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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

2

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

3

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $10,000 per account, not to exceed 20% of cost Scroll Refrigeration Compressors: $500 Variable Speed/Frequency Drive Motor: $500 Variable Speed Compressed Air Motor: $500 Energy Audit: One in Five Years Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free General Lighting: $1 - $15/unit LED Lamps: $2/bulb

4

Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc (AWS) Place: Westlake Village, California Zip: CA 91361 Product: Agricultural Waste Solutions designs small scale gasification systems. References: Agricultural Waste...

5

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

6

Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels Chung Y. HseChung Y. Hse Principal Wood ScientistPrincipal Wood Scientist USDA Forest State UniversityLouisiana State University 66thth Pacific Rim BioPacific Rim Bio--Based Composites

7

Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES COMPLAINT RESPONSE SYSTEM 8 2.1 Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and Code 9 2.2 Environmental ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE 10 3.1 Watershed Farm Practices Study 10 3.2 Ongoing Farm Practices Evaluation 12 3

9

Edmund G. Brown, Jr. PIER INDUSTRIAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, petroleum refining, natural gas, beverage industry, water and wastewater, energy efficiency, industrial natural gas efficiency, electronics, Public Interest Energy R Edmund G. Brown, Jr. Governor PIER INDUSTRIAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND WATER ENERGY EFFICIENCY

10

Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

Altin, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

SciTech Connect

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom capital projects: $0.25/kWh, up to 50% of cost; $2/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Custom operation and maintenance projects: $0.08/kWh or $0.40/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Lighting projects: custom lighting incentives get 35% of project cost; prescriptive incentives also available. Total incentive capped at

13

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

14

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

15

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Industrial Wastes as a Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

point where a conveyor can conveniently handle it. for further transport. Apron feeders transport waste material by means of chain mounted overlapping steel pans that carry, rather than drag or scrape, the material. Normally, the maximum angle... Portable conveyors Lift trucks Feeders 4 TRANSFER Bucket elevator Belt conveyors Flight convPy'Ors Mass-Flow conveyors Stacking conveyors Crushers Sizers Dryers 3 PREP ARATION 6 COVERED STORAGE Bins 5 OUTDOOR STORAGE...

Richardson, G.; Hendrix, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems...

18

Co-processing of agricultural and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect

A major thrust of our research program is the use of waste materials as co-liquefaction agents for the first-stage conversion of coal to liquid fuels. By fulfilling one or more of the roles of an expensive solvent in the direct coal liquefaction (DCL) process, the waste material is disposed off ex-landfill, and may improve the overall economics of DCL. Work in our group has concentrated on co-liquefaction with waste rubber tires, some results from which are presented elsewhere in these Preprints. In this paper, we report on preliminary results with agricultural and biomass-type waste as co-liquefaction agents.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, Ji-Perng [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Agricultural  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

20

Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Industries in FloridaD, Coordinator of Economic Analysis Alan W. Hodges*, PhD, Extension Scientist Rodney L. Clouser, PhD, Professor University of Florida/IFAS, Food & Resource Economics Department PO Box 110240, Gainesville, FL 32611

Florida, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL RECYCLING AND WASTE EXCHANGE W. CURTIS PHILLIPS, SYSTEMS ENGINEER/INDUSTRIAL PROJECT MANAGER, N.C. ENERGY DIVISION, RALEIGH, NC ABSTRACT Recycling and waste exchange, particularly in the industrial sector, has a... products from virgin materials. Process energy reduction possible by recycling is estimated to be as high is 95% for aluminum and 88% for plastics. Industrial waste exchange is facilit~ted by having an independent agency to publicize and coordinate...

Phillips, W. C.

22

Washington State Ergonomics Tool: predictive validity in the waste industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study applies the Washington State Ergonomics Tool to waste industry jobs in Texas. Exposure data were collected by on-site observation of fourteen different multi-task jobs in a major national solid waste management company employing more...

Eppes, Susan Elise

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

25

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

26

Zero landfill, zero waste: the greening of industry in Singapore  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews how a land-scarce city-state is trying to achieve its goals of zero landfill and zero waste through the greening of industry. The main challenges Singapore confronts in its solid waste management are an increasing volume of industrial waste generated, a shortage of land for landfills, and escalating costs of incineration plants. To green its industries, there has been a coordinated effort to develop a recycling industry and to initiate public-private partnerships that will advance environmental technologies. Case studies on the steel, construction, waste incineration, and the food retail industry illustrate the environmental progress that has been made. These cases show also the crucial role played by the government in accelerating the greening of industry by facilitating the formation of strategic collaborations among organisations, and by reconciling the twin objectives of sustainability and profitability.

Josephine Chinying Lang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Industrial Waste Treatment Opportunities for Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the beginning of our industrial economy, an abundant supply of clean water has been a major factor in the choice of plant locations. In many instances in the past, industry has used water from our rivers...

J. G. Mahoney; M. E. Rowley; L. E. West

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry's Most Widespread Health and Safety Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry demonstrated that these potentially permanently disabling injuries are readily prevented using ergonomics that agricultural work is diverse and so agricultural ergonomics must bridge many specific problems with a flexible

Leistikow, Bruce N.

29

Particulate matter characteristics during agricultural waste burning in Taichung City, Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural waste burning is performed after harvest periods in June and November in Taiwan. Typically, farmers use open burning to dispose of excess rice straw. PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 measurements were conducted at National Chung Hsing University in Taichung City using a dichotomous sampler. The sampling times were during straw burning periods after rice harvest during 2002–2005. Ionic species including SO42?, NO3?, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Cl? and Na+ and carbonaceous species (EC and OC) in PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 were analyzed. The results showed that the average PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 concentrations were 123.6 and 31.5 ?g m?3 during agricultural waste burning periods and 32.6 and 21.4 ?g m?3 during non-waste burning periods, respectively. The fine aerosol ionic species including Cl?, K+ and NO3? increased 11.0, 6.7 and 5.5 times during agricultural burning periods compared with periods when agricultural waste burning is not performed. K+ was found mainly in the fine mode during agricultural burning. High nitrogen oxidation ratio was found during agricultural waste burning periods which might be caused by the conversion of Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to NO3?. It is concluded that agricultural waste burning with low dispersion often causes high PM2.5 and gases pollutant events.

Man-Ting Cheng; Chuen-Liang Horng; Yi-Ru Su; Li-Kai Lin; Yu-Chi Lin; Charles C.-K. Chou

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Identifying, examining, and validating a description of the agriculture industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineers, Agricultural Science Teachers, Agricultural Technicians, Animal Breeders, Animal Scientists, Crop and Livestock Manager, Farm and Home Management Advisors, Farmers and Ranchers, Food Science Technicians, Food Scientists and Technologists... ___________ This dissertation follows the style of the Journal of Agricultural Education. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION As evidenced by the dwindling acres of farm land in production in the United States, fewer and fewer people are considering careers in contemporary...

Romero, Edward Wayne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Incineration of hazardous wastes from the petroleum industry in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Persistent hazardous wastes are produced in the recovery, processing and upgrading of crude petroleum in Nigeria. However, recent developments in environmental pollution control are drawing increasing attention to the problems of hazardous wastes. The ever-increasing need to control these wastes from the petroleum industry often compels the chemical engineer to specify methods of treatment and disposal. Present methods for disposal are becoming increasingly undesirable for a number of reasons, and incineration is being considered as an alternative. This paper reviews the extent of hazardous waste generation from the Nigerian petroleum industry and its environmental implications. It also examines the current disposal methods and the incineration technology option. The major chemical engineering concepts of the incineration process and the principles guiding their operations are discussed. The potential for the use of incineration is examined, as well as information that would aid the choice of incineration system for new applications.

O.O. Bello; J.A. Sonibare; S.R.A. Macaulay; A.O. Okelana; A.O. Durojaiye

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Urban agriculture as a tool for neighborhood fabric repair in post-industrial Detroit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on Detroit as a post-industrial city that suffers from abandonment, vacancy, and food security issues. I address this problem through the lens of agriculture, asking how urban farming can be used to ...

Fairbank, Sandra Trubow

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Overland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and nature of faecal waste applications to land in the UK is briefly reviewed, with data presented on both livestock slurry and manure, and human sewage sludge. Particular emphasis is placed on factors influencingOverland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes S.F. Tyrrel1

Quinton, John

34

Industrial Waste Reduction Program annual report, FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Industrial Waste Reduction Program (IWRP) sponsors the development, demonstration, and deployment of technologies that offer a significant opportunity to reduce waste generation, improve productivity, and enhance environmental performance in US industry. The program emphasizes technology-driven solutions that are economically beneficial and environmentally sound. Its goal is to improve the energy efficiency and competitiveness of private industry by cost-effectively reducing waste. Industry, universities, national laboratories and other government agencies are working cooperatively to meet this goal. The IWRP emphasizes the timely commercialization of new technologies that can produce measurable energy, environmental, and economic benefits. All projects are substantially cost-shared with private companies to foster the commercialization process. The program is proud to claim four successfully commercialized technologies that have begun generating benefits. The current IWRP portfolio boasts 32 projects in progress. Funding for the IWRP has grown from $1.7 million in 1990 to $13 million in 1994. New companies join the program each year, reaping the benefits of working cooperatively with government. New technologies are expected to reach commercial success in fiscal year (FY) 1994, further increasing the benefits already accrued. Future Annual Reports will also include projects from the Waste Utilization and Conversion Program. Descriptions of the program`s 32 active projects are organized in this report according these elements. Each project description provides a brief background and the major accomplishments during FY 1993.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nuclear waste problem solved, claims Sweden's nuclear industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... "WE are not going to leave any waste around that is going to harm anybody." So says Asea-Atom's Dr Kare ... Manners, one of the authors of a just-published report which asserts that the Swedish nuclear power industry has found a way of safely storing unreprocessed, spent fuel from ...

Wendy Barnaby

1978-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fluid Bed Combustion Applied to Industrial Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its relatively recent application to coal fired steam production, fluid beds have been uti lized in industry for over 60 years. Beginning in Germany in the twenties for coal gasification, the technology was applied to catalytic cracking of heavy... system cost), use of minimum excess air required, and maintaining the min"imum reactor temperature neces sary to sustain combustion. For superautogenous fuels, where incineration. only is desired, minimum capital cost is achieved by using direct bed...

Mullen, J. F.; Sneyd, R. J.

37

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

38

Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

40

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using a Green and Efficient Catalytic System Based on Sugarcane Bagasse—An Agricultural Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using a Green and Efficient Catalytic System Based on Sugarcane Bagasse—An Agricultural Waste ... § Wisconsin

Wei Chen; Lin-xin Zhong; Xin-wen Peng; Run-cang Sun; Fa-chuang Lu

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Assessment of the suitability of agricultural waste water for geothermal power plant cooling in the Imperial Valley. I. Water quality  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the quality of agricultural waste water is the first step in assessing the sitability of agricultural waste water for geothermal power plant cooling. In this study samples of agricultural waste water from the New and Alamo rivers located in the Imperial Valley of California are analyzed. Determinations of standard water quality parameters, solids content, and inorganic compositions of the solids are made. The results are compared with data on samples of irrigation water and steam condensate also obtained from sites in the Imperial Valley. The data are evaluated in relation to cooling tower operation, waste generation, and waste disposal.

Morris, W.F.; Rigdon, L.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Contribution of Private Industry to Agricultural Innovation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...input industries, there have been striking changes in the composition of research investment. This is best illustrated for the...development costs (17). 16 McDougall P. , The cost of new agrochemical product discovery, development, and registration in 1995...

Keith Fuglie; Paul Heisey; John King; Carl E. Pray; David Schimmelpfennig

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pressure drop in cyclone separators commonly used in the agricultural processing industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering PRESSURE DROP IN CYCLONE SEPARATORS COMMONLY USED IN THE AGRICULTURAL PROCESSING INDUSTRY A Thesis by FRANCISCO ALEJANDRO GUZMAN Approved as to style and content by...: Calvin B. Parnell, Jr. (Chairman of'Committee) Andrew . McFarland / (Member) Otto R. Kunze (Member) William Murphy (Member) Edward Hi er (Head of Department) August 1984 ABSTRACT Pressure Drop 1n Cyclone Separators Commonly Used...

Guzman, Francisco Alejandro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Air gasification of Malaysia agricultural waste in a fluidised bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen production from agricultural waste has been investigated experimentally using a bench-scale fluidised bed gasifier with 60 mm diameter and 425 mm height. During the experiments, the fuel properties and the effects of operating parameters such as gasification temperatures (800â??900°C), fluidisation ratio (2.0â??3.33 m/s), static bed height (10â??30 mm) and equivalence ratio (0.16â??0.46) were analysed. Increasing temperatures favoured hydrogen yield and composition (up to 67 mol %) but only minor effects for other parameters. As conclusion, agricultural wastes are potential candidates as an alternative renewable energy source to fossil fuels.

Wan Ab Karim Ghani Wan Azlina; Reza A. Moghadam; Mohamad Amran Mohd Salleh; Azil Bahari Alias

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

No Name

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES Kelly Traditional approaches for reducing energy and waste in industrial processes typically focus on improving and more apparent to us. In our experience, this approach for reducing energy use and waste generation

Kissock, Kelly

48

Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session and wastewater algae technologies, Dr. Roger Ruan, Professor, BBE, University of Minnesota 11:45 am Lunch break Corporation 1:40 pm Wastewater algae screening, acclimation, and culture. Dr. Joe Zhou, Research Associate

Blanchette, Robert A.

50

Co-processing of agriculture and biomass waste with coal  

SciTech Connect

Biomass and bio-processed waste are potential candidates for co-liquefaction with coal. Specific materials used here include sawdust and poultry manure. Liquefaction experiments were run on each of these materials, separately and with coal, using tetralin as solvent at 350{degrees}C and 1000 psi(cold) hydrogen pressure for 1h. Total conversion was monitored, as well as conversion to asphaltenes, oils and gases. All the biomass samples are converted to oils and gases under the reaction conditions. Poultry manure seems to convert coal more completely, and to produce more oils and gases, than conventional liquefaction.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Wann, J.P. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

52

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery by Use of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project is a combined analytical and experimental programme to investigate the feasibility of the Organic Rankine Cycle principle for waste heat recovery in industry....

Dipl.-Phys. G. Huppmann

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

55

Alkaline subcritical water gasification of dairy industry waste (Whey)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The near-critical water gasification of dairy industry waste in the form of Whey, a product composed of mixtures of carbohydrates (mainly lactose) and amino acids such as glycine and glutamic acid, has been studied. The gasification process involved partial oxidation with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NaOH. The reactions were studied over the temperature range from 300 °C to 390 °C, corresponding pressures of 9.5–24.5 MPa and reaction times from 0 min to 120 min. Hydrogen production was affected by the presence of NaOH, the concentration of H2O2, temperature, reaction time and feed concentration. Up to 40% of the theoretical hydrogen gas production was achieved at 390 °C. Over 80% of the Whey nitrogen content was found as ammonia, mainly in the liquid effluent.

Rattana Muangrat; Jude A. Onwudili; Paul T. Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reducing paint waste in a colour sample manufacturing industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colour sample manufacturing industry provides an important support for the paint manufacturers. It manufactures colour samples that help original paint manufacturers to sell paint by allowing potential customers to accurately visualise a specific colour. One of the burning issues in colour sampling manufacturing is accurately predicting the tally gallons. It involves an estimation of paint volume to cover a given surface area of paper. The as-is tally gallons estimation process is rudimentary and largely depends upon the human experience. Ideally, this quantity should be enough to cover the target surface area regardless of colour appearance. However, this is not the case with existing process. Currently, lighter colours run out in the middle of the production run while darker colour appearances have significant amount of left over paint. The amount of painting waste is as high as 15% (by volume) in some cases. The objective of this paper is to present a predictive model to better estimate the tally gallons by minimising painting waste. It presents a case study of a US colour sample manufacturing company. The results show that the proposed multiple linear regression approach reduces the leftover paint significantly.

Bimal Nepal; Bharatendra K. Rai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation covers typical sources of waste heat from process heating equipment, characteristics of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power.

58

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A New ACS Audio Course to help you understand and solve industrial and municipal waste-water problems ....  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New ACS Audio Course to help you understand and solve industrial and municipal waste-water problems .... ...

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste 767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant in Piketon, Ohio. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 25, 1995 EA-0767: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant October 25, 1995 EA-0767: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural industry Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Distinguished Texans in Agriculture Texas A&M AgriLife L. Don Anderson John B. Armstrong... in Agriculture Award. The Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award ... Source:...

62

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

itself * Waste heat recovery or auxiliary or adjoining systems within a plant * Waste heat to power conversion Recycle Copyrighted - E3M Inc. August 20, 2009 Arvind Thekdi, E3M...

63

forthcoming in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics Effects of the Private-Label Invasion in Food Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Food Industries Abstract Using supermarket scanner data, we test a variety of hypotheses from trade journals about the invasion of private-label food products. According to conventional industry wisdom, name, Economic Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture We are very grateful to Mark Denbaly

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

64

Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings March 30, 2011 - 2:44pm Addthis Interior view of the Gwinnett County "Gas To Energy" Project | Photo Courtesy of Gwinnett County, GA Interior view of the Gwinnett County "Gas To Energy" Project | Photo Courtesy of Gwinnett County, GA Tertia Speiser Project Officer, Golden Field Office What does this project do? Methane gas from biosolids, fats, oils, greases and other high strength industrial wastes is turned into energy. The county is improving efficiency and providing an alternative to clogging the sewers. The "Gas to Energy" system minimizes the impact of rising energy costs on consumers.

65

Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings Georgia County Turning Industrial and Farm Waste Into Big Energy Savings March 30, 2011 - 2:44pm Addthis Interior view of the Gwinnett County "Gas To Energy" Project | Photo Courtesy of Gwinnett County, GA Interior view of the Gwinnett County "Gas To Energy" Project | Photo Courtesy of Gwinnett County, GA Tertia Speiser Project Officer, Golden Field Office What does this project do? Methane gas from biosolids, fats, oils, greases and other high strength industrial wastes is turned into energy. The county is improving efficiency and providing an alternative to clogging the sewers. The "Gas to Energy" system minimizes the impact of rising energy costs on consumers.

66

Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Selected biological investigations on deep sea disposal of industrial wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

found at an actual disposal site with respect to waste dilution with time. This technique was incorporated into the standard 96-hour bioassay test to afford a means of obtaining preliminary information regarding the bioaccumulation of each waste... with time from the 16 ocean dispose 1 study by Ball (1973) Laboratory dilution setup used to simulate conditions found at an actual disposal site with regard to waste dilution. 18 20 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Until recently man haS considered...

Page, Sandra Lea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Industrial waste heat recovery and cogeneration involving organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a systematic approach for energy integration involving waste heat recovery through an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The proposed approach is based...

César Giovani Gutiérrez-Arriaga…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Impact of Generic Advertising on Brand Advertising in Food and Agricultural Industries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Generic advertising programs managed by several agricultural commodity groups are collective economic actions to promote agricultural products. Several previous studies have shown the effectiveness of… (more)

Suh, Daeseok

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect

This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G. [Walchand Inst. of Tech., Maharashtra (India)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Kilowatts From Waste Wood In The Furniture Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recently, the Singer Furniture Co., Lenoir, N. Carolina, purchased a 450 kilowatt steam turbine/induction generator set to use extra steam - produced by 'free' waste wood fuel - in generating 15% of the plant's electrical energy demand. The turbine...

Nailen, R. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

79

Management approaches to integrated solid waste in industrialized zones in Jordan: A case of Zarqa City  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to recognize the difficulties experienced in managing waste and to understand the reasons for those difficulties, especially in developing countries such as Jordan. Zarqa is a Governorate located in central Jordan, which has 2874 registered industries, making up more than 52% of the total industries in the country. Zarqa Governorate suffers from serious solid waste problems. These problems arise from an absence of adequate policies, facilitating legislation, and an environmentally enthused public, which therefore have a negative impact on the environment and health. Solid waste generation in Zarqa Governorate has increased exponentially and has polluted natural resources and the environment. A significant change in municipal solid waste generation was evident between the years 1994 and 2000. The Zarqa Governorate generated 482 tons/day in 2002 with a per capita rate of 0.44 kg/cap-day [Consulting Engineers, 2002, Feasibility study for the treatment of industrial wastewater in Zarqa Governorate. A project funded by METAP and Zarqa Chamber of Industry. Unpublished report]. This manuscript assesses the current operational and management practices of solid waste in the Zarqa Governorate; and evaluates the associated issues of solid waste collection, storage, transport, disposal and recycling in developing countries. The lack of techniques, financial funds and awareness among public and private sectors form an obstacle for achieving a successful environmental program. Several options are proposed to address management goals. Although Jordan became the first country in the Middle East to adopt a national environmental strategy; waste disposal is still largely uncontrolled and large quantities of waste go uncollected. Ensuring proper management of solid wastes, enforcing regulations, and implementing proper environmental awareness programs that will enhance the public understanding and achieve greater efficiency, are the findings of this study.

Mrayyan, Bassam [Faculty of Natural Resources and Environment, Hashemite University, P.O. Box 150459, 13115 Zarqa (Jordan); Hamdi, Moshrik R. [Faculty of Natural Resources and Environment, Hashemite University, P.O. Box 150459, 13115 Zarqa (Jordan)]. E-mail: moshrik@hu.edu.jo

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assessing the Power Generation Solution by Thermal-chemical Conversion of Meat Processing Industry Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a waste to energy conversion solution using a pyro-air-gasification process applied to biodegradable residues from meat processing industry integrated with small scale thermodynamic cycle for power generation. The solution of air- gasification at atmospheric pressure is based on experimental research and engineering computation developed during the study. The input data, such as: waste chemical composition, low/high heating value and proximate analysis, correspond to real waste products, sampled directly from the industrial processing line. Separate drying as first stage pre-treatment and integrated partial drying inside the reactor was used. The syngas low heating value of about 4.3 MJ/Nm3 is insured by its combustible fraction (H2– 12.2%, CO – 19.2%, CH4 – 1.6%). According to syngas composition the thermodynamic cycle was chosen – Otto gas engine. For a given waste feed-in flow considered in our computation of about 110 kg/h the power output obtained is about 50 kWel. The global energy efficiency of the unit is about 15%. The results offer answers to energy recovery waste disposal for residues with characteristics that are not suitable for classic incineration or limit the energy efficiency of the process making it non-economical (the average humidity of the raw waste is about 42% in mass). The research focused on waste to energy conversion process energy efficiency, waste neutralization and power generation.

Cosmin Marculescu; Florin Alexe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Soil Science THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAVDL Approved. s to style and content by: Kirk W...

Davol, Phebe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Treatability study of industrial waste using sanitary sewage to supply nutrients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ferguson, B. S. , U. S. Merchant Marine Academy Co-Chairmen of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. Harold W. Wolf Dr. Tom D. Reynolds Industrial wastewaters in many instances do not contain suffi- cient nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus to permit effective... and phosphorus, which adds to the cost. Sanitary sewage contains these nutrients and, if mixed in proper proportions with petrochemical industrial waste- waters requiring added nutrients, could satisfy the nutrient demand and reduce treatment cost. A limited...

Ferguson, James Ritchie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Packaging waste recycling in Europe: Is the industry paying for it?  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • We study the recycling schemes of France, Germany, Portugal, Romania and the UK. • The costs and benefits of recycling are compared for France, Portugal and Romania. • The balance of costs and benefits depend on the perspective (strictly financial/economic). • Financial supports to local authorities ought to promote cost-efficiency. - Abstract: This paper describes and examines the schemes established in five EU countries for the recycling of packaging waste. The changes in packaging waste management were mainly implemented since the Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste entered into force. The analysis of the five systems allowed the authors to identify very different approaches to cope with the same problem: meet the recovery and recycling targets imposed by EU law. Packaging waste is a responsibility of the industry. However, local governments are generally in charge of waste management, particularly in countries with Green Dot schemes or similar extended producer responsibility systems. This leads to the need of establishing a system of financial transfers between the industry and the local governments (particularly regarding the extra costs involved with selective collection and sorting). Using the same methodological approach, the authors also compare the costs and benefits of recycling from the perspective of local public authorities for France, Portugal and Romania. Since the purpose of the current paper is to take note of who is paying for the incremental costs of recycling and whether the industry (i.e. the consumer) is paying for the net financial costs of packaging waste management, environmental impacts are not included in the analysis. The work carried out in this paper highlights some aspects that are prone to be improved and raises several questions that will require further research. In the three countries analyzed more closely in this paper the industry is not paying the net financial cost of packaging waste management. In fact, if the savings attained by diverting packaging waste from other treatment (e.g. landfilling) and the public subsidies to the investment on the “recycling system” are not considered, it seems that the industry should increase the financial support to local authorities (by 125% in France, 50% in Portugal and 170% in Romania). However, in France and Portugal the industry is paying local authorities more than just the incremental costs of recycling (full costs of selective collection and sorting minus the avoided costs). To provide a more definitive judgment on the fairness of the systems it will be necessary to assess the cost efficiency of waste management operators (and judge whether operators are claiming costs or eliciting “prices”)

Ferreira da Cruz, Nuno, E-mail: nunocruz@ist.utl.pt; Ferreira, Sandra; Cabral, Marta; Simões, Pedro; Marques, Rui Cunha

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

87

Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste heat recovery, and food industry wastes from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and processing of fruits and vegetables. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer, and uses in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste is also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fixed bed downdraft gasification of paper industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The two main wastes generated from secondary fibre paper mills are rejects (composed mainly of plastics and fibres) and de-inking sludge, both of which are evolved from the pulping process during paper manufacture. The current practice for the disposal of these wastes is either by land-spreading or land-filling. This work explores the gasification of blends of pre-conditioned rejects and de-inking sludge pellets with mixed wood chips in an Imbert type fixed bed downdraft gasifier with a maximum feeding capacity of 10 kg/h. The producer gases evolved would generate combined heat and power (CHP) in an internal combustion engine. The results show that as much as 80 wt.% of a brown paper mill’s rejects (consisting of 20 wt.% mixed plastics and 80 wt.% paper fibres) could be successfully gasified in a blend with 20 wt.% mixed wood chips. The producer gas composition was 16.24% H2, 23.34% CO, 12.71% CO2 5.21% CH4 and 42.49% N2 (v/v%) with a higher heating value of 7.3 MJ/Nm3. After the removal of tar and water condensate the producer gas was of sufficient calorific value and flow rate to power a 10 kWe gas engine. Some blends using rejects from other mill types were not successful, and the limiting factor was usually the agglomeration of plastics present within the fuel.

M. Ouadi; J.G. Brammer; M. Kay; A. Hornung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ambient measurements of light-absorption by agricultural waste burning organic aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absorption properties (absorption Ångstrom exponent and mass absorption efficiency) of agricultural waste burning organic aerosols (AWB-OA) and their impact on total absorption were investigated in Cairo (Egypt) during the post-harvest rice straw burning autumn season. At 370 nm, AWB-OA were found to account for more than 25% of total absorption on average for the period of study (and for ?50% during intense biomass burning events), pointing out the major role potentially played by such particles on light absorption at short wavelengths. The absorption exponent obtained for AWB-OA (?3.5) is consistent with values previously reported for biomass burning brown carbon. In addition, AWB-OA were found to exhibit high mass absorption efficiencies at the near ultraviolet/mid-visible regions (e.g. 3.2±1.6 m2 g?1 at 370 nm and 0.8±0.4 m2 g?1 at 520 nm). Such findings clearly illustrate the need to take light absorption by organic aerosols into account for a better estimate of the radiative impact of biomass burning aerosols.

Olivier Favez; Stéphane C. Alfaro; Jean Sciare; Hélène Cachier; Magdy M. Abdelwahab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

SciTech Connect

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chemical properties of urban waste ash produced by open burning on the Jos Plateau: implications for agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Urban centres produce most of the world's waste and between a third and a half goes uncollected. The answer to the problem of waste disposal lies partly in agriculture, as waste can be extremely nutrient-rich. In the last decade there has been a tremendous increase in the developing world in total city area under informal food production and there are many examples of waste recycling onto the urban or peri-urban plots. Farmers on the Jos Plateau, Nigeria, have developed a successful soil fertility management strategy based on the combination of inorganic fertilisers, manure and urban waste ash. This study sought to provide some preliminary data on urban waste ash produced by open burning and used in farming in a developing country. Ash samples were collected from different locations around Jos and tested for C, N, pH, P, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb. It was found that ash is an effective liming material (because of the high pH, and high Ca, Mg and K contents), and has the potential to contribute significant quantities of micro-nutrients such as Mn, Zn and Cu. Ash, however, is far from being a homogenous material and its variability means that its fertilising potential will vary between batches and that, even if mean and median levels are low, there is the risk of the formation of localised areas of soil with excessive heavy metal contents (this is particularly the case with Pb). Further research is required to determine the plant-availability of these elements in the ash and to assess the wider environmental and health implications of uncontrolled, open burning of waste as a means of producing ash for agricultural purposes.

M.W. Pasquini; M.J. Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

New source performance standards for industrial boilers. Volume 5. Analysis of solid waste impacts  

SciTech Connect

This study provides an analysis of the impacts of emission controls on disposal of solid wastes from coal-fired industrial boilers. Examination is made of boiler systems, coal types, emission control alternatives, waste streams, waste disposal and utilization alternatives, and pertinent Federal regulations. Twenty-four representative model case scenarios are studied in detail. Expected disposal/utilization alternatives and disposal costs are developed. Comparison of the systems studied indicates that the most cost-effective SO/sub 2/ control technologies from the perspective of waste disposal cost per unit SO/sub 2/ control are, in decreasing order: physically cleaned coal/double alkali combination; double alkali; lime/limestone; spray drying; fluidized-bed combustion; and sodium throwaway.

Boldt, K.; Davis, H.; Delaney, B.; Grundahl, N.; Hyde, R.; Malloch, R.; Tusa, W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

World first in high level waste vitrification - A review of French vitrification industrial achievements  

SciTech Connect

AREVA has more than 30 years experience in operating industrial HLW (High Level radioactive Waste) vitrification facilities (AVM - Marcoule Vitrification Facility, R7 and T7 facilities). This vitrification technology was based on borosilicate glasses and induction-heating. AVM was the world's first industrial HLW vitrification facility to operate in-line with a reprocessing plant. The glass formulation was adapted to commercial Light Water Reactor fission products solutions, including alkaline liquid waste concentrates as well as platinoid-rich clarification fines. The R7 and T7 facilities were designed on the basis of the industrial experience acquired in the AVM facility. The AVM vitrification process was implemented at a larger scale in order to operate the R7 and T7 facilities in-line with the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants. After more than 30 years of operation, outstanding record of operation has been established by the R7 and T7 facilities. The industrial startup of the CCIM (Cold Crucible Induction Melter) technology with enhanced glass formulation was possible thanks to the close cooperation between CEA and AREVA. CCIM is a water-cooled induction melter in which the glass frit and the waste are melted by direct high frequency induction. This technology allows the handling of highly corrosive solutions and high operating temperatures which permits new glass compositions and a higher glass production capacity. The CCIM technology has been implemented successfully at La Hague plant.

Brueziere, J.; Chauvin, E. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Piroux, J.C. [Joint Vitrification Laboratory - LCV, Marcoule, BP171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

95

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

96

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulation of agricultural waste burning occurs at multipleexample, agricultural waste burning is managed by individualalso take agricultural waste- burning emissions into

Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AM? 2 2 1986 AM? 2 2 1986 NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Line Sites from Further Consideration for FUSRAP Inclusion Carlos E. Garcia, Director Environmental Safety and Health Division Albuquerque Operations Office The enclosed material is being provided to you to document the final actions taken under the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) for the Chupadera Mesa area and the Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Lines, New Mexico. Copies of designation/ elimination reviews for each of the sites are enclosed for your records. We have determined that neither site warrants inclusion in the remedial action program. Primary sources of data for this determination were two survey reports prepared through your Division, LA-10256-MS, "Radiological

98

Recycling non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into structural clay ceramics  

SciTech Connect

Cherokee Environmental Group (CEG)--a subsidiary of the Cherokee Sanford Group, Inc. (CSG)--has developed a system to beneficially reuse non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into the recycling process of CSG`s structural clay ceramics manufacturing operation. The wastes and soils are processed, screened, and blended with brickmaking raw materials. The resulting material is formed and fired in such a way that the bricks still exceed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) quality standards. Prior to usage, recycled materials are rigorously tested for ceramic compatibility and environmental compliance. Ceramic testing includes strength, shrinkage, and aesthetics. Environmental compliance is insured by testing for both organic and inorganic constituents. This recycling process has been fully permitted by all required state regulatory agencies in North Carolina, Maryland, and South Carolina where facilities are located. This inter-industrial synergy has eliminated landfill reliance and liability for many companies and property owners. The recycling volume of wastes and soils is high because CSG is one of the largest brick manufacturers in the nation. Together, CEG and CSG have eliminated more than 1 billion pounds of material from landfills by beneficially reusing the non-hazardous wastes.

MacRunnels, Z.D.; Miller, H.B. Jr. [Cherokee Environmental Group, Sanford, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Association of Indiana Solid Wastes Districts Inc. The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting,

103

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003: The history of waste energy recovery in Germany sinceincreasing recovery of waste energy and process gases, andgeneration or non-energy uses, waste-derived fuels,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Sustainability assessment of industrial waste treatment processes: The case of automotive shredder residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date numerous environmental, economic and societal indicators have been applied to evaluate and compare the sustainability of products and processes. This study presents a set of ad hoc sustainability indicators suitable for assessing and comparing processes for the treatment of industrial waste streams and for allowing to address efficiently all aspects of sustainability. This set consists of the following indicators: energy intensity, material intensity, water consumption, land use, global warming, human toxicity and treatment cost. The application of these indicators to industrial waste treatment processes is discussed in depth. A distinction is made between direct contributions to sustainability, occurring at the process level itself, and indirect contributions related to the production of auxiliaries and the recovery of end products. The proposed sustainability assessment method is applied to treatment processes for automotive shredder residue (ASR), a complex and heterogeneous waste stream with hazardous characteristics. Although different strategies for recycling and valorization of ASR were developed, with some of them already commercialized, large quantities of ASR are still commonly landfilled. This study concludes that for ASR the most sustainable alternative to the present landfill practice, both in short and long term perspective, consists of recycling combined with energetic valorization of the residual fraction.

Isabel Vermeulen; Chantal Block; Jo Van Caneghem; Wim Dewulf; Subhas K. Sikdar; Carlo Vandecasteele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry- Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry, given by Aditya Kumar of GE Global Research, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

106

Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine surfactant concentrations. To reliably quantify both benchmark surfactants and surfactin, a surfactant ion-selective electrode was used as an indicator in the potentiometric titration of the anionic surfactants with Hyamine 1622. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of a commercial preparation of SLS (STEOL CS-330) and surfactin was assessed using two-phase separation, and water flotation techniques; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption on the rock was determined. Qualitative tests indicated that on a molar basis, surfactin is more effective than STEOL CS-330 in altering wettability of crushed Lansing-Kansas City carbonates from oil-wet to water-wet state. Adsorption isotherms of STEOL CS-330 and surfactin on crushed Lansing-Kansas City outcrop and reservoir material showed that surfactin has higher specific adsorption on these oomoldic carbonates. Amott wettability studies confirmed that cleaned cores are mixed-wet, and that the aging procedure renders them oil-wet. Tests of aged cores with no initial water saturation resulted in very little spontaneous oil production, suggesting that water-wet pathways into the matrix are required for wettability change to occur. Further investigation of spontaneous imbibition and forced imbibition of water and surfactant solutions into LKC cores under a variety of conditions--cleaned vs. crude oil-aged; oil saturated vs. initial water saturation; flooded with surfactant vs. not flooded--indicated that in water-wet or intermediate wet cores, sodium laureth sulfate is more effective at enhancing spontaneous imbibition through wettability change. However, in more oil-wet systems, surfactin at the same concentration performs significantly better.

Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Soviet Farm Complex : industrial agriculture in a Socialist context, 1945-1965  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Soviet Farm Complex" is a history of food, farming and the environment in the postwar Soviet Union. It tells the story of how different technical and institutional authorities created an industrial Soviet countryside ...

Smith, Jenny Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

When the cows come home : post post-industrial urban agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past few decades, the industrialization of food has become increasingly influenced by the consolidation of its controlling corporations. This consolidation has isolated meat processing facilities from small farmers, ...

Cheng, Marissa A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Industry  

SciTech Connect

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

wisconsin's vanishing waters tech transfer success stories reducing food waste College of Agricultural & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wisconsin's vanishing waters · tech transfer success stories · reducing food waste College to grow potatoes that serves as a model for other crops and leading cutting-edge research on biofuels

Balser, Teri C.

112

Attitudes of Texas 4-H Club members toward the agricultural industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by governmental agencies concerned with agriculture. Samuel Lubell, the political analyst, has said: "Up to now, as I analyze the situation, support for farm legislation has rested largely on ignorance and confusion among urban dwellers as to what the farm... Policy Forum, Vol. XVII, No. 3, 1964-65, p. 2. 11 Samuel Lubell, "The Impact of Changing Public Opinion on Farm Policy, o A ricultural Policy Review, Vol. III, No, 1, January, February, March, 1963, p. 6. 12 Bardin H. Nelson, "The Creative Role...

Crouch, Marshall Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. March 1985-October 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for March 1985-October 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food-processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste-heat recovery, meat processing, seafood processing, dairy wastes, beverage industry, fruits and vegetables, and other food-industry wastes. Waste utilization includes animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, conversion to fertilizer, composting, and recovery and recycling of usable chemicals. Food-packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 169 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Assessing determinants of industrial waste reuse: The case of coal ash in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Devising effective strategies to facilitate waste reuse depends on the solid understanding of reuse behaviors. However, previous studies of reuse behavior have been limited in scope, focusing mostly on household recycling behaviors or very limited types of industrial wastes. To gain a better understanding of the business reuse behaviors, this study examined the impact of various factors in technical, economic, regulatory, and behavioral categories in the case of coal ash generated in the United States. The results of fixed effect models for fly ash and bottom ash particularly showed the significance role of the behavioral factor. In both models, a proxy variable, which represents knowledge sharing among the power plants or the utility's decision-making, turned out to be statistically significant and had the largest coefficient estimates among a group of variables. This finding may imply that the characteristics of waste reuse behavior are determined more by business decision-making behaviors than by market or institutional factors. However, the role of the behavioral variable was stronger in the bottom ash models than in the fly ash models. While the reuse of bottom ash was determined primarily by the behavioral variable, fly ash reuse was determined by more diverse factors including economic and regulatory variables. This could be explained by material characteristics in relation to competing resources and the nature of reuse applications.

Joo Young Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Adsorption of model textile dyes from aqueous solutions using agricultural wastes as adsorbents: equilibrium, kinetics and fixed bed column study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gram husk and groundnut shell are cheap and abundantly available agricultural waste materials in India. A systematic study on the adsorption of some model dyes from aqueous solution on these low-cost adsorbents has been attempted. Model dyes used were Methylene Blue, Rhodamine B, Congo Red, Eosine Y and Metanil Yellow. Equilibrium, kinetics and column experiments were performed. Effects of different process variables have been studied. Equilibrium data fitted well in Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations. A model using Freundlich equation has been developed for interpretation of kinetic data. Other models such as Lagergren equation and pseudo second order equation were also used. Of these models, pseudo second order equation was found to be the most satisfactory. Column experiments were carried out with gram-husk and Rhodamine B. The data could be correlated well with BDST model.

Sampa Chakrabarti; Basab Chaudhuri; Binay K. Dutta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Impact of agricultural waste burning in the Shandong Peninsula on carbonaceous aerosols in the Bohai Rim, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A total of 115 PM2.5 samples were collected for analyzing organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) at Tuoji Island (TI), China from November 2011 to December 2012. The results showed that annual arithmetical means of OC and EC concentrations were 3.8 ± 2.7 and 2.2 ± 2.2 ?g m? 3, which contributed 8% and 4% of PM2.5 mass concentrations, respectively. High EC concentrations occurred in winter, contributed mainly by EC outflow from the northwest source region, while high OC concentrations were found during spring, attributed largely to biofuel burning in the Shandong Peninsula, and short distance and favorable transport from the peninsula to the TI. Agricultural waste open burning in the peninsula caused the largest variability of OC concentration in summer. Eliminating agricultural field burning in the peninsula can reduce at least one-third of concentration levels and half of northward transport fluxes of OC and EC in Bohai Rim in summer.

Xiaoping Wang; Yingjun Chen; Chongguo Tian; Guopei Huang; Yin Fang; Fan Zhang; Zheng Zong; Jun Li; Gan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid waste and/or waste tires. The following solid waste disposal facilities require a solid waste permit prior to construction and/or operation: land disposal facilities; solid waste processing facilities, including: transfer stations; solid waste incinerators receiving waste from off-site sources; regulated medical waste

118

Industrial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Industrial Institutional Multi-Sector Residential Momentum Savings Regional Efficiency Progress Report Utility Toolkit Energy Smart Industrial - Energy Management...

119

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004). US DOE’s Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) are anof Energy’s Industrial Assessment Center program in SMEs

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Separation of heavy metals from industrial waste streams by membrane separation technology  

SciTech Connect

Industrial membrane technology is becoming increasingly attractive as a low-cost generic separation technique for volume reduction, recovery, and/or purification of the liquid phase and concentration and/or recovery of the contaminant or solute. It offers outstanding future potential in the reduction and/or recycling of hazardous pollutants from waste streams. Membrane separation technology may include: (1) commercial processes such as electrodialysis, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and ultrafiltration and (2) the development of hybrid processes such as liquid membranes, Donnan dialysis, and membrane bioreactor technology. Membrane separation technology as applied to waste treatment/reduction and environmental engineering problems has several advantages over conventional treatment processes. In contrast to distillation and solvent extraction membrane separation is achieved without a phase change and use of expensive solvents. The advantages of this technology are (1) low energy requirements; (2) small volumes of retentate that need to be handled; (3) selective removal of pollutants with the use of complexing agents and biocatalysts or by membrane surface modification; (4) the possibility for achieving zero discharge'' with reuse of product water, binding media and target, compounds; (5) continuous operation; (6) modular design without significant size limitations; (7) discrete membrane barrier to ensure physical separation of contaminants; and (8) minimal labor requirement.

Yichu Huang; Koseoglu, S.S. (Texas A and M Univ. System, College Station, TX (United States). Engineering Biosciences Research Center)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Agricultural Industry Advanced Vehicle Technology: Benchmark Study for Reduction in Petroleum Use  

SciTech Connect

Diesel use on farms in the United States has remained relatively constant since 1985, decreasing slightly in 2009, which may be attributed to price increases and the economic recession. During this time, the United States’ harvested area also has remained relatively constant at roughly 300 million acres. In 2010, farm diesel use was 5.4% of the total United States diesel use. Crops accounting for an estimated 65% of United States farm diesel use include corn, soybean, wheat, hay, and alfalfa, respectively, based on harvested crop area and a recent analysis of estimated fuel use by crop. Diesel use in these cropping systems primarily is from tillage, harvest, and various other operations (e.g., planting and spraying) (Figure 3). Diesel efficiency is markedly variable due to machinery types, conditions of operation (e.g., soil type and moisture), and operator variability. Farm diesel use per acre has slightly decreased in the last two decades and diesel is now estimated to be less than 5% of farm costs per acre. This report will explore current trends in increasing diesel efficiency in the farm sector. The report combines a survey of industry representatives, a review of literature, and data analysis to identify nascent technologies for increasing diesel efficiency

Roger Hoy

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Experimental and economic study of a gasification plant fuelled with olive industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Spain is the first olive oil maker worldwide. Yearly, the olive oil industry generates large amounts of by-products: olive pomace, tree pruning, pits, leaves and branches. This work presents the experimental and feasibility study of a pilot plant for the conversion of olive tree pruning and olive pits into electrical and thermal power. The pilot plant is composed of a downdraft gasifier, gas cooling-cleaning stage and spark ignition engine with a modified carburetor. The experimental results showed satisfactory cold gas efficiency (in the range of 70.7–75.5%) and good lower calorific value of the producer gas for both raw materials (4.8 and 5.4 MJ kg? 1). Moreover, the plant achieved acceptable values for the electric and CHP efficiency: 15% and almost 50%, respectively. Finally, the investment achieved reasonable profitability index with a payback period of 5–6 years. As a result, the energy recovery potential from the olive industry wastes may represent a good opportunity to promote distributed generation systems.

David Vera; Francisco Jurado; Nikolaos K. Margaritis; Panagiotis Grammelis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Determining the biomass fraction of mixed waste fuels: A comparison of existing industry and 14C-based methodologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 14C analysis of flue gas by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) were used to determine the biomass fraction of mixed waste at an operational energy-from-waste (EfW) plant. Results were converted to bioenergy (% total) using mathematical algorithms and assessed against existing industry methodologies which involve manual sorting and selective dissolution (SD) of feedstock. Simultaneous determinations using flue gas showed excellent agreement: 44.8 ± 2.7% for AMS and 44.6 ± 12.3% for LSC. Comparable bioenergy results were obtained using a feedstock manual sort procedure (41.4%), whilst a procedure based on selective dissolution of representative waste material is reported as 75.5% (no errors quoted). 14C techniques present significant advantages in data acquisition, precision and reliability for both electricity generator and industry regulator.

G.K.P. Muir; S. Hayward; B.G. Tripney; G.T. Cook; P. Naysmith; B.M.J. Herbert; M.H Garnett; M. Wilkinson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Waste recycling in the textile industry. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations on the recycling of waste-fibrous materials for textile production, and the recycling of textile-waste materials. Topics include use of wastes as raw materials for textile and fabric manufacturing; reuse of waste cloth, scraps, fibers, and polymeric materials from textile manufacturing; and the equipment used to collect, sort, and process textile wastes. Materials considered include cellulosic wastes, polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass-fiber wastes, and waste dusts. Applications discussed include textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 242 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

126

Energy and materials savings from gases and solid waste recovery in the iron and steel industry in Brazil: An industrial ecology approach  

SciTech Connect

This paper attempts to investigate, from an entropic point of view, the role of selected technologies in the production, transformation, consumption and release of energy and materials in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. In a quantitative analysis, the potential for energy and materials savings with recovery of heat, gases and tar are evaluated for the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil. The technologies for heat recovery of gases include Coke Dry Quenching (CDQ), applied only in one of the five Brazilian coke integrated steel plants, Top Gas Pressure Recovery Turbines (TPRT), recovery of Coke Oven Gas (COG), recovery of Blast Furnace Gas (BFG), recovery of BOF gas, recovery of tar, and thermal plant. Results indicate that, in a technical scenario, some 5.1 TWh of electricity can be generated if these technologies are applied to recover these remaining secondary fuels in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil, which is equivalent to some 45% of current total electricity consumption in the integrated plants in the country. Finally, solid waste control technologies, including options available for collection and treatment, are discussed. Estimates using the best practice methodology show that solid waste generation in the Iron and Steel Industry in Brazil reached approximately 18 million metric tons in 1994, of which 28% can be recirculated if the best practice available in the country is applied thoroughly.

Costa, M.M.; Schaeffer, R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Potential of low pressure agricultural waste briquettes: An alternative energy source for cooking in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the variation of steady-state combustion rate (otherwise called normalized burn rate NBR) with the density moisture content and geometry of sawdust palm fibre and rice husk briquettes burned in free air was investigated. The quest for alternative fuel for heating and cooking as a result of depletion of fossil fuel and environmental pollution associated with its burning has necessitated the need to improve on the use of loose agro-waste as alternative in Nigeria. Cylindrical briquettes were used through out the experiment except for the effect of geometry where cylindrical briquettes with central hole and cylindrical solid briquettes were used. The briquettes were formed by compression of the pulp in the mould with an Instron compression test machine at a pressure range between 1.5 and 7.5?N mm?2 which formed briquettes with densities between 200 and 500?kg m?3. The results show that the NBR for the three selected briquette samples: wood sawdust palm fibre and rice husk respectively was found to decrease as the density and moisture content increases. It was observed that hollow briquette had a higher NBR than that of solid briquette of the same pressure and relaxed diameter with sawdust having the highest variation and rice husk the least. The results show that briquettes could be a viable alternative to fuel wood.

A. Kuhe; F. A. Ibiang; D. I. Igbong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

129

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Division of Waste Management This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or

130

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

131

Behavior of cement mortars containing an industrial waste from aluminium refining: Stability in Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical interaction between a solid industrial waste from aluminium refining and saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution, as well as the effects of substituting siliceous sand for the waste on the physical and mechanical properties of mortars were studied. The waste is a solid that contains reactive alumina capable of combining with the calcium hydroxide. These reactions result in stable and insoluble compounds. This alumina, together with the halite (also present in the waste composition), chemically react with a saturated solution of Ca(OH){sub 2}, giving as a main reaction product the so-called Friedel's salt (Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}O{sub 6} {center{underscore}dot} 10 H{sub 2}O). Straetlingite and Si-hydrogarnets were among other products detected. The waste has a high specific surface area. The cement/waste mixtures therefore require a higher quantity of mixing water than cement/sand mixtures. The result is a decrease of the mechanical strengths and an increase of the total porosity. However, a decrease of the average size of the pores occurs, which can have a positive effect on the durability of the final material.

Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.; Vazquez, T.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: Industrial. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes in the treatment of industrial wastewaters. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, liquid membranes, and ultrafiltration techniques are described. Wastewater treatments for removal of metals, ammonia, sodium compounds, nitrates, fluorides, dyes, biologicals, and radioactive waste using membrane technology are discussed. Applications of this technology to the chemical, petrochemical, pulp, textile, steel, ore treatment, electro-plating, and other wastewater and groundwater-remediation industries are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: Industrial. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*Plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes in the treatment of industrial wastewaters. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, liquid membranes, and ultrafiltration techniques are described. Wastewater treatments for removal of metals, ammonia, sodium compounds, nitrates, fluorides, dyes, biologicals, and radioactive waste using membrane technology are discussed. Applications of this technology to the chemical, petrochemical, pulp, textile, steel, ore treatment, electro-plating, and other wastewater and groundwater-remediation industries are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: Industrial. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes in the treatment of industrial wastewaters. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, liquid membranes, and ultrafiltration techniques are described. Wastewater treatments for removal of metals, ammonia, sodium compounds, nitrates, fluorides, dyes, biologicals, and radioactive waste using membrane technology are discussed. Applications of this technology to the chemical, petrochemical, pulp, textile, steel, ore treatment, electro-plating, and other wastewater and groundwater-remediation industries are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

136

Sequential SO2/CO2 Capture of Calcium-Based Solid Waste from the Paper Industry in the Calcium Looping Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequential SO2/CO2 Capture of Calcium-Based Solid Waste from the Paper Industry in the Calcium Looping Process ... School of Energy and Power Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Coal-Burning Pollutants Emission Reduction, Shandong University, Jinan 250061, China ... Every year, large amounts of calcium-based solid wastes such as carbide slag (from the chlor-alkali industry), red mud (from the aluminum industry), and lime mud (from the paper industry) containing Ca(OH)2 or CaCO3 are produced. ...

Yingjie Li; Changtian Liu; Rongyue Sun; Hongling Liu; Shuimu Wu; Chunmei Lu

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

138

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combined heat and power and coke ovens, and waste managementto ban the use of small-scale coke-producing facilities forcasting, Scrap preheating, Dry coke quenching Inert anodes,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: Industrial. November 1976-October 1989 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for November 1976-October 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes to treat industrial waste water. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, and ultrafiltration processes are described. Removal of metals, sodium compounds, nitrates, flourides, dyes, and radioactive waste using membranes is examined. Waste-water treatment for chemical, pulp, textile, and steel mills using this technology is included. (This updated bibliography contains 294 citations, 13 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: industrial. January 1976-June 1989 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1976-June 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes to treat industrial waste water. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, and ultrafiltration processes are described. Removal of metals, sodium compounds, nitrates, flourides, dyes, and radioactive waste using membranes is examined. Waste-water treatment for chemical, pulp, textile, and steel mills using this technology is included. (This updated bibliography contains 281 citations, 35 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on corn wet milling. Corn Refiners Association corn wet milling industry: An ENERGYas an automotive fuel. Corn wet milling is the most energy-

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased use of biomass and energy efficiency improvements,Moreira, J. , 2006: Global biomass energy potential. Journal1971–2004 Notes 1) Biomass energy included 2) Industrial

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

145

Waste to energy by industrially integrated supercritical water gasification – Effects of alkali salts in residual by-products from the pulp and paper industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a method by which biomass can be converted into a hydrogen-rich gas product. Wet industrial waste streams, which contain both organic and inorganic material, are well suited for treatment by SCWG. In this study, the gasification of two streams of biomass resulting from the pulp and paper industry, black liquor and paper sludge, has been investigated. The purpose is to convert these to useful products, both gaseous and solids, which can be used either in the papermaking process or in external applications. Simple compounds, such as glucose, have been fully gasified in SCWG, but gasification of more complex compounds, such as biomass and waste, have not reached as high conversions. The investigated paper sludge was not easily gasified. Improving gasification results with catalysts is an option and the use of alkali salts for this purpose was studied. The relationship between alkali concentration, temperature, and gasification yields was studied with the addition of KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and black liquor to the paper sludge. Addition of black liquor to the paper sludge resulted in similarly enhancing effects as when the alkali salts were added, which made it possible to raise the dry matter content and gasification yield without expensive additives.

I. Rönnlund; L. Myréen; K. Lundqvist; J. Ahlbeck; T. Westerlund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection The waste management administrative regulations apply to the disposal of solid waste and the management of all liquid, semisolid, solid, or gaseous

147

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal restrictions

148

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

149

Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Control Law (Georgia) Waste Control Law (Georgia) Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams

150

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management

151

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

152

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for im- proving energy efficiency of corn wet milling havefor the corn wet milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide forfuel. Corn wet milling is the most energy-intensive food

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

options for combined heat and power in Canada. Office ofpolicies to promote combined heat and power in US industry.with fuel inputs in combined heat and power plants being

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EJ of primary energy, 40% of the global total of 227 EJ. Bytotal energy use by industry and on the fraction of electricity use consumed by motor driven systems was taken as representative of global

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The incentives for establishing and the expertise for implementing successful waste minimization programs can be found in every company. The “in-house” expertise that discovers, designs, builds and manages manufacturing processes understand...

Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

156

Application of Gasification to the Conversion of Wood, Urban and Industrial Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification is widely accepted as a technological option for the production of synthesis gas (SG) via partial oxidation of heterogeneous organic matter such as, residual biomass, classified urban wastes (RDF)...

N. Abatzoglou; J.-C. Fernandez; L. Laramée…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67 ± 0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (?30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1 ? 1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2 ? 2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions.

Prashant Rajput; M.M. Sarin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Feasibility study of heat pumps for waste heat recovery in industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. A case study was thus carried out at an applicable local industry (brewery) to assess the feasibility of implementing the heat pump for… (more)

De Waal, Devin.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Making Green Building Units By Using Some Wastes of Ceramic Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the fired clay articles. This suggested mix was applied within a common brick fabric in Egypt for studying the possibility of its industrial application....

Abd El-Ghafour, N.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Technologies at Multiple Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet overviewing Verso Paper Corp. project that will deploy industrial technologies to recover and reuse water and steam at pulp and paper facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Monitoring needs in the U.S. southeast: Impact of dioxins and other industrial wastes and wildlife  

SciTech Connect

The US southeast is a center for forest industry activities and over 180 pulp and paper mills have been reported from Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana. Many of these facilities emit bleached kraft mill effluents (BKMEs) into receiving waters. Contaminants present in these mill effluents and in other industrial activities known to adversely affect wildlife and fisheries resources include chlorinated phenolics, dioxins, furans and resin acids. Tennessee and North Carolina have issued fish consumption advisories for specific areas and a fishery has been closed in Arkansas. The extent of injury to wildlife resources from dioxins and other effluents from mill and industrial waste is not presently known. However, preliminary studies indicate effects on biota at several localities. Bioaccumulation of dioxins from mill effluents has been documented in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) (1--2 ppt) and soft-shelled turtles (Trionyx ferox) (17--31 ppt) from pulp/paper mill effluent in St. Joseph`s and Perdido Bays, Florida; reproductive abnormalities were noted in female Gambusia (sp.) exposed to mill effluent. In Jacksonville, Arkansas abnormalities > 10% were noted in fish and reproduction of wood duck (Aix sponsa) was impaired downstream from a chemical plant. Further work is needed to define mill and industrial facilities in the southeast and to monitor adverse effects on fish and wildlife resources.

Glooschenko, V. [National Biological Survey, Atlanta, GA (United States); Brim, M. [USFWS, Panama City, FL (United States); Augspurger, T. [USFWS, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cotton Breeding of the Bureau of Plant Industry U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Texas Experiment Station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

own farm, secure an early g( .plc cotton that will more successfully cscape the boll weevils. For thc use of growers, a brief account without detail of the t ars' breeding work is made herewith. In order to present clearly these rcsul ults of t xr... -- - - BUREAU OF PLANT IN ENT Sr ( . DEPA AGRICULTURE AND THE TEXAS EXPERIMENT STATION r ATIONS POST OFF COLLEGE STATION, BRAZ OCTOBER. 1". ICE 0s cou NTY, TEXAS TEXAS AGRICU FFICER! M. SANSOM, President. ................................. Alvarado...

Bennett, R. L. (Robert Love)

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pollution Caused by Agricultural Waste Burning and Possible Alternate Uses of Crop Stubble: A Case Study of Punjab  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue burning is one among the many sources of air pollution. Burning of farm waste causes severe pollution of land and water ... Straw carbon, nitrogen and sulphur are completely burnt and lost to the atm...

Parmod Kumar; Laxmi Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: industrial. January 1976-June 1988 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for January 1976-June 1988  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes to treat industrial waste water. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, and ultrafiltration processes are described. Removal of metals, sodium compounds, nitrates, flourides, dyes, and radioactive waste using membranes is examined. Wastewater treatment for chemical, pulp, textile, and steel mills using this technology is included. (This updated bibliography contains 246 citations, 26 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

168

Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15%), agricultural waste burning (3%), and tropi- cal peat3.5), with agricultural waste burning estimated to be theforest 1 Agricultural waste burning 1 Peat fires 3 1 Based

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

State Waste Discharge Permit application for industrial discharge to land: 200 East Area W-252 streams  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes the WAC 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit application for six W-252 liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site. Appendices B through H correspond to Section B through H in the permit application form. Within each appendix, sections correspond directly to the respective questions on the application form. The appendices include: Product or service information; Plant operational characteristics; Water consumption and waterloss; Wastewater information; Stormwater; Other information; and Site assessment.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Peak oil and oil vulnerability: what are the implications for industrial agriculture and rural communities? with a case study based in the Southern Gulf region of Queensland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Modern agriculture’s high levels of production and global markets have been made possible through vast inputs of fossil fuels for machinery, transport, fertilizer, chemicals, crop… (more)

Coventry, Donald Hugh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 1: SRF produced from commercial and industrial waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the mass, energy and material balances of a solid recovered fuel (SRF) production process. The SRF is produced from commercial and industrial waste (C&IW) through mechanical treatment (MT). In this work various streams of material produced in SRF production process are analyzed for their proximate and ultimate analysis. Based on this analysis and composition of process streams their mass, energy and material balances are established for SRF production process. Here mass balance describes the overall mass flow of input waste material in the various output streams, whereas material balance describes the mass flow of components of input waste stream (such as paper and cardboard, wood, plastic (soft), plastic (hard), textile and rubber) in the various output streams of SRF production process. A commercial scale experimental campaign was conducted on an MT waste sorting plant to produce SRF from C&IW. All the process streams (input and output) produced in this MT plant were sampled and treated according to the CEN standard methods for SRF: EN 15442 and EN 15443. The results from the mass balance of SRF production process showed that of the total input C&IW material to MT waste sorting plant, 62% was recovered in the form of SRF, 4% as ferrous metal, 1% as non-ferrous metal and 21% was sorted out as reject material, 11.6% as fine fraction, and 0.4% as heavy fraction. The energy flow balance in various process streams of this SRF production process showed that of the total input energy content of C&IW to MT plant, 75% energy was recovered in the form of SRF, 20% belonged to the reject material stream and rest 5% belonged with the streams of fine fraction and heavy fraction. In the material balances, mass fractions of plastic (soft), plastic (hard), paper and cardboard and wood recovered in the SRF stream were 88%, 70%, 72% and 60% respectively of their input masses to MT plant. A high mass fraction of plastic (PVC), rubber material and non-combustibles (such as stone/rock and glass particles), was found in the reject material stream.

Muhammad Nasrullah; Pasi Vainikka; Janne Hannula; Markku Hurme; Janne Kärki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) 8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks,

173

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also

174

Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and

175

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide

176

Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Management of Wastes (Nebraska) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pertaining to the Management of Wastes Pertaining to the Management of Wastes (Nebraska) Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Management of Wastes (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to waste management permits and licenses,

177

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

178

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces

179

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and treatment as

180

Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that are environmentally safe and sanitary, as well as economically feasible; submission of laboratory reports or analyses performed by certified laboratories for the purposes of compliance monitoring and testing and for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection These sections articulate rules for the maintenance and operation of solid waste disposal facilities, as well as site assignment procedures. Applications for site assignment will be reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection as well as the Department of Public

182

Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension · Collaborate with farmers

Kaminsky, Werner

183

Blending mining and nuclear industries at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) traditional procedures for underground mining activities have been significantly altered in order to assure underground safety and project adherence to numerous regulatory requirements. Innovative techniques have been developed for WIPP underground procedures, mining equipment, and operating environments. The mining emphasis at WIPP is upon the quality of the excavation, not (as in conventional mines) on the production of ore. The WIPP is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) project that is located 30 miles southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico, where the nation's first underground engineered nuclear repository is being constructed. The WIPP site was selected because of its location amidst a 607 meter thick salt bed, which provides a remarkably stable rock formation for the permanent storage of nuclear waste. The underground facility is located 655 meters below the earth's surface, in the Salado formation, which comprises two-hundred million year old halites with minor amounts of clay and anhydrites. When completed, the WIPP underground facility will consist of two components: approximately 81 square kilometers of experimental areas, and approximately 405 square kilometers of repository. 3 figs.

Walls, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry  

SciTech Connect

Food and beverage plants inherently consume a large quantity of water and generate a high volume of wastewater rich in organic content. On one hand, water discharge regulations are getting more stringent over the time, necessitating the use of different technologies to reduce the amount of wastewater and improve the effluent water quality. On the other hand, growing energy and water costs are driving the plants to extract and reuse valuable energy and water from the wastewater stream. An integrated waste-tovalue system uses a combination of anaerobic digester (AD), reciprocating gas engine/boiler, membrane bioreactor (MBR), and reverse osmosis (RO) to recover valuable energy as heat and/or electricity as well as purify the water for reuse. While individual anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors are being used in increasing numbers, there is a growing need to integrate them together in a waste-to-value system for enhanced energy and water recovery. However, currently operation of these systems relies heavily on the plant operator to perform periodic sampling and off-line lab analysis to monitor the system performance, detect any abnormal condition due to variations in the wastewater and decide on appropriate remedial action needed. This leads to a conservative design and operation of these systems to avoid any potential upsets that can destabilize the system.

Shi, Ruijie

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation of the Wisconsin Cranberry Industry Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural-Extension #12;STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied

Radeloff, Volker C.

187

AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Farmer Crop Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . 12 #12;2 MAY 1998 ® Will the trend of increasing high and the future of the industry, fac- ulty in the School of Agriculture at Purdue University in collaboration and will continue to dominate trade trends. Potential demand for agricultural products is greatest in Asia

188

Fluidised bed co-gasification of coal and olive oil industry wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of bagasse wastes mixed with coal is technically feasible, without major installation changes. The effect of experimental conditions on co-gasification process was analysed, to enhance gas production and improve its composition and energetic content. The rise of bagasse content increased tars and gaseous hydrocarbons contents, which can be reduced by increasing gasification temperature and/or air flow rate. The rise of temperature till 890 °C favoured hydrocarbons further reactions and allowed an increase of 45% in hydrogen release and a decrease in gaseous hydrocarbons of 55%. A reduction of around 30% in gaseous hydrocarbons was also achieved by rising O2/fuel ratio till 0.6 g/g daf, which decreased gas heating value, due to nitrogen diluting effect. Though no significant changes in gaseous hydrocarbons composition were obtained, the presence of dolomite in the fluidised bed had the benefit of decreasing tars content and rising gas yield, being the gas richer in hydrogen content.

Rui Neto André; Filomena Pinto; Carlos Franco; M. Dias; I. Gulyurtlu; M.A.A. Matos; I. Cabrita

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Projected ocean dumping rates for municipal and industrial wastes in the year 2000. Report for 26 March 1984-26 August 1985  

SciTech Connect

The amounts of coal ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, sewage sludge, industrial waste, and seafood-processing wastes currently ocean dumped were determined, and ocean dumping of these wastes was projected for the year 2000. The projected rates were made using three different scenarios: Scenario I assumed continued ocean dumping only by current permittees, Scenario II assumed some relaxation of ocean dumping regulation, and Scenario III, to provide a maximum estimate, assumed that future ocean-dumping would be based solely on economic considerations. Coal ash and FGD sludge are projected to be the most voluminous waste dumped under Scenarios II and III, and the East coast of the U.S. would produce the greatest amounts to be dumped.

Cura, J.; Menzie, C.; Borchardt, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

191

WASTE HEAT RECOVERY USING THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES IN THE LIGHT METALS INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

Recently discovered thermoelectric materials and associated manufacturing techniques (nanostructures, thin-film super lattice, quantum wells...) have been characterized with thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 12-25+%. These advances allow the manufacture of small-area, high-energy flux (350 W/cm2 input) thermoelectric generating (TEG) devices that operate at high temperatures (~750°C). TEG technology offers the potential for large-scale conversion of waste heat from the exhaust gases of electrolytic cells (e.g., Hall-Hèroult cells) and from aluminum, magnesium, metal and glass melting furnaces. This paper provides an analysis of the potential energy recovery and of the engineering issues that are expected when integrating TEG systems into existing manufacturing processes. The TEG module must be engineered for low-cost, easy insertion and simple operation in order to be incorporated into existing manufacturing operations. Heat transfer on both the hot and cold-side of these devices will require new materials, surface treatments and design concepts for their efficient operation.

Choate, William T.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Majumdar, Rajita

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural energy potential Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Land in 2050 Summary: new 12;source of industrial demand in agricultural markets (Energy Information Agency 2010... be expressed as a function of agricultural...

193

Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

Banbara, Mutsunori

194

Studies on fish waste management practices in Aroor Seafood Industrial Belt, Kerala and conversion of seafood waste into a liquid plant growth supplement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was materialized to analyze the management issues regarding the seafood processing waste generated including its impact on the coastal community in one of… (more)

Abhilash, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

196

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processes: Industrial. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of membranes in the treatment of industrial wastewaters. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, liquid membranes, and ultrafiltration techniques are described. Wastewater treatments for removal of metals, ammonia, sodium compounds, nitrates, fluorides, dyes, biologicals, and radioactive waste using membrane technology are discussed. Applications of this technology to the chemical, petrochemical, pulp, textile, steel, ore treatment, electro-plating, and other wastewater and groundwater-remediation industries are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Agriculture | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture Agriculture Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption transportation industry UN Data application/xml icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XML (xml, 95 KiB) text/csv icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XLS (csv, 21.6 KiB)

198

Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF THERMAL-DEGRADATION RATES OF SOME CANDIDATE RANKINE-CYCLE ORGANIC WORKING FLUIDS FOR CONVERSION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT INTO POWER Mohan L. Jain, Jack Demirgian, John L. Krazinski, and H. Bushby Argonne National Laboratory..., Argonne, Illinois Howard Mattes and John Purcell U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT Serious concerns over the long-term thermal In a previous study [1] based on systems stability of organic working fluids and its effect analysis and covering...

Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

200

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act (West Virginia) Act (West Virginia) Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection In addition to establishing a comprehensive program of controlling all phases of solid waste management and assigning responsibilities for solid waste management to the Secretary of Department of Environmental

202

Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) Livestock Waste Management Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality This statute establishes the animal feeding operation permitting program and gives the Department of Environmental Quality the authority to administer the state permitting program. Permits are required for the

203

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

204

Solid Waste Management (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Dakota) South Dakota) Solid Waste Management (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources This statute contains provisions for solid waste management systems, groundwater monitoring, liability for pollution, permitting, inspections, and provisions for waste reduction and recycling programs

205

Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy and Programs (Minnesota) Policy and Programs (Minnesota) Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting These statutes encourage the State and local governments to develop waste management strategies to achieve the maximum possible reduction in waste generation, eliminate or reduce adverse environmental impacts, encourage

206

Solid Waste Management (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan) Michigan) Solid Waste Management (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that maximize the utilization

207

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut) Connecticut) Solid Waste Management (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental considerations;

208

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Saskatchewan Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame College of Agriculture and Bioresources Inductees 2014 Edition #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall Williams 1941- Lorne Alan Babiuk 1946- #12;"SALUTE TO SASKATCHEWAN FARM LEADERS" Photos courtesy

Peak, Derek

211

Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Efird, Inc., decided to upgrade their heat recovery system at its Dyeing & Finishing Plant in Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They chose an electric industrial process heat pump to enhance heat recovery and to lower operating costs. This application... of the industrial process heat pump was the first of its kind in the American textile industry and was the result of a three year cooperative effort between American & Efird, Inc. and Duke Power Company. This innovative application of heat pump technology has...

Smith, S. W.

212

Chemistry Industry in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemistry Industry in Egypt ... FROM antiquity the Egyptian economy has been predominately agricultural. ... Nevertheless, it is most probable that the ancient Egyptians were the world's first practical or industrial chemists. ...

1953-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Financial Engineering Proposal Department of Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Financial Engineering Proposal Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics and Department engineering is a multidisciplinary field that emphasizes the engineering of new financial economic instruments the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and the Department of Agricultural Economics

Lawrence, Rick L.

214

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews of some twelve recuperator manufacturers and research organizations. Of the reports reviewed, the consensus was that the majority of recuperators used in the U.S. are constructed of 300...

Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Technical assessment of the Office of Industrial Programs' Advanced Heat Exchanger Program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE's AHX Program is an integral part of the OIP's Waste Heat Recovery Program whose goals are to increase the end-use energy efficiency of industry and agricultural operations, and to expand the energy options for manufacturing processes by providing technologies which use various fuels including coal, renewables, oil, and natural gas. The OIP and PNL convened a panel of industry experts to conduct a technical assessment of OIP's AHX program. This report documents the results of the panel's assessment.

Rinker, F.G.; Bergles, A.E.; Marciniak, T.J.; Batman, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Restructuring, Tight Budgets and Executive Order 13123 Create New Incentives to Reduce Waste in Federal Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the positive impact that electric utility industry restructuring, a reduction in the size of government operations, and the recent Presidential Executive Order 13123 should have on energy use in Federal industrial facilities...

Verdict, M. E.

217

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The project objective is to develop the scroll expander for Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems to be used in medium-grade waste heat recovery applications, and to validate and quantify the benefits of the prototype system.

219

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

220

Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Program Info State Montana Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This legislation sets goals for the reduction of solid waste generated by households, businesses, and governments, through source reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting. The state aims to achieve recycling and composting rates of: (a) 17% of the state's solid waste by 2008;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info Start Date 1986 State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Atlantic Compact Commission The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the region. The states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and South Carolina are party to this compact

222

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA) of 1990 was implemented in order to improve solid waste management procedures,

223

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Rebate Program A person who owns, operates, or leases an approved solid waste disposal facility is exempt from the payment of solid waste assessment fees, upon the receipt of a Certificate of Exemption from the director, if that

225

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis; selection and assessment of potential release scenarios  

SciTech Connect

In this part of the assessment, several accident scenarios are identified that could result in significant releases of chemicals into the environment. These scenarios include ruptures of storage tanks, large magnitude on-site spills, mixing of incompatible wastes, and off-site releases caused by tranpsortation accidents. In evaluating these scenarios, both probability and consequence are assessed, so that likelihood of occurrence is coupled with magnitude of effect in characterizing short term risks.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Agricultural Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 December 2012 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 J............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

227

Agricultural Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0604 BREC Report # 2008-17 June 2008 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

228

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Mississippi) Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality requires that each generator of greater than 220

230

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

231

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure,

232

Biological treatment of chemically flocculated agro-industrial waste from the wool scouring industry by an aerobic process without sludge recycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new agro-industrial effluent known as Sirolan CF effluent is the aqueous phase remaining after the chemical flocculation of wool scouring effluent by the Sirolan CF process. This effluent has been characterized, and shown to be effectively treated by biological degradation. It has a high concentration of organic material (5750 mg/L COD), with a low BOD5/COD ratio (0.29). Aerobic biological treatment was tested using laboratory and pilot scale reactors, and shown to remove essentially all BOD5, solvent extractable material and detergent activity. Maximum removal of the COD was 65% leaving a 2000 mg/L residual component of nonbiodegradable organic material. The combined processes of Sirolan CF and biological treatment removed over 90% of the COD and all solvent extractable material from raw wool scouring effluent. This compares favourably to existing treatment systems, and represents a viable and attractive alternative to treat this extremely polluted wastewater.

Andrew J Poole; Ralf Cord-Ruwisch; F.William Jones

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

Virginia Tech

234

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

235

This is not a peer-reviewed article. Pp. 034-043 in the Ninth International Animal, Agricultural and Food Processing Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is not a peer-reviewed article. Pp. 034-043 in the Ninth International Animal, Agricultural protect the soil surface and establish and sustain vegetation. The second part of this project looked requiring substantial investment in erosion control and vegetation establishment. Currently, common erosion

Mukhtar, Saqib

236

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3  

SciTech Connect

A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Agriculture INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volatility following trade liberalization. This had an adverse effect on agricultural economies of regions impact on small and mar- ginal farmers. · Increased non-agricultural demand for land and water as a result of the higher overall GDP growth and urbanization. · Aggravation in social distress

Sohoni, Milind

238

AGRICULTURE, 2005 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2005 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook, and Specialization in the Wisconsin Dairy Industry · The Economic Importance of Value-added Agriculture in Wisconsin · The Economic Value of Wisconsin's Green Industry Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

Radeloff, Volker C.

239

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

least two seconds. ” The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Industry Alliance Industry Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Alliance Industry Alliance Clean, Sustainable Energy for the 21st Century Industry Alliance Industry Alliance Clean, Sustainable Energy for the 21st Century October, 2010...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

Kolokolnikov, Theodore

242

Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.36 billion), which includes food service establishments (restaurants and bars) and retail food storesFE935 Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food Industries

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

243

Organic contaminants in sewage sludge (biosolids) and their significance for agricultural recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminants in water and wastewater' compiled and edited...significance for agricultural recycling S. R. Smith * * s...discharged in urban wastewater from industrial and...significance for agricultural recycling. | Organic chemicals discharged in urban wastewater from industrial and...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

245

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report of cement industry waste heat power generation. ChinaWorrell et al. , 2001). Waste heat recovery (WHR) poweradoption and utilization of waste heat recovery (WHR) power

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industry Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural regions adjoining Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. Agricultural, Industrial and Domestic 4 Annexure III: Water recycling technologies Wastewater and Industrial... water re-treatment Tariff mechanism. 5 Annexure IV and V:...

248

Solid Waste Management and Land Protection (North Dakota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Land Protection (North Dakota) and Land Protection (North Dakota) Solid Waste Management and Land Protection (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The policy of the State of North Dakota is to encourage and provide for environmentally acceptable and economical solid waste management practices, and the Department of Health may promulgate regulations related to waste

249

Effect of agricultural use of phosphogypsum on trace elements in soils and vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the disposal of phosphogypsum, one of the main industrial wastes of phosphorus fertilizer production, is reviewed, from the point of view of element pollution of phosphate raw materials, when it is introduced to soil. When phosphogypsum from different phosphorus producing plants in the USSR is used in agriculture, the main element-pollutants are fluorine, sulphur, strontium and rare earth elements. Their concentration in soils and vegetation exceeds Clark values by 20–100 times. The necessity for complex biogeochemical investigations to identify the hazards from these chemical elements in the environment is discussed.

A.V. Gorbunov; M.V. Frontasyeva; S.F. Gundorina; T.L. Onischenko; B.B. Maksjuta; Chen Sen Pal

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/spills and subsequent clean up costs ($20,000) Sewage Sludge Volume Reduction 234,000 Radioactive Waste $910,000 $193,400 $716,600 60,000 gallons of radioactive STP liquid waste could have been disposed of through,000) Digital Imaging System Substitution 282 Hazardous Waste / Radioactive Waste / Industrial Waste $25,000 $25

251

Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres (subjective, institutional...

Chenault, Edith Anne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Economics Marine industry studies Corporate social responsibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass processing & biomaterials Engineering applications in livestock environments Food processing responsibility Animal and Poultry Science Poultry Nutrition Feed Science Food Science Food nanotechnology Food implementation Accessible Computing Biomedical computation engineering Computational epidemiology Gene expression

Saskatchewan, University of

253

Industrial electrotechnology development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New and improved industrial technologies have a tremendous role in enhancing productivity, minimising waste, reducing overall energy consumption, and mitigating environmental impacts. The electric utility industry plays a major role in developing these new and improved technologies. This paper describes several major advances and their potential impacts.

Clark W. Gellings

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

255

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES OUTSTANDING ALUMNI AWARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES OUTSTANDING ALUMNI AWARD Texas A&M University The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University is currently in its second century of educating leaders and providing leadership for the agricultural industry -- a tradition of leadership. Through its strong teaching

256

NOMINATION FORM 2010 Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOMINATION FORM 2010 Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Award Texas A&M AgriLife The Texas A/her contributions on behalf of the Texas agricultural industry and community (information may be submitted:__________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ RETURN NOMINATIONS TO 2010 Distinguished Texan in Agriculture Selection Advisory Committee c/o Office

257

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition is 6-percent coal/petcoke/animal meal mix, 16-sawdust Coal, plastic, and tires Tires Petcoke, plastic, andwaste oil Petcoke, sunflower shells, and waste oil Tire

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

259

Solid Waste Management Rule (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rule (West Virginia) Rule (West Virginia) Solid Waste Management Rule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes requirements for the siting, financial assurance, installation, establishment, construction, design, groundwater monitoring, modification, operation, permitting, closure and post-closure care of any

260

THE ECONOMIST The waste industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currents cause flotsam from around the world to accumulate in a vast becalmed patch of ocean. In places

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

262

Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

MANUFACTURING OFFICE Advanced, Energy- Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse New Hybrid Membrane System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...

263

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Park Betty Riley South Central Oregon Economic Development District Engineered Geothermal Systems Demonstration Projects May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any...

264

Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Engineered Geothermal Systems, Low Temp, Exploration Demonstration Projects. Project goal: to attract new businesses to Klamath and Lake counties for the purpose of capitalizing on our abundant geothermal resources.

266

Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes Increases soil pH Add plant nutrients Low cost #12;UNH COOPERATIVE EXTENSION Food & Agriculture and scab-susceptible potatoes varieties thrive in acid soils, and should not be supplemented with wood ash

New Hampshire, University of

267

Economic Value of Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Value of Agricultural Research Public Investment in Texas Agricultural Research Yields Significant Economic Returns #12;Texas agricultural producers and especially consumers benefit directly from in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University conducted analyses using an agriculture

268

Agriculture and Food Processes Branch program summary document  

SciTech Connect

The work of the Agriculture and Food Processes Branch within the US DOE's Office of Industrial Programs is discussed and reviewed. The Branch is responsible for assisting the food and agricultural sectors of the economy in increasing their energy efficiency by cost sharing with industry the development and demonstration of technologies industry by itself would not develop because of a greater than normal risk factor, but have significant energy conservation benefits. This task is made more difficult by the diversity of agriculture and the food industry. The focus of the program is now on the development and demonstration of energy conservation technology in high energy use industry sectors and agricultural functions (e.g., sugar processing, meat processing, irrigation, and crop drying, high energy use functions common to many sectors of the food industry (e.g., refrigeration, drying, and evaporation), and innovative concepts (e.g., energy integrated farm systems. Specific projects within the program are summarized. (LCL)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical...

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE TEXAS A&M DISTINGUISHED TEXAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE TEXAS A&M DISTINGUISHED TEXAN IN AGRICULTURE AWARD The agricultural teaching a proud history of training leaders and providing leadership for the agricultural industry for the agricultural community. It is, therefore, fitting to recognize the efforts of Texans who have gained unique

271

Future Agriculture / Framtidens lantbruk Welcome to a lunch seminar June 11, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future Agriculture / Framtidens lantbruk Welcome to a lunch seminar June 11, 2013 "Zero Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use, is a research program- me developed at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). In Future Agriculture researchers work together with industry, interest groups

272

Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 · Corn Ethanol: Impacts on Markets Communities and the Environment . . . . . . 33 · BioenergySTATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 III Special Article: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin

Radeloff, Volker C.

273

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

Noble, James S.

274

Energy from waste via coal/waste co-firing  

SciTech Connect

The paper reviews the feasibility of waste-to-energy plants using the cocombustion of coal with refuse-derived fuels. The paper discusses the types of wastes available: municipal solid wastes, plastics, tires, biomass, and specialized industrial wastes, such as waste oils, post-consumer carpet, auto shredder residues, and petroleum coke. The five most common combustion systems used in co-firing are briefly described. They are the stoker boiler, suspension-fired boilers, cyclone furnaces, fluidized bed boilers, and cement kilns. The paper also discusses the economic incentives for generating electricity from waste.

Winslow, J.; Ekmann, J.; Smouse, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Harding, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

276

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

277

Kentucky Department of Agriculture  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Kentucky Department Kentucky Department of Agriculture of Agriculture Motor Fuel and Pesticide Motor Fuel and Pesticide Testing Laboratory Testing Laboratory Introduction...

278

A New Approach to Industrial Air Conditioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dryer Systems Division, has marketed industrial drying machinery. These heat reactivated dryers can handle latent loads in industrial air conditioning systems. Through waste heat conservation, air conditioning costs can be reduced 25 to 50%, with applications...

Gravenstreter, T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

280

Remote monitoring and controlling of agriculture systems through wireless embedded system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As we know today everyone is facing electric loadshedding problem. This effect is more serious to industrial and agricultural sector. This tends to financial loss. We know our country is an agriculture-oriente...

Mrs. Shinde Sunita Sunil; Patil Ravindra Tanaji

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (virtual- nity and Economic Development Concentration; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization

Stuart, Steven J.

282

Global bioenergy potential from high-lignin agricultural residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...black walnut nut industry, nut markets...by means of gasification process of...Agriculturaland wood waste potentials...Pilot-Plant gasification of olive stone...Bbiomass and Waste IX (Inst Gas...Integrated biomass gasification combined cycle...energy.gov/industry/distributedenergy...

Venugopal Mendu; Tom Shearin; J. Elliott Campbell; Jr; Jozsef Stork; Jungho Jae; Mark Crocker; George Huber; Seth DeBolt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

{open_quotes}Radon{close_quotes} - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities.

Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utilities Commission All proposed nuclear power generation facilities must be certified by the Public Utilities Commission under this statute prior to construction and

285

environment and agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

286

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

287

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for example, Oppili, P., "Waste Burning, A Health Hazard at Pallikaranai," The Hindu, Sept. 9, 2003; "MPPCB1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious

Columbia University

288

Perceptions of secondary school agriculture teachers regarding biomass production education in Iowa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the boom of biorenewable energy, biomass production has become an important segment in agriculture industry (Iowa Energy Center, 2013). A higher workforce will be… (more)

Han, Guang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2011 Armstrong World Industries, Inc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2011 Armstrong World Industries, Inc Overview The main objectives were the following: -To reduce wasted space and optimize the Armstrong Marietta plant generate? How did you analyse them? Outcomes Armstrong will save on forklift fuel costs as a result

Demirel, Melik C.

290

International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

Theurer, Jean E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Use of Fe2O3-Containing Industrial Wastes As the Oxygen Carrier for Chemical-Looping Combustion of Coal: Effects of Pressure and Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2006), 45 (17), 6075-6080 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ... Chemical-Looping Combustion with NiO and Fe2O3 in a Thermobalance and Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor with Double Loops ... Shen, L. H.; Wu, J. H.; Gao, Z. P.; Xiao, J. Combust. ...

Shuai Zhang; Chiranjib Saha; Yichao Yang; Sankar Bhattacharya; Rui Xiao

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

294

Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and agricultural wastewater Largus T biological processing strat- egies that produce bioenergy or biochemicals while treating industrial on wastewater treatment from pollution control to resource exploitation. Many bioprocesses can provide bioenergy

Angenent, Lars T.

295

Agricultural Chemistry and Bioenergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural Chemistry and Bioenergy ... Renewed interest in converting biomass to biofuels such as ethanol, other forms of bioenergy, and bioenergy byproducts or coproducts of commercial value opens opportunities for chemists, including agricultural chemists and related disciplines. ...

William J. Orts; Kevin M. Holtman; James N. Seiber

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute College of Agricultural Sustainability Institute Professor, Department of LAWR With input from Steve Kaffka, Ford Denison Sustainability Institute The Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility is a unique 300-acre facility near

California at Davis, University of

297

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture KEY: # = new course * = course IN AGRICULTURE. (3) Anintroductorycourserequiringcriticalanalysisofthemajorsocial. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfers

MacAdam, Keith

298

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics KEY: # = new course THE ECONOMICS OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE. (3 of agriculture in both a national and international dimension. Students who have completed ECO 201

MacAdam, Keith

299

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture KEY: # = new course INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. (3) Broad introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop and livestock management practices. Relationships

MacAdam, Keith

300

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building and maintaining a productive, safe, and sustainable environment. Agricultural programs integrate biological agricultural systems. COLLEGE PROGRAMS Undergraduate Majors Undergraduate programs lead to a Bachelor

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Industry | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industry Industry Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by other industries and construction. Data is only available for Paraguay and the U.S., years 2000 to 2007. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption Industry UN Data application/zip icon XML (zip, 514 bytes) application/zip icon XLS (zip, 425 bytes) Quality Metrics

302

ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cooperative partnerships between industry and government are encouraging the development and use of innovative technologies that reduce industrial energy use, processing wastes, and production costs.

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced industrial heat Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management and Air Flow) - Waste Heat Recovery in Industrial Processes... on roads - District heating systems - Various industrial processes Geothermal Heat Pumps -...

304

European Commission Agriculture and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B ­ 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32 (0) 2-2969909 Fax: +32 (0) 2-29211 33 E-mail: info@ec.europa.eu Web: https://www.ec.europa.eu/agriculture

305

International Programs in Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

306

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

Noble, James S.

307

Division of Agriculture,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

Ray, David

308

Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

Harms, Kyle E.

309

Introduction. Sustainable agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Introduction. Sustainable agriculture Chris...agriculture more sustainable and to consider...progress and future challenges. The reviews cover...harvesting solar energy for biofuels and...to a Theme Issue Sustainable agriculture I...case for increased integration of crop and animal...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Solving the Nuclear Waste Problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solving the Nuclear Waste Problem ... Of the many problems that beset the nuclear power industry, none has proved as perplexing as taking out the trash. ... Nuclear waste will remain a potential threat to man and the environment for as long as 10,000 years. ...

1988-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

311

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Bond Program Provider Revenue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial, natural resources, recreational development or manufacturing purposes. The board of county commissioners of any county or the governing body of any city may approve an exemption of property funded by industrial revenue bonds (IRB's). Some

312

Economic Impact of the Florida Apiculture Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Economic Impact of the Florida Apiculture Industry Economics Report 01-1 By Alan Hodges, David and Agricultural Sciences Department of Food & Resource Economics Department of Entomology/ Nematology Gainesville .......................................................................................................................................12 Economic Impact Analysis

Florida, University of

313

Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

Barnes, Elizabeth A.

314

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

Lawrence, Rick L.

315

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

316

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry inis very little use of alternative fuels (defined as waste

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

COMMITMENT & INTEGRITY DRIVE RESULTS Industry, Nonprofit,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-containing particles in wastewater. #12;000000.00 3COMMITMENT & INTEGRITY DRIVE RESULTS My Industry Experience 6 years, drinking water, sanitary wastewater, industrial wastewater, and stormwater Worked for private industry of waste, materials storage, product recycling, remediation, property transfers Internal Pressures Profit

Lipson, Michal

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal waste recycling Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measure for recycling of house-hold waste to agriculture 12;Sustainability analysis Bioenergy... , cereal grain), grass from seminatural ecosystem e.g. ... Source: Ris...

319

Waste Minimization: A Hidden Energy Savings?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE MINIMIZATION: A HIDDEN ENERGY SAVINGS? R. 1. GOOD Principal Engineer, Environmental Protection and Energy Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Company, Inc. Seadrift, Texas ABSTRACT Several changes in the last few years have forced a re...-examination of waste generation within the petro chemical industry. In today's political/regulatory arena, industrial waste, both hazardous and non hazardous, has become an extreme potential liability in handling, storing, and disposal. Traditional methods...

Good, R. L.; Hunt, K. E.

320

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel Gas Production from Organic Wastes by Low Capital Cost Batch Digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technical background is reviewed on energy recovery from biomass--i.e., all organic wastes, especially municipal solid wastes, but also including agricultural residues and crops grown specifically for ener...

Donald L. Wise; Alfred P. Leuschner…

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

Gelfond, Michael

323

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

324

Agricultural Marketing Toolkit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural-Marketing-Toolkit Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

325

Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small- and medium-sized manufacturers may be eligible to receive a no-cost assessment provided by DOE Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs). Teams located at 24 universities around the country conduct the energy audits to identify opportunities to improve productivity, reduce waste, and save energy. Each manufacturer typically identifies about $55,000 in potential annual savings on average. Over 15,000 IAC assessments have been conducted. IACs also train the next-generation of energy savvy engineers.

326

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

Darby, D. F.

327

Wisconsin Agriculture Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsin Agriculture 2012 STATUS OF Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics · Status­Extension College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON #12;#12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, UW

Radeloff, Volker C.

328

Nuclear waste disposal in Switzerland: science, politics and uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Switzerland, radioactive waste arises from electricity produced by five nuclear power plants and from the use of ... fields of medicine, industry and research. The waste is grouped into three categories: High-...

Simon Loew

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A R&D Program for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall goal of the DOE Industrial Heat Pump Program is to foster research and development which will allow more efficient and economical recovery of waste energy in industry. Specifically, the program includes the identification of appropriate...

Hayes, A. J.

330

ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors.

331

College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office Science Environmental Horticulture Equine Science Horticulture Landscape Architecture Soil and Crop Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Environmental Horticulture

332

Biofuels and Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and Agriculture Biofuels and Agriculture A Factsheet for Farmers American farmers have "biofuels" like ethanol and biodiesel mean that new markets are opening up. These can provide extra farm as growing markets for other biofuels like biodiesel. What are biofuels? Biofuels (short for "biomass fuels

Pawlowski, Wojtek

333

Agricultural Research in Scotland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... administered by independent governing bodies under the general scientific guidance of the Agricultural Research Council. Expenditure on agricultural research for the current financial year amounted to £875,800, of which ... for the current financial year amounted to £875,800, of which £140,050 was capital ...

1956-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

335

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

336

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a “nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

338

Converter waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect

The importance of waste management and disposal issues to the converting and print industries is demonstrated by the high response rate to a survey of US and Canadian converters and printers. The 30-item questionnaire measured the impact of reuse, recycling, source reduction, incineration, and landfilling on incoming raw-material packaging, process scrap, and waste inks, coatings, and adhesives. The results indicate that significant amounts of incoming packaging materials are reused in-house or through supplier take-back programs. However, there is very little reuse of excess raw materials and process scrap, suggesting the need for greater source reduction within these facilities as the regulatory climate becomes increasingly restrictive.

Schultz, R.B. (RBS Technologies, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

Tullos, Desiree

340

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Waste-to-Energy Biomass Digester with Decreased Water Consumption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications and Industries Disposal of solid animal waste and generation of biogas Suitable for large-scale animal feeding operations that dry-scrape manure Especially...

342

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap...

343

Use Vapor Recompression to Recover Low-Pressure Waste Steam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet on recovering low-pressure waste steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

344

Waste to Energy Developers WTED | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste-to-Energy Developers (WTED) Place: California Sector: Services Product: WTED is an engineering company that provides services in the areas of industrial processes, electric...

345

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial International Energy Outlook 2010 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by 42 percent, or an average of 1.3 percent per year, from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Ninety-five percent of the growth occurs in non-OECD nations. Overview The world's industries make up a diverse sector that includes manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction. Industrial energy demand varies across regions and countries, depending on the level and mix of economic activity and technological development, among other factors. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. Industrial energy use also includes natural gas and petroleum products used as feedstocks to produce non-energy products, such as plastics. In aggregate, the industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sector, consuming about one-half of the world's total delivered energy.

346

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Method for processing aqueous wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating waste water such as that from an industrial processing facility comprising the separation of the waste water into a dilute waste stream and a concentrated waste stream. The concentrated waste stream is treated chemically to enhance precipitation and then allowed to separate into a sludge and a supernate. The supernate is skimmed or filtered from the sludge and blended with the dilute waste stream to form a second dilute waste stream. The sludge remaining is mixed with cementitious material, rinsed to dissolve soluble components, then pressed to remove excess water and dissolved solids before being allowed to cure. The dilute waste stream is also chemically treated to decompose carbonate complexes and metal ions and then mixed with cationic polymer to cause the precipitated solids to flocculate. Filtration of the flocculant removes sufficient solids to allow the waste water to be discharged to the surface of a stream. The filtered material is added to the sludge of the concentrated waste stream. The method is also applicable to the treatment and removal of soluble uranium from aqueous streams, such that the treated stream may be used as a potable water supply.

Pickett, John B. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Martin, Hollis L. (Rt. 1, Box 188KB, McCormick, SC 29835); Langton, Christine A. (455 Sumter St. SE., Aiken, SC 29801); Harley, Willie W. (110 Fairchild St., Batesburg, SC 29006)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

INDUSTRIAL LITERATURE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anionic Surfactants. Features, properties, and applications of the Igepon series of anionic surfactants which have found use in textile wet processing, detergents, cosmetics, and agricultural chemicals. Bulletin 10M-7-58. GENERAL ANILINE & FILM CORP. ...

1958-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

351

Essays on Incorporating Risk Modeling Techniques in Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundation for expanding the standard single period portfolio optimization problem to multi-periods. This modeling technique also provides a framework to analyze other farm financial decisions, farm growth decisions, and even could be applied to loan... and return on assets when compared to industrially diversified firms. Results from previous studies in non-agriculture sectors suggest there are possible gains from geographic diversification. 11 Within an agricultural setting, results of studies...

Larsen, Ryan A.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Protection of ground and surface waters, January 1982-August 1987: Citations from AGRICOLA (Agricultural Online Access) concerning diseases and other environmental considerations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The citations in this bibliography are selected from English-language material from the international literature on the agricultural aspects of the pollution of ground and surface water by chemicals. Some of the subject areas include: Agricultural operations; Pesticides; Legislation; Land use; Urban hydrology and pollution; Food processing wastes; and Waste treatment.

Bebee, C.N.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

355

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Scienc- es (CAFLS) supports Clemson University's land-grant mission to provide education, research and service to the public. The College of Agriculture

Stuart, Steven J.

356

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

39 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (www.clemson.edu/CAFLS) offers a broad. The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics with a Community and Economic

Stuart, Steven J.

357

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Bolding, M. Chad

358

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

46 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 46 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

Stuart, Steven J.

359

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

44 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

Stuart, Steven J.

360

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

Stuart, Steven J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

Stuart, Steven J.

362

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering KEY: # = new course of engineering systems, earthwork computations, and introduction to boundary surveys for Agriculture students in the College of Agriculture and/or consent of instructor. AEN 220 FARM TRACTORS AND ENGINES. (3) Principles

MacAdam, Keith

363

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

41 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

364

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

365

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

42 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

Stuart, Steven J.

366

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Proceedings Research Station. 130 p. Declinesinhabitatofgreatersage, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil

367

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Emission Reduction Technologies. Food and AgriculturalIEA). 2009. Energy Technology Transitions for Industry -IEA). 2010. Energy Technology Perspectives - Scenarios and

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ITP Chemicals: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical Industry, May 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Profiles about the ethylene chain, propylene chain, benzene-toulene-xylene chain, agricultural chemicals chain, chlor-alkali industry, and supporting processes

369

Environmental Effects of Industrial Farming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·Water contamination ·Soil contamination ·Solutions #12;US Meat Industry Animals (2009) kg produced (2009 contamination #12;Water contamination ·~9x108 kg of dry waste produced in the US per day day in 2001 #12;Water!" #12;Air contamination ·220kg of CH4 produced in the lifetime of a cow "Smells like money!" #12;Air

Budker, Dmitry

370

Coal industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

futuresMICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- non as old as the industrial revolution. It's still an issue today, though now it's commonly called

372

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

373

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

374

Purdue Agriculture Annual Statistical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purdue Agriculture Research Works Annual Statistical Report 2005-2006 Purdue AGrICuLTure Read the full report on the Web www.ag.purdue.edu/arp/stat_report_05-06 #12;Purdue AGrICuLTure Purdue Agriculture Research Works Here's why. We are riding the wave of revolutionary changes brought about

375

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

376

Agricultural Equipment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAgriculturalEquipment&oldid267143...

377

BIO?REFINERIES: BIOPROCESS TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTE?WATER TREATMENT, ENERGY AND PRODUCT VALORIZATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non?GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food fiber and other biology?based products including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific?attribute raw materials for differentiated markets we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio?refineries be seen as part of a ‘new’ agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste?water treatment water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal sustainable energy production and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio?oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar?driven microalgae bio?refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy fuels and other useful materials (valorisation) with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

A. Keith Cowan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Challenges Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

Radeloff, Volker C.

379

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains a minimum of 245 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Solid Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Aquaculture and horticulture businesses, and other industries that use geothermal direct-use systems typically don't generate any more solid waste than those that use other energy resources.

382

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

US nuclear waste: Widespread problem of disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... individual states in the United States to develop facilities for disposal of low-level radioactive waste produced by ... produced by nuclear reactors, industry and biomdical research and treatment. The federal Low-Level ...

Christopher Earl

1984-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Conversion of Waste to Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every industrial operation produces some combustible waste, but conversion of this to useful energy is often more difficult than with other energy recovery projects and requires careful attention to design, operating and maintaining...

John, T.; Cheek, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Industrial Waste Air Model (IWAIR) User's Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameter Guidance IWAIR User's Guide Appendix B B-3 Appendix B Parameter Guidance This appendix provides you with guidance on all parameter values needed to run IWAIR. This guidance covers all parameters that you may enter in text boxes and most selections from drop-down boxes. It does not include most option buttons, as those are covered in the operational guidance in Sections 4 and 5. However, a few options are covered here, as well as in Sections 4 and 5. This appendix is organized by screen. Some parameters are applicable only to risk mode or allowable concentration mode; those are so noted. B.1 Method, Met. Station, WMU (Screen 1A) Most of the options on Screen 1A are covered in the operational guidance in Sections 4 and 5. There are only two parameters for this screen: zip code and latitude/longitude. You will

386

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Dataset, Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.wte.org/ Cost: Free The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. Overview The Energy Recovery Council is a national trade organization representing the waste-to-energy industry and communities that own waste-to-energy facilities. The website includes information on waste-to-energy basics

387

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

388

Solid waste management: a public policy study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not be discharged into surface water in violation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System of the Clean Water Act; and no facility may contaminate an underground drinking waste source beyond the plant boundary. 2. Air: No open burning... of residential, commercial, institutional, or industrial solid waste may take place. Certain periodic burning activities are exempt. 3. Farmland: No solid waste facility border may lie within one meter (three feet) of land used for crop. If polychlorinated...

Jayawant, Mandar Prabhatkumar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear waste bill dead for this year  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste bill dead for this year ... "Politics pure and simple" killed compromise legislation to create an interim storage facility in Nevada for commercial high-level nuclear waste, say bill proponents in Congress and in the nuclear power industry. ... Last year, bills passed both the House and Senate that would have required the government to, among other things, temporarily store nuclear waste until a permanent facility could be built. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

1998-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

390

Industrial Hygienist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position wil l serve as an Industrial Hygienist in the Operations Division, providing technical oversight of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory contractors...

391

Industrial Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Users - Media Publications and Information The Invisible Neutron Threat Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices Nuclear Science Research at the LANSCE-WNR...

392

Industrial Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on altitude. This large flux allows testing of semiconductor devices at greatly accelerated rates. Industry users are invited to contact Steve Wender, phone:505-667-1344 or...

393

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

394

transportation industry | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 25 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279625 Varnish cache server transportation industry Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption

395

Cellulose Industries of the West  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Ore. ... THE western United States is a region of contrasts—wide open spaces thinly populated; areas of dense magnificent forest; mineral resources without stint; areas of concentrated industrial and agricultural activity; areas deficient in rainfall; and areas where rivers fed by bounteous rainfall and perpetual snows roll majestically to the sea, halting occasionally at man's command to irrigate arid but fertile soils or to generate electric power with which to process the varied resources of the region. ...

J. ELTON LODEWICK

1947-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assessment of the resource associated with biomethane from food waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the resource of biomethane produced from food waste at a state level in the EU. The resource is dependent on the quantity of food waste available for anaerobic digestion and the specific methane yield from food waste. The specific method of undertaking biomethane potential (BMP) tests was shown to be crucial. BMP tests were carried out at different scales (5 L and 0.5 L) with different sources of inoculum, for both wet and dried substrate samples. The upper bound BMP results for source segregated canteen food waste gave specific methane yields of between 467 and 529 L CH4 per kg volatile solids added. The higher results were associated with acclimatised inoculum and wet samples of food waste. The potential renewable resource of biomethane from food waste is shown to be equivalent to 2.8% of energy in transport in Ireland; this is significant as it surpasses the resource associated with electrifying 10% of the private car fleet in Ireland, which is currently the preferred option for renewable energy in transport in the country. However for this resource to be realised within the EU, source segregation of food waste must be effected. According to the Animal By-Products Regulations, digestate from source segregated food waste may be applied to agricultural land post anaerobic digestion. Digestate from food waste derived from a mixed waste source may not be applied to agricultural land. Thus biomethane from food waste is predicated on source segregation of food waste.

James D. Browne; Jerry D. Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Kings Counties. From 1990 to 2008, seed production started to shift slightly to include represents the economic size of California's seed industry. Using data from the California County produced in the United State. When examining California County Agricultural Commissoners

Ferrara, Katherine W.

398

Industrial microbiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...include the fruit, wine, baking, milling, dairy, and distill-ing industries...fructose known as high fruc-tose corn syrup. Between 500,000 and 1...glucose isomerase has permitted the corn wet milling industry to capture 30 percent of...

AL Demain

1981-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

400

Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coal–coke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H2 and CH4) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H2-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H2 concentration increased with increasing temperature.

Magín Lapuerta; Juan J. Hernández; Amparo Pazo; Julio López

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Resetting global expectations from agricultural biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aggressive renewable energy policies have helped the biofuels industry grow at a rate few could have predicted. However, while discourse on the energy balance and environmental impacts of agricultural biofuel feedstocks are common, the potential they hold for additional production has received considerably less attention. Here we present a new biofuel yield analysis based on the best available global agricultural census data. These new data give us the first opportunity to consider geographically-specific patterns of biofuel feedstock production in different regions, across global, continental, national and sub-national scales. Compared to earlier biofuel yield tables, our global results show overestimates of biofuel yields by ~100% or more for many crops. To encourage the use of regionally-specific data for future biofuel studies, we calculated complete results for 20 feedstock crops for 238 countries, states, territories and protectorates.

Matt Johnston; Jonathan A Foley; Tracey Holloway; Chris Kucharik; Chad Monfreda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Extinctions of aculeate pollinators in Britain and the role of large-scale agricultural changes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by more than 55%, replaced by permanent grassland (11). After World War I, food security concerns led to agricultural reforms that further intensified farming in Britain. This was aided by the invention of the Haber process, allowing the industrial...

Jeff Ollerton; Hilary Erenler; Mike Edwards; Robin Crockett

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

Socio-economic and climate change impacts on agriculture: an integrated assessment, 1990–2080  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...agriculture: an integrated assessment, 1990-2080 Gunther Fischer...NY, USA A comprehensive assessment of the impacts of climate...Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO...al. 1997). The Canadian Center for Climate Modelling and...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment KEY: # = new course INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY. (1) Anintroductiontobiotechnology:historicalperspectives,currentapplicationsandfuturedirections.Thecoursewillconsistofinformal lectures and interactive discussions led by Biotechnology faculty and visiting professionals. The course

MacAdam, Keith

405

An Economic Study of the Dairy Industry in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION - B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS --. - BULLETIN NO. 355 JUNE, 1927 DIVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS AN ECONOMIC STUDY OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IN - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL... ................................................. 35 BULLETIN NO. 358 JUNE, 1927 AN ECONOMrC STUDY OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IN TEXAS* G. L. CRAWFORD,? Marketing Research Specialist, Division of Farm and Ranch Economics The chief purposes of this study were to determine to what extent Texas...

Crawford, G. L. (George Lemuel)

1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

407

What is Sustainable Agriculture?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security, its midwives were not gov- ernment policy makers but small farmers, environmentalists model has degraded soil and water, reduced the biodiversity that is a key element to food security Photo courtesy USDA NRCS #12;Page 2 ATTRA Sustainable Agriculture: An Introduction on imported oil

Wang, Changlu

408

NOTES ON AGRICULTURE (I.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NOTES ON AGRICULTURE (I.) ELECTRO-HORTICULTURE. THE latest results drawn from experi-ments...Cornell University has tested electric lighting ex-tensively during the past few years...writes: "He used the term electro-horticulture to desig-nate this new application...

BYRON D. HALSTED

1895-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

NOTES ON AGRICULTURE (I.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...AGRICULTURE (I.) ELECTRO-HORTICULTURE. THE latest results drawn...University has tested electric lighting ex-tensively during the...He used the term electro-horticulture to desig-nate this new...has a marked effect upon greenhouse plants," it being " benefi-cial...

BYRON D. HALSTED

1895-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Indiana agriculture enters the energy business in a big way. The advent of four new Indiana ethanol plants when crude moves above the $50 level. Clearly the energy value (BTUs) in ethanol is much more valuable. Ethanol means theres a monstrous increase in the need for corn production in 2007, and beyond. Acres have

411

AGRICULTURAL REPORT FEBRUARY 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trading framework. The largest GHG market in the world is the European Union-Emissions Trading Scheme' sulfur diox- ide (SO2) emissions trading program Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets from Agriculture and states have enacted policies individually or in cooperation to reduce GHG emissions through an emissions

412

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research for agricultural and forestry interest (nutrition, photosynthesis, enhancements, fruit cultivation stress and crop protection), and the study of farm animal resources (nutrition, production and animal change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

413

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

Buehrer, R. Michael

414

Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Enzyme insights may help agriculture, biofuels Plant enzymes called Pols IV and...

415

Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and labor, accounts for 40% of agricultural gross domestic product (GDP). Creates livelihoods for one of industrialized production systems impair air and water quality, de-value real estate and create health and well for a large number of impoverished producers. 2 #12;Past and projected regional differences in meat

Archer, Steven R.

416

Child Labor in Texas Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers under age 18 involved in agriculture have a disproportionate rate of injury and death when compared to older workers. This publication explains potential risks to young agricultural workers as well as the laws designed to protect these under...

Smith, David

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

Sivakumar, Gayathri

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Composite analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 area plateau of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the first iteration of the Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site (Composite Analysis) prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Implementation Plan for the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-2. The Composite Analysis is a companion document to published analyses of four active or planned low-level waste disposal actions: the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 West Area, the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 East Area, the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility, and the disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste. A single Composite Analysis was prepared for the Hanford Site considering only sources on the 200 Area Plateau. The performance objectives prescribed in U.S. Department of Energy guidance for the Composite Analysis were 100 mrem in a year and examination of a lower dose (30 mrem in a year) to ensure the {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} concept is followed. The 100 mrem in a year limit was the maximum allowable all-pathways dose for 1000 years following Hanford Site closure, which is assumed to occur in 2050. These performance objectives apply to an accessible environment defined as the area between a buffer zone surrounding an exclusive waste management area on the 200 Area Plateau, and the Columbia River. Estimating doses to hypothetical future members of the public for the Composite Analysis was a multistep process involving the estimation or simulation of inventories; waste release to the environment; migration through the vadose zone, groundwater, and atmospheric pathways; and exposure and dose. Doses were estimated for scenarios based on agriculture, residential, industrial, and recreational land use. The radionuclides included in the vadose zone and groundwater pathway analyses of future releases were carbon-14, chlorine-36, selenium-79, technetium-99, iodine-129, and uranium isotopes.

Kincaid, C.T.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Robotics for mixed waste operations, demonstration description  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is developing technology to aid in the cleanup of DOE sites. Included in the OTD program are the Robotics Technology Development Program and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. These two programs are working together to provide technology for the cleanup of mixed waste, which is waste that has both radioactive and hazardous constituents. There are over 240,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste accumulated at DOE sites and the cleanup is expected to generate about 900,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste over the next five years. This waste must be monitored during storage and then treated and disposed of in a cost effective manner acceptable to regulators and the states involved. The Robotics Technology Development Program is developing robotics technology to make these tasks safer, better, faster and cheaper through the Mixed Waste Operations team. This technology will also apply to treatment of transuranic waste. The demonstration at the Savannah River Site on November 2-4, 1993, showed the progress of this technology by DOE, universities and industry over the previous year. Robotics technology for the handling, characterization and treatment of mixed waste as well robotics technology for monitoring of stored waste was demonstrated. It was shown that robotics technology can make future waste storage and waste treatment facilities better, faster, safer and cheaper.

Ward, C.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The research programme Future Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research programme Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

422

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Industry Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel cell and biogas industries perspectives. Presented by Mike Hicks, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

425

Environmental management in fishery-based industries. Working papers in industrial planning  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of this study are to present technical information and costs related to waste management in the seafood processing industry. Although there is a lack of published data on environmental management in the fish processing industry in developing countries, the focus is on seafood processors in developing countries drawing upon developed countries' experiences as relevant. Recovery and utilization of seafood wastes, both from wastewater and solid wastes, can be good policy for protecting the environment and for the seafood processing industry. Various options, such as production of fish meal, fish silage, and mince are explored. Fish silage, for example, is generally suggested as an option for waste utilization in small operations, whereas production of fish meal is more suitable for large plants.

Not Available

1991-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

NICE3: Industrial Refrigeration System  

SciTech Connect

Energy Concepts has developed an absorption-augmented system as a cost-effective means of achieving more cooling capacity with a substantial reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for industrial refrigeration. It cuts fuel consumption by 30% by combining an internal combustion engine with a mechanical compression refrigeration system and an absorption refrigeration system. The absorption system is powered by engine waste heat. Conventional industrial refrigeration uses mechanical vapor compression, powered by electric motors, which results in higher energy costs. By the year 2010, the new system could cut fuel consumption by 19 trillion Btu and greenhouse emissions by more than 1 million tons per year.

Simon, P.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Industry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Savings. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

Kramer, Klaas Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang, L. , 2008. Alternative fuel using and waste materialPolicy Research on Alternative Fuels for Cement Industry incement and using alternative fuels in the cement kiln. There

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Biodegradation of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons in Soil Contaminated by Oily Wastes Produced During Onshore Drilling Operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The petroleum industry generates high amount of oily wastes during drilling, storage and refining operations. Onshore drilling operations produce oil based wastes, typically 100–150m-3 well. The drilling cuttings...

Qaude-Henri Chaîneau; Jean-Louis Morel; Jean Oudot

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Klamath and Lake Counties Agricultural Industrial Park; 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Klamath and Lake counties for the purpose of capitalizing on the area's abundant geothermal resources. Average Overall Score: 3.34.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0...

431

Reciprocating Constructed Wetlands for Treating Industrial, Municipal, and Agricultural Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many rural communities, treating domestic wastewater efficiently and cost-effectively is a challenging task. Environmental issues, financing of construction costs, and the bottom-line cost to the consumer complicate this effort. Increasingly stringent discharge standards have resulted in a growing number of permit violations from small, “conventional ” treatment systems. Many rural communities have discovered that their existing systems (e.g., facultative lagoons) provided excellent service in the past but have become obsolete due to new discharge standards. These communities simply cannot afford to own and operate the highly sophisticated tertiary treatment facilities these new regulations require. As a result, funding agencies have looked more favorably to “regional” solutions that can achieve consistent, high-quality discharge. In most cases, the regional solution is a centralized treatment facility to which surrounding communities pump their sewage. In many instances, communities must pump extremely long distances to reach the regional treatment facility. This means that communities, and, therefore, funding agencies, are putting most of their money into pumps and piping instead of treatment. What small rural communities need is a decentralized wastewater treatment system that is inexpensive to construct, simple to operate, and achieves consistently high levels of discharge quality, even with small flows. Having such a system would allow a paradigm shift whereby funding agencies could support decentralized treatment and regional management of numerous decentralized treatment systems.

Go~tiscs~!d P S I; Chuck Donnell; H. Alton Pnvette; Leslie L. Behrends

432

Economic Forces Driving Agriculture and the Seed Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1980-2012 with projections until 2030 #12;World map weighted by GDP in 1960 #12;Real Gross Domestic;Population and real per capita GDP in `000 2005 dollars, 2012 and 2030 projections (US per capita income in 2050 Total population (est.) = 9.07 billion 11 #12;U.S. and world real per capita GDP in 2005 dollars

California at Davis, University of

433

Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

An Evaluation of Industrial Heat Pumps for Effective Low-Temperature Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The implementation of industrial heat pumps utilizing waste water from various industrial processes for the production of process steam is presented as a viable economic alternative to a conventional fossil-fired boiler and as an effective fuel...

Leibowitz, H. M.; Colosimo, D. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

436

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

438

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-1335E Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California A.T. Mc of Global Energy Partners. This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Demand Response in California. PIER Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Program. CEC

439

Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) Illinois Solid Waste Management Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Illinois EPA It is the purpose of this Act to reduce reliance on land disposal of solid waste, to encourage and promote alternative means of managing solid waste, and to assist local governments with solid waste planning and management. In furtherance of those aims, while recognizing that landfills will continue to be necessary, this Act establishes the following waste management hierarchy, in descending order of preference, as State policy: volume reduction at the source; recycling and reuse; combustion

440

Industrial Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... chief application of industrial radiology in Norway is in the examination of pipe welds in hydroelectric plant. H. Vinter (Denmark), director of the Akademiet for de Technische Videns ... and to compare various methods of non-destructive testing. He gave results of tests on turbine disk forgings of austenitic steel which showed satisfactory agreement between radiography, ultrasonic examination and ...

1950-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

Vari, J.

442

Energy Management and Computers in the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dryer hood waste heat. o Biomass feedstocks for the production of specialized chemial products. o Crossing of the stone groundwood process with the thermomechanical pulping process. 236 ESL-IE-81-04-42 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy...

Sommerfeld, J. T.; Hartley, E. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

444

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

445

United States Department of Agriculture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 4700 River Road Riverdale, MD 20737 Permit to Receive Soil Regulated by 7 CFR 330 This permit was...

446

Industrial Energy Efficiency Technical Review Guidelines and Best Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of commercial and other sector programs. The following programs were deemed to represent the best combination of applicability and access to relevant information: ? BC Hydro?s Power Smart Partners - Industrial (Transmission and Distribution...) ? Wisconsin?s Focus on Energy ? Industrial ? California Public Utilities Commission?s (CPUC) Southern California Industrial and Agricultural (SCIA) and Pacific Gas & Electric?s (PG&E) Fabrication, Process and Manufacturing Review of Impact Evaluation...

Dalziel, N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Waste minimization necessary for solving wastewater problems  

SciTech Connect

Developing and implementing waste minimization procedures to correct the wastewater treatment problem are not as simple as identifying the problem. People cannot solve today's problems with the same kind of thinking that caused the problems. Nonetheless, industry primarily is using traditional treatment technologies to reduce wastewater. most companies are upgrading their wastewater treatment plants and installing treatment equipment in process areas whenever technically and economically feasible. The solution to ensuring wastewater compliance is recycling, waste minimization and moving toward zero discharge. Treating wastewater to the best possible quality still creates residual waste that must be disposed. In addition, regulatory limits continue to increase. Although some facilities can close and have closed the loop in certain processes, industry is pursuing waste minimization and the goal of zero discharge, given existing technology and economics. This, companies must taken an innovative approach to reducing wastewater volume and toxicity at the source.

Melody, M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Different methods to derive pure silica from agriculture waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rice residues are important natural resources, the management of these residues is a major challenge for environment protection. The use of different techniques to produce silica with minimal mineral contaminants having high Specific Surface Area (SSA) has been investigated. The different methods used depended on treatment of rice hulls with different dilute organic acids and hydrochloric acid, without the risk of using corrosive, toxic and hazardous substances in the burning process. Different powdered silica obtained are characterised by particle size distribution, crystallographic structure, BET SSA and chemical analysis. X-ray Diffraction patterns revealed the amorphous nature of silica. The major impurities of silica produced from rice hulls were Na, K and Ca salts.

Azza El-Maghraby; Heba A. El-Deeb

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Loan Program Provider New Brunswick Economic Development The purpose of the assistance is to provide adequate funding for capital expenditures and working capital to enable the establishment, expansion, or maintenance of eligible industries. The assistance may be provided in the

450

The Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) The Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development The Industrial Machinery Tax Credit provides tax savings from equipment investments dependent upon the size investment made during the period. To qualify for this credit, companies are not required to create new jobs.

451

Assessment and evaluation of a safety factor with respect to ocean disposal of waste materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the oceans is essential if ocean dumping is to be continued. The author has surveyed the available literature, bioassay studies, and pertinent research concerning chronic effects and the risk they impose on the marine ecosystem. The main purpose... OPERATIONS 10 History of Ocean Dumping Corps of Engineers' Letters of No Objection 10 12 Types of Materials Dumped Dredge Spoils Industrial Wastes Municipal Wastes Radioactive Wastes Solid Wastes Military Wastes Construction Debris 13 13 15 15...

Zapatka, Thomas Francis

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

453

Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah Biological and Agricultural Engineering UC Agricultural Ergonomics Research Center Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety WCAHS Seminar, December 5, 2011 Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis Fadi Fathallah

Nguyen, Danh

454

Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building Whiteknights Hall Windsor Hall Students Union Shop IMA 3rd House Annexe 59 Agricultural and Food Economics D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 59 Agriculture D8 Agriculture, Policy & Development 48 Allen Laboratory D5 The Allen Laboratory 41 Alumni Office D4 Whiteknights

Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

455

Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions reductions from GHG emissions reductions policies; AND WE should incentivize agriculture.S. Agriculture in Climate Change Mitigation: Agriculture is both a source of GHG, and a sink (GHG reservoir) As a source of GHG, agriculture contributes approximately 7% of US GHG emissions* ­ mostly from small, diffuse

456

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

Romero, M.

457

Waste To Energy -Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, expanding the steam through back pressure turbines to generate electricity. Some plants used to gen erate so much power through cogeneration and hydro that they became power companies also. The hard ware involved in this type of cogeneration system has... the wastes to make steam? The answer is that under some circumstances the cost of the electric generation equipment would be marginally unattrac tive, but for the majority of American industry, the design of new waste to steam facilities should include...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Waste minimization in semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect

The US semiconductor industry uses 5--7 thousand pounds of arsine annually. Fifty to eighty percent of the arsine used becomes a waste product, which requires abatement. Traditional methods of abatement are reviewed with an emphasis on dry chemical scrubbing. A variety of dry chemical scrubbing materials were evaluated for arsine capacity, using activated carbon as the baseline for comparison. Of the available technologies, dry chemical scrubbing is the most effective means of minimizing arsenic containing waste generated from semiconductor effluents. A copper oxide based media has been identified which has high capacity, high efficiency and treats the spectrum of gases used in MOCVD processes. Reclaim and recovery of spent scrubber media has the potential to drastically reduce arsenic waste from semiconductor manufacturing.

Hardwick, S.J.; Mailloux, J.C. [Novapure Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Coal/waste cofiring: International survey of combustion practices  

SciTech Connect

Coal is an abundant fuel resource worldwide with an historically stable price. The use of coal is expected to increase, particularly in developing countries; and, as industrialization increases, so will the amount of various waste materials and the environmental problems associated with their disposal. Therefore, coal/waste cofiring can offer an environmentally sound, economic approach to both waste remediation and energy production. This paper highlights the results of an international survey of coal/waste cofiring by describing the principal wastes used and the combustion technologies employed. Also provided are examples of cofiring and areas where cofired fuel parameters will have an effect on boiler performance.

Harding, N.S.; Smouse, S.M.; Ekmann, J.M.; Winslow, J.S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," "," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","Pulping","Wood Chips,","And Waste","Row"

463

Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in these high-quality waste heat streams, at today's oil prices, is approximately 12 billion dollars per year. Heat recovery is perhaps one of the largest energy conservation opportunities available to U. S. industries today. The author reviews basic heat...

Bywaters, R. P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year solid waste (MSW). Three dominant ,technologies _ those developed by The only true A global perspective

Columbia University

465

Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Current inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuels and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes were compiled through December 31, 1983, based on the most reliable information available from government sources and the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Future waste and spent fuel to be generated over the next 37 years and characteristics of these materials are also presented, consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) or projection of US commercial nuclear power growth and expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities. Materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, airborne waste, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated, based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions. 48 figures, 107 tables.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators, transporters, as well as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The regulations also define specific types

467

UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

Tobar, Michael

468

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture of Agriculture #12;Slide 3 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Outline · 6 key messages (nationwide

Grotjahn, Richard

469

Structure of the Texas Economy: Emphasis on Agriculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B-1121 May 1972 Texas Economy the Emphasis on Agrkulture Texas A&M University The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Contents Summary... economic effects are its purchases of inputs directly from other Texas industries and its employment, wages and other payments to the local economy. The economic impact of the new plant does not stop with this initial effect, however. As local suppliers...

Mustafa, Gholam; Jones, Lonnie L.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Burning Chemical Waste Disposal Site: Investigation, Assessment and Rehabilitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of underground fires on a site previously used for disposal of chemical wastes from the nylon industry was causing a nuisance and restricting the commercial development of the site and adjacent areas....

D. L. Barry; J. M. Campbell; E. H. Jones

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Use of Thermal Solar Energy to Treat Waste Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processes employed in the various production sectors of trade and industry give rise to waste materials containing substances that can harm the environment to a greater or lesser extent. The volume of such...

H. Effelsberg; B. Barbknecht

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Combustion of Low-Calorific Waste Biomass Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The industrial combustion chamber designed for burning low-calorific syngas from gasification of waste biomass is presented. ... chips and turkey feathers the non-premixed turbulent combustion in the chamber is s...

Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marek Dudy?ski; Konrad Bajer

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Carbon Sequestration Kinetic and Storage Capacity of Ultramafic Mining Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mineral carbonation of ultramafic rocks provides an environmentally safe and permanent solution for CO2 sequestration. In order to assess the carbonation potential of ultramafic waste material produced by industrial processing, we designed a laboratory-...

Julie Pronost; Georges Beaudoin; Joniel Tremblay; Faïçal Larachi; Josée Duchesne; Réjean Hébert; Marc Constantin

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Solid Waste Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (Alabama) Program (Alabama) Solid Waste Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This article states the authority of the department, regulations for the control of unauthorized dumping, disposal fees, violations and penalties. Solid waste refers to any garbage, rubbish, construction or demolition debris, ash, or sludge from a waste treatment facility, water supply plant, or air pollution control facility, and any other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting

475

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University about the accreditation of University of Kentucky. AgriculturalBiotechnology Agriculturalbiotechnologyencompassescellularandmolecularapproaches to the manipulation and improvement of agricultural plants, animals and microorganisms

Hayes, Jane E.

476

The concept of a sustainable agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of a sustainable agriculture varies much with writers: some see it as the preservation of agricultural resources or as the reduction of agricultural contamination of the environment or both. Other authors focus on economic viability...

Kriewaldt, David Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

478

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Mercury and Other Heavy Metals Influence Bacterial Community Structure in Contaminated Tennessee Streams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...50th Purdue Industrial Waste Conference, 1995...dental, and health care industries. The widespread occurrence...agricultural and industrial wastes discharged into waterways...transformations of uranium in wastes. Radiochim. Acta 52...coal combustion and gasification flue gases. Environ...

Tatiana A. Vishnivetskaya; Jennifer J. Mosher; Anthony V. Palumbo; Zamin K. Yang; Mircea Podar; Steven D. Brown; Scott C. Brooks; Baohua Gu; George R. Southworth; Meghan M. Drake; Craig C. Brandt; Dwayne A. Elias

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

480

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural waste industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ester is a scientific term for the biodiesel fuel produced when methanol is used in the biodiesel production process. CHwww.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and emissions. This pub- lication addresses producing one's own biodiesel fuel from waste oil, fats, and oilseed

Liskiewicz, Maciej

482

World food and agriculture: Outlook for the medium and longer term  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waste and nonfood uses at the household level, e.g., food fed to pets...the former U.S.S.R., Japan, Australia, New Zealand...other than Argentina, 33 to Japan and Israel, and 6 to the area...Agriculture Developing Countries Energy Intake Food Supply Humans Nutritional...

Nikos Alexandratos

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

484

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

485

Kentucky Department of Agriculture | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Agriculture Kentucky Department of Agriculture At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer...

486

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agriculture Development Council is tasked with enhancing the future development of agriculture in Montana through establishing policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a...

487

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy...

488

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

Mountziaris, T. J.

489

Risk analysis of buried wastes from electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a great deal of public concern about the dangers of buried radioactive waste from the nuclear industry. The rational approach to evaluating these concerns is to develop quantitative estimates of the health impacts to be expected from these wastes and compare them with the health impacts of wastes from alternative technologies. It is our purpose here to outline that process and develop the results.

Bernard L. Cohen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Waste Minimization- The Challenge of the 90's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W~STE MINIMIZATION - THE CHALLENGE OF THE 90'S RICHARD DURHAM Senior Environmental Specialist Dow Chemical U.S.A. Plaquemine, Louisiana ABSTRACT Waste minimization is an environmental good news story that Dow enjoys going out... informally for years. The chemical industry has been practicing waste reduction by increasing yields, improving their processes and reducing energy requirements. If Dow or any other chemical company does not practice waste reduction, competition...

Durham, R.

491

AgriculturAl Economics http://agrecon.mcgill.ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AgriculturAl Economics http://agrecon.mcgill.ca M.Sc. (Thesis) AnAtomy And cEll Biology www.medicine.mcgill.ca AnimAl sciEncE www.mcgill.ca/animal M.Sc. (Thesis; Applied) Ph.D. (Thesis) Anthropology www.mcgill.ca.A. (Special with research paper) M.A. in Medical Anthropology (Thesis) Ph.D. (Thesis) ArchitEcturE www.mcgill.ca

Barthelat, Francois

492

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

" by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE",," " "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

495

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

496

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

497

Engineering Industrial & Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Engineering Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering Leslie Monplaisir, Ph powerful tool sets used in industry today. -Brent Gillett, BSIE 2007 Advanced Planning Engineer at BMW I is available at: http://ise.wayne.edu/bs-industrial/index What is Industrial Engineering? The industrial

Berdichevsky, Victor

498

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

499

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

500

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA is a voluntary program that promotes the reduction of diesel exhaust emissions from agricultural equipment and vehicles by encouraging proper operations and maintenance by farmers, ranchers, and