Brokerage Industry.r m C o m p e t i t i o n i n Real Estate Commission Rates"The Journal of Real Estate Research 3 (1989) Hopkins, T o

  12. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Description and Statement of General Education to minimize agricultural pollution and sustain food production adequate for the world's population topics include point and nonpoint source pollution, the Clean Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste

  13. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    oxygen demand (COD) and availability of low-grade waste heat sources. The pulp and paper industry and other industries are also potential MHRC users. Project Description This...

  14. State Waste Discharge Permit application for industrial discharge to land: 200 East Area W-252 streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This document constitutes the WAC 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit application for six W-252 liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site. Appendices B through H correspond to Section B through H in the permit application form. Within each appendix, sections correspond directly to the respective questions on the application form. The appendices include: Product or service information; Plant operational characteristics; Water consumption and waterloss; Wastewater information; Stormwater; Other information; and Site assessment.

  15. Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, A. M

    2010-01-01

    factors as type, degree of crystallinty, and fineness of the used pozzolana in addition to the ESL-IC-10-10-09 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 curing conditions (4... for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 strength of the hardened specimens decreases with increasing waste material content in the mix. The continuous growth of the compressive strength is mainly due to the formation and accumulation...

  16. Treatability study of industrial waste using sanitary sewage to supply nutrients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, James Ritchie

    1978-01-01

    Activated sludge Anaerobic digestion Centrifuging Chemical coagulation Chemical oxidation or reduction Distillation and stripping Extraction Fermentation Filtration Flotation (air) Incineration Stabilization ponds Wet oxidation Lagooning... treatment by biological treatment methods. The most effective biological process is the activated sludge process. To treat most petrochemical industrial wastewaters by the activated sludge process requires the addition of the nutrients nitrogen...

  17. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  18. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Ruijie

    2013-12-30

    Food and beverage plants inherently consume a large quantity of water and generate a high volume of wastewater rich in organic content. On one hand, water discharge regulations are getting more stringent over the time, necessitating the use of different technologies to reduce the amount of wastewater and improve the effluent water quality. On the other hand, growing energy and water costs are driving the plants to extract and reuse valuable energy and water from the wastewater stream. An integrated waste-tovalue system uses a combination of anaerobic digester (AD), reciprocating gas engine/boiler, membrane bioreactor (MBR), and reverse osmosis (RO) to recover valuable energy as heat and/or electricity as well as purify the water for reuse. While individual anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors are being used in increasing numbers, there is a growing need to integrate them together in a waste-to-value system for enhanced energy and water recovery. However, currently operation of these systems relies heavily on the plant operator to perform periodic sampling and off-line lab analysis to monitor the system performance, detect any abnormal condition due to variations in the wastewater and decide on appropriate remedial action needed. This leads to a conservative design and operation of these systems to avoid any potential upsets that can destabilize the system.

  19. West Virginia University 1 Department of Industrial and Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , Industrial Energy Efficiency, Building's Energy Efficiency, Industrial Energy and Waste Minimization

  20. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    of waste plastics and waste oils maximizes the beneficialcatalyst waste from oil refining, and waste foundry sands (Tires Petcoke, plastic, and waste oil Petcoke, sunflower

  1. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-07-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  2. CESAR5.3: An Industrial Tool for Nuclear Fuel and Waste Characterization with Associated Qualification - 12067

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidal, Jean-Marc; Eschbach, Romain [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, LECy, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Launay, Agnes; Binet, Christophe [AREVA-NC La Hague, F-50444 Beaumont-Hague (France); THRO, Jean-Francois [AREVA-NC BU Recyclage, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris-La-Defense (France)

    2012-07-01

    CEA and AREVA-NC have developed and used a depletion code named CESAR for 30 years. This user-friendly industrial tool provides fast characterizations for all types of nuclear fuel (PWR / UOX or MOX or reprocess Uranium, BWR / UOX or MOX, MTR and SFR) and the wastes associated. CESAR can evaluate 100 heavy nuclides, 200 fission products and 150 activation products (with Helium and Tritium formation). It can also characterize the structural material of the fuel (Zircalloy, stainless steel, M5 alloy). CESAR provides depletion calculations for any reactor irradiation history and from 3 months to 1 million years of cooling time. CESAR5.3 is based on the latest calculation schemes recommended by the CEA and on an international nuclear data base (JEFF-3.1.1). It is constantly checked against the CEA referenced and qualified depletion code DARWIN. CESAR incorporates the CEA qualification based on the dissolution analyses of fuel rod samples and the 'La Hague' reprocessing plant feedback experience. AREVA-NC uses CESAR intensively at 'La Hague' plant, not only for prospective studies but also for characterizations at different industrial facilities all along the reprocessing process and waste conditioning (near 150 000 calculations per year). CESAR is the reference code for AREVA-NC. CESAR is used directly or indirectly with other software, data bank or special equipment in many parts of the La Hague plants. The great flexibility of CESAR has rapidly interested other projects. CESAR became a 'tool' directly integrated in some other softwares. Finally, coupled with a Graphical User Interface, it can be easily used independently, responding to many needs for prospective studies as a support for nuclear facilities or transport. An English version is available. For the principal isotopes of U and Pu, CESAR5 benefits from the CEA experimental validation for the PWR UOX fuels, up to a burnup of 60 GWd/t and for PWR MOX fuels, up to 45 GWd/t. CESAR version 5.3 uses the CEA reference calculation codes for neutron physics with the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data set. (authors)

  3. Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testoni, A. L.

    2011-10-19

    This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

  4. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  5. This is not a peer-reviewed article. Pp. 034-043 in the Ninth International Animal, Agricultural and Food Processing Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    and Food Processing Wastes Proceedings of the 12-15 October 2003 Symposium (Research Triangle Park, North #12;organic byproducts such as municipal biosolids, wood waste, food processing residuals OF COMPOSTED WASTE MATERIALS IN EROSION CONTROL L. M. Risse and L. B. Faucette ABSTRACT The objective

  6. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    was that the upper material temperature limit of 1500oF is state-of-the-art for recuperators operating in an oxidizing environment produced by the com-bustion of Diesel No.2. A full size counter axial flow metal heat exchanger test module has successfully completed...

  7. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for reduction in mixed waste generation Pump Oil Substitution 51 Hazardous Waste / Industrial Waste $3,520 $6 with the subsequent clean up costs ($15,000). Hydraulic Oil Product Substitution 3,000 Industrial Waste $26,000 $0 $26WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2003 WASTE TYPE

  8. Restructuring, Tight Budgets and Executive Order 13123 Create New Incentives to Reduce Waste in Federal Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdict, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the positive impact that electric utility industry restructuring, a reduction in the size of government operations, and the recent Presidential Executive Order 13123 should have on energy use in Federal industrial facilities...

  9. EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant...

  10. Communication among Agricultural Policy Influencers: A Delphi Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Victor Kingsley

    2015-05-12

    Agricultural policy affects the agricultural industry in its entirety. It affects everything from the type of food that is grown to how it is processed and distributed. Agricultural policy influencers impact the development of the policy...

  11. Elementary School Teachers' Perception of Agricultural-Related Literature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leventini, Alexa Marie

    2013-04-24

    and a need was established for accurate, realistic and representative materials of American agriculture for the classroom. This issue of agricultural literacy has become an imminent concern in today’s agricultural industry. With these rising concerns...

  12. Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Agricultural Savings Category Geothermal...

  13. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    date. “Integrated Solid Waste Management. ” Presentation aton Sustainable Solid Waste Management, Chennai, India.2010. “Municipal solid waste management in China: Status,

  14. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    as MSW, commercial waste, and construction and demolitionfuel injection system and construction of waste-receivingpercent for construction and demolition waste by 2020 (EC,

  15. Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry 2005...

  16. ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much of the state's manufacturing, shipping and tourism offerings. Water is necessary for life -- every Endowed Chair in Water Research, said that access to safe drinking water is one of the most serious public is a vital component of so many industries -- agriculture, manufac- turing and tourism, just to name a few

  17. Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

  18. Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    management now Labor; service fee, $5-6 acre Using Reclaimed Waste Water Substituting water reclaimed from industrial and

  19. Modeling the effect of soil structure on water flow and isoproturon dynamics in an agricultural field receiving repeated urban waste compost application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    field receiving repeated urban waste compost application Vilim Filipovi1,2,3 , Yves Coquet2 , Valérie properties. Tillage practices and compost amendments can modify soil structure and create heterogeneity and compost application on transport processes. A modeling study was performed to evaluate how the presence

  20. Sources and management of hazardous waste in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) has considerable mineral wealth, especially in gold and copper. Large-scale mining takes place, and these activities are the source of most of PNG`s hazardous waste. Most people live in small farming communities throughout the region. Those living adjacent to mining areas have experienced some negative impacts from river ecosystem damage and erosion of their lands. Industry is centered mainly in urban areas and Generates waste composed of various products. Agricultural products, pesticide residues, and chemicals used for preserving timber and other forestry products also produce hazardous waste. Most municipal waste comes from domestic and commercial premises; it consists mainly of combustibles, noncombustibles, and other wastes. Hospitals generate pathogenic organisms, radioactive materials, and chemical and pharmaceutical laboratory waste. Little is known about the actual treatment of waste before disposal in PNG. Traditional low-cost waste disposal methods are usually practiced, such as use of landfills; storage in surface impoundments; and disposal in public sewers, rivers, and the sea. Indiscriminate burning of domestic waste in backyards is also commonly practiced in urban and rural areas. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-03-01

    A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

  2. Exposing strategic assets to create new competencies: The case of technological acquisition in the waste management industry in Europe and North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, MA

    1999-01-01

    International Journal of Technology Management, 12, 769–786.for You? ,’ Research-Technology Management, 32(4), 11–13.demand for waste management technologies. Waste management

  3. Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project THEY are undertaking at ESF DLJohnson, Feb. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    Cow2Joules: Distributed Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy Resources Background to the project energy products. This approach to industrial ecology, or sustainability, is well advanced in Europe where large-scale biogas plants have been constructed to extract energy from residential, agricultural

  4. Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    industrial times, the household was the locus of waste management.Industrial Ecology encourage a new framing of the waste managementIndustrial Ecology approach leads to three changes in waste management:

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

  6. Enriching queries using argumentation: an industrial application of argumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croitoru, Madalina

    expressed by the involved parties (food and packaging industries, health and waste management etc, food industry, packaging industry, waste management policy, etc.) requirements expressed as simple BIOdegradable Composite Advanced Packaging), aiming at conceiving the next generation of food packagings, we

  7. LINKING WATER QUALITY WITH AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION IN A RURAL WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    , agricultural pollution, animal waste, land-water interactions, nitrate, nitrogen surplus, nonpoint source pollution, water pollution, watershed management 1. Background Agriculture is rapidly emerging not require extra nutrients. Animal waste is primarily applied to soils, Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 127

  8. Four: Evaluating Reforms in the Implementation of Hazardous Waste Policies in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutter, W. Bowman; DeShazo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    THE IMPLEMENTATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE POLICIES IN CALIFORNIAfrom the release of hazardous waste and toxic substances.The mishandling of hazardous waste by industry has created

  9. The Pipe vs. The Shed: Waste Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lather, Alaska; Wozniak, Monika

    2011-01-01

    sludge; municipal food waste and groundwater, storm waterseepage as well as food industry waste (dairy, high totalwaste; animal processing waste; food grade fats, oils, and

  10. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production material in industrial and agricultural wastewater Methanogenic anaerobic digestion of organic material

  11. Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    CO2 Emissions (MtCO2) Transport Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Agriculture Agriculture Commercial Buildings Residential Buildings Transport Industry Source:

  12. Individuals Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , with the highest density in the first year, and no obvious differences between the second and the third year. We in the first year, and the lowest in the third year Though taxa diversity was lower in the third year Yards Mesic Yards Year Yea r 321 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Agricultural Desert Parks Desert Remnants

  13. Using big data for decisions in agricultural supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derik Lafayette

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture is an industry where historical and current data abound. This paper investigates the numerous data sources available in the agricultural field and analyzes them for usage in supply chain improvement. We identified ...

  14. WTERT Participation in international waste management conference in Singapore (July 3-4, 2012) The WasteMET Asia-ISWA Beacon Conference brought high-level industry and academic speakers to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    the opportunity and challenges of solid waste management in rapidly growing cities. The theme of the ConferenceWTERT Participation in international waste management conference in Singapore (July 3-4, 2012 was "Globalization, Urban Metabolism and Waste Management"and aimed to outline emerging solutions and best practices

  15. Agriculture and Environmental Quality ALS 3133 Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    treatment process and the use of biosolids and reclaimed water in agriculture. Students will scrutinize for using agricultural systems for disposal of other wastes and the effects of pollution on the agricultural environment. Topics covered include: Soil characterization and erosion/leaching, non-point source pollution

  16. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    2011, 36 million tons of food waste were created, with onlyAgriculture System 5. Waste a) Food is one of the primaryfood production—then proceeding through processing, distribution, consumption, and then to the waste

  17. Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, R.C.

    1992-10-01

    This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

  18. Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Economics Marine industry studies Corporate social responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    implementation Accessible Computing Biomedical computation engineering Computational epidemiology Gene expression Materials Science Plasma Physics Toxicology Aquatic ecosystems #12;Engineering Biological Engineering Biomass processing & biomaterials Engineering applications in livestock environments Food processing

  19. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

  20. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry - Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011 Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food &...

  1. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  2. Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenault, Edith Anne

    2009-05-15

    Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres ...

  3. Waste Management: Garbage Displacement and the Ethics of Mafia Representation in Matteo Garrone’s Gomorra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondavalli, Simona

    2011-01-01

    waste management. 5 Intermediaries between companies and landowners for the disposal of industrial and

  4. Manufacturing industry challenges and responses to EU, California, and other product-targeted environmental regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    PRELIMINARY DRAFT Manufacturing industry challenges andChemicals vs. Products Manufacturing industry’s purpose isindustry deals with manufacturing and other types of waste

  5. THE ECONOMIST The waste industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    to stringent regulation, whereas ones filled with toxic sludge from power plants are less tightly controlled;But it is governments that have the power to turn such visions into reality, and their policies Eyevine THE stretch of the Pacific between Hawaii and California is virtually empty. There are no islands

  6. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced, Energy- Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse New Hybrid Membrane System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Process As...

  7. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  8. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01

    Organic Industrial Agricultural Plastics and Synthetics Drugs Soaps, detergents, toilet paper Paints,

  9. Technical Aspects Regarding the Management of Radioactive Waste from Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragolici, F.; Turcanu, C. N.; Rotarescu, G.; Paunica, I.

    2003-02-25

    The proper application of the nuclear techniques and technologies in Romania started in 1957, once with the commissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from IFIN-HH-Magurele. During the last 45 years, appear thousands of nuclear application units with extremely diverse profiles (research, biology, medicine, education, agriculture, transport, all types of industry) which used different nuclear facilities containing radioactive sources and generating a great variety of radioactive waste during the decommissioning after the operation lifetime is accomplished. A new aspect appears by the planning of VVR-S Research Reactor decommissioning which will be a new source of radioactive waste generated by decontamination, disassembling and demolition activities. By construction and exploitation of the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR)--Magurele and the National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste (DNDR)--Baita, Bihor county, in Romania was solved the management of radioactive wastes arising from operation and decommissioning of small nuclear facilities, being assured the protection of the people and environment. The present paper makes a review of the present technical status of the Romanian waste management facilities, especially raising on treatment capabilities of ''problem'' wastes such as Ra-266, Pu-238, Am-241 Co-60, Co-57, Sr-90, Cs-137 sealed sources from industrial, research and medical applications. Also, contain a preliminary estimation of quantities and types of wastes, which would result during the decommissioning project of the VVR-S Research Reactor from IFIN-HH giving attention to some special category of wastes like aluminum, graphite and equipment, components and structures that became radioactive through neutron activation. After analyzing the technical and scientific potential of STDR and DNDR to handle big amounts of wastes resulting from the decommissioning of VVR-S Research Reactor and small nuclear facilities, the necessity of up-gradation of these nuclear objectives before starting the decommissioning plan is revealed. A short presentation of the up-grading needs is also presented.

  10. DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED WASTE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED WASTE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS, OPTIONS AND STRATEGIES Prepared for BC of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Fisheries and Oceans Fraser River Action Plan November, 1996 Prepared by P. E Nutrients in Wastes 22 4.2.5 Waste Treatment 23 5.0 STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT 24 5.1 LAND USE MANAGEMENT 24 5

  11. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  12. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    environmental concerns of the nuclear industry. In particular, the disposal of long-lived waste, specifically spent fuel

  13. A strategic analysis of the role of uncertainty in electronic waste recovery system economics : an investigation of the IT and appliance industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown-West, Boma Molly

    2010-01-01

    The volume of electronic waste is growing at an increasing rate. The extensive adoption of electronic products, the tendency of consumers to purchase multiple electronics, and the rapid obsolescence of products are ...

  14. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers in agriculture was initiated in 1956. #12;87Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate

  15. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    2007. “Alternative Fuels & Raw Materials in Halyps cement. ”Fuels & Alternative Raw Materials in the Cement Industry.Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials in the European Cement

  16. Agriculture, technology, and conflict 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilverberg, Cody John

    2009-05-15

    Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized...

  17. 1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Keith

    1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE 3. AGRICULTURE MECHANICS SHOP 4. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION (TRACIE D. PEARMAN) 5. APARTMENTS (UNIVERSITY WOODS) 6. ART BUILDING 7. ART STUDIO 8. AUSTIN BUILDING 9. BIOLOGY GREENHOUSE 10. BOYNTON BUILDING 11. BUSINESS BUILDING (R. E. MCGEE) 12. CHEMISTRY

  18. Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada% of the total solid waste management budget. [28] Ironically, NGO and community groups are opposed and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious

  19. Federal Waste Management www.lebensministerium.at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of water use 25 2.3.6. Separately collected industrial recyclables 27 2.3.7. Other non-hazardous waste 27 2 volumes and waste treatment in Austria 12 2.2. Hazardous waste and waste oils 15 2.2.1. Waste volume 15 2.4. Recycling and treatment plants 27 2.4.1. Chemico-physical recycling and treatment plants 28 2.4.2. Thermal

  20. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  1. Waste Heat to Power Market Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elson, Amelia; Tidball, Rick; Hampson, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Waste heat to power (WHP) is the process of capturing heat discarded by an existing process and using that heat to generate electricity. In the industrial sector, waste heat streams are generated by kilns, furnaces, ovens, turbines, engines, and other equipment. In addition to processes at industrial plants, waste heat streams suitable for WHP are generated at field locations, including landfills, compressor stations, and mining sites. Waste heat streams are also produced in the residential and commercial sectors, but compared to industrial sites these waste heat streams typically have lower temperatures and much lower volumetric flow rates. The economic feasibility for WHP declines as the temperature and flow rate decline, and most WHP technologies are therefore applied in industrial markets where waste heat stream characteristics are more favorable. This report provides an assessment of the potential market for WHP in the industrial sector in the United States.

  2. International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theurer, Jean E

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

  3. Specifying Waste Heat Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    1992-01-01

    HEAT BOILERS V.Ganapathy.ABCO Industries Abilene,Texas ABSTRACT Waste heat boilers or Heat Recovery Steam 'Generators(HRSGs) as they are often called are used to recover energy from waste gas streams in chemical plants, refineries... stream_source_info ESL-IE-92-04-42.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11937 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-92-04-42.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 SPECIFYING WASTE...

  4. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  5. Impacts of Livestock at Fairs on Public Perception of Animal Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Jessica Nichole

    2015-06-02

    Due to increased removal from the agricultural industry, the non-farming publics’ ability to gain firsthand experiences with agriculture may be limited. The knowledge gained from firsthand experiences may be restricted to ...

  6. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500 re-distills the solvent when dirty. The removed grit and sludge is mixed in with the waste oil Wash * Waste Minimization 8,000 oils/grease to soils $16,000 $1,000 $16,000 This is a multi

  7. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National Association of State Universities Force on Building a Science Roadmap #12;#12;A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National on Organization and Policy (ESCOP) Task Force on Building a Science Roadmap for Agriculture NOVEMBER 2001 #12

  8. Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    , domestic, municipal, agricultural and industrial uses of water, ... and all relevant means (including nonstructural as well as structural measures) singly, in combination, or in alternative combinations reflecting different choice patterns for providing...

  9. Three Essays on Climate Variability, Water and Agricultural Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jinxiu

    2014-07-23

    examine the implications of increasing drought frequency in the Edwards Aquifer (EA) region of Texas on municipal, industrial, and agricultural water; land allocation; environmental flows; and welfare. To carry out this study we expand a regional...

  10. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  11. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cooperative partnerships between industry and government are encouraging the development and use of innovative technologies that reduce industrial energy use, processing wastes, and production costs.

  12. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System....

  13. Assistant Professor Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences (SAFES), within the College of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnhoff, David

    design, field machinery automation, post-harvest handling and processing, sustainable practices and systems, rotary power and fluid power transfer, bulk material handling, machinery automation mentoring and advising; preparing students for careers in the agricultural and machinery industries

  14. Solid waste landfills under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This document provides guidance for meeting: (1) Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste (40 CFR 241); (2) Criteria for Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices (40 CFR 257); and (3) Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (MSWLFs) (40 CFR Part 258). Revisions to 40 CFR 257 and a new Part 258 were published in the Federal Register (56 FR 50978, 10/9/91). The Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste set requirements and recommended procedures to ensure that the design, construction, and operation of land disposal sites is done in a manner that will protect human health and the environment. These regulations are applicable to MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs (e.g., landfills used only for the disposal of demolition debris, commercial waste, and/or industrial waste). These guidelines are not applicable to the, land disposal of hazardous, agricultural, and/or mining wastes. These criteria are to be used under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in determining which solid waste disposal facilities pose a reasonable possibility of adversely affecting human health or the environment. Facilities failing to satisfy these criteria will be considered to be open dumps which are prohibited under Section 4005 of RCRA. The Criteria for MSWLFs are applicable only to MSWLFs, including those MSWLFs in which sewage sludge is co-disposed with household waste. Based on specific criteria, certain MSWLFs are exempt from some, or all, of the regulations of 40 CFR 258. MSWLFs that fail to satisfy the criteria specified in 40 CFR 258 are also considered open dumps for the purposes of Section 4005 of RCRA. Through the use of a series of interrelated flow diagrams, this guidance document directs the reader to each design, operation, maintenance, and closure activity that must be performed for MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs.

  15. LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND LEGISLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L b b b L h b L i LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND LEGISLATION OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUNf"+ Ministry of Environment,-" ~y!==- Lands and Parks O& kdi Ministry of Agriculture, m Fisheries and Food `-w . L / . #12;L LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND LEGISLATION OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA JULY 1995

  16. Development of a Segregated Municipal Solid Waste Gasification System for Electrical Power Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maglinao, Amado Latayan

    2013-04-11

    Gasification technologies are expected to play a key role in the future of solid waste management since the conversion of municipal and industrial solid wastes to a gaseous fuel significantly increases its value. Municipal solid waste (MSW...

  17. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the cost of one mercury spill and clean-up event. PCB Oils Retrofill 1,200 Hazardous Waste $2,850 $3,450 $2 the life expentency on a $100,000 piece of equipment. PCB Oils Removal 3,110 Hazardous Waste $6,220 $10 generation Pump Oil Substitution 51 Hazardous Waste / Industrial Waste $3,520 $0 $3,520 Replaced oil

  18. Transport of waste leakage in stratified Hongbin Zhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    , stratified formations. 1 INTRODUCTION Underground waste disposal is used for industrial and domestic wastes management of waste disposal requires a better understanding of contaminant transport in the subsurfaceTransport of waste leakage in stratified formations Hongbin Zhan Department of Geology

  19. FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1638, Kodiak, AK 99615. 2Tenney, R. D. 1972. COD for Industrial Waste Water, Tech. Rep. 97, 5 p.; 1972

  20. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    z Black Liquor z Blast Furnace Gas z Coalbed Methane z Coke Oven Gas z Crop Residues z Food Processing Waste z Industrial VOC's z Landfill Gas z Municipal Solid Waste z...

  1. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  2. Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Opportunities for agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Industry Opportunities for agriculture R. Blaauw J. van Haveren E. L International Certification Services EESV according to ISO 9001:2000. Title Biomass for the Dutch Chemical for biomass 18 3.1 General developments 18 3.2 Developments of the Dutch chemical industry towards a bio

  3. Biofuels and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Biofuels and Agriculture Biofuels and Agriculture A Factsheet for Farmers American farmers have "biofuels" like ethanol and biodiesel mean that new markets are opening up. These can provide extra farm as growing markets for other biofuels like biodiesel. What are biofuels? Biofuels (short for "biomass fuels

  4. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry On Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type Skutterudites Development of...

  5. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

    1993-12-28

    A method is presented for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply. 4 figures.

  6. Method for processing aqueous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

  7. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  8. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, E.; Martin, N.; Price, L.; Ruth, M.; Elliott, N.; Shipley, A.; Thorn, J.

    2001-01-01

    consists of all industrial activity outside of agriculture, mining, and construction, accounts for 70% of industrial value added (4). In 1998, the United States consumed 94 Quadrillion Btu (99 EJ) of primary energy or 25% of world primary energy use..., mining, construction, energy intensive industries, and non-energy intensive manufacturing. Energy is necessary to help our industries create useful products; however, we are increasingly confronted with the challenge of moving society toward a...

  9. by PSPVolume 23 No 11. 2014 Fresenius Environmental Bulletin THE IMPACT FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF "WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    number of studies and reports presenting the positive impact of WTE facilities in the waste management, external, etc), it becomes clear that the devotion in waste manage- ment is likely to offer considerable author from municipal solid wastes (MSW) and non-hazardous industrial wastes [1, 3-5]. Waste to Energy

  10. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the principles of industrial energy conservation and energy conservation applications, with emphasis on the energy-intensive industries. Topics covered include energy consumption, alternative energy sources, elements of energy audits, economic investment analysis, management of energy conservation programs, boilers and fired heaters, steam and condensate systems, classification and fouling of heat exchangers, heat transfer augmentation, waste heat sources, heat recovery equipment, properties and characteristics of insulation, energy conservation in industrial buildings, cogeneration, power circuit components and energy conversion devices, electrical energy conservation. A review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics, as well as examples, problems, and case studies from specific industries are included.

  11. A R&D Program for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The overall goal of the DOE Industrial Heat Pump Program is to foster research and development which will allow more efficient and economical recovery of waste energy in industry. Specifically, the program includes the ...

  12. Industrial Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulman, Lloyd

    1987-01-01

    S. Tannenbaum. Madison: Industrial 1955. The Rise of the N ai a Working Paper 8733 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS L l o y d UlmanEconomic Theory and Doctrine INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Two great

  13. Combustion of liquid paint wastes in fluidized bed boiler as element of waste management system in the paint factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soko, W.A.; Biaecka, B.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper the solution to waste problems in the paint industry is presented by describing their combustion in a fluidized bed boiler as a part of the waste management system in the paint factory. Based on the Cleaner Production idea and concept of integration of design process with a future exploitation of equipment, some modifications of the waste management scheme in the factory are discussed to reduce the quantity of toxic wastes. To verify this concept combustion tests of paint production wastes and cocombustion of paint wastes with coal in an adopted industrial boiler were done. Results of these tests are presented in the paper.

  14. Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

  15. ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors.

  16. futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - non as old as the industrial revolution. It's still an issue today, though now it's commonly called

  17. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  18. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

  19. Eco-Efficient Packaging Material Selection for Fresh Produce: Industrial Session

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croitoru, Madalina

    stakeholders (researchers, consumers, food industry, packaging industry, waste manage- ment policy, etc of food packagings. The objective is to select packaging materials according to possibly conflicting requirements expressed by the involved parties (food and packaging industries, health authorities, consumers

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Case Study 77: Heat recovery from a thermal oxidizer.Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery. Steam Tip Sheet 3.Guide 141: Waste heat recovery in the process industries.

  1. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  2. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  3. Overshooting of agricultural prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

    1987-01-01

    Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

  4. Emergency Water Assistance During Drought: Federal Non-Agricultural Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    of Agriculture's RUS provides grants and loans for rural water systems in communities with less than 10.3 billion in loans and $370 million in grants are available for rural community water and waste systems and Water Assistance Grants program $3 million for California's rural communities. Bureau of Reclamation

  5. Observations on European Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  6. Waste heat: Utilization and management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, S.; Lee, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a presentation on waste heat management and utilization. Topics covered include cogeneration, recovery technology, low grade heat recovery, heat dispersion models, and ecological effects. The book focuses on the significant fraction of fuel energy that is rejected and expelled into the environment either as industrial waste or as a byproduct of installation/equipment operation. The feasibility of retrieving this heat and energy is covered, including technical aspects and potential applications. Illustrations demonstrate that recovery methods have become economical due to recent refinements. The book includes theory and practice concerning waste heat management and utilization.

  7. Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many industrial firms are taking a hard look at converting waste to energy. The opportunities for positive significant operational impact are not without large capital outlays. Past experiences indicate that an understanding of the basic...

  8. The Conversion of Waste to Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, T.; Cheek, L.

    1980-01-01

    Almost every industrial operation produces some combustible waste, but conversion of this to useful energy is often more difficult than with other energy recovery projects and requires careful attention to design, operating and maintaining...

  9. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Solid Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquaculture and horticulture businesses, and other industries that use geothermal direct-use systems typically don't generate any more solid waste than those that use other energy resources.

  10. Waste Toolkit A-Z Wooden Pallets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Plastics (non-contaminated plastic only ­ contact TR Recycling for details) Soil & green waste Wooden industry and used for mulch or compost products. Cost TR Recycling generally costs less than a skip

  11. EPRI's Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mergens, E.; Niday, L.

    1992-01-01

    supporting national objectives for a clean environment and a strong economic future. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recognizes that the management of energy use and the environmental impacts of industrial activity are of national importance... in municipal water and sewage treatment plants, field evaluation of advanced reverse osmosis to recycle electroplating waste water, and cross divisional analysis and assessment of EPRI-developed technology for industrial customer applications. SUMMARY...

  12. Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains a minimum of 245 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Supporting industries energy and environmental profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-09-21

    As part of its Industries of the Future strategy, the Industrial Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy works with energy-intensive industries to improve efficiency, reduce waste, and increase productivity. These seven Industries of the Future (IOFs) – aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel – rely on several other so-called “supporting industries” to supply materials and processes necessary to the products that the IOFs create. The supporting industries, in many cases, also provide great opportunities for realizing energy efficiency gains in IOF processes.

  15. Using wastes as resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakasam, T.B.S.; Lue-Hing, C. )

    1992-09-01

    The collection, treatment, and disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater, garbage, and other wastes present considerable problems in urban and semiurban areas of developing countries. Major benefits of using integrated treatment and resource recovery systems include waste stabilization, recovering energy as biogas, producing food from algae and fish, irrigation, improved public health, and aquatic weed control and use. Information and research are needed, however, to assesss the appropriateness, benefits, and limitations of such technology on a large scale. System configuration depends on the types and quantities of wastes available for processing. There must be enough collectable waste for the system to be viable. Information should be gathered to asses whether there is a net public health benefit by implementing a waste treatment and resource recovery system. Benefits such as savings in medical expenses and increased worker productivity due to improved health may be difficult to quantify. The potential health risks created by implementing a resource recovery system should be studied. The most difficult issues to contend with are socioeconomic in nature. Often, the poor performance of a proven technology is attributed to a lack of proper understanding of its principles by the operators, lack of community interest, improper operator training, and poor management. Public education to motivate people to accept technologies that are beneficial to them is important.

  16. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  17. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development Platz-4823 Doctoral researcher in Agricultural and Experimental Economics The Collaborative Research Center (CRC to join the Chair of International Agricultural Economics (Jun.Prof. Dr. M. Wollni) of the University

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    waste, decomposition of organic wastes, geothermal, small hydropower plants, low-emission wood or... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Agricultural,...

  19. MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

  20. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , evaluation, monitoring, point counts, sampling of populations, standards of censusing Technical Editors: C Technical Report PSW-GTR-149 #12;Publisher: Albany, California Mailing address: PO Box 245. Berkeley CA 9470 of Agriculture Abstract Ralph, C. John; Sauer, John R.; Droege, Sam, technical editors. 1995. Monitoring Bird

  1. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  2. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  3. AGRICULTURAL SUMMER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION SUMMER 2005 VOL. 23 NO. 2 futures #12;2 | FUTURES Asthma, cystic fibrosis, Lyme disease, pre- mature birth, campylobacteriosis and dis- eases caused by West Nile research projects is searching for the genes responsi- ble for human asthma. Her long-term goal

  4. Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Responsibility 7 Virginia Tech Principles of Community 7 STUDENTS ARE ~ 8 University/College Policy and Procedures 9 Absences 9 Personal Illness: 9 Death/Illness in the Family 9 Attendance of a Professional of Agriculture and Life Sciences that advising is a collaborative effort between the student and faculty advisor

  5. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  6. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  7. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana on July 26–29, 2015, and will examine industry trends and innovations, with a focus on the focus on the economic, political and social factors influencing the industry. Bioenergy Technologies Office Director Jonathan Male, Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, and Technology Managers Sam Tagore, Mark Elless, and Steve Thomas will be in attendance.

  8. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  9. Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

  10. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  11. Composite analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 area plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kincaid, C.T.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    This report presents the first iteration of the Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site (Composite Analysis) prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Implementation Plan for the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-2. The Composite Analysis is a companion document to published analyses of four active or planned low-level waste disposal actions: the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 West Area, the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 East Area, the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility, and the disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste. A single Composite Analysis was prepared for the Hanford Site considering only sources on the 200 Area Plateau. The performance objectives prescribed in U.S. Department of Energy guidance for the Composite Analysis were 100 mrem in a year and examination of a lower dose (30 mrem in a year) to ensure the {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} concept is followed. The 100 mrem in a year limit was the maximum allowable all-pathways dose for 1000 years following Hanford Site closure, which is assumed to occur in 2050. These performance objectives apply to an accessible environment defined as the area between a buffer zone surrounding an exclusive waste management area on the 200 Area Plateau, and the Columbia River. Estimating doses to hypothetical future members of the public for the Composite Analysis was a multistep process involving the estimation or simulation of inventories; waste release to the environment; migration through the vadose zone, groundwater, and atmospheric pathways; and exposure and dose. Doses were estimated for scenarios based on agriculture, residential, industrial, and recreational land use. The radionuclides included in the vadose zone and groundwater pathway analyses of future releases were carbon-14, chlorine-36, selenium-79, technetium-99, iodine-129, and uranium isotopes.

  12. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

    1998-01-01

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

  13. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

    1998-10-13

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

  14. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  15. United States Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Department of Agriculture Keys to Soil Taxonomy Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;#12;Keys to Soil Taxonomy By Soil Survey Staff United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

  16. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

  17. CALENDAR YEAR 2012 SCHEDULE Workshops to Improve Industrial Productivity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information: http://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/training_process_heating.html Pumping System by the industry, discussions of combustion, heat transfer in furnaces, and waste heat recovery. Also, students. For complete course information: http://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/pumping_systems.html Steam

  18. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Mixed Waste Before generating mixed waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health & Safety: (858) 534-2753. * Disinfectants other than bleach mustBiohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

  19. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

  20. AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    than sugar based ethanol in Brazil; the slow growth in the E85 market and distribution capacity that mobile fuel consumption totals only 140 to 150 billion gallons in the U.S.) unless the E85 market expands and demand forces shaping the industry. In the spirit of helping you discover your own answer, we will here

  1. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 6, Appendix D, Pyrolysis and gasification of MSW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-10-01

    This Appendix summarizes information available in the open literature describing the technology and operating experierice of pyrolysis technology as applied to the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). The literature search, which emphasized the time frame of greatest activity in MSW pyrolysis (i.e., the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s), focused on the scale of application, material feedstock, technical limitations and economic considerations. Smaller scale facilities, either laboratory/research scale (< I TPD) or process development/pilot scale plants (1-20 TPD) for municipal waste and related materials (agricultural, forest residues, industrial wastes, etc.), are mentioned in the literature (275, 495). However, such data are sparse, dated, and often have limited applicability to MSW in general, and for design scale-up in particular. Therefore, greatest emphasis was placed on identifying demonstration scale (20--150 TPD) will commercial seals (> 150 TPD) studies which could be expected to provide economic, environmental, and energy data that can be scaled with possibly less risk. While the promise of pyrolysis of MSW lies in its ability to transform municipal waste into gaseous and liquid chemicals and fuel products, the major limitation is the unproven technical and economic feasibility of a large scale facility.

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01

    Waste. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Industry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Savings. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

  3. Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKey Meeting

  4. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

  5. Utilization of high-carbohydrate food wastes as the feedstock for degradable plastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.; Coleman, R.D.; Tsai, TenLin S.; Bonsignore, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    Wastestreams from food processing industries have become an economic burden as well as a serious environmental problem. In the United States, billions of pounds of potato processed each year is typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3-6/ton. For large food processing plants, removal of more than 1 million gallons of waste/day/plant is required. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that (1) bioconverts existing food processing wastestream into lactic acid, and (2) utilizes lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable plastics. Although the initial substrate for Argonne's process development is potato waste, the process will be applied to many other high-carbohydrate food wastes. Argonne has developed a process to bioconvert greater than 90% of the fermentable starch in solid potato waste to glucose. Lactic acid is produced from glucose via fermentation and subsequently recovered/purified for plastic synthesis. A continuous lactic acid fermentation and recovery process has been designed. Batch fermentation data showed good cell growth and excellent yields (greater than 95%) of lactic acid production from the hydrolyzed potato waste. Three product recovery processes (electrodialysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and esterification) are being evaluated. Plastics containing lactic acid can be designed to have various mechanical properties and degradation rates. Argonne is developing lactic acid plastics that have some novel features. These environmentally-safe, degradable plastics have many attractive applications such as composting bags and agriculture mulch films. Other potential applications of lactic acid polymers include programmable pesticide and fertilizer delivery systems.

  6. Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor...

  7. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  8. 'The Overriding Demand for Energy Conservation in the Cement Industry' An Update 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spellman, L. U.

    1981-01-01

    Incentives and constraints to upgrade the U. S. cement industry and its energy efficiency are discussed. Emphasis is given to those measures most accessible to the industry, such as increased use of blended cements and waste fuels....

  9. An Evaluation of Industrial Heat Pumps for Effective Low-Temperature Heat Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leibowitz, H. M.; Colosimo, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of industrial heat pumps utilizing waste water from various industrial processes for the production of process steam is presented as a viable economic alternative to a conventional fossil-fired boiler and as an effective fuel...

  10. Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

  11. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horticulture Environmental Horticulture Organic Agriculture Plant Health Soil Resources and Conservation Soil and applied research; production and utilization of food and related products; resource use and conservation

  12. Industry Economist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will report to the Manager of Load Forecasting and Analysis of the Customer Services Organization. He/she serves as an industry economist engaged in load...

  13. Waste Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nergFeet)DepartmentWasteWaste

  14. Method of dye removal for the textile industry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a method of processing a waste stream containing dyes, such as a dye bath used in the textile industry. The invention comprises using an inorganic-based polymer, such as polyphosphazene, to separate dyes and/or other chemicals from the waste stream. Membranes comprising polyphosphazene have the chemical and thermal stability to survive the harsh, high temperature environment of dye waste streams, and have been shown to completely separate dyes from the waste stream. Several polyphosplhazene membranes having a variety of organic substituent have been shown effective in removing color from waste streams.

  15. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health & Safety: (858) 534Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Human Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (858

  16. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

  17. Advanced Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    BED WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS G. R. PETERSON Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office Idaho Falls, Idaho ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industri al Programs, has sponsored the development of a... Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery System (FBWHRS) and a higher temperature variant, the Ceramic Tubular Distributor Plate (CTOP) Fluidized Bed Heat Exchanger (FBHX) system. Both systems recover energy from high-temperature flue gases and produce steam...

  18. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  19. Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market analyses the global waste market, with particular reference to municipal solid waste (MSW). Key Note. Industrial waste generally has a greater tonnage than MSW, but its management is the responsibility

  20. Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vari, J.

    1992-01-01

    Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

  1. Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niess, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The energy crisis of 1973 accelerated the development of large-scale heat pumps in the United States. Since that time, the commercial, institutional, and industrial applications of heat pumps for waste heat recovery ...

  2. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  3. Guides to pollution prevention: The pharmaceutical industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Pharmaceutical manufacturers generate a variety of wastes during manufacturing, maintenance, and housekeeping operations which can be reduced or minimized through source reduction and recycling. The typical waste streams are spent fermentation broths, process liquors, solvents, equipment wash water, spilled materials, off-spec products, and used processing aids. Suggestions include improvements to operational practices, solvent recycling and implementing good materials management and housekeeping practices. To help companies in the industry identify opportunities for waste reduction at their own facilities, the guide includes a set of worksheets which take the user step-by-step through an analysis of the on-site waste generating operations and the possibilities for minimizing each waste. The guide and its worksheets would also be instructive to consultants serving the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and government agencies who regulate waste streams generated from these firms.

  4. Developing Automated Methods of Waste Sorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2002-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the need complex-wide for remote and automated technologies as they relate to the treatment and disposal of mixed wastes. This analysis revealed that several DOE sites need the capability to open drums containing waste, visually inspect and sort the contents, and finally repackage the containers that are acceptable at a waste disposal facility such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Conditioning contaminated waste so that it is compatible with the WIPP criteria for storage is an arduous task whether the waste is contact handled (waste having radioactivity levels below 200 mrem/hr) or remote handled. Currently, WIPP non-compliant items are removed from the waste stream manually, at a rate of about one 55-gallon drum per day. Issues relating to contamination-based health hazards as well as repetitive motion health hazards are steering industry towards a more user-friendly, method of conditioning or sorting waste.

  5. The Office of Industrial Technologies technical reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts R D activities which focus on the objectives of improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial energy conservation. The Office also conducts programs to reduce waste generation, increase recycling efforts, and improve the use of wastes as process feedstocks. An active program of technology transfer and education supports these activities and encourages adoption of new technologies. To accomplish these objectives OIT cooperates with the private sector to identify its technological needs and to share R D efforts. R D is conducted to the point that a new technology is shown to work and that it can be transferred to the private sector end-users. This bibliography contains information on all scientific and technical reports sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program during the years 1988--1990.

  6. Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

    2013-01-01

    candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle...

  7. Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waibel, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    Waste gases with potentially useful fuel value are generated at any number of points in refineries, chemical plants and other industrial and commercial sites. The higher quality streams have been utilized successfully in fuel systems for years...

  8. Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

    1979-01-01

    .S. tanning industry may be met through an active conservation program. This program would be directed at the recovery of the energy available in the leather waste; the raw and finished tanned leather trimmings and cuttings resulting from tannery operations...

  9. WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate recovery and long-term recovery management plans that can address contaminated waste through the entire life cycle of the waste. Through Demonstration LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MSW Municipal Solid Waste OSHA Occupational Safety

  10. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  11. AGRICULTURAL WINTER/SPRING 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    animal agriculture and the impact of air and water quality on human health. Powers also heads the new MSU agriculture on air quality through a number of projects. "The manure won't go away," Powers says regulations to ensure that air and water quality are preserved." In her air quality research, Powers

  12. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  13. Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C.; Dibari, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

  14. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-05-09

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4,136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  15. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  16. Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycak, D

    2008-06-16

    This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

  17. Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  1. MFR PAPER 1313 The San Diego Tuna Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1313 The San Diego Tuna Industry and Its Employment Impact on the Local Economy STEVEN 92182. This paper is a result of research sponsored by the Office of Sea Grant, NOAA, under Grant No, like agriculture and manufacturing, is a basic industry rather than a dependent one. It brings new

  2. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1335E Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California A.T. Mc of Global Energy Partners. This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Demand Response in California. PIER Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Program. CEC

  3. Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry Richard VloskyRichard VloskyLSU Agricultural Center England Air ParkEngland Air Park--January 18, 2005January 18, 2005 Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;Outline · Industry Development

  4. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14

    Study abroad and internship experiences are the best ways for students to globalize their education. The purpose of this study was to identify students' perceptions of international agriculture before and after they ...

  5. Waste Management 27 (2007) 141150 www.elsevier.com/locate/wasman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    for integrated solid waste management at the industrial Park level: A case of Tianjin, China Yong Geng a in the production and use of goods and services. The proper management of solid waste is a major challenge these types of developments. Therefore, integrated solid waste management has become very crucial

  6. SARDINIA2003_2_Infrastructure.doc 1 Waste Treatment Infrastructure in North Rhine-Westphalia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    commercial and industrial waste management sector. For the turn of the year 2001/2002, this infrastructure Environmental Office of NRW (www.lua.nrw.de). 1. Introduction, characteristics of waste management in North responsibility and investment risk for appropriate waste management facilities. Favorable for the development

  7. Radioactive Waste Management Information for 1992 and record-to-date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litteer, D.L.; Randall, V.C.; Sims, A.M.; Taylor, K.A.

    1993-07-01

    This document provides detailed data and graphics on air borne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1992. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1992 and record to date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, V.C.; Sims, A.M.

    1993-08-01

    This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1992. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    and M. Kushler. (1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive and22 nd National Industrial Energy Technology ConferenceJr. and G. P. Looby. (1996). Energy Conservation and Waste

  10. Pollution prevention in the pharmaceutical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataramani, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    A clear understanding of the process, reaction pathways, process equipment, operational requirements, and waste stream characteristics are critical for the evaluation, selection, and implementation of pollution prevention in the pharmaceutical industry. Although pollution prevention opportunities are always preferred over treatment and disposal techniques, consideration of a full range of options--including at-source treatments and disposal--is a practical necessity to ensure protection of the environment using best available technology. General housekeeping can also play a major role in waste minimization. Waste minimization and pollution prevention are not new concepts for the pharmaceutical industry. But the confidential and highly competitive nature of the business stands in the way of disseminating information regarding specific activities in this area. The pharmaceutical industry could probably do much better in this respect. Successful implementation of waste minimization in the pharmaceutical industry requires that a process modification not have a negative impact on product quality. Recovered and recycled materials must meet quality specifications that are similar to those for virgin raw materials.

  11. The concept of a sustainable agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriewaldt, David Mark

    1993-01-01

    The concept of a sustainable agriculture varies much with writers: some see it as the preservation of agricultural resources or as the reduction of agricultural contamination of the environment or both. Other authors focus on economic viability...

  12. MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring@ilp.mit.edu, or visit http://ilp.mit.edu. MIT and Automotive Industries The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a leading center of research and education on topics important to the automotive industry and its suppliers

  13. Waste remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-12-29

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  14. Adding Value to Agricultural Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

  15. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  16. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  17. Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

  18. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  19. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  20. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  1. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2...

  2. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework September 24, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and...

  3. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  4. Waste-to-Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into renewable energy, thereby enabling a national network of distributed power and biofuel production sites. Image courtesy of Iona Capital Waste-to-Energy Cycle Waste...

  5. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat Pumpsfacility doe logoInIndustry @ ALS

  6. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientific andIndividualEvent Sign InIndustrial

  7. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,ImpactScientific andIndividualEvent SignIndustrial Users -

  8. Industry Economists

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIA lowerslong4,Guide toHighHowIndustry

  9. Commercialization of Industrialized Absorption Heat Pumps in the US 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettigrew, M. G.

    1987-01-01

    OF INDUSTRIAL ABSORPTION HEAT PUMPS IN THE US MALCOLM G. PETTIGREW LITWIN ENGINEERS &CONSTRUCTORS, INC. HOUSTON, ABSTRACT The recovery of waste heat through absorption heat pumping is quite appeal ing to U.S. industry. However, although... this technology has been successfully applied in Europe and Japan, a cauti ous atmosphere wi 11 continue to prevail in the U.S. until the first absorption heat pump is built and successfully demonstrates it's viability for industrial applications...

  10. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  11. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

  12. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    political backing from the renewable fuels industry. Therequirements under the renewable fuels standard–RFS. Thefor a Waiver of the Renewable Fuel Standard. ” Federal

  13. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

  14. Introduction Actual Industrial Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigam, Nilima

    Introduction Actual Industrial Problems What's needed? Is there really interesting mathematics in Industry? Can mathematicians contribute to society, and do we want to...? Nilima Nigam Department Mathematics in Industry #12;Introduction Actual Industrial Problems What's needed? Some controversial

  15. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

  16. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  17. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  18. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  19. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  20. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT Labeling

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Cooling Through Waste Heat Recovery. Washington, D.C. March.Low-Temperature Waste-Heat Recovery in the Food Industry.Schneider Foods Savours Heat Recovery Benefits. Office of

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Cooling Through Waste Heat Recovery. Washington, D.C. March.Low-Temperature Waste-Heat Recovery in the Food Industry.Canada (AAFC) (1984). Heat Recovery for Canadian Food and

  3. Engineering Industrial & Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Industrial Engineering Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering Leslie Monplaisir, Ph powerful tool sets used in industry today. -Brent Gillett, BSIE 2007 Advanced Planning Engineer at BMW I is available at: http://ise.wayne.edu/bs-industrial/index What is Industrial Engineering? The industrial

  4. Industrial lead paint removal specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, R.C.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader as to some of the pertinent rules and regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that may effect an industrial lead paint removal project. The paper discusses a recommended schedule of procedures and preparations to be followed by the lead paint removal specification writer when analyzing the possible impact of the project on the environment, the public and workers. Implications of the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) along with hazardous waste handling, manifesting, transporting and disposal procedures are discussed with special emphasis placed as to their impact on the writer and the facility owner. As the rules and regulations are highly complex, the writer has attempted to explain the methodology currently being used in state-of-the-art industrial lead abatement specifications.

  5. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

  6. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

  7. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  8. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  9. Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for amendment of agricultural soils/ Métaux lourds dans le compost de déchets municipaux pour application agricole Valérie Duchesneau, #4634809 EVS4904 métaux lourds des compostes de déchets municipaux? http://www.ecometiers.com/fiche/images/43.jpg La

  10. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  11. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    solar energy or "green sunshine" derived from the solar- powered photosynthesis process during the growth and development phases of plant materials. Utilizing Biomass Energy The four methods in which, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological

  12. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

  13. SUMMER-FALL 2011 SCHEDULE Workshops to Improve Industrial Productivity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information: http://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/training_process_heating.html Pumping System by the industry, discussions of combustion, heat transfer in furnaces, waste heat recovery. Also, students. For complete course information: http://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/pumping_systems.html Steam

  14. CALENDAR YEARS 2012-3 SCHEDULE Workshops to Improve Industrial Productivity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information: http://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/training_process_heating.html Pumping System by the industry, discussions of combustion, heat transfer in furnaces, and waste heat recovery. Also, students. For complete course information: http://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/pumping_systems.html Steam

  15. UnitedStates of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tropical forests for products and energy; forest and wildlife management, the South Pacific Forestry, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 88 p. The 17 of the USDA Forest Service's tropical forestry research, forestry research in Asia and the Pacific, management

  16. FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center If all fields are not filled out, you do NOT have permission to fish! Name: ____________________________________________ Fishing Permit is valid for ONE YEAR. In return for this privilege, I agree to: 1. ABSOLVE the Eastern

  17. Genetic Engineering for Modern Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    reserved 1543-5008/10/0602-0443$20.00 Key Words abiotic stress, climate change, field conditions, global warming, stress combination, stress tolerance, transgenic crops Abstract Abiotic stress conditions such as drought, heat, or salinity cause exten- sive losses to agricultural production worldwide. Progress

  18. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    LBNL/PUB-5352, Revision 6 Waste Management QualityAssurance Plan Waste Management Group Environment, HealthRev. 6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

  19. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin; Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia; Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell; Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester .

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

  20. THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT), headquartered at Columbia University in New York City, keeps a close watch on the thermal waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Programme (1994). Good Practice Guide 141: Waste heatProgramme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999a). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  2. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  3. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis technology will be combined with waste heat recovery to convert effluents into electricity and chemical products, including...

  4. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  5. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production DnAES Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250ACP Animal and Crop Production DN250ASC Animal Science DN250ENT Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250 AES 2 Animal and Crop Production DN250 ACP 3 Animal Science DN250 ASC

  7. Instrumentation for Process Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The development of biofuels as an alternative fuel source highlights the MixAlco process as one method to convert organic waste into alcohol fuels. The pretreatment and fermentation of waste is integral to the process ...

  8. Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Copenhagen Waste Management and Incineration Florence, April 24 2009 Julie B. Svendsen 24 20092 Presentation · General introduction to Copenhagen Waste Management System · National incentives · Waste Management plan 2012 · Incineration plants #12;Florence, April 24 20093 Copenhagen Waste

  9. Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haedicke, Michael Anthony

    2008-01-01

    European market to genetically modified foods. She arguesfoods that many industry members felt were not compatible with organic agriculture, including ingredients made from genetically modifiedgenetically modified crops. Below, I discuss the distinction that co-op leaders make between food-

  10. Articulation Agreement Hocking College, Industrial Technology: Alternative Energy and Fuel Cell A.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Energy & Fuel Cells) Credits Transferred from Hocking College: Liberal Education 26 TechnologyArticulation Agreement Between Hocking College, Industrial Technology: Alternative Energy and Fuel Cell A.S. and University of Minnesota, Crookston (UMC), Agriculture & Natural Resources -Ag Systems

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    decomposition of organic wastes, geothermal, small hydropower plants, low-emission wood or... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Agricultural, Multifamily...

  12. Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Davis, Berkeley and San Francisco · Focus on labor-intensive agriculture Agricultural Ergonomics effects of prolonged exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Focus on basic exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Recent Research Projects Fatigue

  13. Randolph EMC- Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficient CFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The...

  14. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, Jørgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  15. Mechanical, Industrial & Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Mechanical, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering (MIME) COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING FY2013 Oregon graduate degrees (MS, MEng, PhD) in mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, and materials science. We offer bachelor's degrees in mechanical, industrial, manufacturing, and energy systems engineering

  16. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  17. Industrial and Systems engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Industrial and Systems engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofIndustrialandSystemsEngineering EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to an industrial and systems to expert clinical recommendations. engineering.wayne.edu/isefaculty Industrial and systems engineering

  18. Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;20031970 The Solid Waste Challenge Waste Explosion 1,200 t/d1,200 t/d 6,900 t/d6,900 t/d #12;Waste ManagementWaste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected

  19. Child Labor in Texas Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28

    percent of all work fatalities. Farm hazards include machinery, confined spaces, animals and live- stock, chemicals, respiratory irritants, toxic gases and extreme environmental conditions. Children working in agriculture may be hired employees, labor... contractor employees or farm family members. Child labor laws exist to ensure that a child is not employed in an occupation or manner that can harm him or her. However, these laws do not cover workers under age 16 who work on their parent?s or guardian?s...

  20. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  1. Hanford Tank Waste Residuals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - 27...

  2. Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Report from the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review March 17-27, 2015 U.S. Department of...

  3. Pet Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28

    About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages...

  4. OTEC- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers programs to agricultural customers.  Interested customers should contact a local OTEC office.

  5. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  6. National Poultry Waste Management Symposium, Birmingham AL 28-30 October, 2002 AMMONIA LOSSES, EVALUATIONS AND SOLUTIONS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    National Poultry Waste Management Symposium, Birmingham AL 28-30 October, 2002 AMMONIA LOSSES projects toward current and upcoming agricultural and food problems. In FY 2001, the IFAFS waste management collecting data on ER or EF from selected U.S. poultry houses and the efficacy of certain management

  7. ERM 593 Applied Project_Guidance for Reviewing and Approving a Waste Stream Profile in the Waste Compliance and Tracking System_Final_05-05-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elicio, Andy U.

    2015-05-05

    My ERM 593 applied project will provide guidance for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Stream Profile reviewer (i.e. RCRA reviewer) in regards to Reviewing and Approving a Waste Stream Profile in the Waste Compliance and Tracking System. The Waste Compliance and Tracking system is called WCATS. WCATS is a web-based application that “supports the generation, characterization, processing and shipment of LANL radioactive, hazardous, and industrial waste.” The LANL generator must characterize their waste via electronically by filling out a waste stream profile (WSP) in WCATS. Once this process is completed, the designated waste management coordinator (WMC) will perform a review of the waste stream profile to ensure the generator has completed their waste stream characterization in accordance with applicable state, federal and LANL directives particularly P930-1, “LANL Waste Acceptance Criteria,” and the “Waste Compliance and Tracking System User's Manual, MAN-5004, R2,” as applicable. My guidance/applied project will describe the purpose, scope, acronyms, definitions, responsibilities, assumptions and guidance for the WSP reviewer as it pertains to each panel and subpanel of a waste stream profile.

  8. In Proceedings of SPIE AeroSense 2001. Robotic Technologies for Outdoor Industrial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stentz, Tony

    in agriculture, surface mining, underground mining, quarrying, construction, material handling, and other automation may be difficult or expensive; for example, an underground coal mine would require new, PA 15201 tony@cmu.edu Abstract The commercial industries of agriculture, mining, construction

  9. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  10. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  11. Industry Analysis February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    -Industries · Biodiesel ­ Biofuel ­ Alternate fuels ­ Green fuels ­ Renewable fuels/energy ­ Green energy ­ Green) · Business Source Complete - Company, market, industry news and articles · CBCA and Canadian Newsstand

  12. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  13. UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology Summer B: August 9 - 21, 2015 Explore aspects in Brazil and the United States. Course Information College of Agricultural and Life Sciences: Urban, Medical and Agricultural Entomology in Brazil Total Number of Credits Offered: 3 About

  14. Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu #12;UC Education Abroad Program Special Focus Pilot Program in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Wageningen University and Research Centre This special-focus pilot program is available only to UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental

  15. Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  16. Waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  17. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture...

  18. Safety management of nuclear waste in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echavarri, L.E. (Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain))

    1991-01-01

    For the past two decades, Spain has been consolidating a nuclear program that in the last 3 years has provided between 35 and 40% of the electricity consumed in that country. This program includes nine operating reactor units, eight of them based on US technology and one from Germany, a total of 7,356 MW(electric). There is also a 480-MW(electric) French gas-cooled reactor whose operation recently ceased and which will be decommissioned in the coming years. Spanish industry has participated significantly in this program, and material produced locally has reached 85% of the total. Once the construction program has been completed and operation is proceeding normally, the capacity factor will be {approximately} 80%. It will be very important to complete the nuclear program with the establishment of conditions for safe management and disposal of the nuclear waste generated during the years in which these reactors are in operation and for subsequent decommissioning. To establish the guidelines for the disposal of nuclear waste, the Spanish government approved in october 1987, with a revision in January 1989, the General Plan of Radioactive Wastes proposed by the Ministry of Industry and Energy and prepared by the national company for radioactive waste management, ENRESA.

  19. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the...

  20. Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmiaton, A.; Garforth, A.A.

    2011-06-15

    Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidised bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C{sub 2}-C{sub 7}) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that 'waste' FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity.

  1. Transactions of the ASAE Vol. 45(5): xxxxxx E 2002 American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN 00012351 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Jr., Frederick C.

    in the HRHB. Keywords. Air velocity, Swine manure, compost, Ammonia, High­RiseTM hog building, Computational fluid dynamic model, Fluent±. oncern about the potential for animal waste pollution has emerged as one, and Frederick C. Michel, Jr., ASAE Member Engineer, Assistant Professor, Department of Food, Agricultural

  2. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  3. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  4. Radioactive Waste Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, supersedes DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

  5. Industrial Heat Pumps- A Reexamination in Light of Current Energy Trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, N.; Simon, M.; Terry, S.; Leach, J.

    2009-01-01

    Heat pumps have been used for nearly one hundred years mostly providing heating and cooling for homes and residential settings. However, industrial heat pumps are also used and may be driven by waste heat streams from the manufacturing facility...

  6. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  7. Knowledge Networks and Science Data December 7, 2012, AGU12 IN54A-02.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    information Demand side management Voluntary agreements Regional conflicts Waste water treatment Ban, caused by discharges from waste water treatment plants, industrial effluents and agricultural run

  8. Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreeger, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    BOILER OPERATING EXPERIENCE IN DIRTY GAS STREAMS Alan H. Kreeger. Aerojet Energy Conversion Company. Sacramento. California ABSTRACT The first industrial fluid bed waste heat boiler in the U. S. is operating on an aluminium melting furnace...

  9. Properties of concrete paving blocks made with waste marble Osman Gencela,f,*, Cengiz Ozelb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Laboratory of Advanced Polymers & Optimized Materials (LAPOM), Department of Materials Science: Concrete paving blocks Recycled aggregate Marble waste Concrete wear a b s t r a c t Marble industry

  10. Integrated electronic waste management in Mexico : law, technology and public policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Llera, Ricardo, 1971-

    2004-01-01

    What is electronic waste? Why is it considered a problem? What are the public health implications of its mishandling? The electronic industry, a sector that has experienced one of the highest growth rates of the last decade, ...

  11. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery - Steam Tip Sheet #3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  12. Use Vapor Recompression to Recover Low-Pressure Waste - Steam Tip Sheet #11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on recovering low-pressure waste steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  13. Phosphate and ammonium removal from waste water, using constructed wetland systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drizo, Aleksandra

    1998-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen in waste water from sewerage systems contribute to excessive nutrient enrichment of surface waters, presenting a threat to nature conservation, domestic and industrial water supplies, and recreation. ...

  14. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board May 5th, 2011 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 IAB 2010-2011 · David K. Anderson ­ Alden Research Laboratory, Inc went on for three weeks Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 6 #12;Reza Shahbazian Yassar Mechanical

  15. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M Systems and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.), the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial Engineering, and the Doctor of Philosophy in Systems and Engineering Management programs prepare competent industrial engineers

  16. Industry Analysis October 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Industry and Company research ­ they build on each other #12;Industry Studies Standard & Poor's Net of competitors Standard & Poor's NetAdvantage - See 'Industry Surveys' under the "Quick Links" #12;Where Common technologies are there industry standards, platforms manufacturing processes, outsourcing? #12

  17. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  18. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-26

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  19. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

  20. www.d-waste.com info@d-waste.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    management data available". According to David Newman, president of the International Solid Waste Association collection services, according to the first global survey of waste management. The Waste Atlas 2013 Report marketplace, about 47 grams of waste is produced-- with worldwide municipal solid waste generation totaling

  1. Waste Disposal Guide HOW TO PROPERLY DISPOSE OF WASTE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    of Containers p.8 o E. Disposal of Empty Containers p.8 o F. Storage of Waste Chemicals p.8,9 o G. Chemical Compatibility p.9 Radioactive Waste Disposal p.10 Bio Hazard Waste chemical and radioactive waste, and Biohazardous waste. This document contains university procedures

  2. 8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

  3. EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oneida’s Energy Recovery Project would construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems.

  4. 2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  5. 2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  6. 2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  7. 2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  8. PRODUCTION OF NEW BIOMASS/WASTE-CONTAINING SOLID FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Akers; Glenn A. Shirey; Zalman Zitron; Charles Q. Maney

    2001-04-20

    CQ Inc. and its team members (ALSTOM Power Inc., Bliss Industries, McFadden Machine Company, and industry advisors from coal-burning utilities, equipment manufacturers, and the pellet fuels industry) addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that includes both moisture reduction and pelletization or agglomeration for necessary fuel density and ease of handling. Further, this method of fuel production must be applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provide environmental benefits compared with coal. Notable accomplishments from the work performed in Phase I of this project include the development of three standard fuel formulations from mixtures of coal fines, biomass, and waste materials that can be used in existing boilers, evaluation of these composite fuels to determine their applicability to the major combustor types, development of preliminary designs and economic projections for commercial facilities producing up to 200,000 tons per year of biomass/waste-containing fuels, and the development of dewatering technologies to reduce the moisture content of high-moisture biomass and waste materials during the pelletization process.

  9. Framework for managing wastes from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-15

    Oil and gas companies operate in many countries around the world. Their exploration and production (E&P) operations generate many kinds of waste that must be carefully and appropriately managed. Some of these wastes are inherently part of the E&P process; examples are drilling wastes and produced water. Other wastes are generic industrial wastes that are not unique to E&P activities, such as painting wastes and scrap metal. Still other wastes are associated with the presence of workers at the site; these include trash, food waste, and laundry wash water. In some host countries, mature environmental regulatory programs are in place that provide for various waste management options on the basis of the characteristics of the wastes and the environmental settings of the sites. In other countries, the waste management requirements and authorized options are stringent, even though the infrastructure to meet the requirements may not be available yet. In some cases, regulations and/or waste management infrastructure do not exist at all. Companies operating in these countries can be confronted with limited and expensive waste management options.

  10. Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Jane; Schumacher, Leon

    2014-10-23

    The Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) program brought together a team of representatives from government, academia, and private industry to enhance the availability of energy efficiency services for small livestock producers in the State of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) managed the project via a subcontract with the University of Missouri (MU), College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources, MU Extension, the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences, the MU College of Engineering, and the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA). MU teamed with EnSave, Inc, a nationally-recognized expert in agricultural energy efficiency to assist with marketing, outreach, provision of farm energy audits and customer service. MU also teamed with independent home contractors to facilitate energy audits of the farm buildings and homes of these livestock producers. The goals of the project were to: (1) improve the environment by reducing fossil fuel emissions and reducing the total energy used on small animal farms; (2) stimulate the economy of local and regional communities by creating or retaining jobs; and (3) improve the profitability of Missouri livestock producers by reducing their energy expenditures. Historically, Missouri scientists/engineers conducted programs on energy use in agriculture, such as in equipment, grain handling and tillage practices. The MAESTRO program was the first to focus strictly on energy efficiency associated with livestock production systems in Missouri and to investigate the applicability and potential of addressing energy efficiency in animal production from a building efficiency perspective. A. Project Objectives The goal of the MAESTRO program was to strengthen the financial viability and environmental soundness of Missouri's small animal farms by helping them implement energy efficient technologies for the production facility, farm buildings, and the homes on these farms. The expected measurable outcomes of the project were to improve the environment and stimulate the economy by: • Reducing annual fossil fuel emissions by 1,942 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, reducing the total annual energy use on at least 323 small animal farms and 100 farm homes by at least 8,000 kWh and 2,343 therms per farm. • Stimulating the economy by creating or retaining at least 69 jobs, and saving small animal farmers an average of $2,071 per farm in annual energy expenditures. B. Project Scope The MAESTRO team chose the target population of small farms because while all agriculture is traditionally underserved in energy efficiency programs, small farms were particularly underserved because they lack the financial resources and access to energy efficiency technologies that larger farms deploy. The MAESTRO team reasoned that energy conservation, financial and educational programs developed while serving the agricultural community could serve as a national model for other states and their agricultural sectors. The target population was approximately 2,365 small animal farm operations in Missouri, specifically those farms that were not by definition a confined animal feeding operation (CAFO). The program was designed to create jobs by training Missouri contractors and Missouri University Extension staff how to conduct farm audits. The local economy would be stimulated by an increase in construction activity and an increasing demand for energy efficient farm equipment. Additionally, the energy savings were deemed critical in keeping Missouri farms in business. This project leveraged funds using a combination of funds from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources’ Missouri Energy Center and its Soil and Water Conservation Program, from the state's Linked Deposits, MASBDA's agricultural loan guarantee programs, and through the in-kind contribution of faculty and staff time to the project from these agencies and MU. Several hundred Missouri livestock producers were contacted during the MAESTRO project. Of the

  11. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  12. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  13. CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization 24.A.1 BACKGROUND DOE must provide waste inventory information Report (TWBIR), Revisions 2 and 3, which provides waste characterization information specific to DOE solidified waste forms was included. Waste described in TWBIR Revision 3 was primarily characterized through

  14. The Texas Meat Packing Industry -- Structure, Operational Characteristics, and Competitive Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond A.; Farris, Donald E.

    1976-01-01

    Bulletin] The Texas Meat Packing Industry - Structure, Operational Characteristics, and Competitive Practices Mention of a trademar k'or a proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by The Texas Agricultural..., age, or national origin. [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] CONTENT S Page Highlights ................................................... ii Structural Characteristics of the Slaughter Industry ......... 3 Meat Packing Operations...

  15. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  16. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  17. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  18. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

  19. Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental...

  20. Solid Waste Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of...

  1. HLW Glass Waste Loadings

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview Vitrification - general background Joule...

  2. Waste Confidence Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum...

  3. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  4. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-04-06

    A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  5. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  6. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1991-12-01

    This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

  7. Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Losses. Using Reclaimed Waste Water. Decrease in Electricity$5-6 acre Using Reclaimed Waste Water Substituting watercan be saved by using waste water. the impact of waste water

  8. ORISE: Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural Research Service Postdoctoral Research Program Selected candidates participate in USDA research for one to four years...

  9. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

  10. ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING Cooperative Extension directly. Otherwise, backtrack to their suppliers, in person or by telephone. For the first few years

  11. WINDExchange: Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Resources & Tools Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools This page lists...

  12. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  13. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Waste-to-Energy Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , synthetic diesel (development) ·Torrefied wood for pellets, coal replacement ·Pyrolysis oil for boilers in South Korea, fueled by industrial waste (mainly fabric, wood, plastic, packaging materials

  14. Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

  15. A multi-echelon supply chain model for municipal solid waste management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yimei; Huang, Guo He; He, Li

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, a multi-echelon multi-period solid waste management system (MSWM) was developed by inoculating with multi-echelon supply chain. Waste managers, suppliers, industries and distributors could be engaged in joint strategic planning and operational execution. The principal of MSWM system is interactive planning of transportation and inventory for each organization in waste collection, delivery and disposal. An efficient inventory management plan for MSWM would lead to optimized productivity levels under available capacities (e.g., transportation and operational capacities). The applicability of the proposed system was illustrated by a case with three cities, one distribution and two waste disposal facilities. Solutions of the decision variable values under different significant levels indicate a consistent trend. With an increased significant level, the total generated waste would be decreased, and the total transported waste through distribution center to waste to energy and landfill would be decreased as well.

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LLC. The Order, at paragraph 22, requires the Permittees to submit a WIPP Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container Isolation Plan for identified nitrate salt bearing waste...

  17. Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act provides for planning for the processing and disposal of municipal waste; requires counties to submit plans for municipal waste management systems within their boundaries; authorizes...

  18. Report: EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Full Report for Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    meeting, enclosed please find the Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for Waste Treatment Plant; Report Number EMAB EM-TWS WTP-001,...

  19. Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

  20. Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...