Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

2

Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

3

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a...

4

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to...

5

Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels Chung Y. HseChung Y. Hse Principal Wood ScientistPrincipal Wood Scientist USDA Forest State UniversityLouisiana State University 66thth Pacific Rim BioPacific Rim Bio--Based Composites

6

Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Waste Management Trends in Texas Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Industrial Assessment Center at Texas A&M University has performed several waste and energy minimization surveys in small- and medium- sized industrial manufacturing plants in Texas. During these surveys, Industrial Assessment Center personnel...

Smith, C. S.; Heffington, W. M.

8

Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES COMPLAINT RESPONSE SYSTEM 8 2.1 Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and Code 9 2.2 Environmental ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE 10 3.1 Watershed Farm Practices Study 10 3.2 Ongoing Farm Practices Evaluation 12 3

9

Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

Altin, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Edmund G. Brown, Jr. PIER INDUSTRIAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, petroleum refining, natural gas, beverage industry, water and wastewater, energy efficiency, industrial natural gas efficiency, electronics, Public Interest Energy R Edmund G. Brown, Jr. Governor PIER INDUSTRIAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND WATER ENERGY EFFICIENCY

11

Photographic Effects on Students' Perceptions of the Agriculture Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on reader opinion of the agriculture industry when standing alone and when coupled with agriculture news leads in magazines. A stratified random sample of students (N=300) was asked to complete two online surveys-pretest and post test. Parametric...

Bradley, Kathryn A.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Accelerated carbonation treatment of industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of industrial waste presents major logistical, financial and environmental issues. Technologies that can reduce the hazardous properties of wastes are urgently required. In the present work, a number of industrial wastes arising from the cement, metallurgical, paper, waste disposal and energy industries were treated with accelerated carbonation. In this process carbonation was effected by exposing the waste to pure carbon dioxide gas. The paper and cement wastes chemically combined with up to 25% by weight of gas. The reactivity of the wastes to carbon dioxide was controlled by their constituent minerals, and not by their elemental composition, as previously postulated. Similarly, microstructural alteration upon carbonation was primarily influenced by mineralogy. Many of the thermal wastes tested were classified as hazardous, based upon regulated metal content and pH. Treatment by accelerated carbonation reduced the leaching of certain metals, aiding the disposal of many as stable non-reactive wastes. Significant volumes of carbon dioxide were sequestrated into the accelerated carbonated treated wastes.

Gunning, Peter J., E-mail: gunning_peter@hotmail.co [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom); Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Asia, and 21% and 13% in Africa and Latin America, respectively. Agricultural waste supplies about 33% of total biofuel use, providing 39%, 29%, and 13% of biofuel use in Asia, Latin America, and Africa, and 41 and industry. The emission of 0.9 Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small

Jacob, Daniel J.

14

THE ECONOMIST The waste industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ten feet. Humanity has always produced waste in vast quantities; but more people, more consumption as with toxic chemicals, governments need to persuade people that they should be responsible for the muck into electricity or fuel or fertiliser. Environmentalists dream of a world in which almost nothing is wasted. #12

15

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used...

16

Industrial Wastes as a Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equipment for separating tramp iron. Ash Handling Ash is the incombustible mineral matter left be hind when some waste materials burn completely. Ash removal is practiced from two sources: the bottom of the furnace; and from collecting devices...

Richardson, G.; Hendrix, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

Not Available

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Co-processing of agricultural and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major thrust of our research program is the use of waste materials as co-liquefaction agents for the first-stage conversion of coal to liquid fuels. By fulfilling one or more of the roles of an expensive solvent in the direct coal liquefaction (DCL) process, the waste material is disposed off ex-landfill, and may improve the overall economics of DCL. Work in our group has concentrated on co-liquefaction with waste rubber tires, some results from which are presented elsewhere in these Preprints. In this paper, we report on preliminary results with agricultural and biomass-type waste as co-liquefaction agents.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, Ji-Perng [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture process waste Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural and food processing plants can turn waste into power can turn... . Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), waste streams from food and beverage processing plants,...

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural wastes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capable of converting wastes into fuels to other agriculturally based or other biomass feedstocks... ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Recovering the Value of Waste for Environmental...

24

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Davol, Phebe

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Industries in FloridaD, Coordinator of Economic Analysis Alan W. Hodges*, PhD, Extension Scientist Rodney L. Clouser, PhD, Professor University of Florida/IFAS, Food & Resource Economics Department PO Box 110240, Gainesville, FL 32611

Florida, University of

26

Washington State Ergonomics Tool: predictive validity in the waste industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study applies the Washington State Ergonomics Tool to waste industry jobs in Texas. Exposure data were collected by on-site observation of fourteen different multi-task jobs in a major national solid waste management company employing more...

Eppes, Susan Elise

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

29

Waste minimization in the oil and gas industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent legislative actions place an emphasis on waste minimization as opposed to traditional end-of-pipe waste management. This new philosophy, coupled with increasing waste disposal costs and associated liabilities, sets the stage for investigating waste minimization opportunities in all industries wastes generated by oil and gas exploration and production (E P) and refuting activities are regulated as non-hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Potential reclassification of these wastes as hazardous would make minimization of these waste streams even more desirable. Oil and gas E P activities generate a wide variety of wastes, although the bulk of the wastes (98%) consists of a single waste stream: produced water. Opportunities to minimize E P wastes through point source reduction activities are limited by the extractive nature of the industry. Significant waste minimization is possible, however, through recycling. Recycling activities include underground injection of produced water, use of closed-loop drilling systems, reuse of produced water and drilling fluids in other oilfield activities, use of solid debris as construction fill, use of oily wastes as substitutes for road mix and asphalt, landspreading of produced sand for soil enhancement, and roadspreading of suitable aqueous wastes for dust suppression or deicing. Like the E P wastes, wastes generated by oil and gas treatment and refining activities cannot be reduced substantially at the point source but can be reduced through recycling. For the most part, extensive recycling and reprocessing of many waste streams already occurs at most petroleum refineries. A variety of innovative waste treatment activities have been developed to minimize the toxicity or volume of oily wastes generated by both E P and refining activities. These treatments include bioremediation, oxidation, biooxidation, incineration, and separation. Application of these treatment processes is still limited.

Smith, K.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Waste minimization in the oil and gas industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent legislative actions place an emphasis on waste minimization as opposed to traditional end-of-pipe waste management. This new philosophy, coupled with increasing waste disposal costs and associated liabilities, sets the stage for investigating waste minimization opportunities in all industries wastes generated by oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) and refuting activities are regulated as non-hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Potential reclassification of these wastes as hazardous would make minimization of these waste streams even more desirable. Oil and gas E&P activities generate a wide variety of wastes, although the bulk of the wastes (98%) consists of a single waste stream: produced water. Opportunities to minimize E&P wastes through point source reduction activities are limited by the extractive nature of the industry. Significant waste minimization is possible, however, through recycling. Recycling activities include underground injection of produced water, use of closed-loop drilling systems, reuse of produced water and drilling fluids in other oilfield activities, use of solid debris as construction fill, use of oily wastes as substitutes for road mix and asphalt, landspreading of produced sand for soil enhancement, and roadspreading of suitable aqueous wastes for dust suppression or deicing. Like the E&P wastes, wastes generated by oil and gas treatment and refining activities cannot be reduced substantially at the point source but can be reduced through recycling. For the most part, extensive recycling and reprocessing of many waste streams already occurs at most petroleum refineries. A variety of innovative waste treatment activities have been developed to minimize the toxicity or volume of oily wastes generated by both E&P and refining activities. These treatments include bioremediation, oxidation, biooxidation, incineration, and separation. Application of these treatment processes is still limited.

Smith, K.P.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Olefin Recovery from Chemical Industry Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process to separate olefins from paraffins in waste gas streams as an alternative to flaring or distillation. Flaring these streams wastes their chemical feedstock value; distillation is energy and capital cost intensive, particularly for small waste streams.

A.R. Da Costa; R. Daniels; A. Jariwala; Z. He; A. Morisato; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

32

Barron Electric Cooperative- Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Barron Electric Cooperative (BEC) offers the Customized Energy Incentive Program for their commercial, industrial, and agricultural members to save energy by replacing old equipment with more...

33

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department...

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

34

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law...

35

Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry's Most Widespread Health and Safety Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry demonstrated that these potentially permanently disabling injuries are readily prevented using ergonomics that agricultural work is diverse and so agricultural ergonomics must bridge many specific problems with a flexible

Leistikow, Bruce N.

36

Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Identifying, examining, and validating a description of the agriculture industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineers, Agricultural Science Teachers, Agricultural Technicians, Animal Breeders, Animal Scientists, Crop and Livestock Manager, Farm and Home Management Advisors, Farmers and Ranchers, Food Science Technicians, Food Scientists and Technologists... ___________ This dissertation follows the style of the Journal of Agricultural Education. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION As evidenced by the dwindling acres of farm land in production in the United States, fewer and fewer people are considering careers in contemporary...

Romero, Edward Wayne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 2, Industrial liquid waste processing, industrial gaseous waste processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume proceedings summarize the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Individual reports are indexed separately.

Lee, V.E. [ed.; Watts, R.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Overland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nature of faecal waste applications to land in the UK is briefly reviewed, with data presented on both livestock slurry and manure, and human sewage sludge. Particular emphasis is placed on factors influencingOverland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes S.F. Tyrrel1

Quinton, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Recovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity Spring 2010 Department available thermoelectric modules and to build a thermoelectric power generator demonstration unit dependent. A calorimeter has been used to measure the heat supplied by a thermoelectric module #12;(operated

Kjelstrup, Signe

42

Urban agriculture as a tool for neighborhood fabric repair in post-industrial Detroit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on Detroit as a post-industrial city that suffers from abandonment, vacancy, and food security issues. I address this problem through the lens of agriculture, asking how urban farming can be used to ...

Fairbank, Sandra Trubow

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fluid Bed Combustion Applied to Industrial Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of its relatively recent application to coal fired steam production, fluid beds have been uti lized in industry for over 60 years. Beginning in Germany in the twenties for coal gasification, the technology was applied to catalytic cracking of heavy... system cost), use of minimum excess air required, and maintaining the min"imum reactor temperature neces sary to sustain combustion. For superautogenous fuels, where incineration. only is desired, minimum capital cost is achieved by using direct bed...

Mullen, J. F.; Sneyd, R. J.

44

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

45

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David Frederick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Solid Waste Management in Vietnam An Industrial Ecology Study by Thao Nguyen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid Waste Management in Vietnam An Industrial Ecology Study by Thao Nguyen School greatly magnified the problems with Vietnam's solid waste management system, pushing waste management, the issue of how to deal with its solid waste will only become more critical as Vietnam industrializes

Columbia University

50

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

No Name

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES Kelly Traditional approaches for reducing energy and waste in industrial processes typically focus on improving and more apparent to us. In our experience, this approach for reducing energy use and waste generation

Kissock, Kelly

53

An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world Rosemarie Yevich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Latin America, respectively. Agricultural waste supplies about 33% of total biofuel use, providing 39%, 29%, and 13% of biofuel use in Asia, Latin America, and Africa, and 41% and 51% of the biofuel use.9Pg C (as CO2) from burning of biofuels and field residues together is small, but non-negligible when

Jacob, Daniel J.

54

Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session and wastewater algae technologies, Dr. Roger Ruan, Professor, BBE, University of Minnesota 11:45 am Lunch break Corporation 1:40 pm Wastewater algae screening, acclimation, and culture. Dr. Joe Zhou, Research Associate

Blanchette, Robert A.

56

Industrial Robot: An International Journal Emerald Article: A software framework for agricultural and forestry robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and forestry robots Thomas Hellström, Ola Ringdahl Article information: To cite this document: Thomas Hellström, Ola Ringdahl, (2013),"A software framework for agricultural and forestry robots", Industrial Robot and forestry robots Thomas Hellstro¨m and Ola Ringdahl Department of Computing Science, Umea° University, Umea

Hellström, Thomas

57

Co-operative Forage Crop Investigations Between the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and the Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture. Alfalfa in Northwest Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 137 Co-operative Forage Crop Investigations BETWEEN THE Texas Agricultural Experiment Station AND THE Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of ~griculture ALFALFA IN NORTHWEST... features 7 Soil and plant covering ..................................... 8 Adaptability of alfalfa to the region ....................... 8 Preparing the land for alfalfa ................................. 8 Objects in preparing the land...

Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

59

Co-processing of agriculture and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass and bio-processed waste are potential candidates for co-liquefaction with coal. Specific materials used here include sawdust and poultry manure. Liquefaction experiments were run on each of these materials, separately and with coal, using tetralin as solvent at 350{degrees}C and 1000 psi(cold) hydrogen pressure for 1h. Total conversion was monitored, as well as conversion to asphaltenes, oils and gases. All the biomass samples are converted to oils and gases under the reaction conditions. Poultry manure seems to convert coal more completely, and to produce more oils and gases, than conventional liquefaction.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, J.P. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Conversion of Waste Biomass into Useful Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste biomass includes municipal solid waste (MSW), municipal sewage sludge (SS), industrial biosludge, manure, and agricultural residues. When treated with lime, biomass is highly digestible by a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms. Lime...

Holtzapple, M.

62

Engi 8717 -9601, In Class Assignment, 9 March 2010 A) human waste and agricultural run-off  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engi 8717 - 9601, In Class Assignment, 9 March 2010 A) human waste and agricultural run-off B) reduced fertilizer use (or no fertilizer use), ii) wetlands need to be reintroduced into the catchments

Coles, Cynthia

63

Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co-processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in theno date. “Integrated Solid Waste Management. ” Presentationincineration of Municipal Solid Waste in Cement Industry. :

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

Sprinkle, Donald Lee

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural industry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Distinguished Texans in Agriculture Texas A&M AgriLife L. Don Anderson John B. Armstrong... in Agriculture Award. The Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award ... Source:...

69

forthcoming in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics Effects of the Private-Label Invasion in Food Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Food Industries Abstract Using supermarket scanner data, we test a variety of hypotheses from trade journals about the invasion of private-label food products. According to conventional industry wisdom, name, Economic Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture We are very grateful to Mark Denbaly

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

70

Waste Management Recommendations in the Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) was one of the four Energy Analysis & Diagnostic Centers (EADC) that began providing waste management, in addition to energy and demand conservation, assessments in January, 1994. Over 30...

Eggebrecht, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

71

Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation...

Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of regulations and the most interest. There is a chain of regulation that extends from those who generate hazardous waste to those who transport, store, treat, and dispose of it. However, facilities that recycle or reuse hazardous wastes are excluded from...~e listed as available in waste-exchange catalogs. The haza~dous natu~e of these wastes is ext~emely impo~tant in dete~mining the benefits of exchanging them, because the costs of ~egulated disposal, sto~age, and t~eatment may be avoided by ~ecycling (4...

Phillips, W. C.

75

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid waste programs updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module focuses on EPA`s efforts in two areas: municipal and industrial solid waste. The garbage that is managed by the local governments is known as municipal solid waste (MSW). Garbage excluded from hazardous waste regulation but not typically collected by local governments is commonly known as industrial solid waste. This category includes domestic sewage and other wastewater treatment sludge, demolition and construction wastes, agricultural and mining residues, combustion ash, and industrial process wastes.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Beneficial reuse of oilfield waste outside of the oil and gas industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If a beneficial reuse of an oilfield waste can be found, that specific byproduct is no longer a waste, but a product. With such downstream use, the environmental liabilities of the former waste are, except for any packaging or transportation requirements, potentially eliminated. There is a problem, however, with the lack of an active infrastructure to implement the process. Some states have limited programs, but participation is a problem. It is apparent that a {open_quotes}Waste Clearinghouse{close_quotes} addressing oilfield waste in conjunction with major industrial waste and feed streams is needed, but implementation remains in the future. An active network of participating suppliers and users would be the goal of such action. The benefits for industry would be a reduction in waste disposal and associated liabilities and {open_quotes}virgin{close_quotes} feedstock requirements. From the operators viewpoint, this scenario would require a compilation of the different waste/byproduct streams and their characteristics and a prioritizing of those wastes by characteristics that might affect their reuse potential. These might include: (1) the greatest likelihood of finding a market; (2) the highest potential waste volume reduction; (3) the highest cost of disposal and (4) the greatest associated hazards. For the industry as a whole, an inventorying of these byproducts and characteristics would be tied to the identification of consumers/outlets for specific byproducts. This might be accomplished through the funding of consultants/contractors specializing in clearinghouse activities and/or research into potential applications and uses. The industry needs to change it`s view of waste/byproduct streams in order to be more aware of potential downstream uses. Existing examples of reuse can be used as models for further efforts.

Marinello, S.A.; Herbert, B.F.; Lillo, H. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G. [Walchand Inst. of Tech., Maharashtra (India)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Kilowatts From Waste Wood In The Furniture Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently, the Singer Furniture Co., Lenoir, N. Carolina, purchased a 450 kilowatt steam turbine/induction generator set to use extra steam - produced by 'free' waste wood fuel - in generating 15% of the plant's electrical energy demand. The turbine...

Nailen, R. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

88

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Agricultural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply ManagementAgricultural Sign In

91

Agricultural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply ManagementAgricultural Sign

92

Selected biological investigations on deep sea disposal of industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shrimp bioassay summary. Dinoflagellate bioassay summary. Diatom bioassay summary. Summary of 96-hour TL bioassay results. 25 28 30 33 viii LIST OF FIGURES Number ~Pa e Growth of control showing logarithmic rate. Waste concentration decrease.... To date, funds have been available only for short- term studies that have been directed toward specific questions such as maximum discharge rates and short-term toxic effects on marine organisms. Hood and his associates (1958) at Texas A&M University...

Page, Sandra Lea

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Packaging waste recycling in Europe: Is the industry paying for it?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We study the recycling schemes of France, Germany, Portugal, Romania and the UK. • The costs and benefits of recycling are compared for France, Portugal and Romania. • The balance of costs and benefits depend on the perspective (strictly financial/economic). • Financial supports to local authorities ought to promote cost-efficiency. - Abstract: This paper describes and examines the schemes established in five EU countries for the recycling of packaging waste. The changes in packaging waste management were mainly implemented since the Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste entered into force. The analysis of the five systems allowed the authors to identify very different approaches to cope with the same problem: meet the recovery and recycling targets imposed by EU law. Packaging waste is a responsibility of the industry. However, local governments are generally in charge of waste management, particularly in countries with Green Dot schemes or similar extended producer responsibility systems. This leads to the need of establishing a system of financial transfers between the industry and the local governments (particularly regarding the extra costs involved with selective collection and sorting). Using the same methodological approach, the authors also compare the costs and benefits of recycling from the perspective of local public authorities for France, Portugal and Romania. Since the purpose of the current paper is to take note of who is paying for the incremental costs of recycling and whether the industry (i.e. the consumer) is paying for the net financial costs of packaging waste management, environmental impacts are not included in the analysis. The work carried out in this paper highlights some aspects that are prone to be improved and raises several questions that will require further research. In the three countries analyzed more closely in this paper the industry is not paying the net financial cost of packaging waste management. In fact, if the savings attained by diverting packaging waste from other treatment (e.g. landfilling) and the public subsidies to the investment on the “recycling system” are not considered, it seems that the industry should increase the financial support to local authorities (by 125% in France, 50% in Portugal and 170% in Romania). However, in France and Portugal the industry is paying local authorities more than just the incremental costs of recycling (full costs of selective collection and sorting minus the avoided costs). To provide a more definitive judgment on the fairness of the systems it will be necessary to assess the cost efficiency of waste management operators (and judge whether operators are claiming costs or eliciting “prices”)

Ferreira da Cruz, Nuno, E-mail: nunocruz@ist.utl.pt; Ferreira, Sandra; Cabral, Marta; Simões, Pedro; Marques, Rui Cunha

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste heat recovery, and food industry wastes from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and processing of fruits and vegetables. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer, and uses in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste is also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

1 INTRODUCTION Industry has become an essentialpart of modem society,and waste production is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food Processing and Dairy Products Ink Formulation Inorganic Chemicals Synthetics Inorganic Pigments1 INTRODUCTION Industry has become an essentialpart of modem society,and waste production and environmental threats, contaminated sites can contribute to the long-term contaminationof the ambient air, soils

Ma, Lena

97

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Health assessment for Royal Hardage Industrial Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility, Criner, Oklahoma, Region 6. CERCLIS No. OKD000400093. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Royal Hardage Industrial Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility (Hardage/Criner) National Priorities List Site is located in Criner, McClain County, Oklahoma. The site is located in an agricultural area. There are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and several heavy metals present in the groundwater and soil, and VOCs in surface water and sediment. The Record of Decision signed November 1986 selected several remedial actions which included excavation of the primary source material and separation of the wastes for treatment, solids to be disposed of in an on-site landfill that meets Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, organic liquids to be incinerated, and inorganic liquids to be treated by other means as necessary. The site is currently in the remedial-design phase.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Industry and Academic Biotechnology: teaching students the art of Doublespeak E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2002 E. Ann Clark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industry and Academic Biotechnology: teaching students the art of Doublespeak E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) ©2002 E. Ann Clark Presented to Defusing Dissent

Clark, E. Ann

100

Selection of melter systems for the DOE/Industrial Center for Waste Vitrification Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA has designated vitrification as the best developed available technology for immobilization of High-Level Nuclear Waste. In a recent federal facilities compliance agreement between the EPA, the State of Washington, and the DOE, the DOE agreed to vitrify all of the Low Level Radioactive Waste resulting from processing of High Level Radioactive Waste stored at the Hanford Site. This is expected to result in the requirement of 100 ton per day Low Level Radioactive Waste melters. Thus, there is increased need for the rapid adaptation of commercial melter equipment to DOE`s needs. DOE has needed a facility where commercial pilot scale equipment could be operated on surrogate (non-radioactive) simulations of typical DOE waste streams. The DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research (Center) was established in 1992 at the Clemson University Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Clemson, SC, to address that need. This report discusses some of the characteristics of the melter types selected for installation of the Center. An overall objective of the Center has been to provide the broadest possible treatment capability with the minimum number of melter units. Thus, units have been sought which have broad potential application, and which had construction characteristics which would allow their adaptation to various waste compositions, and various operating conditions, including extreme variations in throughput, and widely differing radiological control requirements. The report discusses waste types suitable for vitrification; technical requirements for the application of vitrification to low level mixed wastes; available melters and systems; and selection of melter systems. An annotated bibliography is included.

Bickford, D.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Recycling non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into structural clay ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cherokee Environmental Group (CEG)--a subsidiary of the Cherokee Sanford Group, Inc. (CSG)--has developed a system to beneficially reuse non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into the recycling process of CSG`s structural clay ceramics manufacturing operation. The wastes and soils are processed, screened, and blended with brickmaking raw materials. The resulting material is formed and fired in such a way that the bricks still exceed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) quality standards. Prior to usage, recycled materials are rigorously tested for ceramic compatibility and environmental compliance. Ceramic testing includes strength, shrinkage, and aesthetics. Environmental compliance is insured by testing for both organic and inorganic constituents. This recycling process has been fully permitted by all required state regulatory agencies in North Carolina, Maryland, and South Carolina where facilities are located. This inter-industrial synergy has eliminated landfill reliance and liability for many companies and property owners. The recycling volume of wastes and soils is high because CSG is one of the largest brick manufacturers in the nation. Together, CEG and CSG have eliminated more than 1 billion pounds of material from landfills by beneficially reusing the non-hazardous wastes.

MacRunnels, Z.D.; Miller, H.B. Jr. [Cherokee Environmental Group, Sanford, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The future characteristics of the beef industry and the implications for education within colleges of agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Triangulation was used to obtain validity for the purpose of determining realities summarized in the conclusions. The three groups represented included professors from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Extension specialists of the Texas A...

Ramirez, David A

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

Diane E. Hoffmann

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

Reaven, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Aerobic treatability of waste effluent from the leather finishing industry. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seton Company supplies finished leather products exclusively for the automotive industry. In the process of finishing leather, two types of wastewaters are generated. The majority of the wastewater is composed of water-based paint residuals while the remainder is composed of solvent-based coating residuals. Aerobic treatability studies were conducted using water-based and solvent-based waste recirculatory waters from the Seton Company's Saxton, Pennsylvania processing plant. The specific objective was to determine the potential for using aerobic biological processes to biodegrade the industry's wastes and determine the potential for joint treatment at the local publicly owned treatment works (POTW). This study was accomplished in two phases. Phase I was conducted during the Spring Semester 1993 and consisted of aerobic respirometer tests of the raw wastes and mass balance analysis. The results of Phase I were published in a report to the Seton Company as Environmental Resources Research Institute project number 92C.II40R-1. Phase II was conducted during the Summer Semester 1993 and consisted of bench-scale reactor tests and additional aerobic respirometer tests. The aerobic respirometer batch tests and bench-scale reactor tests were used to assess the treatability of solvent-based and water-based wastewaters and determine the degree of biodegradability of the wastewaters. Mass balance calculations were made using measured characteristics.

Vinger, J.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003: The history of waste energy recovery in Germany sinceincreasing recovery of waste energy and process gases, andgeneration or non-energy uses, waste-derived fuels,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Case Studies of Waste Heat Driven Industrial Heat Pumps from the North Carolina State University Industrial Assessment Center.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Waste heat driven heat pumps can produce useful heat streams for manufacturing facilities. A heat pump system that uses a waste heat stream as the… (more)

Lewis, Nathaniel Bates

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

David Frederick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2012-October 31, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Engineering analysis of the air pollution regulatory process impacts on the agricultural industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factor is 7 kg/1000 hd-day (16 lb/1000 hd-day) while the AERMOD emission factor is 5 kg/1000 hd-day (11 lb/1000 he-day). The EPA is considering implementing a crustal exclusion for the PM emitted by agricultural sources. Over the next five years...

Lange, Jennifer Marie

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"WASTE HEAT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE A WASTE OF MONEY" THE AMERICAN & EFIRD HEAT RECOVERY PROJECT: A FIRST FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY STEVE W. SMITH, P.E., Program Manager Electrotechnology Sales Duke Power Company Charlotte, NC In 1989 American... and finishing Finishing Plant was targeted as an ideal operations recover energy from their site for a process heat pump installation. wastewater discharges usjng shell and tube Over a three year period, 1987-1990, Duke heat exchangers and preheat incoming...

Smith, S. W.

118

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

wisconsin's vanishing waters tech transfer success stories reducing food waste College of Agricultural & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wisconsin's vanishing waters · tech transfer success stories · reducing food waste College to grow potatoes that serves as a model for other crops and leading cutting-edge research on biofuels

Balser, Teri C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Soviet Farm Complex : industrial agriculture in a Socialist context, 1945-1965  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The Soviet Farm Complex" is a history of food, farming and the environment in the postwar Soviet Union. It tells the story of how different technical and institutional authorities created an industrial Soviet countryside ...

Smith, Jenny Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

When the cows come home : post post-industrial urban agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past few decades, the industrialization of food has become increasingly influenced by the consolidation of its controlling corporations. This consolidation has isolated meat processing facilities from small farmers, ...

Cheng, Marissa A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Attitudes of Texas 4-H Club members toward the agricultural industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concept has created a shift of political power from rural areas to urban areas, while also creating a shift in the distribution of power between political parties and 8 Kenneth L. Bachman, eU. S. A gricultural Export Opportunities, " Agricultural... to most unfavorable, in equally spaced, experimentally deter- mined units along a continuum. The average scale value endorsed by a subject thus becomes a measure of his attitude with reference to the attitude object. Rensis Likert was appointed head...

Crouch, Marshall Edgar

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. March 1985-October 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for March 1985-October 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food-processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste-heat recovery, meat processing, seafood processing, dairy wastes, beverage industry, fruits and vegetables, and other food-industry wastes. Waste utilization includes animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, conversion to fertilizer, composting, and recovery and recycling of usable chemicals. Food-packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 169 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemicals and chemical processes, and are the best equipped to manage and reduce waste. It is the responsibility of all companies that manufacture a product or generate a waste to understand the meaning of proper waste management hierarchy, waste...

Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

126

First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, its average cost per watt would be about half the price of electricity produced by other plants electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online with the national electricity grid. On Wednesday, August 3, the Ho Chi Minh City Urban Environment Management

Columbia University

127

Contamination of the agricultural land due to industrial activities southern of greater Cairo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The industrial processes in the investigated area include ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgical work, ceramics, fire bricks, cement industry, etc. Soil, weeds, vegetation and dust samples were collected and analysed for several heavy metals. High levels of Pb, Cd, Ni, Cr, Mn and zinc found in the soil close to a lead, zinc smelter. In the heavy contaminated area concentrations of more than 500 ug/g Pb, 1200 ug/g zinc and 50 ug/g Ni and Cd were recorded in the surface soil at 1500 m from the smelter. The concentrations of the heavy metals in the contaminated area (3-5) km from the smelter reached more than 200 ug/g Pb and 25 ug/g Ni and Cd and 160 ug/g zinc. Higher levels of these toxic elements were found in the dust on the leaves of the examined vegetations. Furthermore, accumulated concentrations reached more than 100 ug/g Pb and 10 ug/g Cd in leaves of herbs and maize. Soil close to cement industry found enriched with heavy metals but it is much less pronounced. 10 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Ali, E.A.; Ibrahim, Y.H.; Nasralla, M.M. (National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

We thank the Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station for financial support that made this work possible.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 We thank the Michigan Grape and Wine Industry Council and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment a grower attempts to grow a relatively cold-tender grape variety. One method of avoiding such injury and an adjustable storage leg for this unit when it is not being used. The disc plows themselves were mounted

Isaacs, Rufus

129

Waste recycling in the textile industry. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations on the recycling of waste-fibrous materials for textile production, and the recycling of textile-waste materials. Topics include use of wastes as raw materials for textile and fabric manufacturing; reuse of waste cloth, scraps, fibers, and polymeric materials from textile manufacturing; and the equipment used to collect, sort, and process textile wastes. Materials considered include cellulosic wastes, polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass-fiber wastes, and waste dusts. Applications discussed include textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 242 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Agricultural Industry Advanced Vehicle Technology: Benchmark Study for Reduction in Petroleum Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel use on farms in the United States has remained relatively constant since 1985, decreasing slightly in 2009, which may be attributed to price increases and the economic recession. During this time, the United States’ harvested area also has remained relatively constant at roughly 300 million acres. In 2010, farm diesel use was 5.4% of the total United States diesel use. Crops accounting for an estimated 65% of United States farm diesel use include corn, soybean, wheat, hay, and alfalfa, respectively, based on harvested crop area and a recent analysis of estimated fuel use by crop. Diesel use in these cropping systems primarily is from tillage, harvest, and various other operations (e.g., planting and spraying) (Figure 3). Diesel efficiency is markedly variable due to machinery types, conditions of operation (e.g., soil type and moisture), and operator variability. Farm diesel use per acre has slightly decreased in the last two decades and diesel is now estimated to be less than 5% of farm costs per acre. This report will explore current trends in increasing diesel efficiency in the farm sector. The report combines a survey of industry representatives, a review of literature, and data analysis to identify nascent technologies for increasing diesel efficiency

Roger Hoy

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy and materials savings from gases and solid waste recovery in the iron and steel industry in Brazil: An industrial ecology approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper attempts to investigate, from an entropic point of view, the role of selected technologies in the production, transformation, consumption and release of energy and materials in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. In a quantitative analysis, the potential for energy and materials savings with recovery of heat, gases and tar are evaluated for the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. The technologies for heat recovery of gases include Coke Dry Quenching (CDQ), applied only in one of the five Brazilian coke integrated steel plants, Top Gas Pressure Recovery Turbines (TPRT), recovery of Coke Oven Gas (COG), recovery of Blast Furnace Gas (BFG), recovery of BOF gas, recovery of tar, and thermal plant. Results indicate that, in a technical scenario, some 5.1 TWh of electricity can be generated if these technologies are applied to recover these remaining secondary fuels in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil, which is equivalent to some 45% of current total electricity consumption in the integrated plants in the country. Finally, solid waste control technologies, including options available for collection and treatment, are discussed. Estimates using the best practice methodology show that solid waste generation in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil reached approximately 18 million metric tons in 1994, of which 28% can be recirculated if the best practice available in the country is applied thoroughly.

Costa, M.M.; Schaeffer, R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHIP - Solar heat for industrial processes. Internationalsolar power could be used to provide process heat for

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

137

Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil, vegetation, workshop-floor dust, and electronic shredder residue from an electronic waste recycling facility and in soils from a chemical industrial complex in eastern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, 11 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDD/Fs and 10 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were determined in electronic shredder waste, workshop-floor dust, soil, and leaves (of plants on the grounds of the facility) from a large-scale electronic wastes (e-waste) recycling facility and in surface soil from a chemical-industrial complex (comprising a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) as well as agricultural areas in eastern China. Total PBDD/F concentrations in environmental samples were in the range of 113-818 pg/g dry wt (dw) for leaves, 392-18,500 pg/g dw for electronic shredder residues, 716-80,0000 pg/g dw for soil samples, and 89,600-14,3000 pg/g dw for workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility and in a range from nondetect (ND) to 427 pg/g dw in soil from the chemical-industrial complex. The highest mean concentrations of total PBDD/Fs were found in soil samples and workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility. The dioxin-like toxic equivalent (measured as TEQ) concentrations of PBDD/Fs were greater than the TEQs of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) reported in our previous study for the same set of samples. The concentrations of PBDFs were several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations of PBDDs in samples from the e-waste facility or from soil from the chemical-industrial complex. A significant correlation was found between the concentrations of {Sigma}PBDD/Fs and {Sigma}PBDEs (r = 0.769, p < 0.01) and between SPBDD/Fs and the previously reported SPCDD/F concentrations (r = 0.805, p < 0.01). The estimated daily human intakes of TEQs contributed by PBDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposures in e-waste recycling facilities were higher than the intakes of TEQs contributed by PCDD/Fs, calculated in our previous study. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Jing Ma; Rudolf Addink; Sehun Yun; Jinping Cheng; Wenhua Wang; Kurunthachalam Kannan [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both emis- sions from incineration and the demand for fossilyr (Okazaki et al. , 2004). Incineration of wastes (e.g. ,by reducing emissions from incineration and the demand for

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003: Jupiter oxygen combustion technology of coal and otherOxygen Furnace Gas ME = Main Exhaust WH = Waste Heat Figure 7.1: CO 2 reduction potential of eight energy saving technologies

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pennsylvania Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- mental regulations cover industrial pollution as well as pollution controls for agriculture. Two of PA but must be kept on the farm and made available upon request. Plans NPDES Permits The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is a requirement for construction activities that disturb 1 acre

Guiltinan, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste-to-value is a promising and comprehensive wastewater processing solution being pursued by GE that recovers valuable energy and purified water from the abundant wastewater generated and...

143

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

options for combined heat and power in Canada. Office ofpolicies to promote combined heat and power in US industry.with fuel inputs in combined heat and power plants being

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EJ of primary energy, 40% of the global total of 227 EJ. Bytotal energy use by industry and on the fraction of electricity use consumed by motor driven systems was taken as representative of global

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Making Green Building Units By Using Some Wastes of Ceramic Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the fired clay articles. This suggested mix was applied within a common brick fabric in Egypt for studying the possibility of its industrial application....

Abd El-Ghafour, N.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Technologies at Multiple Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet overviewing Verso Paper Corp. project that will deploy industrial technologies to recover and reuse water and steam at pulp and paper facilities.

148

Hazardous-waste combustion in industrial processes: cement and lime kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of several studies relating to hazardous-waste combustion in cement and lime kilns. The tests included in the study are four kilns tested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, four kilns tested by State agencies or the kiln operator, two Canadian tests, and one Swedish test. The predominant types of wastes tested included chlorinated organic compounds, aromatic compounds, and metal-contaminated waste oil. The kiln types include lime kilns and cement kilns, which included the dry, wet, and preheated processes. Fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) were the pollution-control devices used in these processes, and the primary fuels included coal, coke, coal/coke, fuel oil, and natural gas/coke. The parameters examined in the report were Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of the Principal Organic Hazardous Constitutents, particulate and HCl emissions, metals, and the effect of burning hazardous waste on SO/sub 2/, NOx, and CO emissions. The primary conclusion of the study is that DRE's of 99.99% or greater can be obtained in properly-operated calcining kilns. Particulate matter can increase when chlorinated wastes are burned in a kiln equipped with an electrostatic precipitator. Those kilns equipped with fabric filters showed no change in emissions.

Mournighan, R.E.; Branscome, M.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

151

Industrial Technology of Decontamination of Liquid Radioactive Waste in SUE MosSIA 'Radon' - 12371  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SUE MosSIA 'RADON' - this enterprise was created more than 50 years ago, which deals with the recycling of radioactive waste and conditioning of spent sources of radiation in stationary and mobile systems in the own factory and operating organizations. Here is represented the experience SUE MosSIA 'Radon' in the field of the management with liquid radioactive waste. It's shown, that the activity of SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is developing in three directions - improvement of technical facilities for treatment of radioactive waters into SUE MosSIA 'RADON' development of mobile equipment for the decontamination of radioactive waters in other organizations, development of new technologies for decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes as part of various domestic Russian and international projects including those related to the operation of nuclear power and nuclear submarines. SUE MosSIA 'RADON' has processed more than 270 thousand m{sup 3} of radioactive water, at that more than 7000 m{sup 3} in other organizations for more than 50 years. It is shown that a number of directions, particularly, the development of mobile modular units for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste, SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is a leader in the world. (authors)

Adamovich, Dmitry V.; Neveykin, Petr P.; Karlin, Yuri V.; Savkin, Alexander E. [SUE MosSIA 'Radon', 7th Rostovsky lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cotton Breeding of the Bureau of Plant Industry U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Texas Experiment Station.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

own farm, secure an early g( .plc cotton that will more successfully cscape the boll weevils. For thc use of growers, a brief account without detail of the t ars' breeding work is made herewith. In order to present clearly these rcsul ults of t xr... -- - - BUREAU OF PLANT IN ENT Sr ( . DEPA AGRICULTURE AND THE TEXAS EXPERIMENT STATION r ATIONS POST OFF COLLEGE STATION, BRAZ OCTOBER. 1". ICE 0s cou NTY, TEXAS TEXAS AGRICU FFICER! M. SANSOM, President. ................................. Alvarado...

Bennett, R. L. (Robert Love)

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

State Waste Discharge Permit application for industrial discharge to land: 200 East Area W-252 streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes the WAC 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit application for six W-252 liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site. Appendices B through H correspond to Section B through H in the permit application form. Within each appendix, sections correspond directly to the respective questions on the application form. The appendices include: Product or service information; Plant operational characteristics; Water consumption and waterloss; Wastewater information; Stormwater; Other information; and Site assessment.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

156

How to Put the Dollar Value on Waste Heat Recovery in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Steam savings or steam generation 2. Fuel savings (in case of combustion air preheat or fuel preheat) 3. Power generation (Rankine cycle) Traditionally waste heat recovery was judged on its Btu recovery. If from a 100 MM Btu/hr fue 1 fired heater... 8 MM Btu/hr were stack losses and 2 MM Btu/hr were lost to the atmosphere via exposed areas, then the t~OfF-fl!.2efficiency of the heater was claimed to be 100 or 90%. By this way of reasoning, a further improvement in heat recovery from...

Campagne, W. V. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Food and beverage plants inherently consume a large quantity of water and generate a high volume of wastewater rich in organic content. On one hand, water discharge regulations are getting more stringent over the time, necessitating the use of different technologies to reduce the amount of wastewater and improve the effluent water quality. On the other hand, growing energy and water costs are driving the plants to extract and reuse valuable energy and water from the wastewater stream. An integrated waste-tovalue system uses a combination of anaerobic digester (AD), reciprocating gas engine/boiler, membrane bioreactor (MBR), and reverse osmosis (RO) to recover valuable energy as heat and/or electricity as well as purify the water for reuse. While individual anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors are being used in increasing numbers, there is a growing need to integrate them together in a waste-to-value system for enhanced energy and water recovery. However, currently operation of these systems relies heavily on the plant operator to perform periodic sampling and off-line lab analysis to monitor the system performance, detect any abnormal condition due to variations in the wastewater and decide on appropriate remedial action needed. This leads to a conservative design and operation of these systems to avoid any potential upsets that can destabilize the system.

Shi, Ruijie

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension · Collaborate with farmers

Kaminsky, Werner

160

AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation of the Wisconsin Cranberry Industry Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural-Extension #12;STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied

Radeloff, Volker C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farmer Crop Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . 12 #12;2 MAY 1998 ® Will the trend of increasing high and the future of the industry, fac- ulty in the School of Agriculture at Purdue University in collaboration and will continue to dominate trade trends. Potential demand for agricultural products is greatest in Asia

162

WASTE HEAT RECOVERY USING THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES IN THE LIGHT METALS INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently discovered thermoelectric materials and associated manufacturing techniques (nanostructures, thin-film super lattice, quantum wells...) have been characterized with thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 12-25+%. These advances allow the manufacture of small-area, high-energy flux (350 W/cm2 input) thermoelectric generating (TEG) devices that operate at high temperatures (~750°C). TEG technology offers the potential for large-scale conversion of waste heat from the exhaust gases of electrolytic cells (e.g., Hall-Hèroult cells) and from aluminum, magnesium, metal and glass melting furnaces. This paper provides an analysis of the potential energy recovery and of the engineering issues that are expected when integrating TEG systems into existing manufacturing processes. The TEG module must be engineered for low-cost, easy insertion and simple operation in order to be incorporated into existing manufacturing operations. Heat transfer on both the hot and cold-side of these devices will require new materials, surface treatments and design concepts for their efficient operation.

Choate, William T.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Majumdar, Rajita

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Examination of Babcock and Wilcox tubes after exposure in an industrial waste incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven ceramic tubes provided by, and in most cases manufactured by, Babcock and Wilcox were exposed in E. I. DuPont`s Wilmington, Delaware, hazardous waste incinerator. These tubes were subsequently examined at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the effect of exposure on the strength and microstructural integrity of the tube materials. An unexposed tube section of one of the materials was also examined. Evaluation methods included c-ring compression tests, light microscopy, and electron microprobe spectroscopy. The c-ring compression tests revealed a very wide range in the strengths of the materials tested; the strongest was DuPont Lanxide Composites (DLC) silicon carbide particulate-strengthened alumina, and the weakest was the DLC Type B mixed-oxide material. The only material for which data on unexposed samples were available showed lower strength than the exposed material. Microstructural examination of the samples yielded minimal evidence of interaction of most of the tube materials with the components of the environment. Microprobe examination showed some segregation of yttrium in the matrix and along the surface of one of the PRD166/zirconia tubes and limited interaction of the fibers in the same tube with the components of the environment.

Keiser, J.R.; Ferber, M.K.; Longmire, H.F.; Walker, L.R.; Hindman, D.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mineralogical characterization of steel industry hazardous waste and refractory sulfide ores for zinc and gold recovery processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steel industry generates dust as a waste product from high temperature electric arc furnaces (EAF), which is a major step in processing scrap metal into steel. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has classified EAF dust as KO61 hazardous waste, due to its lead, cadmium, and chromium content. The dust also contains valuable zinc, averaging 19%. Detailed mineralogical characterization show the zinc is present as crystals of franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite solid solutions in calcium-iron-silicate glass spheres and as zincite mostly as very small individual spheres. Much of the chromium is present in an insoluble form in solid solution in the iron spinels. This microscopic research is a valuable tool in determining treatment processes for the 600,000 tons of dust generated annually in the US. Refractory gold ores, pyrite and arsenopyrite, have been studied to determine additional, cost-effective methods of processing. One technique under investigation involves roasting sulfide mineral particles to hematite to create porosity through which a leach can permeate to recover the gold. Portlandite, Ca(OH)[sub 2], is added to the roast for retention of hazardous sulfur and arsenic. Modern microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, such electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, cathodoluminescence microscopy, and electron microprobe, have been applied, as well as reflected light and dark field microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to determine the mineralogy of the sulfur, arsenic, and iron phases, and the extent of porosity, permeability, and oxidation state of the ore particles at various roasting temperatures. It is concluded that mineralogical techniques can be effectively applied to the solution of environmental problems.

Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Geology Geophysics Dept.)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural energy potential Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Land in 2050 Summary: new 12;source of industrial demand in agricultural markets (Energy Information Agency 2010... be expressed as a function of agricultural...

166

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum pro- duction wastes. Some aluminum-bearing waste materials, particularly aluminum production wastes

167

Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

Testoni, A. L.

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

agricultural food chains: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGRICULTURE, FOOD & WINE Physics Websites Summary: Graduate Profile AGRICULTURE, FOOD & WINE "I was amazed that I could be a part of the food industry in a scientific way."...

169

Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

Banbara, Mutsunori

170

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Saskatchewan Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame College of Agriculture and Bioresources Inductees 2014 Edition #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall Williams 1941- Lorne Alan Babiuk 1946- #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy

Peak, Derek

173

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews of some twelve recuperator manufacturers and research organizations. Of the reports reviewed, the consensus was that the majority of recuperators used in the U.S. are constructed of 300...

Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Restructuring, Tight Budgets and Executive Order 13123 Create New Incentives to Reduce Waste in Federal Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the positive impact that electric utility industry restructuring, a reduction in the size of government operations, and the recent Presidential Executive Order 13123 should have on energy use in Federal industrial facilities...

Verdict, M. E.

175

Financial Engineering Proposal Department of Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financial Engineering Proposal Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics and Department engineering is a multidisciplinary field that emphasizes the engineering of new financial economic instruments the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and the Department of Agricultural Economics

Lawrence, Rick L.

176

Solid Waste Paul Woodson, East Central University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater contamination, air pollution, and odor. Solid wastes may be displeasing to the public either, industrial and medical wastes, food wastes, mineral waste, and nonhazardous wastes. In addition/reservoirs, special wastes, such as medical wastes, low level radioactive wastes, construction/demolition debris

177

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

178

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

agricultural knowledge science: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Agricultural Economics Marine industry studies Corporate social Materials Science Plasma Physics Toxicology Aquatic ecosystems 12;Engineering Biological...

180

EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Outstanding Ag Leader Award Presented by MSU College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outstanding Ag Leader Award Presented by MSU College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES) Criteria for Selection Be well respected in their agricultural community of achievement in agriculture, be an industry leader, or an upcoming active innovative producer (or a combination

Maxwell, Bruce D.

182

Regional secondary resource utilization parks: The industrial parks of the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. One potential solution takes the form of the secondary resource utilization park. The premise is simple: Provide a strategically located facility where a broad range of secondary resources are separated, refined or converted, and made into new products on the site. The secondary material resources would come from municipal solid waste, demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous forms. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would also minimize transportation costs and could provide a test case for an industrial ecology'' approach to sustainable economic development.

Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.; Holter, G.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Regional secondary resource utilization parks: The industrial parks of the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. One potential solution takes the form of the secondary resource utilization park. The premise is simple: Provide a strategically located facility where a broad range of secondary resources are separated, refined or converted, and made into new products on the site. The secondary material resources would come from municipal solid waste, demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous forms. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would also minimize transportation costs and could provide a test case for an ``industrial ecology`` approach to sustainable economic development.

Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.; Holter, G.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis; selection and assessment of potential release scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this part of the assessment, several accident scenarios are identified that could result in significant releases of chemicals into the environment. These scenarios include ruptures of storage tanks, large magnitude on-site spills, mixing of incompatible wastes, and off-site releases caused by tranpsortation accidents. In evaluating these scenarios, both probability and consequence are assessed, so that likelihood of occurrence is coupled with magnitude of effect in characterizing short term risks.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial,...

186

Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

2012 Annual Report Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covered iii Funding Sources; Expenditure Breakdown Commercial Agriculture 1 Putting New Jersey Vintages for Librarians Economic Development 25 Food Industry Gateway 26 New Jersey Clean Energy Resource Network counties: Rutgers Cooperative Extension Statistics NJAES plays a significant role in the state's economic

Goodman, Robert M.

191

AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply will shape the future of the agricultural industry. We will discuss each in turn. Ethanol and energy Ethanol will be using almost 30% of the U.S. corn crop by 2009 with total ethanol production reaching almost 14 billion gallons. Numerous analysts have suggested that total demand for ethanol longer

192

Globalization and Hazardous Waste Management: From Brown to Green?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the international scrap metal industry and its national/73 The waste and scrap metal industries have been heavily

O'Neill, Kate

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

194

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

Virginia Tech

195

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

least two seconds. ” The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Industry Alliance Industry Alliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Alliance Industry Alliance Clean, Sustainable Energy for the 21st Century Industry Alliance Industry Alliance Clean, Sustainable Energy for the 21st Century October, 2010...

198

Agriculture INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volatility following trade liberalization. This had an adverse effect on agricultural economies of regions impact on small and mar- ginal farmers. · Increased non-agricultural demand for land and water as a result of the higher overall GDP growth and urbanization. · Aggravation in social distress

Sohoni, Milind

199

Modeling the effect of soil structure on water flow and isoproturon dynamics in an agricultural field receiving repeated urban waste compost application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field receiving repeated urban waste compost application Vilim Filipovi1,2,3 , Yves Coquet2 , Valérie properties. Tillage practices and compost amendments can modify soil structure and create heterogeneity and compost application on transport processes. A modeling study was performed to evaluate how the presence

Boyer, Edmond

200

This is not a peer-reviewed article. Pp. 034-043 in the Ninth International Animal, Agricultural and Food Processing Wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of twelve different compost and mulch materials on total solids (TS) loss and water quality and found blankets and berms offer significant improvements in water quality through improved erosion control OF COMPOSTED WASTE MATERIALS IN EROSION CONTROL L. M. Risse and L. B. Faucette ABSTRACT The objective

Mukhtar, Saqib

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Using big data for decisions in agricultural supply chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture is an industry where historical and current data abound. This paper investigates the numerous data sources available in the agricultural field and analyzes them for usage in supply chain improvement. We identified ...

Smith, Derik Lafayette

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.36 billion), which includes food service establishments (restaurants and bars) and retail food storesFE935 Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food Industries

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

203

Biotechnology for environmental control and waste treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A slide show is reproduced here to review the technology of anaerobic digestion as a process for cleaning waste waters from municipal and industry wastes. Radioactive wastes are addressed also. (PSB)

Donaldson, T.L.; Harris, M.T.; Lee, D.D.; Walker, J.F.; Strandberg, G.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

205

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report of cement industry waste heat power generation. ChinaWorrell et al. , 2001). Waste heat recovery (WHR) poweradoption and utilization of waste heat recovery (WHR) power

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Industry Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural regions adjoining Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Agricultural, Industrial and Domestic 4 Annexure III: Water recycling technologies Wastewater and Industrial... water re-treatment Tariff mechanism. 5 Annexure IV and V:...

208

Investigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture: a choice experiment approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in France (excluding agriculture waste) [1], the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmentalInvestigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture or mineral fertilizers. The paper addresses in particular 3 environmental effects: the organic waste

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/spills and subsequent clean up costs ($20,000) Sewage Sludge Volume Reduction 234,000 Radioactive Waste $910,000 $193,400 $716,600 60,000 gallons of radioactive STP liquid waste could have been disposed of through,000) Digital Imaging System Substitution 282 Hazardous Waste / Radioactive Waste / Industrial Waste $25,000 $25

210

Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

Atreya, Arvind

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

About California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 2Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

Editor, The

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

About California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Form 3579” to California Agriculture at the address above. ©Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewour Writing CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 66 , NUMBER 4

Editors, The

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

About California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 1Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

Editor, The

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

215

1989 Industry Directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid Waste Power's 1989 Industry Directory is divided into three main sections: the Company Directory, the Service Directory, and the Product Directory. The Company Directory lists all companies involved in the waste-to-energy industry that responded to a survey Solid Waste Power conducted in the fall of 1988. Companies are listed alphabetically. Each of the companies in the Company Directory is further referenced in the Service and Product directories follow. The Service and Product directories are broken down into various categories. Within each category is a list of the names of companies identified themselves as providing the service or product. Preceding the Service and Product directories is the Category Index.

Not Available

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

217

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies (IPTS). 1999. “The Incineration of Waste in Europe:Seemann, A. 2007. “Co-incineration of Municipal Solid Wastefacilities Composting Incineration Uncontrolled landfill

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres (subjective, institutional...

Chenault, Edith Anne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Economics Marine industry studies Corporate social responsibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Gradient-free MRI Modelling DNA-Enzyme Interactions Chemical Engineering Biofuels Bioremediation Catalytic processes Fluidized beds Mineral Processing Nanotechnology Civil Engineering Geothermal energy

Saskatchewan, University of

220

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES OUTSTANDING ALUMNI AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES OUTSTANDING ALUMNI AWARD Texas A&M University The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University is currently in its second century of educating leaders and providing leadership for the agricultural industry -- a tradition of leadership. Through its strong teaching

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NOMINATION FORM 2010 Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOMINATION FORM 2010 Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award Texas A&M AgriLife The Texas A/her contributions on behalf of the Texas agricultural industry and community (information may be submitted:__________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ RETURN NOMINATIONS TO 2010 Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Selection Advisory Committee c/o Office

222

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

223

Technical Aspects Regarding the Management of Radioactive Waste from Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proper application of the nuclear techniques and technologies in Romania started in 1957, once with the commissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from IFIN-HH-Magurele. During the last 45 years, appear thousands of nuclear application units with extremely diverse profiles (research, biology, medicine, education, agriculture, transport, all types of industry) which used different nuclear facilities containing radioactive sources and generating a great variety of radioactive waste during the decommissioning after the operation lifetime is accomplished. A new aspect appears by the planning of VVR-S Research Reactor decommissioning which will be a new source of radioactive waste generated by decontamination, disassembling and demolition activities. By construction and exploitation of the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR)--Magurele and the National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste (DNDR)--Baita, Bihor county, in Romania was solved the management of radioactive wastes arising from operation and decommissioning of small nuclear facilities, being assured the protection of the people and environment. The present paper makes a review of the present technical status of the Romanian waste management facilities, especially raising on treatment capabilities of ''problem'' wastes such as Ra-266, Pu-238, Am-241 Co-60, Co-57, Sr-90, Cs-137 sealed sources from industrial, research and medical applications. Also, contain a preliminary estimation of quantities and types of wastes, which would result during the decommissioning project of the VVR-S Research Reactor from IFIN-HH giving attention to some special category of wastes like aluminum, graphite and equipment, components and structures that became radioactive through neutron activation. After analyzing the technical and scientific potential of STDR and DNDR to handle big amounts of wastes resulting from the decommissioning of VVR-S Research Reactor and small nuclear facilities, the necessity of up-gradation of these nuclear objectives before starting the decommissioning plan is revealed. A short presentation of the up-grading needs is also presented.

Dragolici, F.; Turcanu, C. N.; Rotarescu, G.; Paunica, I.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

A strategic analysis of the role of uncertainty in electronic waste recovery system economics : an investigation of the IT and appliance industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The volume of electronic waste is growing at an increasing rate. The extensive adoption of electronic products, the tendency of consumers to purchase multiple electronics, and the rapid obsolescence of products are ...

Brown-West, Boma Molly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

226

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* In 2007, Green Fuels of Oregon, Inc. signed a lease with Liskey Farms to develop a Biodiesel production facility in existing greenhouses. * Local farmer Rick Walsh has...

227

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

228

TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE TEXAS A&M DISTINGUISHED TEXAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE TEXAS A&M DISTINGUISHED TEXAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD The agricultural teaching a proud history of training leaders and providing leadership for the agricultural industry for the agricultural community. It is, therefore, fitting to recognize the efforts of Texans who have gained unique

229

Future Agriculture / Framtidens lantbruk Welcome to a lunch seminar June 11, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future Agriculture / Framtidens lantbruk Welcome to a lunch seminar June 11, 2013 "Zero Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use, is a research program- me developed at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). In Future Agriculture researchers work together with industry, interest groups

230

SCALE, CONTEXT, AND DECISION MAKING IN AGRICULTURAL ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCALE, CONTEXT, AND DECISION MAKING IN AGRICULTURAL ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CHANGE of climate variability and change in agricultural adaptation, and developed for a case study of Australian, agriculture, climate change, decision-making, variability 1. Introduction The global agricultural industry

Risbey, James S.

231

Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. January 1984-October 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 84-Oct 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 151 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

233

Waste management experience at IPEN-Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares--IPEN) is the biggest nuclear research center in Brazil. Located in the campus of the University of Sao Paulo, it is maintained and operated by the National Commission on Nuclear Energy (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear--CNEN). Its objectives are the development of nuclear energy and its fuel cycle, the applications of radiation and radioisotopes in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, education, and environmental preservation, and the realization of basic and applied research in related fields. This paper describes the history and the practices of the waste management at a nuclear research center in Brazil where research on the nuclear fuel cycle and on the applications of radioisotopes are in progress.

Vicente, R. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleaires, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

A New Approach to Industrial Air Conditioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dryer Systems Division, has marketed industrial drying machinery. These heat reactivated dryers can handle latent loads in industrial air conditioning systems. Through waste heat conservation, air conditioning costs can be reduced 25 to 50%, with applications...

Gravenstreter, T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

foods that many industry members felt were not compatible with organic agriculture, including ingredients made from genetically modified plants, irradiation

Haedicke, Michael Anthony

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 · Corn Ethanol: Impacts on Markets Communities and the Environment . . . . . . 33 · BioenergySTATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 III Special Article: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin

Radeloff, Volker C.

237

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

Noble, James S.

238

Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependencies in the light of energy price volatility and concerns as to long-term fossil energy availabilities ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . 232 6. FOOD WASTE AND ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . . . . Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems Nathan Pelletier,1 Eric Audsley,2 Sonja Brodt,3

Wang, Changlu

239

Kentucky Department of Agriculture  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Kentucky Department Kentucky Department of Agriculture of Agriculture Motor Fuel and Pesticide Motor Fuel and Pesticide Testing Laboratory Testing Laboratory Introduction...

240

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (virtual- nity and Economic Development Concentration; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization

Stuart, Steven J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

http://wmr.sagepub.com/ Waste Management & Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of metallic wastes Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: International Solid Waste carried out on two solid waste streams from a metal recycling industry. The concentrations of heavy metals The amount of waste produced in our society is rapidly increas- ing and the mountains of solid waste

Short, Daniel

242

environment and agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

243

Roadmap for Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

244

Agricultural and Food Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers-level courses in agriculture were offered by the School of Arts and Sciences at AUB as early as 1914. Between

245

Agricultural and Food Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;88 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers aims to offer specialized training in a variety of fields in food and agriculture, and to prepare

246

International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

Theurer, Jean E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry 1 Contributed by: Jim Mavis CH2M HILL 777 108 th Ave., NE Bellevue, WA 98004 Prepared under contract to Center for Waste...

248

Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Animal Sciences, Equine Sciences, economics, business, and communications. The program in Agricultural Education recently has been renovated

249

Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2011 Armstrong World Industries, Inc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2011 Armstrong World Industries, Inc Overview The main objectives were the following: -To reduce wasted space and optimize the Armstrong Marietta plant generate? How did you analyse them? Outcomes Armstrong will save on forklift fuel costs as a result

Demirel, Melik C.

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural catchment montousse Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of pollutants (diffuse agricultural and urban emissions, industrial emissions... , of rainwater and of stormwater discharges at the outlet of experimental catchments, ii) the...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural catchments gascogne Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of pollutants (diffuse agricultural and urban emissions, industrial emissions... , of rainwater and of stormwater discharges at the outlet of experimental catchments, ii) the...

252

Perceptions of secondary school agriculture teachers regarding biomass production education in Iowa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With the boom of biorenewable energy, biomass production has become an important segment in agriculture industry (Iowa Energy Center, 2013). A higher workforce will be… (more)

Han, Guang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Federal Waste Management www.lebensministerium.at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY ENVIRONMENT AND WATER MANAGEMENT FEDERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN 2001 Issued by the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Environment and Water Management on June 30, 2001 #12;Note, Environment and Water Management, Division III/3 U; Stubenbastei 5, 1010 Vienna Printed and layouted by

Columbia University

254

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Industrial Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the...

256

Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal, state and local planners in the United States have come to realize that our rapidly growing population, and the increased agricultural, municipal, recreational and industrial expansion caused by this population growth, is increasing...

Conner, J. R.

257

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Brochure).  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartment ofof EnergyMotionWaste

258

Agriculture and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices, land application of biosolids and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste and pesticides. Students will examine the nitrogen

Ma, Lena

259

Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and agricultural wastewater Largus T biological processing strat- egies that produce bioenergy or biochemicals while treating industrial on wastewater treatment from pollution control to resource exploitation. Many bioprocesses can provide bioenergy

Angenent, Lars T.

260

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 Cooperators: R.W. Chase, Ray INDUSTRY COMMISSION 2004 Michigan Potato Research Report Volume 36 Left to Right: Ben Kudwa, MPIC; Caryn

Douches, David S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE MICHIGAN POTATO INDUSTRY COMMISSION MICHIGAN POTATO RESEARCH REPORT 2003 Volume 35 Click Here to Open the 2003 Potato, S. Cooper, L. Frank, J. Driscoll, and E. Estelle Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Michigan State

Douches, David S.

262

Immigration reform and California agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reform and California agriculture Philip Martin Professor,proposals for California agriculture. Immigration reformCenter. 196 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4

Martin, Philip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Networks, Local Institutions and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Paper Series Agriculture for Development Paper No.Institutions and Agriculture. Chris Udry Yale UniversityMay 2009 Conference on “Agriculture for Development in Sub-

Udry, Chris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

Fisher, Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building and maintaining a productive, safe, and sustainable environment. Agricultural programs integrate biological agricultural systems. COLLEGE PROGRAMS Undergraduate Majors Undergraduate programs lead to a Bachelor

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

266

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture KEY: # = new course * = course IN AGRICULTURE. (3) Anintroductorycourserequiringcriticalanalysisofthemajorsocial. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfers

MacAdam, Keith

267

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics KEY: # = new course THE ECONOMICS OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE. (3 of agriculture in both a national and international dimension. Students who have completed ECO 201

MacAdam, Keith

268

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture KEY: # = new course INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. (3) Broad introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop and livestock management practices. Relationships

MacAdam, Keith

269

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute College of Agricultural Sustainability Institute Professor, Department of LAWR With input from Steve Kaffka, Ford Denison Sustainability Institute The Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility is a unique 300-acre facility near

California at Davis, University of

270

Economic Impact of the Florida Apiculture Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Economic Impact of the Florida Apiculture Industry Economics Report 01-1 By Alan Hodges, David and Agricultural Sciences Department of Food & Resource Economics Department of Entomology/ Nematology Gainesville .......................................................................................................................................12 Economic Impact Analysis

Florida, University of

271

Fulbrighters Agricultural scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fulbrighters are... Agricultural scientists Anthropologists Archeologists Architects Art historians. Jenny Montgomery Film Studies Vijay Narasimhan Material Sciences/ Nanotechnology Michael Haughton

272

Waste Minimization: A Hidden Energy Savings?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE MINIMIZATION: A HIDDEN ENERGY SAVINGS? R. 1. GOOD Principal Engineer, Environmental Protection and Energy Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Company, Inc. Seadrift, Texas ABSTRACT Several changes in the last few years have forced a re...-examination of waste generation within the petro chemical industry. In today's political/regulatory arena, industrial waste, both hazardous and non hazardous, has become an extreme potential liability in handling, storing, and disposal. Traditional methods...

Good, R. L.; Hunt, K. E.

273

Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

European Commission Agriculture and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B ­ 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32 (0) 2-2969909 Fax: +32 (0) 2-29211 33 E-mail: info@ec.europa.eu Web: https://www.ec.europa.eu/agriculture

275

International Programs in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

276

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

Noble, James S.

277

Division of Agriculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

Ray, David

278

Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

Harms, Kyle E.

279

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal waste recycling Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measure for recycling of house-hold waste to agriculture 12;Sustainability analysis Bioenergy... , cereal grain), grass from seminatural ecosystem e.g. ... Source: Ris...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

Lawrence, Rick L.

282

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry inis very little use of alternative fuels (defined as waste

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

Barnes, Elizabeth A.

284

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasting drought effects on agriculture based on waterEffects of 2009 Drought on San Joaquin Valley Agriculture

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Demonstration of a Carbon Dioxide-Based Industrial Laundry Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Agriculture/Water End-Use PIER Industrial/Agriculture/Water End-Use http://www.energy-hours also exists. While the industry has implemented water efficiency measures, thus far the need for the drying process. The drying process can be electric or natural gas

286

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from untreated raw curbside trash MSW , industrial waste, and aluminum production wastes variously called dross

287

Waste Plastics as Fuel The concept of PlastofuelTM is the use of waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Plastics as Fuel The concept of PlastofuelTM is the use of waste agricultural plastic as a fuel source. The PlastofuelTM process creates a dense plastic nugget of compressed shredded plastic that can be burned cleanly in a high temperature combustion process. The shredded plastic is composed

Demirel, Melik C.

288

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

Darby, D. F.

289

Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the ITP, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) provide energy, waste, and productivity assessments at no charge to small and mid-sized manufacturers while providing...

290

Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

Gelfond, Michael

291

Waste characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most industries generate limited types of solid wastes of a result of their manufacturing processes. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a research and development facility, generates a large variety of solid wastes, some exotic. Over 50,000 distinct waste streams are currently generated in the 43 square mile area defining LANL. These wastes include refuse, medical, infectious, hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes. LANL is subject to federal and State oversight on matters concerning management of solid wastes. In order to assure regulatory agencies such as the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that the Laboratory is properly managing and disposing all solid wastes. LANL has undertaken an extensive waste characterization program to identify sources and ultimate disposition of all solid wastes. Given the number of solid waste streams expected, LANL has taken a two-pronged approach to characterizing wastes: (a) physical identification of all sources of solid wastes including interviews with waste generators; and (b) characterization of wastes from the point of generation. The former approach consists of canvassing all structures within the LANL complex, interviewing waste generators, and identifying sources of waste generation. Data gathered by these interviews are compiled in a database in order to identify the types and rates of waste generation and correct mismanagement of wastes identified during the interviews. The latter approach consists of characterizing all solid wastes which are controlled administratively or subject to stricter controls than municipal solid wastes (i.e., infectious, hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes). This characterization forms the basis by which LANL will manage solid waste in accordance to NMED/EPA regulations and US Department of Energy Orders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

Corpion, J.C.; Grieggs, A.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

BTU Accounting for Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, salesmen cars, over the highway trucks, facilities startup, waste used as fuel and fuels received for storage. This is a first step in the DOE's effort to establish usage guidelines for large industrial users and, we note, it requires BTU usage data...-generated electricity, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, in-plant transportation, ore hauling, raw material storage and finished product warehousing. Categories which are excluded are corporate and divisional offices, basic research, distribution centers...

Redd, R. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A R&D Program for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall goal of the DOE Industrial Heat Pump Program is to foster research and development which will allow more efficient and economical recovery of waste energy in industry. Specifically, the program includes the identification of appropriate...

Hayes, A. J.

294

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

295

Wisconsin Agriculture Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wisconsin Agriculture 2012 STATUS OF Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics · Status­Extension College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON #12;#12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, UW

Radeloff, Volker C.

296

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

297

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap...

298

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply. 4 figures.

Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Langton, C.A.; Harley, W.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Administration ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty ............................................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty .............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

302

Administration....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty..............................................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

303

Administration....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty..............................................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................18 Research Projects School of Agriculture

304

Administration ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY Research Projects School of Agriculture

305

Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of climate change on Indian agriculture. ” Manuscript,study of climate change impacts on Indian agriculture hasclimate change on agricultural output, because of the relevance of agriculture

Moorthy, Aravind

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science DN250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production Dn Engineering Technology DN250FAM Food and Agribusiness Management #12;1 Contents Agricultural Science DN250 1

Buehrer, R. Michael

308

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

Tullos, Desiree

309

Public Parking > Agriculture Building Parkade**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY > Agriculture Building Parkade** > Pay Parking Lots** > Stadium Parkade** > Diefenbaker Lot > Health Sciences Parkade** Disabled Persons' Parking* Motorcyle Parking* Faculty & Sta Parking Lots* Student Parking Lots

Saskatchewan, University of

310

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Remediation of oil field wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment and disposal of drilling muds and hazardous wastes has become a growing concern in the oil and gas industry. Further, past practices involving improper disposal require considerable research and cost to effectively remediate contaminated soils. This paper investigates two case histories describing the treatments employed to handle the liquid wastes involved. Both case histories describe the environmentally safe cleanup operations that were employed. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coal industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

315

Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Otter Tail Power Company Rebate Program offers rebates to qualifying commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program...

316

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Emission Reduction Technologies. Food and AgriculturalIEA). 2009. Energy Technology Transitions for Industry -IEA). 2010. Energy Technology Perspectives - Scenarios and

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste.

Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Tsien, Roger Y.

320

Environmental Effects of Industrial Farming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

·Water contamination ·Soil contamination ·Solutions #12;US Meat Industry Animals (2009) kg produced (2009 contamination #12;Water contamination ·~9x108 kg of dry waste produced in the US per day day in 2001 #12;Water!" #12;Air contamination ·220kg of CH4 produced in the lifetime of a cow "Smells like money!" #12;Air

Budker, Dmitry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Solid Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Aquaculture and horticulture businesses, and other industries that use geothermal direct-use systems typically don't generate any more solid waste than those that use other energy resources.

323

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

324

Method of recycling hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

NONE

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coal industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Coal industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

328

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

43 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Scienc- es (CAFLS) supports Clemson University's land-grant mission to provide education, research and service to the public. The College of Agriculture

Stuart, Steven J.

329

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

39 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (www.clemson.edu/CAFLS) offers a broad. The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics with a Community and Economic

Stuart, Steven J.

330

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Bolding, M. Chad

331

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 46 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

Stuart, Steven J.

332

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

44 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

Stuart, Steven J.

333

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

Stuart, Steven J.

334

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

Stuart, Steven J.

335

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering KEY: # = new course of engineering systems, earthwork computations, and introduction to boundary surveys for Agriculture students in the College of Agriculture and/or consent of instructor. AEN 220 FARM TRACTORS AND ENGINES. (3) Principles

MacAdam, Keith

336

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

41 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

337

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

338

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

42 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

339

AGRICULTURAL SPRING 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In 1877, William Beal established the first seed testing laboratory in the United States at what was then the Michigan Agricultural College. Beal was also the first person to cross-fertilize corn to increase yield

340

Agriculture and Natural Resources Family and Consumer Sciences 4-H Youth Development Community and Economic Development COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, LEXINGTON, KY, 40546  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF AGRICULTURE, LEXINGTON, KY, 40546 AEN-112 ANewConceptin On-FarmBiofuelProduction Tim Stombaugh, Mike Montross at the University of Kentucky are working on a new system of biofuel production that involves on-farm processing on agriculture and the fuel-production industry. What are Biofuels? Biofuels are fuels produced from biological

Hayes, Jane E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- non as old as the industrial revolution. It's still an issue today, though now it's commonly called

342

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

343

Purdue Agriculture Annual Statistical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purdue Agriculture Research Works Annual Statistical Report 2005-2006 Purdue AGrICuLTure Read the full report on the Web www.ag.purdue.edu/arp/stat_report_05-06 #12;Purdue AGrICuLTure Purdue Agriculture Research Works Here's why. We are riding the wave of revolutionary changes brought about

344

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

345

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

346

AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Challenges Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

Radeloff, Volker C.

347

Waste Description Type of Project Pounds Reduced, Reused,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerator =1; National Synchrotron Light Source=1; Basic Energy Sciences=1) each handle 66 lbs. of hazardousWaste Description Type of Project Pounds Reduced, Reused, Recycled or Conserved in 2009 Waste Type Description Details * Alkaline batteries Recycling 200 Industrial waste $10 $0 $10 Two hundred pounds

348

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

349

Industrial Hygienist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position wil l serve as an Industrial Hygienist in the Operations Division, providing technical oversight of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory contractors...

350

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Kings Counties. From 1990 to 2008, seed production started to shift slightly to include represents the economic size of California's seed industry. Using data from the California County produced in the United State. When examining California County Agricultural Commissoners

Ferrara, Katherine W.

351

Robotics for mixed waste operations, demonstration description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is developing technology to aid in the cleanup of DOE sites. Included in the OTD program are the Robotics Technology Development Program and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. These two programs are working together to provide technology for the cleanup of mixed waste, which is waste that has both radioactive and hazardous constituents. There are over 240,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste accumulated at DOE sites and the cleanup is expected to generate about 900,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste over the next five years. This waste must be monitored during storage and then treated and disposed of in a cost effective manner acceptable to regulators and the states involved. The Robotics Technology Development Program is developing robotics technology to make these tasks safer, better, faster and cheaper through the Mixed Waste Operations team. This technology will also apply to treatment of transuranic waste. The demonstration at the Savannah River Site on November 2-4, 1993, showed the progress of this technology by DOE, universities and industry over the previous year. Robotics technology for the handling, characterization and treatment of mixed waste as well robotics technology for monitoring of stored waste was demonstrated. It was shown that robotics technology can make future waste storage and waste treatment facilities better, faster, safer and cheaper.

Ward, C.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Swedish nuclear waste efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

Rydberg, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Composite analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 area plateau of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the first iteration of the Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site (Composite Analysis) prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Implementation Plan for the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-2. The Composite Analysis is a companion document to published analyses of four active or planned low-level waste disposal actions: the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 West Area, the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 East Area, the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility, and the disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste. A single Composite Analysis was prepared for the Hanford Site considering only sources on the 200 Area Plateau. The performance objectives prescribed in U.S. Department of Energy guidance for the Composite Analysis were 100 mrem in a year and examination of a lower dose (30 mrem in a year) to ensure the {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} concept is followed. The 100 mrem in a year limit was the maximum allowable all-pathways dose for 1000 years following Hanford Site closure, which is assumed to occur in 2050. These performance objectives apply to an accessible environment defined as the area between a buffer zone surrounding an exclusive waste management area on the 200 Area Plateau, and the Columbia River. Estimating doses to hypothetical future members of the public for the Composite Analysis was a multistep process involving the estimation or simulation of inventories; waste release to the environment; migration through the vadose zone, groundwater, and atmospheric pathways; and exposure and dose. Doses were estimated for scenarios based on agriculture, residential, industrial, and recreational land use. The radionuclides included in the vadose zone and groundwater pathway analyses of future releases were carbon-14, chlorine-36, selenium-79, technetium-99, iodine-129, and uranium isotopes.

Kincaid, C.T.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

355

The UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, in partnership with Fachhochschule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The UF Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, in partnership with Fachhochschule.abroad.ufic.ufl.edu Osnabrück Agricultural and Biological Engineering Summer A May 14 - June 22, 2012 2012 Undergraduate Program, a copper manufacturing industry Tour of a renewable energy biogas plant Tour of the Artland Brewery

Watson, Craig A.

356

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and labor, accounts for 40% of agricultural gross domestic product (GDP). Creates livelihoods for one of industrialized production systems impair air and water quality, de-value real estate and create health and well for a large number of impoverished producers. 2 #12;Past and projected regional differences in meat

Archer, Steven R.

359

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guideline for implementing Co-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through-generation based on Biomass waste from Thai Industries - through implementation and organisation of Industrial biomasse ressourcer fra det omkringliggende nærområde kan erhverves, og hvilke der er interessante

360

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it to energy is not a new phenomenon in India. Rural India has gained considerable experience in anaerobic1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada concern is the inadequate supply of energy and increasing demand for electricity, amplified by a booming

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

Buehrer, R. Michael

362

Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Fixen, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change on Indian agriculture. ” Manuscript, Department ofJ. Parikh. “Indian agriculture and climate sensitivity. ”3):353–368, 1979. Food and Agriculture Organization of the

Moorthy, Aravind

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Farm Workers and Unions in California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Unions in California Agriculture Philip Martin June 30,unions and immigration in California agriculture 2. scanningbargaining agreements signed in CA agriculture (http://

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012): Can Cali- fornia Agriculture disprove the allegedweed. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture TheCalifornia Agriculture team has won three awards from the

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Economic Value of Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all sources of $0.4 billion and assuming that 50% of the $3.6 billion is from publicly funded research for the nation) by the appropriate agricultural statistics (e.g. the ratio of irrigated sprinkler acres in Texas Developed LEPA Irrigation Low Energy Precision Application (LEPA) irrigation technology increases water

367

PhosPhorus, Agriculture &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphorus lost from agricultural soils can increase the fertility status of natural waters (eutrophication that controls eutrophication of fresh waters.The USEPA has recommended a limit for controlling eutrophication have not been established. Numerous water quality problems have been associated with eutrophication

Liskiewicz, Maciej

368

AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as Indiana agriculture enters the energy business in a big way. The advent of four new Indiana ethanol plants. Ethanol means theres a monstrous increase in the need for corn production in 2007, and beyond. Acres have of the process to produce ethanol from cellulose (plant material). Indiana biofuels are both ethanol (corn

369

futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research in both the plant and animal sciences to improve disease resistance and reduce dependency on chemicals, as well as research to identify and develop value- added opportunities for agriculture Economic and Environmental Needs -- was conceived in 1995, its goal was to make Michigan agri- cultural

370

AGRICULTURAL REPORT FEBRUARY 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trading framework. The largest GHG market in the world is the European Union-Emissions Trading Scheme' sulfur diox- ide (SO2) emissions trading program Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets from Agriculture and states have enacted policies individually or in cooperation to reduce GHG emissions through an emissions

371

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

372

What is Sustainable Agriculture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

security, its midwives were not gov- ernment policy makers but small farmers, environmentalists model has degraded soil and water, reduced the biodiversity that is a key element to food security Photo courtesy USDA NRCS #12;Page 2 ATTRA Sustainable Agriculture: An Introduction on imported oil

Wang, Changlu

373

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research for agricultural and forestry interest (nutrition, photosynthesis, enhancements, fruit cultivation stress and crop protection), and the study of farm animal resources (nutrition, production and animal change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

374

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 6, Appendix D, Pyrolysis and gasification of MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix summarizes information available in the open literature describing the technology and operating experierice of pyrolysis technology as applied to the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). The literature search, which emphasized the time frame of greatest activity in MSW pyrolysis (i.e., the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s), focused on the scale of application, material feedstock, technical limitations and economic considerations. Smaller scale facilities, either laboratory/research scale (< I TPD) or process development/pilot scale plants (1-20 TPD) for municipal waste and related materials (agricultural, forest residues, industrial wastes, etc.), are mentioned in the literature (275, 495). However, such data are sparse, dated, and often have limited applicability to MSW in general, and for design scale-up in particular. Therefore, greatest emphasis was placed on identifying demonstration scale (20--150 TPD) will commercial seals (> 150 TPD) studies which could be expected to provide economic, environmental, and energy data that can be scaled with possibly less risk. While the promise of pyrolysis of MSW lies in its ability to transform municipal waste into gaseous and liquid chemicals and fuel products, the major limitation is the unproven technical and economic feasibility of a large scale facility.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

Sivakumar, Gayathri

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Child Labor in Texas Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workers under age 18 involved in agriculture have a disproportionate rate of injury and death when compared to older workers. This publication explains potential risks to young agricultural workers as well as the laws designed to protect these under...

Smith, David

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Urban food waste generation: challenges and opportunities Bijaya K. Adhikaria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and which, if introduced worldwide, could provide agricultural soils with a good source of organic matter, anaerobic digestion could provide energy as biogas for a few high energy demanding industries within cities (CSBE), American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), Nepalese Society

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

despite globalization tendencies elsewhere in the economy.globalization in the non-agricultural sectors of the world economy.

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NICE3: Industrial Refrigeration System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Concepts has developed an absorption-augmented system as a cost-effective means of achieving more cooling capacity with a substantial reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for industrial refrigeration. It cuts fuel consumption by 30% by combining an internal combustion engine with a mechanical compression refrigeration system and an absorption refrigeration system. The absorption system is powered by engine waste heat. Conventional industrial refrigeration uses mechanical vapor compression, powered by electric motors, which results in higher energy costs. By the year 2010, the new system could cut fuel consumption by 19 trillion Btu and greenhouse emissions by more than 1 million tons per year.

Simon, P.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Industry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Savings. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

Kramer, Klaas Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry incement and using alternative fuels in the cement kiln. There

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The research programme Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research programme Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

383

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

384

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

387

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) is located at the University of Pretoria. The primary objectives of the Institute are to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) is located at the University benefits to the forestry and agricultural sectors of South Africa · Establish partnerships with industries linked to agriculture and forestry, both nationally and internationally, to produce new and improved

389

The Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) is located on the campus of the University of Pretoria. The primary objectives of the Institute are to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) is located on the campus and long term benefits to the forestry and agricultural sectors of South Africa · Establish partnerships with industries linked to agriculture and forestry, both nationally and internationally, to produce new

390

The Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) is located on the campus of the University of Pretoria. The primary objectives of the Institute are to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) is located on the campus and longer term benefits to the forestry and agricultural sectors of South Africa · Establish partnerships with industries linked to agriculture and forestry, both nationally and internationally, to produce new

391

An Evaluation of Industrial Heat Pumps for Effective Low-Temperature Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The implementation of industrial heat pumps utilizing waste water from various industrial processes for the production of process steam is presented as a viable economic alternative to a conventional fossil-fired boiler and as an effective fuel...

Leibowitz, H. M.; Colosimo, D. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Agricultural Marketing Toolkit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply ManagementAgricultural

393

Method of dye removal for the textile industry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention comprises a method of processing a waste stream containing dyes, such as a dye bath used in the textile industry. The invention comprises using an inorganic-based polymer, such as polyphosphazene, to separate dyes and/or other chemicals from the waste stream. Membranes comprising polyphosphazene have the chemical and thermal stability to survive the harsh, high temperature environment of dye waste streams, and have been shown to completely separate dyes from the waste stream. Several polyphosplhazene membranes having a variety of organic substituent have been shown effective in removing color from waste streams.

Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

395

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-1335E Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California A.T. Mc of Global Energy Partners. This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Demand Response in California. PIER Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Program. CEC

396

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park; 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Peer Review lowtemp013riley.pdf More Documents & Publications Microseismic Study with LBNL - Monitoring the Effect of Injection of Fluids from the Lake County Pipeline on...

397

Economic Forces Driving Agriculture and the Seed Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1980-2012 with projections until 2030 #12;World map weighted by GDP in 1960 #12;Real Gross Domestic;Population and real per capita GDP in `000 2005 dollars, 2012 and 2030 projections (US per capita income in 2050 Total population (est.) = 9.07 billion 11 #12;U.S. and world real per capita GDP in 2005 dollars

California at Davis, University of

398

An internship in the agricultural chemical industry: Miles Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?' Mslonekg city 310 A Den? Dawso Aquise 6 ( Hubbard West, Mount 31 ~ Cal r Cocllda Elm MO Xv +PI iep iab 7886'% , CreSt ' Cc nea& art. parker I 0 knn Bkyrcr mT, uQ, Reer d Mart 4 ~ ~ C I 0 Ao er 148 Grays I 47 198 ? I M 3 72 Co I la I ttonwccd... B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D Daily Log of Activities . Territory Map . Internship Manual Outline Functional Linkages . . 10 21 22 24 . 25 DEFINITION OF TERMS SCOUTING: To examine a field for insects to determine the need for chemical...

Adams, Sharla K

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park; 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In 2007, Green Fuels of Oregon, Inc. signed a lease with Liskey Farms to develop a Biodiesel production facility in existing greenhouses. Utilizing geothermal water to heat...

400

Reciprocating Constructed Wetlands for Treating Industrial, Municipal, and Agricultural Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many rural communities, treating domestic wastewater efficiently and cost-effectively is a challenging task. Environmental issues, financing of construction costs, and the bottom-line cost to the consumer complicate this effort. Increasingly stringent discharge standards have resulted in a growing number of permit violations from small, “conventional ” treatment systems. Many rural communities have discovered that their existing systems (e.g., facultative lagoons) provided excellent service in the past but have become obsolete due to new discharge standards. These communities simply cannot afford to own and operate the highly sophisticated tertiary treatment facilities these new regulations require. As a result, funding agencies have looked more favorably to “regional” solutions that can achieve consistent, high-quality discharge. In most cases, the regional solution is a centralized treatment facility to which surrounding communities pump their sewage. In many instances, communities must pump extremely long distances to reach the regional treatment facility. This means that communities, and, therefore, funding agencies, are putting most of their money into pumps and piping instead of treatment. What small rural communities need is a decentralized wastewater treatment system that is inexpensive to construct, simple to operate, and achieves consistently high levels of discharge quality, even with small flows. Having such a system would allow a paradigm shift whereby funding agencies could support decentralized treatment and regional management of numerous decentralized treatment systems.

Go~tiscs~!d P S I; Chuck Donnell; H. Alton Pnvette; Leslie L. Behrends

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoff Meeting forKSRS25RV*)

402

The Office of Industrial Technologies technical reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts R D activities which focus on the objectives of improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial energy conservation. The Office also conducts programs to reduce waste generation, increase recycling efforts, and improve the use of wastes as process feedstocks. An active program of technology transfer and education supports these activities and encourages adoption of new technologies. To accomplish these objectives OIT cooperates with the private sector to identify its technological needs and to share R D efforts. R D is conducted to the point that a new technology is shown to work and that it can be transferred to the private sector end-users. This bibliography contains information on all scientific and technical reports sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program during the years 1988--1990.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

Vari, J.

404

Energy Management and Computers in the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dryer hood waste heat. o Biomass feedstocks for the production of specialized chemial products. o Crossing of the stone groundwood process with the thermomechanical pulping process. 236 ESL-IE-81-04-42 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy...

Sommerfeld, J. T.; Hartley, E. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is Deputy Director for Water Resources Research. WASTE GUIDE ON THERMAL POLLUTION Copies of an "Industrial, urban water use and needs, water system construction, and flood plain management. The focal point VIaste Guide on Thermal Pollution" may be obtained by writing to: National Thermal Pollution Research

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

406

Waste processing air cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assessment and evaluation of a safety factor with respect to ocean disposal of waste materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the oceans is essential if ocean dumping is to be continued. The author has surveyed the available literature, bioassay studies, and pertinent research concerning chronic effects and the risk they impose on the marine ecosystem. The main purpose... OPERATIONS 10 History of Ocean Dumping Corps of Engineers' Letters of No Objection 10 12 Types of Materials Dumped Dredge Spoils Industrial Wastes Municipal Wastes Radioactive Wastes Solid Wastes Military Wastes Construction Debris 13 13 15 15...

Zapatka, Thomas Francis

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

409

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

Romero, M.

411

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Waste minimization in semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US semiconductor industry uses 5--7 thousand pounds of arsine annually. Fifty to eighty percent of the arsine used becomes a waste product, which requires abatement. Traditional methods of abatement are reviewed with an emphasis on dry chemical scrubbing. A variety of dry chemical scrubbing materials were evaluated for arsine capacity, using activated carbon as the baseline for comparison. Of the available technologies, dry chemical scrubbing is the most effective means of minimizing arsenic containing waste generated from semiconductor effluents. A copper oxide based media has been identified which has high capacity, high efficiency and treats the spectrum of gases used in MOCVD processes. Reclaim and recovery of spent scrubber media has the potential to drastically reduce arsenic waste from semiconductor manufacturing.

Hardwick, S.J.; Mailloux, J.C. [Novapure Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Industrial Energy Efficiency Technical Review Guidelines and Best Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commercial and other sector programs. The following programs were deemed to represent the best combination of applicability and access to relevant information: ? BC Hydro?s Power Smart Partners - Industrial (Transmission and Distribution...) ? Wisconsin?s Focus on Energy ? Industrial ? California Public Utilities Commission?s (CPUC) Southern California Industrial and Agricultural (SCIA) and Pacific Gas & Electric?s (PG&E) Fabrication, Process and Manufacturing Review of Impact Evaluation...

Dalziel, N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitecAWSAgri-Energy LLC Place: Luverne,Solutions Inc

416

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

417

CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

418

Chemical and microbiological hazards associated with recycling of anaerobic digested residue intended for agricultural use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, three full-scale biogas plants (BGP) were investigated for the concentration of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides and the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli in the anaerobically digested residues (ADR). The BGPs mainly utilize source-separated organic wastes and industrial food waste as energy sources and separate the ADR into an ADR-liquid and an ADR-solid fraction by centrifugation at the BGP. According to the Norwegian standard for organic fertilizers, the ADR were classified as quality 1 mainly because of high zinc (132-422 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and copper (23-93 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations, but also because of high cadmium (0.21-0.60 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations in the liquid-ADR. In the screening of organic pollutants, only DEHP (9.7-62.1 mg kg{sup -1}) and {Sigma} PAH 16 (0.2-1.98 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were detected in high concentrations according to international regulations. Of the 250 pesticides analyzed, 11 were detected, but only imazalil (<0.30-5.77 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and thiabendazol (<0.14-0.73 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were frequently detected in the ADR-fiber. Concentrations of imazalil and thiabendazol were highest during the winter months, due to a high consumption of citrus fruits in Norway in this period. Ten percent of the ADR-liquid samples contained cereulide-producing B. cereus, whereas no verotoxigenic E. coli was detected. The authors conclude that the risk of chemical and bacterial contamination of the food chain or the environment from agricultural use of ADR seems low.

Govasmark, Espen, E-mail: espen.govasmark@bioforsk.no [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Soil and Environment, Fredrik A. Dahlsvei 20, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Staeb, Jessica [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Abteilung Hydrochemie, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Buesnau) (Germany); Holen, Borge [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Plant Health, Hogskoleveien 7, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Hoornstra, Douwe [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland); Nesbakk, Tommy [Mjosanlegget AS, Roverudmyra Miljostasjon, Asmarkveien 301, NO-2600 Lillehammer (Norway); Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste gases with potentially useful fuel value are generated at any number of points in refineries, chemical plants and other industrial and commercial sites. The higher quality streams have been utilized successfully in fuel systems for years...

Waibel, R. T.

420

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Applications of Industrial Wireless Sensor Milan Erdelj  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................... 10 1.3.2.2 Hazard ........................................ 10 1.3.2.3 Security manuscript, published in "Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Protocols, and Standards CRC the problems of air, water (together with waste water) pollution, but covers the production material pollution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

OVERVIEW OF MUNICIPAL AND INDUSTRIAL LAND APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BE "RIGHT IN YOUR BACKYARD" Variety of municipal and industrial wastes Inexpensive supply of plant - Heavy metals, organic compounds, pathogens - Nutrient loading (N and P) - Nitrate leaching or P loss Beneficially re-use nutrients and/or organic material Protect the quality of the soil, and surface water

Balser, Teri C.

425

Aluminum industry energy conservation workshop V papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains papers given at a recent meeting sponsored by The Aluminum Association. The focus of the meeting is on energy conservation in the aluminum industry. Topics include recovery of waste heat, more energy efficient design of plants, and government policies.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building Whiteknights Hall Windsor Hall Students Union Shop IMA 3rd House Annexe 59 Agricultural and Food Economics D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 59 Agriculture D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 48 Allen Laboratory D5 The Allen Laboratory 41 Alumni Office D4 Whiteknights

Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

427

Public Policy and Agriculture Dr. Jeff Burkhardt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Policy and Agriculture Dr. Jeff Burkhardt With Dr. John VanSickle Food & Resource Economics & Agriculture? #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture? · Economic instability #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture? · Economic instability · Globalization #12;Why Public Policy for Food & Agriculture

Hill, Jeffrey E.

428

Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah Biological and Agricultural Engineering UC Agricultural Ergonomics Research Center Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety WCAHS Seminar, December 5, 2011 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah

Nguyen, Danh

429

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

430

Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite analysis of low-level radioactive waste disposal and other radioactive sources was recently completed for the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington State. Impacts from source release and environmental transport were estimated for a 1000-year period following Site closure in a multi-step process involving 1) estimation of radiological inventories and release, 2) assessment of contaminant migration through the vadose zone, groundwater, and atmospheric pathways, 3) and estimation of doses. The analysis showed that most of the radionuclide inventory in past-practice liquid discharge sites and pre-1988 solid waste burial grounds on the 200 Area Plateau will be released in the first several hundred years following Hanford Site closure, well before projected releases from active and planned disposals of solid waste. The maximum predicted agricultural dose was less than 6 mrem/y in 2050 and declined thereafter. The maximum doses for the residential, industrial, and recreational scenarios, were 2.2, 0.7, and 0.04 mrem/y, respectively, and also declined after 2050.

Kincaid, Charles T.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Cole, Charles R.; Freshley, Mark D.; Johnson, Vernon G.; Kaplan, D. I.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Streile, Gary P.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Vail, Lance W.; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4,136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

432

Waste Minimization- The Challenge of the 90's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W~STE MINIMIZATION - THE CHALLENGE OF THE 90'S RICHARD DURHAM Senior Environmental Specialist Dow Chemical U.S.A. Plaquemine, Louisiana ABSTRACT Waste minimization is an environmental good news story that Dow enjoys going out... informally for years. The chemical industry has been practicing waste reduction by increasing yields, improving their processes and reducing energy requirements. If Dow or any other chemical company does not practice waste reduction, competition...

Durham, R.

433

Sustainable solutions for solid waste management in Southeast Asian countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human activities generate waste and the amounts tend to increase as the demand for quality of life increases. Today's rate in the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEANs) is alarming, posing a challenge to governments regarding environmental pollution in the recent years. The expectation is that eventually waste treatment and waste prevention approaches will develop towards sustainable waste management solutions. This expectation is for instance reflected in the term 'zero emission systems'. The concept of zero emissions can be applied successfully with today's technical possibilities in the agro-based processing industry. First, the state-of-the-art of waste management in Southeast Asian countries will be outlined in this paper, followed by waste generation rates, sources, and composition, as well as future trends of waste. Further on, solutions for solid waste management will be reviewed in the discussions of sustainable waste management. The paper emphasizes the concept of waste prevention through utilization of all wastes as process inputs, leading to the possibility of creating an ecosystem in a loop of materials. Also, a case study, focusing on the citrus processing industry, is displayed to illustrate the application of the aggregated material input-output model in a widespread processing industry in ASEAN. The model can be shown as a closed cluster, which permits an identification of opportunities for reducing environmental impacts at the process level in the food processing industry. Throughout the discussion in this paper, the utilization of renewable energy and economic aspects are considered to adapt to environmental and economic issues and the aim of eco-efficiency. Additionally, the opportunities and constraints of waste management will be discussed.

Uyen Nguyen Ngoc [Institute for Process Engineering (IPE), Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 21a, A8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: utemvnn2003@yahoo.com; Schnitzer, Hans [Institute for Process Engineering (IPE), Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 21a, A8010 Graz (Austria)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Industrial Users  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planningtoA Journey Inside the Complex andIndustrial

436

Industry Economists  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planningtoA Journey Inside the ComplexIndustry

437

Industry @ ALS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In AboutIn theIndustry @ ALS

438

Structure of the Texas Economy: Emphasis on Agriculture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B-1121 May 1972 Texas Economy the Emphasis on Agrkulture Texas A&M University The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Contents Summary... economic effects are its purchases of inputs directly from other Texas industries and its employment, wages and other payments to the local economy. The economic impact of the new plant does not stop with this initial effect, however. As local suppliers...

Mustafa, Gholam; Jones, Lonnie L.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

Tobar, Michael

440

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture of Agriculture #12;Slide 3 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Outline · 6 key messages (nationwide

Grotjahn, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

LIST OF SUBJECT AREA -CODES ISCED -(01.0 Agricultural Sciences) 62 Agriculture, forestry and fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIST OF SUBJECT AREA - CODES ISCED - (01.0 Agricultural Sciences) 62 Agriculture, forestry and fishery (01.1 Agriculture) 620 Agriculture, forestry and fishery (broad programmes) (01.2 Agricultural Economics) 629 Agriculture, forestry and fishery (others) (01.3 Food Science and Technology) 541 Food

442

Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of AgriculturalSconSin agriculture 2012 i #12;ii StatuS of WiSconSin agriculture 2012 #12;Preface Status of Wisconsin Agriculture is an annual agricultural situation and outlook report authored (except where noted) by faculty

Radeloff, Volker C.

443

AgExcellence 2006 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AgExcellence 2006 The College of Agriculture and Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in Review #12;ACAdEMiC pRogRAMS College of Agriculture Baccalaureate: Agricultural Education Options: AgRelations Teaching Agricultural Operations Technology MasterofScience: Agricultural Education Baccalaureate

Maxwell, Bruce D.

444

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Waste Generated from LMR-AMTEC Reactor Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The candidate Liquid Metal Reactor-Alkali Metal Thermal -to- Electric Converter (LMR-AMTEC) is considered to be the first reactor that would use pure liquid potassium as a secondary coolant, in which potassium vapor aids in the conversion of thermal energy to electric energy. As with all energy production, the thermal generation of electricity produces wastes. These wastes must be managed in ways which safeguard human health and minimize their impact on the environment. Nuclear power is the only energy industry, which takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Based on the candidate design of the LMR-AMTEC components and the coolant types, different wastes will be generated from LMR. These wastes must be classified and characterized according to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulation, CFR. This paper defines the waste generation and waste characterization from LMR-AMTEC and reviews the applicable U.S. regulations that govern waste transportation, treatment, storage and final disposition. The wastes generated from LMR-AMTEC are characterized as: (1) mixed waste which is generated from liquid sodium contaminated by fission products and activated corrosion products; (2) hazardous waste which is generated from liquid potassium contaminated by corrosion products; (3) spent nuclear fuel; and (4) low-level radioactive waste which is generated from the packing materials (e.g. activated carbon in cold trap and purification units). The regulations and management of these wastes are summarized in this paper.

Hasan, Ahmed; Mohamed, Yasser, T.; Mohammaden, Tarek, F.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

447

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University about the accreditation of University of Kentucky. AgriculturalBiotechnology Agriculturalbiotechnologyencompassescellularandmolecularapproaches to the manipulation and improvement of agricultural plants, animals and microorganisms

Hayes, Jane E.

448

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

populations of mus- sels. Dam construction, siltation, water pollution, min- ing and industrial wastes important commer- cial value in the cultured pearl and jewelry industry. Our pearly mussels are of unique- sels are underway. However, water pollution continues to threaten streams crucial to their survival

Liskiewicz, Maciej

449

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

Mountziaris, T. J.

450

An analytical protocol for the knowledge of waste by Pierre HENNEBERT1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analytical protocol for the knowledge of waste by substances Pierre HENNEBERT1 , Arnaud PAPIN2 1 Technologique ALATA, BP n°2, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, France. Abstract The hazardousness of waste could samples of different industrial wastes have been tested following (with differences) this protocol by two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1992 and record to date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1992. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

Randall, V.C.; Sims, A.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Radioactive Waste Management Information for 1992 and record-to-date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides detailed data and graphics on air borne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1992. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

Litteer, D.L.; Randall, V.C.; Sims, A.M.; Taylor, K.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1993 and record to date  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1993. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System.

Sims, A.M.; Taylor, K.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Properties of concrete paving blocks made with waste marble Osman Gencela,f,*, Cengiz Ozelb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of concrete paving blocks made with waste marble Osman Gencela,f,*, Cengiz Ozelb , Fuat: Concrete paving blocks Recycled aggregate Marble waste Concrete wear a b s t r a c t Marble industry. Waste marble is well usable instead of the usual aggregate in the concrete paving block production. Ã?

North Texas, University of

455

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Agriculture Development Council is tasked with enhancing the future development of agriculture in Montana through establishing policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a...

457

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of...

458

Kentucky Department of Agriculture | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Agriculture Kentucky Department of Agriculture At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer...

459

Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. (2007) Agriculture. Climate Change 2007: Mitigationagriculture’s future contributions to climate change,agriculture greenhouse gas emissions mitigation carbon price | land use change | climate

Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Engineering Industrial & Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Engineering Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering Leslie Monplaisir, Ph powerful tool sets used in industry today. -Brent Gillett, BSIE 2007 Advanced Planning Engineer at BMW I is available at: http://ise.wayne.edu/bs-industrial/index What is Industrial Engineering? The industrial

Berdichevsky, Victor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

462

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

463

AgriculturAl Economics http://agrecon.mcgill.ca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AgriculturAl Economics http://agrecon.mcgill.ca M.Sc. (Thesis) AnAtomy And cEll Biology www.medicine.mcgill.ca AnimAl sciEncE www.mcgill.ca/animal M.Sc. (Thesis; Applied) Ph.D. (Thesis) Anthropology www.mcgill.ca.A. (Special with research paper) M.A. in Medical Anthropology (Thesis) Ph.D. (Thesis) ArchitEcturE www.mcgill.ca

Barthelat, Francois

464

New directions at TVA with special reference to agricultural research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Support for the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) fertilizer research and development program in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, ended in fiscal year 1993. TVA`s research center at Muscle Shoals, formerly known as the National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center, is now the TVA Environmental Research Center. Efforts at the Center have diversified to include research and support areas of Agricultural Research and Practices, Atmospheric Sciences, Biotechnology, Waste Management, and Remediation, Environmental Site Remediation, Support Services, Environmental Management, and Technology Transfer. ``We`re building on the expertise and success of our earlier research and focusing our new projects on emerging problems of the 21st century,`` TVA`s Chairman Craven Crowell said in prepared remarks to Congress on March 2, 1994. Agricultural Research in TVA has been aligned with corporate objectives to develop solutions to environmental problems of regional, national and international significance because the agency`s business incorporates a broad mix of responsibilities, including power generation, navigation, flood control, shoreline management, recreation, environmental research, and economic development. Agricultural strategies for watershed protection lie at the core of TVA`s new agricultural research agenda. The major influences for this agenda are TVA`s direct stewardship responsibilities for the 60,000 miles of streams that feed the 652-mile-long Tennessee River; the 11,000 miles of shoreline; and 470,000 acres of TVA-managed public land.

Williams, R.J.; Rylant, K.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

467

Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-073.99 4.22PrimaryWaste

468

Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy metals in composted municipal solid wastes for amendment of agricultural soils/ Métaux lourds dans le compost de déchets municipaux pour application agricole Valérie Duchesneau, #4634809 EVS4904 métaux lourds des compostes de déchets municipaux? http://www.ecometiers.com/fiche/images/43.jpg La

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

469

Industry strengths open new services opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental service industry is in a state of transition in which innovative technologies are increasingly playing a critical role. These changes play to the strengths of the chemical industry, and several firms are effectively growing environmental businesses. At the same time, chemical companies, which are among the largest buyers of environmental services, are making decisions that reflect the changes. Du Pont, for example, has decided to rethink its involvement with the controversial Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, OH. Initially expecting a shortage of incineration capacity, Du Pont had signed a contract - along with BASF and Chemical Waste Management - for a share of capacity at the 60,000-tons/year WTI unit. A number of chemical firms are leveraging their strengths. Air Products and Chemicals (Allentown, PA), for one, has partnerships in the waste-to-energy and flue-gas desulfurization businesses. The company runs cogeneration plants that can burn a combination of coal and natural gas to make both steam and electricity. Air Products assorted businesses can be strong at different times, says Hinman. The flue-gas desulfurization business, for example, was active during the first phase of enforcement of the 1990 Clean Air Act requirements for lower sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) emissions.

Heller, K.

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry Final Project Report to the Florida Turfgrass Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry in Florida Final Project Report to the Florida of Food and Agricultural Sciences Food and Resource Economics Department Gainesville, FL Corresponding.....................................................................................................................................................21 Economic Contribution Analysis

Florida, University of

471

Adding Value to Agricultural Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR WASTE USING HAZARDOUS WASTE GUIDANCE. APPLICATIONS TO HANFORD SITE ACCELERATED HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL MISSION0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hazardous waste regulations were developed for management of industrial waste. These same regulations are also applicable for much of the nation's defense nuclear wastes. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, one of the nation's largest inventories of nuclear waste remains in storage in large underground tanks. The waste's regulatory designation and its composition and form constrain acceptable treatment and disposal options. Obtaining detailed knowledge of the tank waste composition presents a significant portion of the many challenges in meeting the regulatory-driven treatment and disposal requirements for this waste. Key in applying the hazardous waste regulations to defense nuclear wastes is defining the appropriate and achievable quality for waste feed characterization data and the supporting evidence demonstrating that applicable requirements have been met at the time of disposal. Application of a performance-based approach to demonstrating achievable quality standards will be discussed in the context of the accelerated high-level waste treatment and disposal mission at the Hanford Site.

Hamel, William; Huffman, Lori; Lerchen, Megan; Wiemers, Karyn

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

agricultural vocational education: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 108 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

474

agricultural cooperative ludanice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 104 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

475

agriculture habitat loss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 82 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

476

agricultural cooperatives: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 104 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

477

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

478

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

479

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

480

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Nuclear Waste Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

482

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

483

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

484

Review of tribological sinks in six major industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Radioactive and chemotoxic wastes: Only radioactive wastes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste arising from Italian Nuclear Power Plants and Research Centers, classified as 1st and 2nd Category wastes, are managed only as radioactive wastes following the Technical Guide No. 26 issued by the Italian Regulatory Body: ENEA DISP on 1987. A very important Regulatory Regime revision for Italian Nuclear Activities started at the end of 1991. This paper considers the need to develop a new strategy dedicated to mixed waste in line with current international trends.

Eletti, G.F.; Tocci, M. [ENEA DISP, Rome (Italy)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste.

488

2014-2015Series College of Agriculture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014-2015Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Kentucky is accredited of University of Kentucky. Agricultural Economics The Agricultural Economics program enables graduates to pursue and production. Opportunities are also available in public policy for agriculture and rural America

MacAdam, Keith

489

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University about the accreditation of University of Kentucky. AgriculturalEconomics The Agricultural Economics for agriculture and rural America and environmental economics. These career opportunities may be found in both

Hayes, Jane E.

490

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture Gregory Graff, Ryan Mortenson, Rebecca Goldbach, Dawn of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College of Agricultural Sciences, and the Office of Engagement Colorado by support from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and the Colorado State University Office of Engagement

491

AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles · Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies · Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture · The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

Radeloff, Volker C.

492

"Celebrate Agriculture" 8:30 Registration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Celebrate Agriculture" 8:30 Registration 9:00 ­ 9:05 Welcome Waded Cruzado, Montana State University President 9:05 ­ 9:25 Montana and U.S. Agriculture Outlook George Haynes, Agriculture Policy Specialist Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics 9:30 ­ 9:50 Cattle Cycles Gary Brester, Professor

Maxwell, Bruce D.

493

Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C. ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 DEPROLETARIANIZING AGRICULTURE RECOVERING AGRICULTURE FROM AGRIBUSINESS AND THE NEED FOR A COMMONS-BASED, OPEN SOURCE AGRICULTURE Dr. Pieter LEMMENS Wageningen University Centre for Methodical Ethics and Technology Assessment

Boyer, Edmond

494

RULES AND REGULATIONS Title 7--AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RULES AND REGULATIONS Title 7--AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE [7 PA. CODE CH. 130b] Nutrient Management Certification [35 Pa.B. 6504] The Department of Agriculture (Department), under section 7(a or the Senate or House Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committees regarding the proposed rulemaking

Guiltinan, Mark

495

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture Gregory Graff, Ryan Mortenson, Rebecca Goldbach, Dawn of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College of Agricultural Sciences, and the Office of Engagement Colorado the Colorado Department of Agriculture and the Colorado State University Office of Engagement. The authors

Stephens, Graeme L.

496

Agriculture Club Compiled by Christopher Hives (2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture Club fonds Compiled by Christopher Hives (2000) Revised April 2010 University;Fonds Description Agriculture Club fonds. ­ 1928-1935. 1 volume. Administrative History Established in 1928/29, the Agriculture Club succeeded the Agricultural Discussion Club and the Livestock Club

Handy, Todd C.

497

Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Kurt Richter Agricultural Issues Center University of California March 2011 #12;Statistical Review of California's Organic Agriculture 2005 ­ 2009 Karen Klonsky Extension Specialist Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Ferrara, Katherine W.

498

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

499

The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

Minor in Agricultural Systems Management The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Agricultural Systems Management Offered by The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering College of Agriculture and Life Sciences The minor in Agricultural Systems Management is available systems management. The courses listed below constitute the 18 hours required for a minor in Agricultural