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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

2

Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relations Act: Report. Sacramento, CA: Office of the AuditorLabor Relations Law. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural1975-76 and 1976-77. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural

Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $10,000 per account, not to exceed 20% of cost Scroll Refrigeration Compressors: $500 Variable Speed/Frequency Drive Motor: $500 Variable Speed Compressed Air Motor: $500 Energy Audit: One in Five Years Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free General Lighting: $1 - $15/unit LED Lamps: $2/bulb

4

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom capital projects: $0.25/kWh, up to 50% of cost; $2/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Custom operation and maintenance projects: $0.08/kWh or $0.40/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Lighting projects: custom lighting incentives get 35% of project cost; prescriptive incentives also available. Total incentive capped at

5

Agricultural and Industrial Process-Heat-Market Sector workbook  

SciTech Connect

This workbook summarizes the preliminary data and assumptions of the Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Market Sector prepared in conjunction with the development of inputs for a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy.

Shulman, M. J.; Kannan, N. P.; deJong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Pesticide Exposures in an Agricultural Community: Sources and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pesticide Exposures in an Agricultural Community: Sources and Pathways (Division Review Presentation) Speaker(s): Thomas McKone Date: June 26, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

8

Industry Group Learns About Light Source Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry over the past 50 years. General Electric's "Durathon" sodium metal halide battery breakthrough required the use of light sources allowing them to understand the...

9

Industrial User Office | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Liaison Office Industrial Liaison Office Industrial Liaison Office registration page New to Synchrotron Radiation New to the APS Already a User Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Industrial Liaison Office home page. The purpose of this Office is to provide outreach from the APS to the industrial community. As we develop the Office and this website to better address the needs of industrial users of the APS, both current and prospective, we are soliciting input by requesting projects and measurements that you would like to perform at the APS. Please complete the form below so that we can begin communicating with you. Questions? Email aps-i@aps.anl.gov. General Information Company Name *required First Name *required Last Name *required

10

Sources of information utilized by California agricultural interest groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing interest group theory describes legislative decision-making as a communication process whereby interest groups research information on issues, combine this information with constituent opinions, and present the resulting information to legislators. Legislators then use this information in developing legislation. The original source of information used by lobbyists greatly impacts the interest group�s ability to effectively represent its policy objectives in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study was to identify and evaluate sources of information utilized by selected California agricultural interest groups. This study determined common sources used among selected California agricultural interest groups, how and why groups choose their sources, the role of trust in information source selection, and what purposes interest groups have for using the information. Data from this study suggest lobbyists of California agricultural interest groups are primarily researching for lobbying purposes. Lobbyists acknowledged the importance of research in their lobbying work. Specifically, two main themes developed from the interviewees� responses: 1) lobbyists gather the political and technical information needed to thoroughly understand an issue before lobbying on it, and 2) lobbyists find the appropriate information to support their organization�s policy objectives. The purpose of their research and the type of information needed drive how lobbyists research an issue and what information sources they utilize. Lobbyists rely on their previous experiences to determine which sources will provide them with the necessary information. Data from this study suggest four main factors that impact which information sources lobbyists choose to utilize: 1) what information is needed, 2) who their contacts and personal relationships are with, 3) how much they trust potential sources, and 4) other characteristics of the sources such as accessibility, quality and accuracy, brevity and readability, experience of source, current information, scientifically-based, sincere, and/or a source that provides needed pictures or graphics.

Noble, Elisa Lynn

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Liaison Office Industrial Liaison Office registration page New to Synchrotron Radiation New to the APS Already a User Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. We are one of five synchrotron radiation light sources operated as national user facilities by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The APS is open to everyone who can utilize extremely bright x-ray photon beams for high-value research. This premier national research facility provides these x-ray beams to more than 5,000 scientists from all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and several foreign countries. These scientists come to the APS from industry, universities,

12

Edmund G. Brown, Jr. PIER INDUSTRIAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, petroleum refining, natural gas, beverage industry, water and wastewater, energy efficiency, industrial natural gas efficiency, electronics, Public Interest Energy Research crosscutting, Industrial ......................................................................................................... 8 2.0 Natural Gas

13

Urban agriculture as a tool for neighborhood fabric repair in post-industrial Detroit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on Detroit as a post-industrial city that suffers from abandonment, vacancy, and food security issues. I address this problem through the lens of agriculture, asking how urban farming can be used to ...

Fairbank, Sandra Trubow

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications  

SciTech Connect

A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Solar energy for agricultural and industrial process heat  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art review of solar process heat is given; near term prospects are discussed; and the federal solar industrial process heat program is reviewed. Existing solar industrial process heat projects are tabulated. (WHK)

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

California Energy Commission PIER Industrial, Agriculture and Water Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Not Pass Biodiesel Industries of Ventura, LLC 31 Solar Power, and Gasification and Anaerobic Digestion Biodiesel Industries of Ventura, LLC 61* Solar Power, and Gasification and Anaerobic Digestion of Raw

17

Control of agricultural nonpoint source pollution in Kranji Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singapore's Kranji Reservoir is highly sensitive to nutrient and bacterial pollution, both of which can be directly traced to agricultural runoff. Water quality samples were collected along the main drainage channel in the ...

Hoff, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Sino-US Symposium on Eco-agriculture and Biomass Energy Industry Renewable Energy Session and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota. 9:05 am Overview of Renewable Energy and Environmental, Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment, A signature program of the Institute on the Environment

Minnesota, University of

20

Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated Recovery Act funds to more than 25 projects that capture and sequester CO2 emissions from industrial sources - such as cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, paper mills, and manufacturing facilities - into underground formations. Large-Scale Projects Three projects are aimed at testing large-scale industrial carbon capture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysis of sourcing & procurement practices : a cross industry framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents and analyzes the various practices in the functional area of Sourcing and Procurement. The 21 firms that are studied operate in one of the following industries: Aerospace, Apparel/ Footwear, Automotive, ...

Koliousis, Ioannis G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sources and Uses of Weather Information for Agricultural Decision Makers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies have examined the importance of weather information to farmers and ranchers across the U.S. This study is focused on the kinds of weather information received by farmers and ranchers, the sources of that information, and its use ...

Kevin P. McNew; Harry P. Mapp; Claude E. Duchon; Earl S. Merritt

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improvements to the EPA Industrial Source Complex Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality models are a key component in determining air pollution control requirements. The Industrial Source Complex (ISC2) model is a steady-state Gaussian plume model that is used for modeling point, area, volume, and line sources. Since its ...

Dennis G. Atkinson; Desmond T. Bailey; John S. Irwin; Jawad S. Touma

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Source category survey: mineral wool manufacturing industry. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains background information which was used for determining the need for new source performance standards (NSPS) for the mineral wool manufacturing industry in accordance with Section 111 of the Clean Air Act. Air pollution emissions and growth trends of the mineral wool industry are examined. Manufacturing processes, control strategies, and state and local air pollution regulations are discussed. The impact of a potential NSPS on particulate and carbon monoxide emissions is calculated.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Using big data for decisions in agricultural supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is an industry where historical and current data abound. This paper investigates the numerous data sources available in the agricultural field and analyzes them for usage in supply chain improvement. We identified ...

Smith, Derik Lafayette

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Agriculture | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture Agriculture Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption transportation industry UN Data application/xml icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XML (xml, 95 KiB) text/csv icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XLS (csv, 21.6 KiB)

28

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Capability to Switch from Natural Gas to Alternative Energy" 4. Capability to Switch from Natural Gas to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Billion Cubic Feet)" ,," Natural Gas",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

29

" Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Capability to Switch from Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative" 5. Capability to Switch from Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative" " Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected" " Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," Distillate Fuel Oil ",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

30

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy" 3. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,," Electricity Receipts",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-----------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal",,"RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Coke and",,"Row" ,,"Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

31

" Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Capability to Switch from Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy" 6. Capability to Switch from Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy" " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," 1991 " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," Residual Fuel Oil",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total",,"Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

32

Source choice in agricultural news coverage: impacts of reporter specialization and newspaper location, ownership, and circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examined coverage of the December 2003 bovine spongiform encephalopathy event to discover reporters’ sources for breaking agricultural news, the impact of reporter specialization on source choices, and the impact of newspaper differences, including location, circulation, and ownership, on coverage. Quantitative content analysis was performed on 62 stories selected through a keyword search for the period December 23, 2003 through October 31, 2004 from U.S. newspapers included in the LexisNexis database. These stories were divided into two equal groups based on reporter work-role identity and were analyzed by length, number of sources, and source variety, and by location, circulation, and ownership of the newspapers in which they appeared. ANOVA, bivariate correlation, and forced entry regression were statistical techniques used. Results indicated numbers of stories, story length, and numbers of sources per story appear related to newspaper location, and use of scientists and agricultural scientists as sources to be correlated with type of newspaper. Newspaper circulation and ownership type were found to explain a statistically significant amount of variance in number of sources used. No statistically significant differences between mean length or mean number of sources used were found between stories written by science-specialty beat reporters and those written by reporters not assigned to such beats, contradicting previous research. However, while mean overall source variety did not differ between the two reporters groups, work-role identity was found to be correlated with use of scientists and agricultural scientists as sources. Extrapolation from this study suggests it is open to question whether (a) reporters would be well-advised to pursue courses of study or to seek additional training to build defined areas of expertise, better equipping themselves to cover more complex issues; (b) editors should seek candidates with such special training and structure their newsroom routines to accommodate specialty reporters when considering adding employees to their reporting staffs; and (c) universities should offer journalism curricula that facilitate both acquisition of basic reporting skills and registration for substantive electives which build subject-matter knowledge. Answers to these questions should be actively pursued, since they may shape the future of journalism education and practice.

White, Judith McIntosh

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

National program plan for research and development in solar heating and cooling for building, agricultural, and industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main feature of the directed program is the focus on specific approaches, called paths, to the application of solar energy. A path is the linking of a method of energy collection or rejection with a particular application. Eleven such paths are identified for building applications and eleven for agricultural and industrial process applications. Here, an overview is given of the program plan. The 11 paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and the 11 paths for agricultural and industrial process applications are described. Brief descriptions of these tasks and of the non-engineering tasks are included. The importance of each non-engineering task to the overall R and D program is indicated. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Engineering analysis of the air pollution regulatory process impacts on the agricultural industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EPA press release dated February 23, 2004 states that the three Buckeye Egg Farm facilities had the potential to emit more than a combined total of 1850 tons per year of particulate matter (PM). This number was based on flowrate calculations that were three times higher than those measured as well as a failure to include particle size distributions in the emissions calculations. The annual PM emission for each facility was approximately 35 tons per year. The EPA was unjustified in requiring Buckeye Egg Farm to obtain Title V and PSD permits as the facilities could not have met the thresholds for these permits. Engineers need to be concerned with correctly measuring and calculating emission rates in order to enforce the current regulations. Consistency among regulators and regulations includes using the correct emission factors for regulatory permitting purposes. EPA has adopted AERMOD as the preferred dispersion model for regulatory use on the premise that it more accurately models the dispersion of pollutants near the surface of the Earth than ISCST3; therefore, it is inappropriate to use the same emission factor in both ISCST3 and AERMOD in an effort to equitably regulate PM sources. For cattle feedlots in Texas, the ISCST3 emission factor is 7 kg/1000 hd-day (16 lb/1000 hd-day) while the AERMOD emission factor is 5 kg/1000 hd-day (11 lb/1000 he-day). The EPA is considering implementing a crustal exclusion for the PM emitted by agricultural sources. Over the next five years, it will be critical to determine a definition of crustal particulate matter that researchers and regulators can agree upon. It will also be necessary to develop a standard procedure to determine the crustal mass fraction of particulate matter downwind from a source to use in the regulatory process. It is important to develop a procedure to determine the particulate matter mass fraction of crustal downwind from a source before the crustal exclusion can be implemented to ensure that the exclusion is being used correctly and consistently among all regulators. According to my findings, the mass fraction of crustal from cattle feedlot PM emissions in the Texas High Plains region is 52%.

Lange, Jennifer Marie

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Evaluation of the Industrial Source Complex Screen2 for regulatory purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air dispersion modeling is becoming a significant part of the regulatory process in many states. Most states require all new facilities to obtain a permit prior to construction. Part of this permit application is to demonstrate that once the facility is in operation it will be in compliance with air quality standards for all regulated pollutants. Since it is impossible to measure air quality impacts of a future source, air dispersion modeling is used. In addition to being used in the initial permitting process, modeling could also be used to determine the impact of sources that wish to amend their abatement system, if this amendment will result in increased emissions. Also, any facility that receives a complaint will be evaluated to determine whether they are in violation of the air quality standards. At this point, the regulator could use air dispersion modeling to determine if the facility is in compliance. For all of these cases, it is essential to have a model that will accurately predict the concentration of pollutants downwind from the source. One particular model being used for this purpose is the Industrial Source Complex (ISC) Screen2. However, the use of Screen2 results in inaccurate predictions of downwind concentrations. Therefore, a model that will accurately predict downwind concentrations when compared to ISC Screen2 is sought. This paper will describe a dispersion model that more accurately predicts downwind concentrations of particulate from agricultural operations. Both ISC Screen2 and the proposed model, Classical Gaussian Dispersion (CGD), are based upon the Gaussian diffusion equations.

Williams, Linda Mendez

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

SourceGas- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SourceGas offers a variety of incentives for high efficiency commercial and industrial equipment. Rebates are available for the purchase of qualifying furnaces, hydronic heating systems, high...

37

Portable Low Energy Neutron Source - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Typically, sources of low energy neutrons are large and immobile, often filling entire rooms. A portable source of low energy neutrons would allow for accurate and ...

38

Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion  

SciTech Connect

On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

Diane E. Hoffmann

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Urban agriculture as a tool for neighborhood fabric repair in post-industrial Detroit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on Detroit as a post-industrial city that suffers from abandonment, vacancy, and food security issues. I address this problem through the lens… (more)

Fairbank, Sandra Trubow

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Review: Wireless sensors in agriculture and food industry-Recent development and future perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview on recent development of wireless sensor technologies and standards for wireless communications as applied to wireless sensors. Examples of wireless sensors and sensor networks applied in agriculture and food production ... Keywords: Bluetooth, CAN, CDMA, GPRS, GSM, HVAC, IEEE, IT, IrDA, LAN, M2M, MEMS, NCAP, NIST, PDA, RAS, RFID, SPWAS, STIM, TEDS, TII, USDA, WINA, WLAN, WPAN, WPS, WPSRD, WiFi, ZigBee

Ning Wang; Naiqian Zhang; Maohua Wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of the apiclutural industry in relation to geothermal development and agriculture in the Imperial Valley, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PART I: Continuous exposure to 30 ppB H/sub 2/S increased lifespan of caged worker honey bees, Apis mellifera L., 33%; whereas, bees exposed > 13 days to 100 ppB and 300 ppB H/sub 2/S the lifespan was shortened 32% and 51%, respectively, over unexposed bees; bees exposed > 15 days to a combination of 300 ppB H/sub 2/S + 50 ppM CO/sub 2/ the lifespan was shortened 4.4% more that 300 ppB H/sub 2/S alone. The mean temperature and/or relative humidity did not exert a direct effect on the hazard to bees. A continuous exposure to 300 ppB SO/sub 2/ was detrimental to caged worker honey bees; and, a mean temperature of 27.2/sup 0/C was 75.7% more toxic than the same dosage at 16.7/sup 0/C. Worker bee lifespans exposed to 300 ppB SO/sub 2/ at 16.7/sup 0/C were shortened 13.5% and 79%, respectively, compared to unexposed bees. Therefore, both dosage and temperature exert direct effects on the hazards to bees. PART II: The status of the apicultural industry in Imperial County, California, was outlined giving a short characterization of the area in relation to the apicultural industry. Agriculture utilizes 500,000 intensely farmed acres which generated a 11-year average income of $370 million. Over 40 agricultural commodities are produced. The apicultural industry is intimately involved in 25% of the total gross agricultural income. In addition, most of the flora growing in the desert community which comprises the remainder of the county are very important to honey bees by providing sustaining nectar and/or pollen for brood rearing. The bee foraged flora provides substantial bee forage when colonies are located outside of the agriculutral area. It is concluded that geothermal resource development in the Imperial Valley is contemplated to have minimal effects on the apicultural industry.

Atkins, E.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

When the cows come home : post post-industrial urban agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past few decades, the industrialization of food has become increasingly influenced by the consolidation of its controlling corporations. This consolidation has isolated meat processing facilities from small farmers, ...

Cheng, Marissa A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Soviet Farm Complex : industrial agriculture in a Socialist context, 1945-1965  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Soviet Farm Complex" is a history of food, farming and the environment in the postwar Soviet Union. It tells the story of how different technical and institutional authorities created an industrial Soviet countryside ...

Smith, Jenny Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Economic and environmental impacts of the corn grain ethanol industry on the United States agricultural sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the impacts of increased ethanol production from corn starch on agricultural land use and the environment in the United States. The Policy Analysis System simulation model was used to simulate alternative ethanol production scenarios for 2007 through 2016. Results indicate that increased corn ethanol production had a positive effect on net farm income and economic wellbeing of the US agricultural sector. In addition, government payments to farmers were reduced because of higher commodity prices and enhanced net farm income. Results also indicate that if Conservation Reserve Program land was converted to crop production in response to higher demand for ethanol in the simulation, individual farmers planted more land in crops, including corn. With a larger total US land area in crops due to individual farmer cropping choices, total US crop output rose, which decreased crop prices and aggregate net farm income relative to the scenario where increased ethanol production happened without Conservation Reserve Program land. Substantial shifts in land use occurred with corn area expanding throughout the United States, especially in the traditional corn-growing area of the midcontinent region.

Larson, J.A.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; Menard, R.J.; Hellwinckel, C.M.; West, Tristram O.

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Californium-252: neutron source for industry and medicine  

SciTech Connect

From eleventh conference on radioisotopes; Tokyo, Japan (13 Nov 1973). The history, production, and availability of /sup 252/Cf and its many potential uses are discussed. Applications in life sciences, education chemical analysis, exploration for natural resources, industrial process control, neutron radiography, nondestructive inspection, and neutron flux enhancement are described. (TFD)

Reinig, W.C.; Permar, P.H.; Cornman, W.R.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

SOLERAS: Rural/agricultural project technical overview  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Rural and Agricultural Solar Applications Projects is to enhance the quality of rural life in hot, arid climates by providing systems that use renewable or regenerable energy sources for domestic or communal, agricultural, and local industrial applications. These systems must provide domestic services such as hot water, heat for cooking, and electric power for lighting, communications, and refrigeration. In addition, agricultural applications such as water desalination, irrigation pumping, and heat and electricity for crop or food processing and local industrial functions, can become the basis for improving the villagers' standard of living. 29 refs., 82 figs., 23 tabs.

Huraib, F.S.; Adcock, J.P.; Knect, R.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Programmatic environmental assessment of the DOE Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program's potential environmental impacts are evaluated to ensure that environmental issues are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process. The existing environment is studied for the following: grain drying; crop drying; livestock shelter heating; food processing; textile products; lumber and wood products; paper products; chemicals; petroleum refining; stone, clay, and glass products; and primary metals industries. Environmental impacts of the proposed action on the following are studied: air quality, water quality, ecosystems, health and safety, land use, esthetics, and social and institutional impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of environmentally friendly and renewable energy sources, and 3) promoting industrial uses of agricultural products service). Renderers who filter out the solids and remove enough moisture to meet industry specifications soybean oil, yellow grease and fats recycled from the restaurant industry, and rendered animal fats

Radeloff, Volker C.

51

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lanka’s opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sources of the German Productivity Demise* Tracing the Effects of Industry-Level ICT Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the US experienced two successive productivity surges in 1995 and 2000, Germany’s labor productivity declined dramatically during the same period. We examine the sources of Germany’s productivity demise using the ifo productivity database that provides detailed industry-level investment information. While much attention has focused on the reduction in German labor hours, our data show that Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) investment in Germany was deeply lacking in the mid 1990’s as compared to the US. The transition to the new economy mitigated the German productivity slowdown, but did not reverse it. After 2000, we find that German Non-ICT investment surged, but TFP contributions collapsed as more than half of the industries, accounting for almost 50 percent of German output, experienced negative TFP growth. This second major difference between the US and German industry performance explains Germany’s continued departure from the technological frontier.

Theo S. Eicher; Oliver Roehn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hydrocarbon Source Signatures in Houston, Texas: Influence of the Petrochemical Industry  

SciTech Connect

Observations of C1-C10 hydrocarbon mixing ratios measured by in-situ instrumentation at the La Porte super site during the TexAQS 2000 field experiment are reported. The La Porte data were compared to a roadway vehicle exhaust signature obtained from canister samples collected in the Houston Washburn tunnel during the same summer to better understand the impact of petrochemical emissions of hydrocarbons at the site. It is shown that the abundance of ethene, propene, 1-butene, C2-C4 alkanes, hexane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isopropylbenzene, and styrene at La Porte were systematically impacted by petrochemical industry emissions. Coherent power law relationships between frequency distribution widths of hydrocarbon mixing ratios and their local lifetimes clearly identify two major source groups, roadway vehicle emissions and industrial emissions. Distributions of most aromatics and long chain alkanes were consistent with roadway vehicle emissions as the dominant source. Airmass reactivity was generally dominated by C1-C3 aldehydes. Propene and ethene sometimes dominated air mass reactivity with HO loss frequencies often greater than 10 s-1. Ozone mixing ratios near 200 ppbv were observed on two separate occasions and these air masses appear to have been impacted by industrial emissions of alkenes from the Houston Ship Channel. The La Porte data provide evidence of the importance of industrial emissions of ethene and propene on air masses reactivity and ozone formation in Houston.

Jobson, B Tom T.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Kuster, W. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Williams, E. J.; Fesenfeld, F.; Apel, Eric; Karl, Thomas G.; Lonneman, William A.; Riemer, D.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

57

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the single vent port. Leak testing prior to transport may be either using helium mass spectrometry or the pressure-rise concept.

Brown, Darrell Dwaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noss, Philip W [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Note: Biomass energy included Source: Price et al. , 2006.Note: Biomass energy included Source: Price et al. (2006).

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber reservoir for industrial processing purposes at Valley Nitrogen Producers Inc. , El Centro agricultural chemical plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber KGRA for industrial processing purposes at the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc. El Centro, California agricultural chemical plant was investigated. The analysis proceeds through the preliminary economics to determine the restraints imposed by geothermal modification size on internal rates of return, and through the energy utilization evaluation to determine the best method for substituting geothermal energy for existing fossil fuel energy. Finally, several geothermal utilization schemes were analyzed for detailed cost-benefit evaluation. An economically viable plan for implementing geothermal energy in the VNP Plant was identified and the final conclusions and recommendations were made based on these detailed cost-benefit analyses. Costs associated with geothermal energy production and implementation were formulated utilizing a modified Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories' ''GEOCOST'' program.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

64

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

66

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Industry | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industry Industry Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by other industries and construction. Data is only available for Paraguay and the U.S., years 2000 to 2007. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption Industry UN Data application/zip icon XML (zip, 514 bytes) application/zip icon XLS (zip, 425 bytes) Quality Metrics

68

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 81 Chapter 7 Final Draft 2030 production (Mt) a A1 B2 GHGpotential and cost in 2030 Notes and sources: a Price etelectrode technology by 2030. g Humphreys and Mahasenan,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Effects of Vegetation Clumping on Two–Source Model Estimates of Surface Energy Fluxes from an Agricultural Landscape during SMACEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of nonrandom leaf area distributions on surface flux predictions from a two-source thermal remote sensing model are investigated. The modeling framework is applied at local and regional scales over the Soil Moisture–Atmosphere ...

Martha C. Anderson; J. M. Norman; William P. Kustas; Fuqin Li; John H. Prueger; John R. Mecikalski

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Foodservice Sourcebook: A Quick-Reference Guide to Industry Information and Sources (Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The directories in this first revision of the foodservice sourcebook contain 1989 information relevant to the foodservice industry. Included is material on commercial equipment, associations, electric utility contacts and activities, and 10 categories of leading foodservice operators. This concise updated reference will help utilities better understand and serve the foodservice industry.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

transportation industry | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 25 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279625 Varnish cache server transportation industry Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption

72

Agricultural nonpoint source pollution and economic incentive policies. Issues in the reauthorization of the Clean Water Act. Staff report  

SciTech Connect

The limited success of command-and-control policies for reducing nonpoint source (NPS) water pollution mandated under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) has prompted increased interest in economic incentive policies as an alternative control mechanism. No single policy, however, is likely to be effective in reducing all NPS pollution. Economic incentives may be effective in some cases, command-and-control practices in others.

Malik, A.S.; Larson, B.A.; Ribaudo, M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A framework for developing, manufacturing, and sourcing trucks & equipment in a global fluid management industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selecting and executing the optimal strategy for developing new products is a non trivial task, especially for low volume, high complexity products in a highly volatile global industry such as Fluid Management. At Fluid ...

Awwad, Ghassan Samir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY/WATER USE DURING A DROUGHT YEAR (1977) Water Supply & Demand in 1977 California's agricultural industry

Ritschard, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Open-Source Software for Power Industry Research, Teaching, and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for power Transmission grid congestion managed via some variant of Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) Prices version of the WPMP market design. #12;5 Regions Adopting Versions of WPMP Design to Date http://www.ferc.gov/industries/electric/indus-act/rto/rto-map by an Independent System Operator (ISO) or a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) Day-ahead & real-time markets

Tesfatsion, Leigh

76

Getting ahead in sourcing through benchmarking and system dynamic analysis : an aerospace industry perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sourcing and purchasing have received renewed attention recently as many supply chains challenge themselves to meet cost reduction goals. These challenges are especially apparent in the high-mix, low volume, and often ...

Chang, Yue (Yue Cathy)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating &...

78

Foodservice sourcebook: A quick-reference guide to industry information and sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was the development of a comprehensive, easily-updated sourcebook of information and references related to the foodservice industry for use by electric utility customer service staffs. The Foodservice Sourcebook'' consists of the following directories: (1)Foodservice Industry Leaders --- Leading Foodservice Operators (Fast Food; Full Service; Lodging; Diversified Restaurant, Cafeteria and Retail Chains, Transportation and Recreation Foodservice Operators; Contract Management Firms; Franchises; Parent and Subsidiary Company Finders; Institutional, Military, School, and Healthcare Foodservice Organizations; Independent Restaurant Operators), and Foodservice Trade and Restaurant Associations; (2) Equipment Manufacturer Directories --- Broilers; Fryers; Griddles; Hot Water Heaters; Ovens; Ranges; Refrigerators and Freezers; Steamers and Skillets; Ventilation and Exhaust Equipment; Warewashers; Leading Major Equipment Distributors; (3) Electric Utilities --- National Electric Customer Assistance Network; Electric Utility Foodservice Activities (Commercial Cooking, Test/Demonstration Kitchen, Equipment Efficiency Improvement, Lighting, Hot Water, Space Conditioning, and Refrigeration electric utility programs); (4) Foodservice Market Trends --- Excerpts from Restaurant Business: Restaurant Growth Index,'' September, 1989; (5) Foodservice Design/Operation Guide --- Excerpts from National Restaurant Association Facilities Operations Manual; and (6) Reference Bibliography --- Electric Power Research Institute, National Restaurant Association, and industry publications.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and Contribution to California Agriculture William A. Matthews* University of California Agricultural Issues Center of California Agricultural Issues Center. #12; The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity

Hammock, Bruce D.

80

Significance of Pre-Industrial and Older Anthropogenic Sources of Mercury in Ichawaynochaway Creek Watershed, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about elevated levels of mercury in fish tissue, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed mercury Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL), which is a calculation of the maximum amount of mercury a waterbody can assimilate without exceeding the applicable water quality standard. These calculations assume that >99% of mercury load to the aquatic systems is derived from recent atmospheric deposition and that older anthropogenic mercury or mercury from terrestrial sources...

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",39378154,38667162,41852352,40154595,42337169,39683722,40851631,40765087,44699071,42951057,44585709,43764015,42532420,42261405,43059537,44031568,42905244,43144350,43909400,43182207,44738543,98,93 " Coal",38681220,37862584,41153537,39301199,41380267,38804539,39551555,39315335,43287140,41718548,43355361,42560578,41685278,41490825,42372775,43112061,41948761,42204359,42900080,41040274,42126910,95.3,87.5 " Petroleum",45561,60850,54839,56970,47029,67673,59443,58765,42871,46197,35159,33744,38686,41567,43450,40311,44240,46116,43765,49958,55973,0.1,0.1

82

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",8617977,8281502,6260025,9022654,7303193,10062854,12230805,13511823,11978079,12456120,10114257,6666589,8164140,7732812,7765655,8032438,10495090,8611890,8893983,9977502,8589208,84.9,71.4 " Petroleum",615,311,475,103,31,311,245,95,253,155,2792,3723,65,116,136,5,144,134,120,41,74,"*","*" " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",76168,61229,27775,73353,94504,240504,230189,286865,170231,"-",1.4

83

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45063182,44850089,45942891,48810720,45380625,47955288,47544649,48380102,51454036,50278792,51403249,50413729,51218320,49776514,48298390,54250814,51917155,54177692,60074823,57516914,57421195,92.5,79.5 " Coal",25188557,26027968,27666494,28990113,27453911,29714368,31876730,33036688,31026837,30588375,32852645,32164601,33444114,34200128,31240478,33604628,32324391,31610751,33625415,31645255,29102532,59.1,40.3 " Petroleum",49422,18533,15180,14027,11456,77528,124951,12568,7541,7622,46637,146375,10311,111555,21008,13181,24187,139391,12600,12433,12606,0.1,"*"

84

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",89058681,94567383,82679444,92250107,83720636,92478772,95155261,89564616,85146307,87874695,89572141,97067330,100451718,96634055,99608512,104830689,97373706,96785842,94503953,82787341,89666874,86,80.4 " Coal",65295742,65138291,61434530,61558991,67538611,65425002,66097259,65552021,69142807,69118017,66980252,66931691,65389899,66448916,67253690,69158736,66654737,69406550,68421489,65867455,64766712,64.3,58.1 " Petroleum",689461,553863,498159,619777,655860,687264,651860,602053,1005170,1282696,993932,724313,1090767,883847,714881,788563,272106,445915,281604,215189,195180,1,0.2

85

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31497406,38215120,39586558,43488284,43765565,44658945,44380543,44552905,48513503,49323828,31783195,88150,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2996,62.1,"*" " Coal",23299412,22622989,23625314,24890670,25394481,27369905,27780141,27394342,29077013,29352347,20353004,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",39.8,"-" " Petroleum",3328080,3935221,2611820,3953777,4133533,1407598,1401195,1478623,3311978,3897208,1507860,87790,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2832,2.9,"*"

86

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",36478610,35802358,32838301,28163544,27466049,26971667,27758877,33898697,26036881,4359511,1704653,1566491,1156651,2055622,1524169,1622208,942917,493885,507254,447912,802906,4.4,1.9 " Coal",11273069,11861344,10949228,9815909,10209727,10586608,11500536,12488802,8168608,1073628,1094848,1096681,"-",1074514,903789,1025141,"-","-","-","-","-",2.8,"-" " Petroleum",14556403,15612257,13282101,11112574,9561302,5848663,6221378,11586081,10019730,300040,123931,131797,220435,517767,290865,189211,29031,58456,57639,32698,42546,0.3,0.1

87

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",49171999,46298021,41220343,40743085,37490089,44031261,47883913,49068279,46352310,51698318,46059938,38059649,39731986,38577937,39092958,37407039,43068822,43202516,44590530,42703218,41142684,88.9,74.6 " Coal",1297978,2814199,3682715,3502742,3814009,1527874,1727583,1500879,3348089,3697900,3785462,4423843,3768531,4285697,3535764,3463644,2370628,4351624,4044319,3196902,4126435,7.3,7.5 " Petroleum",26809,9648,9212,32365,5398,4346,6631,10942,33127,7699,52038,92767,5893,44035,20305,47427,4323,5044,9974,2825,3330,0.1,"*"

88

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7099663,7603723,6267492,8306462,8501043,8324101,8121853,6578599,6317738,6239372,4137127,1872053,170994,31107,23751,25989,16558,47830,19068,12768,30059,69.1,0.5 " Coal",4904473,4598301,3813594,5185396,4754309,4226615,4225125,3925643,3811669,2762460,3319195,1626254,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",55.4,"-" " Petroleum",1436186,1899201,1829938,2094383,1619659,917065,1188294,832577,1234464,1234121,398100,209088,154118,9863,10083,6442,113,4132,512,457,843,6.6,"*"

89

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",33440,33337,33446,33423,33675,33699,33723,33825,33781,25251,13394,4978,4887,4921,4968,455,455,455,455,455,455,36.3,1 " Coal",17543,16894,17515,17480,17492,17503,17463,17386,17386,10108,3133,2407,2360,2360,2407,"-","-","-","-","-","-",8.5,"-" " Petroleum",5031,5031,4845,4875,4881,4860,4881,3208,3374,3022,1999,3,3,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",5.4,"-"

90

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2407,2417,2405,2402,2433,2432,2387,1498,1457,88,21,17,16,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,0.5,0.4 " Petroleum",1126,1126,1115,1111,1109,1109,1069,1064,1025,54,18,17,16,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,0.4,0.4 " Nuclear",860,870,870,870,870,870,870,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Hydroelectric",420,420,420,421,422,421,416,404,402,34,3,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",0.1,"-"

91

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",591756,171457,109308,53740,68641,653076,3301111,3562833,2061351,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Petroleum",158154,54218,74715,28582,33836,50334,61675,16609,8827,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Natural Gas",433602,117239,34593,25158,34805,602742,3239436,3546224,2052524,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

92

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",165682846,162366875,166034292,166200686,169029050,168941707,175022081,177166516,173903236,161595988,97075771,27633966,30537243,30099444,33900004,1058313,1311434,1077389,1224597,1159659,1086500,48.1,0.5 " Coal",101996271,100359157,102198817,100390066,93951561,96799645,100857561,105445514,106516740,85580341,36704124,13863092,15935860,15944113,18396944,"-","-","-","-","-","-",18.2,"-" " Petroleum",4013814,3713606,2220932,4559186,5182491,3072153,3212502,2307411,4097006,3063268,1656505,21609,39420,34944,32129,7717,2942,"-",873,710,525,0.8,"*"

93

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",19286260,20922439,20962974,19820333,20519076,19997354,21362057,22869773,26552567,26485602,29341675,27896065,25008568,24634871,24246391,24112225,19686302,22376989,22979409,26095005,23710917,82.7,67.5 " Coal",15053277,16365730,16443169,15627860,15324714,13971824,14656868,15250606,17161341,16907530,18931521,17736970,16413025,17085959,18257265,18384261,7253521,7090911,6884521,6376887,5584370,53.4,15.9 " Petroleum",284108,238321,327585,246506,166446,26549,93811,31156,50285,35418,64614,911611,25472,16793,95766,20500,17347,11447,9865,8472,7675,0.2,"*"

94

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",41549628,40427575,37783876,41254101,40917280,42502869,41791506,40302526,43976935,44153826,46615673,44798014,48568719,49576276,47232462,46791349,46710674,47793039,46758314,44442211,45428599,90.7,84.6 " Coal",27587603,26186299,24443013,27110850,26399834,26820765,27329077,27081067,29884402,28366977,31731081,31037544,32200713,33157032,31477117,30514512,30600302,31199099,30771207,28582304,27176478,61.7,50.6 " Petroleum",440740,575916,638979,630166,596987,484708,640427,763764,649866,674398,440264,599557,640129,845239,752362,752774,484235,362765,211633,49502,25870,0.9,"*"

95

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9758,10723,10862,10709,10837,10957,10957,11101,10970,10955,753,70,69,70,79,79,79,80,80,80,80,7.2,0.6 " Coal",3975,4617,4617,4628,4631,4636,4636,4647,4647,4647,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",2479,2427,3040,2717,2648,1394,2618,2631,2516,2673,241,70,69,70,79,79,79,80,80,80,80,2.3,0.6 " Natural Gas",1225,1601,1127,1275,1353,2722,1498,1618,1602,1448,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

96

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7141,7060,6988,6754,6733,6722,6321,6294,5616,2919,2204,185,34,210,174,25,37,111,111,111,160,34.2,1.9 " Coal",385,385,385,385,385,385,385,385,385,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",3335,3263,3191,2957,2738,2728,2831,2801,2744,756,176,176,25,201,165,16,28,30,30,30,76,2.7,0.9 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-",214,214,338,341,341,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",71,71,71,75,"-",0.9

97

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power",3,3,3,3,3,3,"-","-","-","-",804,806,806,806,806,806,806,806,790,790,790,100,100

98

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32155574,23552082,25153644,28714867,27201416,26931900,15773738,13227766,15122925,20484367,16992594,2816826,21463,59812,45095,41709,47612,37217,52334,47137,65570,51.5,0.2 " Coal",2351049,2117781,2148078,1907826,2104045,2269352,2367889,2557934,1482608,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",8632571,7890483,5297424,4206354,3353897,3397400,5255050,8431425,8608001,5793975,7726,11032,928,13955,9253,695,1282,3325,2597,2465,2604,"*","*"

99

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31312872,31038231,31899303,32687317,33324413,32673972,33971688,34375573,35471294,36167349,40108260,41957723,41509933,41226252,40436218,41014609,42055989,42353281,41176711,37467527,39584166,90.8,78 " Coal",29602738,28922906,30001882,30456351,31401250,30276010,31952337,32002082,33079201,32605202,35101982,35654162,35135198,35807527,35570358,35285966,36003331,35722617,34639561,31454143,34386818,79.5,67.8 " Petroleum",25129,37883,39164,8898,8913,10136,15539,14623,36736,32430,91320,158742,22519,33927,11797,15464,17646,14748,18092,12583,17424,0.2,"*"

100

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" " Petroleum",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",46951,123239,261980,74144,36487,226042,81467,75251,72316,35499,199858,32.5,100

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",114528000,104967938,119309725,125782063,126749186,121881402,114706047,112183063,114926213,87874809,85856285,70132656,74588271,81728209,75177122,89348213,100338454,87348589,83346844,85123706,96939535,41.3,47.5 " Petroleum",4385235,598489,325424,2007674,1862719,488530,674899,141872,121385,51769,144590,316691,43933,50996,51482,57974,58991,65296,58187,50625,40819,0.1,"*" " Natural Gas",45221848,43940427,56609607,46499103,61530357,39089723,30768135,36300778,26385452,13917748,12411961,11918703,8808012,9873371,10759580,12982348,19805412,22896497,26129803,25237449,31251994,6,15.3

102

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

THE APPLICATION OF RADIOACTIVE RADIATION SOURCES IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY. PART IV. FURTHER EXAMPLES OF APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

A review on the status of radioisotope applications in the textile industry is presented. The use of energy-rich radiation for the initiation of block- and graft polymerization of macromolecules used in the manufacture of synthetic fibers is discussed. For determining the colorfastness of fabrics, their behavior toward fatty acids can be measured by using soaps or detergents labeled with I/sup 131/. In manufacturing viscose fibers, the complete removal of S can be determined by using S/sup 35/-labeled xanthogenate. The viscosity can be measured by determining the sink velocity of a radioactively labeled small Pb ball. In spinning, numerous applications are possible by using suitably labeled radioactive fibers in the spinning process. In weaving, radioisotopes allow the control of the physical and mechanical qualities of the fabrics. In laundry and dry-cleaning research, radioisotopes are used for determining the soil removal from different fabrics by various cleaning agents. Pn/sup 210/ is used in textile plants for removing static electricity accumulating in textile machinery during operation. (OID)

Heger, A.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4992578,5258829,4698045,4300537,5293892,4839820,5004219,5323432,4393537,4734555,5307016,4734002,2971224,626337,643426,673607,802680,701474,752800,711507,720853,84.2,10.9 " Petroleum",2543,5244,2581,4805,5764,13357,3428,9816,41265,22392,60660,31740,9406,22607,17800,10179,7371,7811,4266,2439,4509,1,0.1 " Natural Gas",65281,95341,63120,20558,5806,6593,97,93,827,18291,90790,11000,3275,2029,3224,2240,1875,1889,2655,4431,3783,1.4,0.1 " Nuclear",3616268,4108314,3734594,3372148,4315544,3858509,3798790,4266866,3357696,4059107,4548065,4171120,2367209,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",72.2,"-"

105

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73902614,73931670,75396209,71614268,74853548,82277534,88647111,93293232,94142638,89682569,92311813,92937315,92570929,88678127,94371964,93942273,90960035,92474664,88262641,77432806,79816049,96.3,96.9 " Coal",50186951,46671234,49995747,59559596,52132070,57971909,55504189,58899058,55120297,55220519,60675314,58166973,58080553,53376149,56583558,57560600,59146323,58849255,55752210,40426487,42259569,63.3,51.3 " Petroleum",134397,160072,127282,234545,295961,252611,257586,192880,699233,502286,539784,379703,250325,379007,166943,201121,137187,155646,207233,182291,211654,0.6,0.3

106

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",11236,11236,11237,10133,10166,10446,10526,10537,10449,10293,10337,10354,10348,10338,9555,9839,9971,10502,10491,10683,10846,91.7,76.1 " Coal",530,530,508,508,508,508,508,508,528,530,557,557,557,556,556,585,585,585,585,585,585,4.9,4.1 " Petroleum",109,109,109,109,106,103,103,103,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Natural Gas",493,493,493,493,493,767,849,849,849,706,706,729,753,725,725,967,962,1354,1364,1341,1337,6.3,9.4

107

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45550958,47148818,46463756,47762861,49437481,51012390,51651435,48560127,52529065,54704370,55665471,54959426,54773666,56068698,56142364,55169108,51914755,44284480,45536712,41375366,45579970,93.3,70.9 " Coal",32144557,33489286,32740540,33558049,35282695,36863872,38144842,40819517,39785759,39899142,41057919,40185649,38583501,40579973,40981609,40506086,38866178,38719363,40452933,36238643,39185565,68.8,60.9 " Petroleum",47444,62162,54332,105173,171563,147493,124088,169863,200225,220944,191091,170443,162990,185625,494535,470219,591486,725019,647602,458848,478866,0.3,0.7

108

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",26824491,27535034,28592323,28499824,29003713,28842021,30769712,29719764,30518976,31259830,31122917,30135733,31147221,31075012,29526814,31512768,30328375,30402807,30852784,31375152,31343796,99.4,90.2 " Coal",25092696,25750792,26864520,27048924,27099914,26336456,27529906,26314471,28176015,28610457,28952976,28769721,29518865,29298347,27938264,30133242,28761820,29041826,29551647,29486194,28349079,92.5,81.6 " Petroleum",20682,27636,28951,35795,47340,49107,88834,85698,47091,40300,47457,33850,35728,45648,36565,32480,39269,47332,40977,41475,35855,0.2,0.1

109

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73807286,75505081,77351259,84997718,84097034,86161578,88438224,91558046,86151121,81658150,81349922,83677982,80161524,80696982,82921402,85679912,86816479,85259079,86012151,90029962,97472144,87.5,99.2 " Coal",70500461,71713851,73476309,81722246,79897442,82539467,84659818,87875331,82412216,78544604,78598836,79381504,75308162,76367048,78574428,81188722,83068626,81877334,83197690,84037596,91053858,84.5,92.7 " Petroleum",118646,111558,83886,96727,154819,130598,135437,125625,127062,103755,118876,120418,135412,130280,93651,96557,79520,96733,106853,2016282,2284852,0.1,2.3

110

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",24173,24243,24221,24259,24255,24277,24276,25273,25235,25189,23840,24055,24141,24216,23878,24065,24303,24511,26243,26322,26498,91.5,86.9 " Coal",1310,1360,1360,1390,1390,1340,1390,1390,1390,1340,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",173,173,173,173,88,88,87,62,62,4,4,133,40,39,39,39,39,3,3,3,3,"*","*" " Natural Gas",590,590,590,590,590,590,590,838,838,955,955,987,1146,1153,1184,1141,1138,1111,2768,2782,2849,3.7,9.3

111

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",13730,13725,13824,13850,13500,13817,13645,13684,13390,12085,1244,1244,1244,1244,1005,1005,1005,558,477,466,460,7.5,2.5 " Coal",1652,1652,1629,1644,1634,1629,1629,1635,1658,1643,387,387,387,387,307,307,307,23,23,23,"-",2.3,"-" " Petroleum",3784,3480,3548,3212,2967,2890,2842,3915,3573,2373,286,286,286,286,232,232,232,69,54,43,49,1.7,0.3 " Natural Gas",4101,4410,4434,4761,4657,5056,4912,3872,3897,3807,171,171,171,171,66,66,66,66,"-","-","-",1,"-"

112

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",123623905,130743964,133976775,140066943,141790885,147156684,145140217,147983676,169447167,166914264,169888638,170966177,182346629,188034719,193383664,196096285,200015227,200533885,196524348,195063261,206062185,88.6,89.9 " Coal",59073203,61122819,61631012,61889050,60770030,61864438,65782399,66034628,65470151,62680522,67143257,63090794,60997142,62094661,60013823,57559411,60413597,62633944,59731231,49942611,56074369,35,24.5 " Petroleum",25092296,30115618,28176184,34277523,33330039,21583186,22890565,25742149,40952580,36697343,34337080,39075398,32449236,35545897,35824155,36122039,22508349,19841026,11830552,9028865,8867397,17.9,3.9

113

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",14908,16162,16314,16131,16691,16701,17173,17431,17627,17681,17716,18246,19101,19402,20406,20787,21019,21730,22152,22190,22172,94.8,92.5 " Coal",4818,4812,4812,4812,5352,5352,5471,5794,6007,6055,6054,6077,5925,5925,5968,5968,5984,6460,7060,7028,7048,32.4,29.4 " Petroleum",897,894,894,816,828,1192,1488,1192,1163,1163,957,955,955,970,684,689,682,682,699,663,664,5.1,2.8 " Natural Gas",301,396,396,328,336,345,345,585,576,576,779,1279,2150,2437,3712,3708,3923,3956,3919,3964,3966,4.2,16.5

114

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",263,261,156,153,148,442,441,441,7,7,6,7,9,9,9,6,8,8,7,7,7,0.5,0.4 " Petroleum",262,161,155,152,146,20,20,20,5,5,5,6,7,7,7,5,7,7,7,7,7,0.4,0.4 " Natural Gas","-",99,"-","-","-",420,420,420,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Hydroelectric",1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,"-","-","-",0.1,"-"

115

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",16996,16269,16294,16224,16482,16144,17253,17361,17546,17253,17893,18600,19137,19235,19239,19120,19768,19977,20456,20418,20968,92,97.9 " Coal",9289,8702,8683,8691,8615,8615,8615,8604,8604,8618,8618,8618,8602,8609,8623,8618,8585,8599,8624,8589,8589,44.3,40.1 " Petroleum",1152,1100,1080,1080,1982,1096,1096,1135,1252,784,800,836,56,56,56,58,58,58,58,58,58,4.1,0.3 " Natural Gas",516,480,488,488,"-",472,472,514,571,732,1344,1960,3116,3128,3137,3032,3659,3632,4082,4099,4639,6.9,21.7

116

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20731,20752,21399,21504,22039,22290,22782,23147,23390,23329,24860,24099,25821,24804,25404,26538,26542,26432,26462,26558,26639,89.6,72.7 " Coal",12952,12972,13104,13115,13164,12551,13234,13222,13540,13095,13470,13503,13498,13331,13215,13192,13192,13192,13129,13084,13103,48.5,35.8 " Petroleum",1488,1493,1635,1351,1341,1231,1228,1228,1172,1145,1145,1145,1145,1055,991,991,991,973,991,991,991,4.1,2.7 " Natural Gas",96,103,103,362,841,1274,1276,1281,1273,1564,2647,1974,3386,2827,3470,4618,4609,4577,4577,4652,4646,9.5,12.7

117

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York" York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31224,31349,31108,32731,32824,32147,30060,29985,29585,17679,15806,11572,11675,11902,11386,11927,12046,12056,11784,11871,11032,44.4,28 " Coal",3887,3897,3897,3879,3879,3870,3891,3880,3891,668,668,302,302,302,297,297,297,297,45,45,"-",1.9,"-" " Petroleum",12349,9869,8992,8885,7684,7637,11500,12759,12530,4991,5035,3638,3638,3688,2642,2450,2468,2465,2467,2465,1607,14.1,4.1 " Natural Gas",5065,7634,8304,7895,9194,8469,4718,3249,3131,2600,2227,2682,2783,2908,3894,4628,4628,4644,4623,4629,4619,6.3,11.7

118

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9910,9771,9494,9461,9287,9288,9365,9442,3385,2214,996,993,1090,981,981,983,837,827,829,930,937,8.1,6.8 " Coal",1723,1692,1684,1679,1675,1707,1730,1737,328,146,145,145,145,145,145,144,"-","-","-","-","-",1.2,"-" " Petroleum",5216,5070,4913,5041,4132,4058,4030,4094,787,547,475,474,771,663,661,661,659,648,624,624,528,3.8,3.9 " Natural Gas",289,330,378,219,953,993,1082,1086,333,302,330,329,130,130,131,131,131,131,157,257,353,2.7,2.6

119

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20023,19902,19930,19972,19878,20463,20692,20840,21292,21462,22366,22532,23429,23007,23186,23252,23218,23182,23144,23285,23642,95,72.9 " Coal",11777,11589,11599,11579,11494,11669,11515,11286,11349,11349,11301,11362,11246,11217,11238,11500,11465,11452,11414,11401,11356,48,35 " Petroleum",65,18,18,18,388,18,20,16,16,30,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,34,0.1,0.1 " Natural Gas",400,530,544,586,202,987,1437,1706,1971,2076,3041,3157,4182,3550,3627,3471,3440,3440,3440,3593,3937,12.9,12.1

120

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio" Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",26996,27540,27130,27186,27192,27365,27278,26630,26768,27083,26302,27081,27885,27694,27684,19312,20147,20012,20340,20356,20179,92.3,61 " Coal",23086,23317,23060,23043,23058,23123,23033,22415,22456,22626,21675,21675,21599,21258,21366,16272,16296,16204,15909,15932,15733,76.1,47.6 " Petroleum",1151,1148,907,907,907,853,856,805,824,891,1031,1381,1000,1017,1008,588,588,596,575,575,577,3.6,1.7 " Natural Gas",501,817,902,980,976,1140,1140,1154,1232,1271,1300,1661,2921,3056,3074,2346,3156,3105,3749,3741,3760,4.6,11.4

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121

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",16751,16795,16699,16885,16873,17019,17150,17079,17014,16339,14317,14165,14233,14090,14176,15137,15176,14756,15755,15615,16471,67.8,61.6 " Coal",3343,3343,3343,3343,3343,2843,3453,3453,3448,3453,1723,1723,1723,1723,1723,1723,1723,1739,1739,1739,1674,8.2,6.3 " Petroleum",17,17,228,212,231,35,35,16,16,11,16,20,16,16,26,239,239,240,240,240,775,0.1,2.9 " Natural Gas",11380,11424,11122,11324,11293,12130,11651,11599,11539,10864,10566,10350,10423,10284,10372,11051,11095,10650,11622,11494,11880,50,44.4

122

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32714,32708,33411,34814,35487,35857,36898,36727,36472,36536,37264,38240,40313,41996,42619,45196,45184,47224,47222,50781,50853,89.7,86 " Coal",9971,10001,10034,10030,10037,10069,10763,10823,10676,10770,10783,10783,11301,10223,9653,9634,9564,9528,9499,9495,9210,26,15.6 " Petroleum",11107,11117,11590,11598,14724,13478,13653,13493,12222,12153,12431,12552,10650,10063,10715,10611,10593,10586,12043,11549,10980,29.9,18.6 " Natural Gas",7775,7712,7909,9313,6857,8447,8560,8485,9655,9665,10102,10955,14401,17751,18290,20990,21065,23148,21698,25731,26424,24.3,44.7

123

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",62288980,66767347,70108979,68025039,71203728,68966538,70877043,78060498,81299241,83095924,88149792,85807868,81710063,80348246,81351521,82914964,84355976,88825573,94452931,89640192,91232664,99.1,81.6 " Coal",31636037,32306088,34602347,37020817,38072165,31710476,30780575,34219281,36225373,37994159,40662627,39731623,37957468,37739559,39419177,39750729,40056468,40911234,43505012,39464060,43347748,45.7,38.8 " Petroleum",116407,88935,72838,59875,128437,63610,65097,60927,61227,46287,189396,311787,51061,46706,39414,41127,71761,46137,48324,61381,63439,0.2,0.1

124

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7996096,7333192,6861255,6083815,6055087,6190584,6420195,6212643,6301169,6452068,6534692,6383088,7513051,6493205,6982469,6915159,7040473,6928397,6700636,6509550,6416068,61.7,59.2 " Petroleum",7967354,7312791,6851432,6070063,6036282,6174627,6402329,6193852,6287107,6429429,6516929,6362846,7502913,6489565,6971259,6904293,7015977,6913231,6682593,6262182,6178666,61.5,57 " Hydroelectric",22743,20401,9823,13752,18805,15957,17866,18791,13750,18844,15114,18132,8533,2078,9724,9169,23656,14729,17872,28608,16719,0.1,0.2

125

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",690465,693016,695059,699971,702229,706111,709942,711889,686692,639324,604319,549920,561074,547249,550550,556235,567523,571200,584908,596769,602076,74.4,57.9 " Coal",299781,299444,300385,300634,300941,300569,302420,302866,299739,277780,260990,244451,244056,236473,235976,229705,230644,231289,231857,234397,235707,32.2,22.7 " Petroleum",76390,72393,71266,69046,69549,64451,70421,69557,62704,49020,41032,38456,33876,32570,31415,30867,30419,29115,30657,30174,28972,5.1,2.8 " Natural Gas",121300,126837,128149,132427,133620,142295,139936,141713,130404,123192,123665,112841,127692,125612,131734,147752,157742,162756,173106,180571,184231,15.2,17.7

126

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",1487,1521,1560,1602,1602,1602,1610,1595,1616,1608,1626,1622,1622,1624,1691,1705,1730,1730,1730,1859,1828,68.1,72.1 " Petroleum",1483,1518,1556,1598,1598,1598,1607,1592,1612,1605,1621,1616,1618,1620,1687,1699,1724,1724,1724,1740,1711,67.9,67.5 " Hydroelectric",3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,3,2,2,2,4,4,4,4,4,4,0.1,0.2 " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,115,113,0.1,4.5

127

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",14906,14910,14973,15034,15098,15222,15147,15164,15084,15091,15140,15284,15699,16193,16141,18860,19566,19551,19717,20127,20115,98.9,76.2 " Coal",5116,5070,5070,5108,5119,5159,5201,5256,5286,5311,5336,5336,5336,5336,5336,5362,5762,5750,5750,6159,6165,34.9,23.4 " Petroleum",78,78,78,100,100,95,184,248,248,240,244,243,263,191,108,108,86,89,89,89,89,1.6,0.3 " Natural Gas",3306,3236,3236,3236,3236,3273,3126,2989,2924,2919,2939,3080,3444,3908,3955,6566,6897,6891,6987,6987,6969,19.2,26.4

128

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",21630677,22971934,22387247,22724286,21945525,25279277,27322697,28388030,28720209,29980967,29045739,30411669,31550226,30367879,31944127,31391643,31599046,32403289,32355676,33776062,36242921,99.8,98.9 " Coal",12658464,13562815,12402148,14739783,14002015,16079519,16040775,17209080,18335965,17794136,18424799,20193542,19899803,20907970,20414960,20772590,20632855,19611849,21479723,23307746,23214616,63.3,63.4 " Petroleum",12981,13459,9482,19035,18201,26679,19973,31059,41892,28807,53715,25154,18410,47971,21004,30026,18914,35552,34655,22869,30849,0.2,0.1

129

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa" Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7952,8090,8092,8074,8217,8237,8161,8238,8368,8435,8508,8352,8407,9093,9895,10090,9562,10669,11274,11479,11282,93.5,77.3 " Coal",5860,5912,5909,5818,5975,5995,5807,5573,5717,5702,5920,5668,5620,5666,5741,5705,5666,6535,6528,6529,6389,65.1,43.8 " Petroleum",659,723,714,746,755,755,861,872,877,932,1001,1012,980,912,908,936,935,930,924,921,915,11,6.3 " Natural Gas",779,816,829,870,847,825,835,913,906,938,932,916,1007,1710,2381,2376,2370,2401,2394,2345,2296,10.2,15.7 " Nuclear",530,515,515,515,515,528,520,535,520,520,520,520,566,562,563,581,"-","-","-","-","-",5.7,"-"

130

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina" South Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",69259815,69837984,71478648,75588386,74193685,78439814,76325556,78374450,84396897,87347364,90421081,86734778,93689257,91544429,94406828,99104373,95872763,99997011,97921204,97336653,100610887,96.9,96.6 " Coal",22874805,23165807,23013743,26532193,26993543,25801600,30307236,31042658,32377814,35246389,38664405,36302690,36490769,37065509,38516633,39352428,39140908,41270230,41184319,34146526,37340392,41.4,35.9 " Petroleum",71997,83385,68375,95193,108250,129854,125657,188326,331357,300739,265931,225008,205664,289474,690071,484181,135522,174663,160102,490911,178378,0.3,0.2

131

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",5042,5045,5062,5062,5078,5078,5077,5183,5294,5299,5250,5250,5463,5398,5393,5692,6223,6324,6324,6344,6345,93.8,78 " Coal",3899,3901,3901,3901,3901,3901,3901,3901,3913,3942,3942,3942,3942,3942,3937,3957,3957,3957,3957,3977,3990,70.4,49.1 " Petroleum",24,24,24,24,24,44,24,23,15,"-","-","-",15,35,35,35,26,26,26,26,20,"-",0.2 " Natural Gas",1063,1063,1079,1079,1096,1076,1094,1200,1285,1275,1226,1226,1425,1339,1339,1619,2158,2259,2259,2259,2253,21.9,27.7

132

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97565058,90809416,91779352,95737505,98752712,102015724,98729242,101780433,108716930,110536794,116176834,110564676,111855967,115755114,117918895,126444777,127367613,132831987,126031263,115074702,120425913,93.8,87.5 " Coal",67564750,59985395,58235454,63295811,64727519,65880095,63230856,66179551,69871150,74067633,79007166,73443695,77288328,77858022,79185166,86358096,85700960,89532913,84652246,68863420,72550375,63.8,52.7 " Petroleum",164987,107662,128485,237473,161235,218515,292018,200873,670924,662699,641415,275630,233940,278618,156672,189819,86798,82380,67971,64833,70781,0.5,0.1

133

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",28491171,25064613,27707513,28364368,30018011,29431903,29364389,30568142,31428332,31654480,32855587,32210683,29926241,31770151,32242728,33561875,35411074,34033374,33844547,34245148,30848406,96.6,85.1 " Coal",25826928,22129312,25348413,25507029,26752349,26121447,26357179,27078660,27537426,28067704,29065954,28402187,26902880,28812844,29263899,29947248,29859008,27603647,27014233,29117308,25617789,85.4,70.7 " Petroleum",34081,32240,35614,35337,22929,23073,22452,21075,23020,40133,29529,30210,30710,47860,30321,32528,40634,42969,52012,44599,49394,0.1,0.1

134

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2808151009,2825022865,2797219151,2882524766,2910712079,2994528592,3077442152,3122523144,3212170791,3173673550,3015383376,2629945673,2549457170,2462280615,2505231152,2474845558,2483655548,2504130899,2475366697,2372775997,2471632103,79.3,59.9 " Coal",1559605707,1551166838,1575895394,1639151186,1635492971,1652914466,1737453477,1787806344,1807479829,1767679446,1696619307,1560145542,1514669950,1500281112,1513640806,1484855188,1471421060,1490984698,1466395192,1322092036,1378028414,44.6,33.4 " Petroleum",117016961,111462979,88916308,99538857,91038583,60844256,67346095,77752652,110157895,86929098,72179917,78907846,59124871,69930457,73693695,69722196,40902849,40719414,28123785,25216814,26064909,1.9,0.6

135

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",12769,12848,12881,12859,12898,12928,13091,12931,12622,12861,13438,13436,13387,13463,13550,13992,14648,14495,15913,16187,16015,94.6,76.2 " Coal",4850,4865,4874,4874,4868,4831,4848,4848,4837,4808,4856,4856,4896,4941,4949,4964,4981,4975,4912,4940,4940,34.2,23.5 " Petroleum",58,58,58,58,58,58,64,62,61,61,61,60,60,62,68,68,72,68,69,69,67,0.4,0.3 " Natural Gas",6858,6870,6888,6866,6885,6952,7007,6934,6634,6887,7411,7410,7314,7340,7427,7899,8364,8221,9701,9842,9669,52.2,46 " Other Gases1","-",52,52,52,52,52,52,52,55,63,57,57,61,61,58,"-","-","-","-","-","-",0.4,"-"

136

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",22315,22275,22374,22412,22413,21981,21985,21909,21943,22374,22752,22831,23279,23345,23314,23029,22734,21894,21885,21759,21639,88.3,72.5 " Coal",11931,11960,11976,11929,11928,11794,11793,11796,11840,11573,11636,11638,11627,11636,11623,11633,11534,11533,11543,11431,11218,45.1,37.6 " Petroleum",3460,3171,3184,3235,3235,2618,2620,2617,2632,2634,1831,1860,1654,1685,1649,1647,1397,616,610,612,568,7.1,1.9 " Natural Gas",702,727,798,800,800,1434,1436,1435,1439,2131,3244,3302,3958,3964,3982,3669,3695,4461,4447,4446,4618,12.6,15.5

137

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",1065,1091,1094,1094,1093,1090,1092,1094,774,782,777,262,261,260,251,258,259,258,259,257,260,79,23 " Petroleum",117,117,120,120,120,118,119,119,117,117,112,111,107,107,101,100,101,101,101,100,100,11.4,8.9 " Nuclear",496,496,496,496,496,496,496,496,500,506,506,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",51.4,"-" " Hydroelectric",404,430,430,430,430,426,427,423,103,107,106,99,102,96,93,100,101,99,100,100,103,10.8,9.1

138

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",5809,5826,5847,5869,5874,5970,5966,6044,6018,6011,6048,6052,6122,6088,6086,6241,6137,6142,6450,6713,6931,97.1,86.8 " Coal",5525,5545,5545,5567,5567,5662,5662,5737,5710,5709,5710,5710,5692,5692,5692,5817,5747,5747,5832,5829,5935,91.6,74.3 " Petroleum",15,15,15,15,15,15,10,10,10,"-","-",5,5,5,5,"-","-",5,5,5,5,"-",0.1 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",34,34,119,85,80,113,79,79,79,79,79,0.5,1

139

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",59010858,60120689,56627107,53202268,61519090,65400254,67827241,71073239,74894188,73504882,76283550,78990878,79796801,86102107,86419717,90159045,91118304,89925724,89178555,86704766,90176805,99.6,97.7 " Coal",48501751,47907503,46829678,40688696,48592766,53582211,57176084,59903073,62488551,61249846,62624807,65445161,67147996,73904272,74711159,77123580,77113165,74745712,73246599,71401581,74829029,81.8,81.1 " Petroleum",89342,118645,80522,634432,730820,682321,95980,125449,309734,280945,247622,637504,528353,155968,195098,168258,59958,59611,56620,87081,124866,0.3,0.1

140

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",43681,43599,43763,44313,43297,43302,43934,43709,30663,24323,24319,24405,24609,23223,23867,25248,26346,26334,26467,28021,28689,46.5,42.6 " Petroleum",2800,2473,1759,1553,1553,1692,1692,1072,737,526,526,524,296,297,297,297,245,226,222,204,174,1,0.3 " Natural Gas",21815,22074,22810,23285,22208,22040,22365,23193,10581,5671,5670,5733,5954,5042,5567,6850,7917,8188,8134,9629,10333,10.8,15.3 " Nuclear",4746,4746,4310,4310,4310,4310,4746,4310,4310,4310,4310,4324,4324,4324,4324,4324,4390,4390,4390,4390,4390,8.2,6.5

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141

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina" North Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",79845217,83520063,83007307,88753614,91454784,96109819,102786590,107371092,113112235,109882388,114433191,109807278,115597653,118433112,118328694,121674733,117797331,123215621,118778090,112961309,121251138,93.6,94.2 " Coal",46631040,46762330,54011457,59383147,53234497,55698342,64097781,70181392,69000633,68569499,71719489,68775284,71223313,70630278,71956852,74915235,72311023,76611703,72625233,62765545,69274374,58.7,53.8 " Petroleum",186899,174136,147134,165175,199418,234263,259252,211974,285902,284400,468482,412765,376170,459947,250402,231141,219114,236042,232446,232119,245987,0.4,0.2

142

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",22923971,23305127,20487946,23234028,26222313,26395165,28838302,31227619,31991676,32212133,33896003,47550273,35099283,31358938,32838145,30619168,34158706,34426533,33796221,34759024,40841436,90.1,75 " Coal",9445584,8750253,7796112,8819755,8889624,9259980,12010196,12500586,11747963,13037100,13877065,19196065,12483658,13742273,14274786,13389906,14907777,14422788,14033627,9610808,10309709,36.9,18.9 " Petroleum",705474,370130,371568,3545055,1106209,23738,1173503,2633109,5417924,3141934,2970676,5120602,26357,1620395,2763630,1432077,395330,397080,71597,12475,76832,7.9,0.1

143

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9578,9609,9693,9706,9715,9675,9694,9786,9915,10020,10086,10223,10244,10731,10705,10734,10829,10944,11246,11733,11732,99.5,93.5 " Coal",5064,5091,5149,5189,5220,5244,5256,5364,5407,5325,5295,5295,5310,5265,5222,5250,5203,5208,5190,5180,5179,52.3,41.3 " Petroleum",622,602,613,611,613,579,578,510,494,520,522,652,546,564,587,583,565,569,564,564,550,5.2,4.4 " Natural Gas",2755,2784,2772,2772,2722,2685,2697,2749,2850,3005,3099,3106,3219,3735,3729,3734,3793,3900,4232,4580,4546,30.6,36.2

144

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20190,20131,20148,20182,19767,20597,20923,21054,21020,21182,22015,23478,23652,23726,23671,23822,24553,25500,25558,25529,25553,89.9,92.3 " Coal",12500,12500,12500,12503,12438,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12440,12495,12487,12439,12394,12411,12294,12271,50.8,44.3 " Petroleum",760,773,773,804,804,1676,776,791,794,791,791,790,836,836,541,540,509,510,507,509,524,3.2,1.9 " Natural Gas",270,257,274,286,286,314,1514,1511,1511,1676,2509,3931,4010,4010,4035,4200,4975,5597,5660,5749,5773,10.2,20.9

145

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",15180,15308,15385,15433,15488,15724,15978,16212,16282,16755,17180,17726,18409,18587,18606,18970,19675,19570,19621,19600,20360,99.4,93.7 " Coal",10678,10722,10724,10738,10754,10540,10557,10920,10943,10889,11032,11032,11053,11172,11159,11172,11199,11165,11146,11137,11976,63.8,55.1 " Petroleum",1498,1533,1546,1569,1617,1710,1730,1200,1181,1181,1198,1616,1236,1259,1243,1241,1265,1274,1267,1257,1197,6.9,5.5 " Natural Gas",818,817,878,891,892,1240,1444,1839,1815,2359,2607,2736,3778,3806,3853,4158,4809,4728,4790,4790,4771,15.1,21.9

146

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",13661,13652,13772,14054,13763,14342,14806,15291,15314,15311,15606,15761,15818,17128,17567,18091,18166,18376,18828,19135,19434,80.4,80.6 " Coal",4225,4210,4215,4217,4217,5451,5099,5099,5099,5099,4796,4784,4789,4468,4468,4586,4586,4605,4587,4587,4594,24.7,19.1 " Petroleum",2753,2753,2753,2784,2689,1374,2192,2192,2213,2213,2175,2180,2083,2081,2098,2031,2027,2041,2041,2050,2048,11.2,8.5 " Natural Gas",192,198,377,595,400,995,994,1524,1524,1524,2083,2248,2097,3714,4101,4395,4395,4429,4897,5076,5122,10.7,21.2

147

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32602,32643,32636,32769,32952,33139,33164,33549,30367,16992,17495,4420,4151,3007,2994,3987,4742,4642,4691,4830,4800,48.1,10.9 " Coal",14912,14916,14947,15063,15090,14916,14931,15339,14250,5543,5473,2862,2862,1866,1859,1844,1844,1767,1833,1998,1993,15.1,4.5 " Petroleum",4480,4207,3928,2848,2448,2645,2648,2671,1569,989,867,700,406,368,401,399,399,377,381,372,372,2.4,0.8 " Natural Gas",591,901,1143,2236,2792,2963,2963,2917,4006,732,1229,846,871,761,722,1729,2485,2483,2462,2442,2417,3.4,5.5

148

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",37053436,38365135,37369823,38049072,39547768,39526825,43677535,42789637,43198908,44130705,41486451,44728133,42873364,41636514,45055455,40545220,42068467,45522928,45880232,45423149,47108063,94.6,77.2 " Coal",19160989,19573925,20030355,18025615,19780738,21506397,24339185,22760970,23140020,24612079,24073573,24678344,22986650,23422401,25248810,22940659,24095405,25642175,25993257,24986333,26421729,54.9,43.3 " Petroleum",73856,64278,49640,65624,96439,53208,98250,66622,143834,141475,206991,846105,136134,263982,476133,162961,135291,76212,57158,80962,37140,0.5,0.1

149

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana" Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4912,4828,4871,4871,4907,4943,4943,4943,4944,2997,3005,2232,2232,2274,2189,2186,2163,2179,2190,2232,2340,58.2,39.9 " Coal",2260,2260,2260,2260,2260,2260,2260,2294,2300,792,792,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,15.4,0.9 " Petroleum","-","-","-","-","-","-",5,5,5,5,5,"-","-","-","-",2,2,2,2,2,2,0.1,"*" " Natural Gas",120,120,120,120,120,120,120,53,52,53,58,58,58,97,98,100,100,100,100,102,186,1.1,3.2

150

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",8834,8884,8880,8864,8951,8923,9180,9216,9089,8987,9067,10110,10329,10162,10179,10543,10458,10719,11432,11639,11547,88.4,78.5 " Coal",5757,5786,5771,5708,5742,5630,5779,5811,5657,5605,5613,5729,5726,5342,5260,5087,5083,5048,5077,4667,4630,54.7,31.5 " Petroleum",1004,1020,1026,1070,1065,1044,1112,1102,1056,1013,1019,1051,1020,669,699,711,718,728,746,759,748,9.9,5.1 " Natural Gas",307,305,305,302,353,454,457,464,461,459,475,1373,1637,2276,2336,2852,2719,2974,3528,4118,3929,4.6,26.7

151

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97738497,98199986,97299582,99951149,103485409,105188892,105557018,110466291,112771878,114182827,119721399,114666355,112029989,112395725,114690471,117373699,117643504,116727908,115887993,103594020,107852560,93.7,86.2 " Coal",96012872,96526976,95745949,98776088,102043025,103774522,104413600,108911799,110696190,112336883,117619535,113135350,109441044,109839659,112899892,115413188,116284183,114974642,114321205,101000267,103204599,92,82.4 " Petroleum",673984,354297,287064,197848,209379,213051,320566,606905,821530,813232,845481,371623,470976,407648,393135,244554,134035,155132,165142,132655,137977,0.7,0.1

152

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",20588,20773,20821,20901,20710,20712,20681,20200,20337,20358,20554,20616,20802,21016,21126,22017,22021,22012,23598,23631,23008,85.9,83.2 " Coal",19556,19588,19562,19542,19192,18844,19045,18426,18709,18566,18734,18734,18530,18400,18426,18455,18428,18416,18401,18434,17774,78.3,64.3 " Petroleum",492,490,491,491,492,486,487,486,486,486,471,471,473,474,479,479,487,487,487,486,486,2,1.8 " Natural Gas",473,628,700,799,958,1087,1087,1087,1083,1090,1290,1353,1741,2082,2162,3024,3024,3020,4620,4616,4371,5.4,15.8

153

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2708,2710,2744,2733,2965,2950,2954,2927,2923,2895,2812,2814,2854,2650,2618,2759,2889,2826,2911,3042,2994,100,82.6 " Coal",495,484,499,467,488,475,474,467,477,477,477,477,477,476,477,482,492,492,497,497,497,17,13.7 " Petroleum",298,296,293,293,291,291,297,276,276,278,297,296,238,237,228,221,229,223,227,226,225,10.6,6.2 " Natural Gas",93,110,132,153,366,363,363,363,363,333,360,360,459,385,385,553,649,645,722,722,676,12.8,18.7 " Hydroelectric",1821,1821,1821,1820,1820,1820,1820,1820,1806,1806,1678,1678,1678,1549,1526,1500,1516,1463,1463,1594,1594,59.7,44

154

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2282,2282,2357,2304,2500,2559,2553,2576,2576,2571,2585,2659,2690,2439,2394,2558,2558,2547,2686,3029,3035,85.7,76.1 " Petroleum",56,56,56,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,0.2,0.1 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-",136,136,136,136,136,136,136,212,212,212,212,376,376,376,536,543,543,4.5,13.6 " Hydroelectric",2227,2226,2302,2299,2358,2418,2412,2435,2435,2429,2444,2441,2472,2221,2176,2176,2176,2166,2144,2481,2486,81,62.3 "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power",314,353,379,404,409,415,434,434,433,433,432,577,574,563,592,602,652,649,692,729,955,14.3,23.9

155

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",1542,1547,1672,1711,1737,1732,1734,1750,1721,1744,1794,1770,1740,1753,1722,1769,1736,1820,1847,1868,1889,85.1,91.4 " Coal",56,56,54,54,54,54,54,54,25,25,25,25,25,25,25,52,25,25,25,25,25,1.2,1.2 " Petroleum",494,498,500,539,570,572,569,575,585,593,610,527,522,529,517,526,527,581,601,604,618,28.9,29.9 " Natural Gas",756,756,766,767,762,754,759,759,752,752,762,819,796,803,785,785,785,814,818,818,825,36.2,39.9 " Hydroelectric",236,237,352,352,352,353,353,362,359,374,396,399,396,396,395,397,397,397,400,414,414,18.8,20.1

156

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",5452,5450,5453,5512,5518,5529,5632,5760,5811,5829,5939,6010,6052,6667,6722,7007,7056,6959,7011,7675,7647,99.7,97.3 " Coal",3094,3087,3066,3103,3112,3112,3111,3152,3169,3181,3181,3181,3196,3196,3196,3196,3196,3196,3196,3863,3863,53.4,49.2 " Petroleum",370,311,334,342,342,331,544,547,518,528,636,708,638,637,638,639,641,330,382,387,387,10.7,4.9 " Natural Gas",565,630,631,645,643,666,559,644,712,723,723,721,811,1317,1374,1589,1630,1889,1874,1864,1849,12.1,23.5 " Nuclear",1254,1254,1254,1254,1254,1254,1250,1250,1245,1234,1234,1234,1234,1233,1232,1238,1238,1240,1252,1252,1245,20.7,15.8

157

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah" Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4805,4785,4802,4812,4816,4927,4926,4945,5077,5102,5111,5129,5573,5574,5754,6053,6212,6710,6499,6581,6648,97.9,88.7 " Coal",4316,4271,4271,4271,4273,4374,4374,4318,4448,4463,4464,4464,4461,4461,4645,4645,4645,4645,4645,4645,4677,85.5,62.4 " Petroleum",26,28,26,25,25,25,23,33,33,44,44,50,45,46,38,35,35,25,25,25,23,0.8,0.3 " Natural Gas",228,228,228,228,227,231,231,296,296,296,303,332,782,782,796,1098,1257,1755,1542,1624,1660,5.8,22.1 " Hydroelectric",213,236,251,253,257,261,262,263,265,265,265,251,252,252,252,253,253,253,253,253,253,5.1,3.4

158

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4525,4546,4476,4478,4488,4485,4207,4733,4656,4675,4678,4677,4659,4562,4673,4625,4636,4668,4691,4852,4912,99.2,79.4 " Coal",3876,3903,3856,3856,3867,3862,3585,4062,4068,4084,4107,4107,4084,4107,4105,4106,4106,4098,4098,4127,4131,87.1,66.8 " Petroleum",94,88,65,66,67,69,68,117,61,63,65,64,69,72,71,75,75,72,72,68,68,1.4,1.1 " Natural Gas",10,10,10,10,10,10,10,9,9,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,15,15,0.2,0.2 " Hydroelectric",545,545,545,545,545,545,545,545,518,518,497,497,497,371,485,432,443,486,486,508,508,10.5,8.2

159

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4944,5125,5119,5235,5478,5556,5643,5642,5642,5434,5434,5388,5384,5323,5389,5611,6771,6998,8741,8741,8713,80.9,76.3 " Coal",2692,2692,2692,2717,2717,2717,2807,2806,2806,2806,2806,2747,2658,2657,2657,2657,2657,2689,2689,2689,2655,41.8,23.2 " Petroleum",79,260,260,260,260,50,46,46,46,46,46,46,43,45,45,45,45,45,45,45,45,0.7,0.4 " Natural Gas",1142,1142,1136,1227,1455,1743,1743,1743,1743,1533,1533,1547,1636,1576,1642,1862,3023,3217,4964,4964,4970,22.8,43.5 " Hydroelectric",1031,1031,1031,1031,1046,1046,1046,1046,1046,1049,1049,1048,1048,1045,1045,1047,1047,1048,1043,1043,1043,15.6,9.1

160

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",6633,6610,6642,6648,6675,6647,6794,6850,6937,7254,7269,7479,7603,7883,7954,7955,8034,8008,8142,8454,9114,86.6,66.2 " Coal",4945,4945,4955,4950,4954,4954,4961,4955,4963,4981,4981,4981,4891,4891,4891,4888,4899,4921,4925,4970,5661,59.3,41.1 " Petroleum",221,221,222,222,222,221,177,177,174,180,181,178,193,193,207,181,179,179,181,176,176,2.2,1.3 " Natural Gas",393,387,387,379,369,359,542,541,624,917,917,1142,1333,1612,1662,1684,1752,1704,1832,2105,2078,10.9,15.1 " Hydroelectric",542,524,546,566,598,582,582,615,614,614,614,600,600,601,601,610,609,610,610,610,606,7.3,4.4

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161

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",9641,9634,9639,9672,9674,9639,9639,9688,9618,9278,9330,9615,9551,9777,9772,10434,10669,11467,11459,11456,11488,96,71.9 " Coal",3817,3817,3817,3817,3817,3817,3817,3865,3817,3680,3680,3741,3757,3745,3745,3793,3846,3846,3861,3864,3865,37.9,24.2 " Petroleum",221,213,215,216,217,217,217,308,308,29,29,29,25,25,25,23,23,22,22,22,22,0.3,0.1 " Natural Gas",2620,2620,2620,2620,2620,2585,2585,2494,2494,2454,2504,2645,2578,2752,2750,3369,3561,4414,4390,4384,4411,25.8,27.6 " Nuclear",1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1694,1695,1782,1776,1840,1837,1834,1824,1838,1839,1835,1835,17.4,11.5

162

Table 4. Electric Power Industry Capability by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7016,7016,7032,7045,7114,7170,7177,7159,7156,6817,7057,7964,8888,9279,9015,8904,9407,9377,10093,10081,10858,78.3,69.2 " Coal",2244,2246,2227,2238,2228,2255,2255,2131,2136,2121,2208,2208,2225,2231,2220,2123,2108,2102,2115,2115,2086,24.5,13.3 " Petroleum",894,894,894,896,125,31,31,31,40,35,60,54,36,36,32,34,36,36,36,35,35,0.7,0.2 " Natural Gas",2736,2733,2768,2769,3619,3711,3712,3797,3776,3456,3579,4492,5396,5749,5493,5481,5997,5971,6683,6680,7486,39.7,47.7 " Nuclear",1142,1143,1143,1143,1143,1173,1179,1200,1204,1204,1210,1210,1231,1263,1270,1266,1266,1268,1259,1251,1251,13.4,8

163

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

164

Annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. [Includes about 400 abstracts and glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from the Load Research Committee of Association of Edison Illuminating Companies (LRC/AEIC) reports and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts over references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report is a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end-use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis, and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from LRC/AEIC reports, and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts cover references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

Reznek, B.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $1000/kW Program Info Funding Source Connecticut Ratepayers Federally-Mandated Congestion Charges State Connecticut Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 100% of project cost Provider Ameresco Note: Contact the program administrator before making investment decisions; this program requires pre-approval. Connecticut electricity customers that install energy efficiency equipment

167

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

168

Effect of Pretreatment on the Properties of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural waste disposal is becoming a problem due to its increasing production and potential pollution. As a kind of biomass, agricultural waste can be used as a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Agricultural waste disposal is of great ... Keywords: agricultural waste, animal manure, acid washing, pyrolysis

Zhang Shouyu; Wang Jian; Wang Xiu-Jun; Peng Dingmao; Takayuki Takarada

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Protected Water Sources (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protected Water Sources (Iowa) Protected Water Sources (Iowa) Protected Water Sources (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for

170

Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture uses large quantities of energy to pump groundwater for irrigation. This means the cost of energy has important implications for the industry in terms of costs and profitability. Increases in the prices of energy sources such as natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas and diesel can cause economic hardship for irrigators, particularly if those increases are unanticipated. The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize important trends in the current domestic energy situation that could have significant impacts on the future cost and availability of energy, and to show what the implications of those trends are for irrigated agriculture. The primary focus of this study will be on trends in natural gas, since natural gas is the major fuel used for irrigation in the Great Plains states.

Patton, W. P.; Lacewell, R. D.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Great River Energy State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure and member cooperative offering. Provider Great River Energy Great River Energy, a generation and transmission cooperative which serves

172

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

173

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

175

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

176

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the California Cement Industry. Lawrence Berkeley NationalOpportunities in California Industry Sasank Goli, Danieland DR opportunities. The cement industry and agricultural

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Case Study to Bottle the Biogas in Cylinders as Source of Power for Rural Industries Development in Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Pakistan is one of the developing countries with very low energy consumption, correspondingly low standard of living and high population growth. The country is trying to improve its living standards by increasing its energy consumption and establishing appropriate industries. It has immense hydropower potential, which is almost untapped at the present time. Employment generation and poverty alleviation are the two main issues related with rural development. These issues can be tackled by rural industrialization using local resources and appropriate technologies. However, sufficient number of industries can not be set up in rural areas so far due to scarcity of energy supply i.e. electricity, diesel etc. Biogas, a renewable fuel may be able to fill the gap in energy availability in the rural areas. Biogas can supply energy near to biogas plant which makes it hindrance in its wide spread application and therefore mobility of biogas is must, which is achieved by bottling of biogas. Here a model is conceptualized to bottle the biogas in cylinders and then use it to power the rural industries. It is found that use of bottled biogas can save diesel of the worth US $ 147 in 12 hours and also generate employment for 12 persons. Key words: Employment rural industries biogas bottling

Syed Zafar Ilyas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 3: Potash, Soda Ash, and Borates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potash, Potash, Soda Ash, and Borates 3 Potash, soda ash and borates are industrial minerals. They are used primary as feedstock for other industries. They are used to make fertilizers, glass, chemicals and other materials used throughout manufacturing industries. For example, the agricultural industry relies heavily on potash and borates as fertilizers. It is the dependence of these manufacturing industries that make industrial minerals so important. Forms of Potash Potash is used primarily as an agricultural fertilizer because it is a source for soluble potassium. Potash denotes a variety of mined and manufactured salts, all containing the element potassium in water-soluble form. Potash can be potassium chloride [KCL, or muriate of potash (MOP)], potassium sulfate [K

180

PNNL: Available Technologies: Agriculture & Mining Industry  

Bio-based. Bio-based. Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran; Building Efficiency. DSOM (Decision Support for Operations and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CustomOthers pending approval, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Motor VFDs, Motors, LED Exit Signs, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy...

182

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting: 15fixture LED Exit Sign: 5sign Occupancy Sensors: 5switch Commercial Air Conditioning Units: 40ton Plate CoolersPre-Coolers: 500unit Dairy Refrigeration...

183

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

184

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

187

Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

Jackson, R.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Cooperative ExtensionTHE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF AGRICULTURE IN WISCONSIN COUNTIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Wisconsin, policy makers are exploring ways to unleash the private sector to stimulate the economy with an emphasis on job creation. Historically agriculture has been an important part of the Wisconsin economy, but over the years the relative importance of agriculture in the economy has diminished as the service sector employment, such as recreation and tourism, became more predominant. With the loss of many manufacturing jobs and the recent recession, there is renewed interest in agriculture in terms of employment and as a potential source of new employment opportunities. But is this renewed interest justified? Is the agricultural sector one that can have a larger or stimulative role in the Wisconsin economy? How should local and state policy makers consider an “old ” industry that seems to again have relevance? In an original study by Deller (2004), the contributions of agriculture to the Wisconsin economy were documented and more recently re-examined by Deller and Williams in 2009. In both of these studies agriculture was defined to include on-farm production and food processing. Using 2007 data, Wisconsin agriculture was found to contribute $59.16 billion to total business sales (about 12.5 percent of the Wisconsin total); 353,991 jobs (10 percent of total employment) and $20.2 billion of total income (about nine percent of the Wisconsin total). For the first time, the 2009 study also used “clustering analysis ” to examine changes (2001 to 2007) in subsectors of on-farm and food processing to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the

Steven Deller; David Williams; Steven C. Deller; David Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Public Power District

190

Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Program (Mississippi) Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance Program (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State

191

Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Industry and Enhance America's Energy Security Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Industry and Enhance America's Energy Security July 2, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to deploying every available source of American energy and reducing our reliance on imported oil, U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced new funding available to pursue new innovations in biofuels technologies, increase production of U.S. biofuels, and strengthen American energy security. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Navy and Department

192

Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Industry and Enhance America's Energy Security Obama Administration Announces New Investments to Advance Biofuels Industry and Enhance America's Energy Security July 2, 2012 - 10:33am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to deploying every available source of American energy and reducing our reliance on imported oil, U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced new funding available to pursue new innovations in biofuels technologies, increase production of U.S. biofuels, and strengthen American energy security. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Navy and Department

193

Texas agricultural producers' perceptions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is a trade agreement between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico that encompasses the agricultural industry in Texas. However,… (more)

Spraberry, Jennifer L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Funding Sources for Agriculture Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass conversion facilities for use as heat, power, biobased products or biofuels. #12;18 (http://www biofuels, so as to: 1. increase the energy independence of the United States; 2. promote resource chemicals, functional foods (e.g. lutin enhanced ``power bar'' snacks, soy enhanced products

Milchberg, Howard

195

Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program Commercial and Industrial Solar Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate The lesser of 25% of the total cost or $50,000 Program Info Funding Source RPS alternative compliance payments Start Date 11/1/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: $0.80/W (DC) for new systems; $0.50/W (DC) for additions to existing systems Solar Thermal: $0.12/rated or modeled kBtu/year for new systems with 15 or fewer collectors; $0.07/rated or modeled kBtu/year for new systems with

196

Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 - $180

197

Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Eligible Project: $25,000 Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 Night Covers: $6

198

Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Wabash Valley Power Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 Night Covers: $6 Programmable Thermostat: $20 - $25

199

Industrial-market opportunities for geothermal energy in Colorado. Special Publication 20  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal sites in Colorado are listed. The potential industrial market for geothermal energy in Colorado is described for agriculture, manufacturing, and the tourism and travel industry.

Coe, B.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

202

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

203

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

205

Publications Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2012). Economics of IPM Decisions. Stored Product Protection (1- 9). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State (1-11). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State. http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/finished- chapters/s156-ch-27 of Food and Agriculture­ Conservation Effects Assessment Project. How to Build Better Agricultural

206

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

207

College of Agriculture Departments and Degree Programs Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Education Animal & Range Sciences Land Resources & Environmental Sciences Immunology & Infectious Diseases Multi Disciplinary Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Natural Resources & Rangeland Ecology Environmental Sciences Pre-Vet Program (non-degree) Biotechnology Sustainable Foods

Lawrence, Rick L.

208

Funding Sources - Industrial Partnerships Office  

September 27, 2013. ... Livermore Lab Report. News Archive. News Releases. Partnerships. ... Technology & Market Discovery: Working with Us: printer friendly page.

209

Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Opportunities for agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass for the Dutch Chemical Industry Opportunities for agriculture R. Blaauw J. van Haveren E. L International Certification Services EESV according to ISO 9001:2000. Title Biomass for the Dutch Chemical for biomass 18 3.1 General developments 18 3.2 Developments of the Dutch chemical industry towards a bio

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

210

Agriculture, technology, and conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized. Agriculture and its related technologies are often affected by conflict, but rarely acknowledged as a cause or solution to conflict. Literature reviews in six topic areas illustrate various facets of the relationship between agriculture and conflict. Research conducted in Santa Cruz del Quiché, Guatemala illustrates the ways farmers were impacted by the country’s civil war. It also examines farmer survival strategies during the war, and reveals the presence of minor localized conflict over water resources. Conflict over land is not a major concern at present. Market access for inputs and outputs are shown to have been a problem for a number of farmers during the civil war. The poverty of Santa Cruz farmers indicates that much could be gained by rural development. Research is unable to support the hypotheses that agricultural technologies have prevented or caused conflict in Santa Cruz del Quiché, or that they have played a large role in recovery from the country’s civil war. The author recommends that future research be undertaken in regions with a diverse set of agricultural technologies, and/or a recent history of significant technological change in agriculture. Policy recommendations include providing secure access to markets during war time, increasing capacity for home-based rural production, and continuing research into resilient crops. Finally, the author suggests that the responsible decision to develop, adopt, or introduce an agricultural technology must take into account the social consequences of that decision, including how the new technology may alleviate or contribute to conflict.

Zilverberg, Cody John

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Otter Tail Power Company- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Otter Tail Power Company Rebate Program offers rebates to qualifying commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers for the installation of high-efficiency equipment upgrades. See the program...

212

A Social Semiotic Discourse Analysis of Film and Television Portrayals of Agriculture: Implications for American Cultural Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. farm populace is declining rapidly, and the majority of Americans are generations removed from food and fiber production. Society now receives the majority of its information about agriculture-related topics from sources removed from the industry itself, including entertainment media such as films and television programs. To better understand how these entertainment media influence societal perceptions of the food and fiber industry, the researcher sought to explicate the content of entertainment media texts related to agricultural production and to compare that content to previously recorded public perceptions of the industry. Using themes outlined by the Kellogg Foundation’s 2002 survey of perceptions of rural life—the pastoral fantasy, the traditional family farm, and the decline of the agrarian tradition—a social semiotic content analysis of 23 films and television programs released between 1950 and 2012 was conducted to identify parallels between the content of those media texts and the findings of the Kellogg study. Films and television programs released between 1950 and 1990 contained narrative and visual elements that closely linked those texts to the three themes identified by the Kellogg researchers, indicating that those perceptual elements could have been influenced by pervasive images of traditional agricultural production practices. Films and programs released after 1990 also contained components strongly tying them to the Kellogg study themes with added emphasis on the decline of the agrarian tradition theme.

Specht, Annie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Overshooting of agricultural prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Agricultural Meteorology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nearly five weeks in China (May–June 1981), the author visited scientific institutions and experiment stations engaged in agricultural meterology and climatology research and teaching. The facilities, studies, and research programs at each ...

Norman J. Rosenberg

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy for agriculture. A computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

Energy may come from the sun or the earth or be the product of plant materials or agricultural wastes. Whatever its source, energy is indispensable to our way of life, beginning with the production, processing, and distribution of abundant, high quality food and fiber supplies. This specialized bibliography on the subject of energy for agriculture contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Originally issued by Michigan State University (MSU), it is being reprinted and distributed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The literature citations will be incorporated into AGRICOLA (Agricultural On-Line Access), the comprehensive bibliographic data base maintained by Technical Information Systems (TIS), a component of USDA's Science and Education Administration (SEA). The citations and the listing of research projects will be combined with other relevant references to provide a continuously updated source of information on energy programs in the agricultural field. No abstracts are included.

Stout, B.A.; Myers, C.A. (comps.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting While this policy alleviates some requirements on low-emitting emission sources, it does not change the policy of requiring applicants to submit reasonable information concerning all potential emission sources.

218

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

219

Agriculture Residues Recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Saudi Arabia, as well as other countries in the Near East region, is characterized by erratic weather conditions, limited area of fertile arable lands, and with acute water shortage. Although agricultural residues (AGR) production in the region is huge (more than 440 million tons), most of these residues are either burned in the field or utilized in an inefficient way. Utilization of AGR as compost may contribute to expansion of arable lands through its use for reclamation of soil and reduce irrigation requirements. This study was conducted at Al Khalidiah farm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to assess compost production at large commercial scale using several types of agricultural and animal by-products with addition of a BZT®Compost Activator (based mainly on microorganism, enzymes and yeast). In this study, two types of compost piles were made at the farm. The first pile of compost was made of different agriculture residues, namely: animal wastes (quail, goat and sheep manure), brownian agricultural wastes (windbreaks residues, date trees, citrus and olive trees pruning) and green landscape grasses (50%, 25 % and 25%, respectively) and was treated with a tested compost activator. The same agriculture residues combination was also made for the second pile as traditional compost

M. W. Sadik; H. M. El Shaer; H. M. Yakot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Agriculture - Sustainable biofuels Redux  

SciTech Connect

Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices - as will a 2007 legislative mandate for 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year by 2022. Similar directives elsewhere, e.g., the European Union's mandate that 10% of all transport fuel in Europe be from renewable sources by 2020, make this a global issue. The European Union's current reconsideration of this target places even more emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks (1). The need for knowledge- and science-based policy is urgent. Biofuel sustainability has environmental, economic, and social facets that all interconnect. Tradeoffs among them vary widely by types of fuels and where they are grown and, thus, need to be explicitly considered by using a framework that allows the outcomes of alternative systems to be consistently evaluated and compared. A cellulosic biofuels industry could have many positive social and environmental attributes, but it could also suffer from many of the sustainability issues that hobble grain-based biofuels, if not implemented the right way.

Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Doering, Otto C. [Purdue University; Hamburg, Steven P [Brown University; Melillo, Jerry M [ORNL; Wander, Michele M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Texas Industries of the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the Texas Industries of the Future program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of advanced technologies and adoption of best practices that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs, resulting in improved competitive performance. The bottom line for Texas industry is savings in energy and materials, cost-effective environmental compliance, increased productivity, reduced waste, and enhanced product quality. The state program leverages the programs and tools of the federal Department of Energy's Industries of the Future. At the federal level, there are nine Industries of the Future: refining, chemicals, aluminum, steel, metal casting, glass, mining, agriculture, and forest products. These industries were selected nationally because they supply over 90% of the U.S. economy's material needs and account for 75% of all energy use by U.S. industry. In Texas, three IOF sectors, chemicals, refining and forest products, account for 86% of the energy used by industry in this state.

Ferland, K.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Industrial Oil Products Division Student Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Awarded to a graduate student for travel to AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo to present a paper. Industrial Oil Products Division Student Award Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents distinguished

223

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

224

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Bond Program Provider Revenue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial, natural resources, recreational development or manufacturing purposes. The board of county commissioners of any county or the governing body of any city may approve an exemption of property funded by industrial revenue bonds (IRB's). Some

225

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Indiana Kingman Research Station (Corn and Soybeans)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that is created when sulfur dioxide is removed from the exhaust gases during the combustion of coal for energy production. Research on FGDG has been conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. EPA, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural ...

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

227

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lines, and becoming an international benchmark in some of them. Incentives will be given to those (elimination of wastes genera- ted by society, decontamination of soils, clean agriculture, etc change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

228

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies Tad Patzek, Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering, UT Austin of Conclusions, cntd. The main energy crops I have looked at are maize, sugarcane, soybeans, and oil palms are witnessing a global move away from food to energy crops. Diverting more land to pure energy crops

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

229

Geothermal Energy Industry Briefing Packet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earl Warren Legal Institute, part of the University of California at Berkeley, is a center for law-related interdisciplinary research and public service in areas of national social concern. Since 1975, we have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on various projects addressing energy policy and environmental issues. We are now engaged in a major effort to identify current legal, economic and institutional obstacles to commercial development and use of geothermal energy sources. Geothermal resources--heat reservoirs beneath the earth's surface--have received increasing attention in recent years of growing energy consciousness, and much progress has been made toward understanding their nature, extent and uses. Encouraged by federal and state development programs, there now exists an active and growing community of geologists, geophysicists, engineers, drilling companies, developers and end-users of geothermal heat. However, Department of Energy studies indicate that current knowledge and available technology would support substantially broader use of the resource, particularly by private sector commercial, industrial and agricultural concerns. Accordingly, we are now seeking to determine the knowledge and attitudes of such entities toward geothermal use; the factors which will influence decisions to utilize geothermal or not; the perceived obstacles, if any, to expanded use in their own industries; and the types of government policies or programs which might minimize such obstacles. The industries we have chosen to approach have been targeted by others as potential geothermal users. However, we recognize that many firms today have little or no knowledge of the resource or of its potential applications. We have therefore prepared the following brief summary as an introduction for some, perhaps a refresher for others, and hopefully a stimulus for an exchange of ideas with all whose views we intend to solicit as our work proceeds.

Bressler, Sandra E.; Hanemann, Michael; Katz, Ira Benjamin; Nimmons, John T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

234

AEP Texas Central Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program Central Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program AEP Texas Central Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $15,000 Non-residential: $31,2500 Program Info Start Date 08/01/2009 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $1.50/W DC Non-residential: $1.25/W DC Provider Smart Source PV Program American Electric Power Texas Central Company (AEP-TCC) offers rebates to customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or other buildings. Customers of all rate classes are eligible to participate in the

235

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

236

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wind energy applications in agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstract are included for each of the papers presented concerning the use of wind turbines in agriculture.

Kluter, H.H.; Soderholm, L.H. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Water Heaters: $100 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $150 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,000 Provider Farmers Electric Cooperative Farmers Electric Cooperative offers incentives for its residential and agricultural members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. In order to receive rebates, equipment and installation must meet program requirements. Rebates are available for qualifying air

239

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info Funding Source Efficiency Vermont Public Benefit Fund Expiration Date 06/30/2013 State Vermont Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies according to technology; prescriptive and custom rebates available Provider Efficiency Vermont In Vermont, agricultural operations are eligible for prescriptive and customized incentives on equipment proven to help make farms more efficient. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting (free to $175 per fixture, depending on the type of fixture or lighting) and for a variety of equipment including plate coolers, variable speed milk transfer

240

Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008: Industrial ...  

Source: McKinsey & Company, 2007. Industry represents 38% of the total global opportunity to reduce energy demand: 6 Agenda Market Overview ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Print Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

242

LEDSGP/Agriculture Work Space/Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Agriculture Work Space/Tools < LEDSGP Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts How We Work > Work Streams and Working Groups > Agriculture > Tools Agriculture Tools Add an Impact Assessment Program Add an Agriculture Tool Guides Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Scale-up

243

Autonomous farming: modelling and control of agricultural machinery in a unified framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant challenges faced by the farming industry, including a reduced labour workforce and a corporate style of farming. Such factors demand an increase in farming efficiency and productivity. This paper describes future autonomous farming ... Keywords: agricultural machinery, agricultural robotics, agronomy data, articulated farm vehicles, autonomous farming, autonomous robots, autonomous vehicles, intelligent systems, precision agriculture, precision farming, tracking control, trajectory tracking, uncertainty, vehicle control, vehicle modelling

Ray Eaton; Jay Katupitiya; Kheng Wah Siew; Blair Howarth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Commercial and Industrial Renewable Energy Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Grants Renewable Energy Grants Commercial and Industrial Renewable Energy Grants < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate No maximum Program Info Funding Source RPS alternative compliance payments State New Hampshire Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Minimum $100,000 Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission '''''Note: The deadline for the most-recent round of funding under this program, which offered a total of $1.8 million in grants, was June 7, 2013.

245

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Industrial Process Surveillance System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

249

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

250

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

251

Industrial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Industrial Dataset Summary Description The Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Database is a collection of all the publicly available data from energy efficiency assessments conducted by IACs at small and medium-sized industrial facilities. Source Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Centers Date Released September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords assessment energy efficiency Industrial manufacturing small and medium-sized Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon copy_of_iac_database.xls (xls, 28.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Standards Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Daily Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

252

California Agriculture: Dimensions and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture 1959. California, Vol. 1, Part 48. ----------.of Population, California, Vol. 1, Part 6. ----------. 1990Vol. 12, No. 67, 1888. California Committee to Survey the

Siebert,, Jerome Editor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Capture & Storage Industrial Capture & Storage Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

254

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial International Energy Outlook 2010 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by 42 percent, or an average of 1.3 percent per year, from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Ninety-five percent of the growth occurs in non-OECD nations. Overview The world's industries make up a diverse sector that includes manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction. Industrial energy demand varies across regions and countries, depending on the level and mix of economic activity and technological development, among other factors. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. Industrial energy use also includes natural gas and petroleum products used as feedstocks to produce non-energy products, such as plastics. In aggregate, the industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sector, consuming about one-half of the world's total delivered energy.

257

Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate $250,000 per farm Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge (SBC) Expiration Date 12/01/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount General: 75% of project costs Energy Audits: up to $2,500 (cost share may be required for audit costs exceeding this amount) Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers incentives for electric and natural gas efficiency improvements made

258

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

260

Permits to Install,New Source Review (PTI,NSR) (Michigan) |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permits to Install,New Source Review (PTI,NSR) (Michigan) Permits to Install,New Source Review (PTI,NSR) (Michigan) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

Scherr, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage Area 1 Large-Scale Industrial CCS Program The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

265

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Brown (2004). Industrial Refrigeration Best PracticesD. Brown (2004). Industrial Refrigeration Best Practicesoutlet – common in industrial refrigeration Source: Wilcox,

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Industrial Demand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial.gif (5205 bytes) The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing...

267

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

268

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

269

CAT Communicator | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source News Archives CAT Communicator CAT Communicator was a newsletter intended to provide APS information to...

270

Industries Affected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Industries affected by microbiologically influenced corrosion...generation: nuclear, hydro, fossil fuel,

271

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editor Janet White accepted the awards during the 2012 ACEa noxious weed. Three ACE awards for California AgricultureAgriculture team has won three awards from the Association

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

273

Sustainable Agriculture Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Sustainable Agriculture Network" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSustainableAgricultureNetwork&oldid312235" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations...

274

Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research July...

275

Renewable Agricultural Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Agricultural Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Agricultural Energy...

276

Agriculture and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA is a voluntary program that promotes the reduction of diesel exhaust emissions from agricultural equipment and vehicles by encouraging proper operations and maintenance by farmers, ranchers, and

278

Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience produced by Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/agricultural/podcasts.asp Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 MST Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 Tue, 29

279

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

280

One-on-one Meetings with Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 One-on-one Meetings with Industry The Nuclear Production Contract Source Evaluation Board (SEB) will hold one-on-one meetings with industry participants. The intent of one-on-one...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

AEP Texas North Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program North Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program AEP Texas North Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $15,000 Non-residential: $30,000 Program Info Start Date 08/01/2009 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $1.50/watt DC Non-residential: $1.20/watt DC Provider Smart Source PV Program American Electric Power Texas North Company (AEP-TNC) offers rebates to customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or other buildings. Customers of all rate classes (e.g., residential, commercial)

284

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Review: Interpretive review of conceptual frameworks and research models that inform Australia's agricultural vulnerability to climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture in Australia is highly vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the sector's vulnerability is critical to developing immediate policy for the future of the agricultural industries and their communities. This review aims to identify research ... Keywords: Biophysical models, Contextual vulnerability, Outcome vulnerability

Leonie J. Pearson; Rohan Nelsonc; Steve Crimp; Jenny Langridge

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

industrial sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

industrial sector industrial sector Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

287

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

288

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide range x-ray techniques such as thin film x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, powder diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering, protein solution scattering and protein crystallography, as well as x-ray imaging. Currently she is the project leader of a multi-million dollar project on transmission x-ray microscopy recently funded by the U.S. DOE and the spokesperson for this new imaging beamline at the NSLS. She has also been collaborating with universities and industries for several projects on energy research at the NSLS.

289

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

291

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

292

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

293

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

294

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

295

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

296

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

297

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

298

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

299

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

300

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

302

Radiological considerations of phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiological concerns associated with phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture have been placed in perspective by considering the consequences of a hypothetical case involving heavy long term applications of phosphogypsum. In California, such a schedule might consist of an initial gypsum application of 10 tons/acre followed by alternate year applications of 5 tons/acre. If the radium content of the gypsum were 15 pCi/g and the till depth 6 inches, this schedule could be maintained for more than 100 years before the radium buildup in the soil would reach a proposed federal concentration limit of 5 pCi/g. An agricultural worker spending 40 h a week in a field containing 5 pCi/g of radium would be exposed to terrestrial radiation of about 7 ..mu..R/h above background. This exposure would result in an annual radiation dose of about 15 mrem, which is 3% of the recommended limit for an individual working in an uncontrolled area. Five pCi/g of radium in the soil could generate airborne radon daughter concentrations exceeding the concentration limit proposed for residential exposure. However, as residential exposure limits are predicated on 75% of continuous occupancy, these limits should not be applied to agricultural workers because of the seasonal nature of their work. Radium uptake by food crops grown in the hypothetical soil would result in a 50 year integrated dose to the bone surface of 1.4 rem. This dose is conservatively based on the assumption that an adult's total vegetable diet comes from this source and that consumption was continuous during the 50 year period.

Lindeken, C.L.

1980-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

A global sourcing strategy for durable tooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competitive pressures in manufacturing industries have led to an increased utilization of strategic sourcing initiatives: among them is low cost sourcing. While low cost sourcing has been used extensively for direct ...

Vasovski, Steven

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

305

Roadmap for Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee established a goal that biomass will supply 5% of the nation’s power, 20% of its transportation fuels, and 25% of its chemicals by 2030. These combined goals are approximately equivalent to 30% of the country’s current petroleum consumption. The benefits of a robust biorefinery industry supplying this amount of domestically produced power, fuels, and products are considerable, including decreased demand for imported oil, revenue to the depressed agricultural industry, and revitalized rural economies. A consistent supply of highquality, low-cost feedstock is vital to achieving this goal. This biomass roadmap defines the research and development (R&D) path to supplying the feedstock needs of the biorefinery and to achieving the important national goals set for biomass. To meet these goals, the biorefinery industry must be more sustainable than the systems it will replace. Sustainability hinges on the economic profitability of all participants, on environmental impact of every step in the process, and on social impact of the product and its production. In early 2003, a series of colloquies were held to define and prioritize the R&D needs for supplying feedstock to the biorefinery in a sustainable manner. These colloquies involved participants and stakeholders in the feedstock supply chain, including growers, transporters, equipment manufacturers, and processors as well as environmental groups and others with a vested interest in ensuring the sustainability of the biorefinery. From this series of colloquies, four high-level strategic goals were set for the feedstock area: • Biomass Availability – By 2030, 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock is needed annually to achieve the power, fuel, and chemical production goals set by the Biomass Research and Development Technology Advisory Production Committee • Sustainability – Production and use of the 1 billion dry tons annually must be accomplished in a sustainable manner • Feedstock Infrastructure – An integrated feedstock supply system must be developed and implemented that can serve the feedstock needs of the biorefinery at the cost, quality, and consistency of the set targets • System Profitability – Economic profitability and sustainability need to be ensured for all required participants in the feedstock supply system. For each step in the biomass supply process—production, harvesting and collection, storage, preprocessing, system integration, and transportation—this roadmap addresses the current technical situations, performance targets, technical barriers, R&D needs, and R&D priorities to overcome technical barriers and achieve performance targets. Crop residue biomass is an attractive starting feedstock, which shows the best near-term promise as a biorefinery feedstock. Because crop residue is a by-product of grain production, it is an abundant, underutilized, and low cost biomass resource. Corn stover and cereal straw are the two most abundant crop residues available in the United States. Therefore, this roadmap focuses primarily on the R&D needed for using these biomass sources as viable biorefinery feedstocks. However, achieving the goal of 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock will require the use of other biomass sources such as dedicated energy crops. In the long term, the R&D needs identified in this roadmap will need to accommodate these other sources of biomass as well.

J. Richard Hess; Thomas D. Foust; Reed Hoskinson; David Thompson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this trend will continue, especially if the prices for fossil fuels continue to increase. Other direct, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological iomass energy is energy derived from organic matter of recent biological origin. Common forms of biomass

Lee, Dongwon

307

Technology acquisition: sourcing technology from industry partners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemicals, oil and gas and biofuels. The research adopts the perspective of an acquiring firm, which is interested in incorporating a new technology into its operations in order to meet a particular business need. Such a business need can be, for example...

Ortiz-Gallardo, Victor Gerardo

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

Industrial Retrofits are Possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontario is the industrial heartland of Canada and more than 80% of its energy comes from Canadian sources with the remainder from the neighbouring U.S. states. Because of the ever increasing demand for energy relating to increased economic activity, the provincial government's major energy priority is efficiency. In April of 1987, the provincial government initiated a program to assist industrial energy users to reduce their energy usage. This program was designed to concentrate on an in-depth analysis of the complete operations of industrial plants with the analyses being performed by specialist, private sector, engineering consultants. The program is in 3 phases providing an Ontario industrial plant with an Energy Analysis, a Feasibility Analysis Grant and a Project Engineering Design Grant. In this presentation, the author will outline the results of the program to date and will attempt to share with the audience the individual case experiences. Since the program's start, the Ontario Ministry of Energy has completed over 320 energy analyses of industrial plants which had combined energy bills of over $420 million. The potential annual energy savings identified were over $40 million or 9.51%. Electricity and natural gas are the major fuels used by Ontario industries and our surveys to date have shown savings of 6% in electricity and 11% in natural gas. Over the first two years of the program, individual plants have or are intending to implement more than half of the energy analysis recommendations.

Stobart, E. W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

econom- ics of algae as a source of biofuel is dependent onThe future of algae as a source of biofuel will depend on

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Selling Texas: an internship at the Texas Department of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"SELLING TEXAS," an overview of the Texas Department of Agriculture and its Marketing and Agribusiness Division, takes a look at how the organization promotes Texas as the best of the best, and considers what would make the campaign better. Enriched by abundant resources and industrious people, Texas is a modem worldwide leader in the export of many raw and processed agricultural products ... Your market is our market ... Supply, quality and diversity--that's Texas agriculture" (TDA, 1996a). The Texas Department of Agriculture's Marketing and Agribusiness Development Division has a unique opportunity to encourage businesses to locate in Texas (and thereby boost the Texas economy) as a result of the State's mystique. For instance, the number of brand names including "Texas" places it in the top five-among other U.S. states in terms of popularity as an advertising tool. "Savor all the flavors of Texas ... Bred to survive and flourish in the unique Texas climate ... The vast ranges and fertile soils of Texas produce the world's finest fibers..." (TDA, 1996c). The division's BLJY TEXAS cwnpaign also promotes Texas products to its residents with whom Texas pride and loyalty are an arguable second only to American patriotism. The BUY TEXAS initiative is an umbrella consumer marketing effort that "encourages ocnsumers to seek and purchase products grown, sewn, and processed in Texas" (Marketing and Agribusiness Development, 1996) including Taste of Texas foods, Vintage Texas wines, TEXAS GROAN plants, and Naturally TEXAS apparel.

Cross, Kelly D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

312

Industrial lighting handbook  

SciTech Connect

Technological advances in industrial lighting system components now make it possible to reduce lighting system consumption by up to 50% or more without loss of the benefits inherent in good quality electric illumination. Management involvement in decisions about industrial lighting is essential, however, and this document provides generalized information in lay terms to help decision-makers become familiar with the concerns that affect industrial environment and the financial well-being of their companies. The five sections (1) discuss the benefits of good lighting, (2) review certain major lighting issues and terms, (3) identify procedures for developing a lighting energy management plan, (4) identify lighting energy management options (LEMOs), and (5) discuss sources of assistance. 19 figures, 8 tables.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Strategies for an evolving generation industry  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with the changing structure of the power generation industry to include nonutility generation resources. The topics discussed include the permanence of nonutility generation as a power source, the evolving industry, and the strategies for an evolving industry. The emphasis is on developing sound, sophisticated purchasing procedures to fully benefit from this new generation resource.

Kee, E.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry By: Richard Newell, Administrator...

315

User Facilities for Industry 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Organizers:+Andreas+Roelofs+(CNM),+Jyotsana+Lal+(APS),+Katie+Carrado+Gregar+(CNM),+and+Susan+Strasser+ (APS)! ! In! order! to! increase! awareness! of! the! industrial! community! to! Argonne! National! Laboratory! user! facilities,!the!Advanced!Photon!Source!(APS),!the!Center!for!Nanoscale!Materials!(CNM)!and!the!Electron! Microscopy!Center!(EMC)!welcomed!industrial!scientists,!engineers!and!related!professionals!to!a!oneC day! workshop! to! learn! more! about! Argonne's! National! Laboratory! and! the! capabilities/techniques! available! for! their! use.! The! workshop! showcased! several! successful! industrial! user! experiments,! and! explained! the! different! ways! in! which! industrial! scientists! can! work! at! Argonne! or! with! Argonne!

316

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

An intercomparison of models used to simulate the short-range atmospheric dispersion of agricultural ammonia emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ammonia emitted into the atmosphere from agricultural sources can have an impact on nearby sensitive ecosystems, either through elevated ambient concentrations or dry/wet deposition to vegetation and soil surfaces. Short-range atmospheric dispersion ... Keywords: Agriculture, Ammonia, Atmospheric dispersion model, Evaluation, Validation

Mark R. Theobald; Per LřFstrřM; John Walker; Helle V. Andersen; Poul Pedersen; Antonio Vallejo; Mark A. Sutton

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA Draft Findings) Richard Grotjahn Professor of Climate Dynamics University of California, Davis 6 March 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture

Grotjahn, Richard

320

Evaluating News Bias in Agriculture: The Salmonella Outbreak of 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the United States is considered to have one of the safest food supplies in the world, consumers have become increasingly alarmed with the subject of food safety as each crisis-related outbreak is scrutinized. With the onset of an agricultural-related food crisis, the media plays a vital role in publicizing both facts and opinions. Because of the relationship between agricultural risk communication and the media, it is essential to study the level of bias in the news reporting of these agricultural risk-associated events. The purpose of this study was to analyze the coverage and level of bias of the Salmonella outbreak associated with tomatoes in associated press (AP) newswires during a six-month period in 2008 through a descriptive content analysis. A comprehensive search yielded 57 usable articles written during a six-month period surrounding the outbreak; these articles were analyzed using the Hayakawa-Lowry News Bias categories. A total of 1,444 sentences were coded into nine categories: (a) report attributed, (b) report unattributed, (c) inference labeled, (d) inference unlabeled, (e) judgment attributed favorable, (f) judgment attributed unfavorable, (g) judgment unattributed favorable, (h) judgment unattributed favorable, and (i) other. Data indicated a significantly higher number of report sentences as compared to judgment sentences. Report sentences are considered both verifiable and factual. Thus, data indicated a low level of bias. Additionally, although journalists were objectively reporting information regarding the Salmonella outbreak, per capita tomato consumption for 2008 decreased. In the wake of a crisis, objective reporting is crucial. Journalists have an obligation to report information that is objective, factual, and verifiable. Understanding how the media tells agriculture‘s story can help bridge the gap between the industry and those reporting the issues.

Schroeder, Charlsie Lauren

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research on Agricultural Information Service Platform Based on Information Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For exiting problems of information technology in agriculture, modern information technologies are used to make agricultural information service platform, which can integrate information resources, then agricultural network information service sharing ... Keywords: modern information technology, agricultural information, service platform

Zhang Yubin; Liu Zhiguo; Lin Lizhong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

323

Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) Financial Assistance to Industry Program (New Brunswick, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Loan Program Provider New Brunswick Economic Development The purpose of the assistance is to provide adequate funding for capital expenditures and working capital to enable the establishment, expansion, or maintenance of eligible industries. The assistance may be provided in the

324

The Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) The Industrial Machinery Tax Credit (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development The Industrial Machinery Tax Credit provides tax savings from equipment investments dependent upon the size investment made during the period. To qualify for this credit, companies are not required to create new jobs.

325

Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Eligibility...

326

Biomass power industry: Assessment of key players and approaches for DOE and industry interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review team established by the Department of Energy conducted an assessment of the US biomass power industry. The review team visited with more than 50 organizations representing all sectors of the biomass power industry including utilities, independent power producers, component manufacturers, engineering and construction contractors, agricultural organizations, industrial users, and regulatory organizations. DOE solicited industry input for the development of the Biomass Power Division`s Five Year Plan. DOE believed there was a critical need to obtain industry`s insight and working knowledge to develop the near- and long-term plans of the program. At the heart of this objective was the desire to identify near-term initiatives that the program could pursue to help accelerate the further development of biomass power projects.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Associations and Industry - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Associations and Industry, Research Programs, ==== Basic Metallurgy ==== ... FORUMS > ASSOCIATIONS AND INDUSTRY, Replies, Views, Originator, Last ...

328

Attitude determination by integration of MEMS inertial sensors and GPS for autonomous agriculture applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) technologies, which has widespread usage in industry, is also regarded as an ideal solution for automated agriculture because it fulfils the accuracy, reliability and ... Keywords: Automated guidance systems, GPS/INS, Kalman Filter, Loose-coupled integration

Yong Li; Mahmoud Efatmaneshnik; Andrew G. Dempster

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Industrial alliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

Adams, K.V.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

331

State Level Analysis of Industrial Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most analyses of industrial energy use have been conducted at the national level, in part because of the difficulties in dealing with state level data. Unfortunately, this provides a distorted view of the industrial sector for state and regional policymakers. ACEEE has completed analyses on eight states drawing upon data from a diverse set of sources to characterize the industries at a relatively high level of disaggregation. These analyses demonstrate how different state and regional mixes are from the national mix and the importance of a regionally specific approach to industrial energy policy. In addition, the data suggest that significant shifts are occurring in industry mix in some of these states that will have important ramifications on future industrial policies for these states. This paper will provide an overview of our analytical approach, the data sources that are available, and provide examples of the analysis results to demonstrate the regional diversity of industrial electricity use.

Elliott, R. N.; Shipley, A. M.; Brown, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","...

333

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sidual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural...

334

Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" 2.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",27.5,"X",42,39.5,62,"X",0,9.8

336

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" 3.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

337

Three Essays on International Agricultural Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many factors that affect international agricultural trade. One of them is international transportation costs. Another important factor is non-tariff barriers such as sanitary and phytosanitary regulations caused by animal disease outbreaks. The main purpose of this dissertation was to analyze how these factors interfere in the international agricultural trade by examining three cases. In Chapter II, a spatial price equilibrium model of the international cotton sector was utilized to evaluate the effects of the Panama Canal expansion (PCE) on the world cotton industry. Three scenarios were evaluated by reducing ocean freight rates from U.S. Gulf and Atlantic ports to Asian destinations. All scenarios suggested that cotton exports from U.S. Gulf and Atlantic ports would considerably increase. On the other hand, the West Coast ports decreased its participation in total U.S. cotton exports. Overall, total U.S. cotton exports were expected to increase due to the PCE. By using the same model which was used in Chapter II, the third chapter analyzes port improvements in Brazil. By March of 2012, the port of Salvador is expected to have undergone relevant improvements. As a result, the port of Salvador is expected to attract ocean shipping companies which are willing to export directly to Asian importing markets. Scenarios with different reductions in cotton export cost for this port were examined. In general, results indicated a shift in Brazil cotton export flows from the port of Santos to the port of Salvador as well as an increase in exports and producer revenues for the country. Finally, in Chapter IV, the impacts of the 2005 FMD outbreak on the Brazilian meat market was examined. The imposition of an import ban by Russia on Brazilian meat exports was also investigated. By using time series methods, it was found that the outbreak along with the import ban caused a temporary negative price shock to the Brazilian meat market. Export pork and export chicken prices were found to not fully recover after the removal of the import ban by Russia. On the other hand, the export beef price was indicated to undergo a complete recovery.

Costa, Rafael

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantities consumed of particular types and import sources of olive oilquantity of imports of Italian-style cheese) both stimulate more olive oil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has been conducted under the auspices of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, and universities. This report describes work conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 2008–2012 as part of that effort. Two separate ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) This is the approved revision of this page, as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

342

AGRICULTURAL REPORT SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Secure America's energy future through renewable biofuels 5. Mitigate and adapt agriculture to variations will harvestprocessor will harvest and process theand process the product for wholesaleproduct for wholesale

343

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

344

Charles County - Agricultural Preservation Districts - Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Siting & Permitting Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas...

345

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

346

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loan Program Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category...

348

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a short-term or long-term ability to stimulate agriculture development and diversification in rural, urban,...

349

Industrial Development (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Indiana) (Indiana) Industrial Development (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1981 State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Indiana Economic Development Corporation An economically distressed county can apply for designation as a community

350

Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present, wild hogs exist in Texas in free-ranging populations numbering in the millions. These populations continue to expand, and now are pervasive in almost all land resource areas of the state. Wild hogs have a noted presence in the ranching and farming industry. This presence is both biophysical and socioeconomic in nature. The hogs financially influence agriculture as both a valuable asset and expensive liability. The economic presence of this influence reflects opposing personal preferences which play an important part in opposing valuations. Biological information is available which concerns the hogs, but no research has centered specifically around the economic effects of the hog's presence upon agricultural producers. To properly perform any economic analysis of wild hog impacts on the state's agricultural producers, good data was needed and became a primary focus of this study. A second need and focus of the study was the employment of enterprise budgeting as an economic research method to discover values for the positive and negative financial effects of the hogs. These methods were used to yield sound values for the economic effects of the wild hogs on the Texas agriculture producers which were the focus of this study. This research effort demonstrates the economic effects of wild hogs on eight selected Texas agricultural producers. An intensive survey was conducted which involved gathering primary data which focused on the effects the hogs have on the respondent's operations. This data was used to construct both full and partial combination effect enterprise budgets for the respondent's agriculture enterprises. These budgets yield values for the benefits and damages that result from the hog's growing influence on landowners / managers. The values for the economic effects of the hogs are presented and discussed in an attempt to offer information and alternatives which may help efficiently manage populations of the hogs in Texas. This information can be used to evaluate biophysical and socioeconomic options for that management effort in several areas. These are the establishment of legal ownership of the hogs, legal liability, and creation of rules, regulations, and programs which increase the efficiency of management efforts.

Bach, Joel Paul

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Transforming the Freight Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Freight Industry From Regulation to Icommon-carrier freight industry was Competition to backwardjourneys. When the freight industry was deregulated, it was

Regan, Amelia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Demographics and industry returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographics and Industry Returns By Stefano DellaVigna andand returns across industries. Cohort size fluc- tuationspredict profitability by industry. Moreover, forecast demand

Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of A

354

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Minerals of Agric

355

NYSEG (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program NYSEG (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate No maximum per customer rebate; however, NYSEG/RG&E reserve the right to cap the rebate to any one customer. Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting, HVAC: Prescriptive incentives vary A/C or Heat Pump A/C or Heat Pump > 63 tons: $25/ton + $5/ton for each 0.1 EER above 9.7 Water Cooled Chillers: $6/ton or $15/ton + $2-$8/ton for each 0.01 kW/ton

356

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Industrial Hygiene  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Hygiene FAQS Industrial Hygiene FAQS STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency (1) Plan, observe, and evaluate contractor performance involving industrial hygiene activities to ensure the adequacy and effectiveness of contractor programs such as: * Technical performance (e.g., adequacy of technical practices) * Plans, policies, and procedures * Management controls * Worker training and qualification programs * Occurrence reporting and corrective actions * Occupational health programs FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph C 4 5 (2) Develop, review, and assess industrial hygiene documentation. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph D 4 5 (3) Resolve or facilitate the resolution of industrial hygiene issues.

357

Evolution of innovation : fiber optics and the communications industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovations can be the single source of industry's growth. How innovations themselves grow or decline also has a direct affect on the health of the industry in which they play. This thesis looks at fiber optic technologies ...

Zadeh, Rodan, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Thailand: Petroleum and natural gas industry profile. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report profiles the petroleum, natural gas, and petrochemical industries in Thailand. It covers: exploration production, consumption, trade, pipelines, industry structure, national energy policy, product marketing, refining, conservation/environmental issues, alternative energy sources, prices, transportation, and commercial opportunities.

1992-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

360

Urban and Industrial Sites Reinvestment Tax Credit Program (Connecticut) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Industrial Sites Reinvestment Tax Credit Program and Industrial Sites Reinvestment Tax Credit Program (Connecticut) Urban and Industrial Sites Reinvestment Tax Credit Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Department of Economic and Community Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mason County PUD 3 - Commercial and Industrial Energy Rebates | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Rebates Commercial and Industrial Energy Rebates Mason County PUD 3 - Commercial and Industrial Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting Rebates: Up to 70% of project cost Prescriptive Rebates: Varies widely, contact Mason County PUD 3 Custom Rebates: Varies widely, contact Mason County PUD 3 Provider Mason County PUD 3 Mason County PUD 3 offers rebates to its non-residential customers for

362

U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative April 15, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, April 15, 2011- To support President Obama's goal of reducing America's oil imports by one-third by 2025, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) today jointly announced up to $30 million over three to four years that will support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will help create a diverse group of economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

363

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Consumers Number of Consumers Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

364

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

365

List of Agricultural Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Equipment Incentives Agricultural Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 90 Agricultural Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 90) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Boilers Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Dishwasher Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) State Rebate Program Vermont Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Custom/Others pending approval Lighting

366

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage Area 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage Area 2 Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

367

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

368

Channels and sources used to gather equine-related information by college-age horse owners and enthusiasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the equine-related topics that are important to Texas college-age horse owners and enthusiasts and the channels/sources they use to get equine-related information. Little research has focused on this group to determine their information needs. Therefore, two focus groups were conducted in 2008 in Texas with college-age horse owners and enthusiasts to conduct a needs assessment. Participants were separated into competitive and recreational groups depending on their level of participation in the industry. They were asked what topics they consider important and what channels/sources they use to gain desired information. Training was the most mentioned topic overall, and the most mentioned by recreational participants. Alternative medical treatments was the most mentioned topic by competitive participants. Competitive participants reported a smaller number of topics as important, indicating that they have specialized information needs. Recreational participants emphasized broader, less specialized topics. Participants showed an interest in relevant and controversial topics affecting the equine industry. Participants also used a combination of channels/sources and competitive and recreational participants often placed importance on different channels/sources. Face-to-face communication was important to both groups. Magazines were important to competitive participants, while the Internet was important to recreational participants. Competitive participants doubted the trustworthiness of sources available through the Internet, but wanted more reliable sources to be made available in the future. Participants preferred to get information from industry specialist sources, such as trainers, veterinarians, other owners and enthusiasts, breed associations, and equine magazines. Participants’ perceptions of trustworthiness were affected by the source’s ability to demonstrate equine-specific knowledge and the source’s reputation and success among equine industry members. The results suggests that the influence of the Internet has altered the traditional models of communication in which source selection determines channel use. In this study, the participants’ Internet channel selection often determined their source use. The results also suggests that communicators wanting to reach this audience should target specific topics to competitive and recreational audiences, use a multi-channel approach, establish trustworthiness, and explore the changing role of the Internet in agricultural communication.

Sullivan, Erin Alene

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

370

Agricultural Trade Liberalization and Poverty in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural research centers that receive principal funding from governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations, most of which are members of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS AND PARTNERS IFPRI’s research, capacity strengthening, and communications work is made possible by its financial contributors and partners. IFPRI gratefully acknowledges generous unrestricted funding from Australia,

Joachim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho; Joaquim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mr. Hayrullo Esonov Agricultural Economist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humphrey year, he plans to work in the areas of crop growing, fruit and vegetable processing, storage and professional skills in the areas of renewable sources of energy, new carbon markets, environmental policies

Hammock, Bruce D.

372

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate For lighting, motors, and ASDs, there is a maximum of 50% of the project cost, or $5,000 Agriculture Ventilation: 50% of cost or $100,000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies according to fixture type Rooftop/Split System A/C: $18/ton, plus bonus of $5/ton for each 0.1 above

373

Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Review of tribological sinks in six major industries  

SciTech Connect

Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Principles of biotechnological treatment of industrial wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review includes current information on biodegradation processes of pollutants, digestor biocenosis and bioadditives, sludge production, measurement of pollution, and advances regarding biotechnological treatment of a series of specific industrial effluents. It was foreseen in 1980 that biotechnology would foster the creation of new industries with low energy requirements. This is because the growth of microorganisms provides a renewable source of energy.

Roig, M.G.; Martin Rodriguez, M.J.M.; Cachaza, J.M. (Univ. de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica); Mendoza Sanchez, L. (C/Sol Oriente, Salamanca (Spain). Estudios y Proyectos); Kennedy, J.F. (Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Research Lab. for the Chemistry of Bioactive Carbohydrates and Proteins)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the gas/oil industry radioactive sources are routinelyreplacement of radioactive sources for oil-well logging withto build a neutron source suit- able for oil-well logging

Persaud, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Impact of Unions in the 1890's: The Case of the New Hampshire Shoe Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

principal source of new shoe industry labor. Blewett, Dawleyto Lynn and other shoe industry towns took the form mainlyFrederick Allen, The Shoe Industry (New York, 1922), p. 198

Maddox, Steven; Eichengreen, Barry

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chemical and microbiological hazards associated with recycling of anaerobic digested residue intended for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, three full-scale biogas plants (BGP) were investigated for the concentration of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides and the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli in the anaerobically digested residues (ADR). The BGPs mainly utilize source-separated organic wastes and industrial food waste as energy sources and separate the ADR into an ADR-liquid and an ADR-solid fraction by centrifugation at the BGP. According to the Norwegian standard for organic fertilizers, the ADR were classified as quality 1 mainly because of high zinc (132-422 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and copper (23-93 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations, but also because of high cadmium (0.21-0.60 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations in the liquid-ADR. In the screening of organic pollutants, only DEHP (9.7-62.1 mg kg{sup -1}) and {Sigma} PAH 16 (0.2-1.98 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were detected in high concentrations according to international regulations. Of the 250 pesticides analyzed, 11 were detected, but only imazalil (<0.30-5.77 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and thiabendazol (<0.14-0.73 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were frequently detected in the ADR-fiber. Concentrations of imazalil and thiabendazol were highest during the winter months, due to a high consumption of citrus fruits in Norway in this period. Ten percent of the ADR-liquid samples contained cereulide-producing B. cereus, whereas no verotoxigenic E. coli was detected. The authors conclude that the risk of chemical and bacterial contamination of the food chain or the environment from agricultural use of ADR seems low.

Govasmark, Espen, E-mail: espen.govasmark@bioforsk.no [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Soil and Environment, Fredrik A. Dahlsvei 20, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Staeb, Jessica [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Abteilung Hydrochemie, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Buesnau) (Germany); Holen, Borge [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Plant Health, Hogskoleveien 7, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Hoornstra, Douwe [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland); Nesbakk, Tommy [Mjosanlegget AS, Roverudmyra Miljostasjon, Asmarkveien 301, NO-2600 Lillehammer (Norway); Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Neutron Stress, Texture, and Phase Transformation for Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NST2 Neutron Stress, Texture, and Phase Transformation for Industry April 19, 2007 Spallation Neutron Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Presentation PDF's & Group...

380

Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the structure before it's immobilized. This process is important for the modern concrete industry because chloride corrosion of steel reinforcement is a major source of decay....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into the structure before it's immobilized. This process is important for the modern concrete industry because chloride corrosion of steel reinforcement is a major source of decay....

382

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

384

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

385

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

386

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

387

Optimal taxation with joint production of agriculture and rural amenities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of agriculture and rural amenities 1 Georgesof an agricultural good and rural amenities, the ?rst-besthenceforth use the generic term rural amenities to refer to

Casamatta, Georges; Rausser, Gordon C.; Simon, Leo K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

389

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

390

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California) Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California)...

391

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

392

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and...

393

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IDB-Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

394

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

395

Developer Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in...

396

Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

both domestically and internationally. Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured...

397

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...

398

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

399

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

400

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

402

Sources - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help · annotate · Contents Next: References Up: RamanujanModular Equations, Previous: Ramanujan's sum. Sources. [Annotate] · [Shownotes]. References [7] ...

403

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" 4.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.3

404

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

405

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Empire, Nevada Coordinates 40.5757352°, -119.34213° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

406

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Outreach Articles  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Articles Outreach Articles Electricity from the Wind series of articles was designed to support agricultural outreach efforts. The articles explore wind energy issues as they relate to the rural/agricultural community. These articles are available to media outlets in your state, especially agricultural media outlets. The articles may also be used as handouts when attending agricultural group meetings. Electricity from the Wind: A New Lesson for Schools Electricity from the Wind: What Landowners Should Know Electricity from the Wind: The New Cash Crop Electricity from the Wind: Wind Energy and the Natural Gas Crisis Electricity from the Wind: Economic Development for Rural Communities Electricity from the Wind: USDA Farm Bill Section 9006 Provides Funding for Farm and Ranch Wind Projects

407

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

408

Non-road Industry Advisory Council: August 26-27, 2008 Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Non-Road Transportation Industry Advisory Council brings together industry's stakeholders to promote non-road electrification. The Council's August 26-27, 2008 meeting included stakeholders from utilities, public agencies and manufacturers. The presentations dealt with batteries, lift trucks, utility vehicles, agriculture vehicles, and ground support equipment.

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Non-road Electric Transportation Industry Advisory Council: July 28-29, 2009 Meeting Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Non-road Electric Transportation Industry Advisory Council brings together industry's stakeholders to promote non-road electrification. The Council's July 28-29, 2009 meeting included stakeholders from utilities, public agencies and manufacturers. The presentations dealt with batteries, lift trucks, utility vehicles, agriculture vehicles, and ground support equipment.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Lewis County PUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lewis County PUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Lewis County PUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lewis County PUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Up to 70% of project cost HVAC Upgrades: UP to 70% of project cost Pre-Rinse Spray Valves: $150 Grocer Smart: Varies Custom: Varies Agricultural: Varies Provider PUD No.1 of Lewis County [http://www.lcpud.org/index.html Lewis County PUD] offers rebates for commercial and industrial lighting, as well as industrial process upgrades,

411

Entergy Arkansas - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Arkansas - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Entergy Arkansas - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Entergy Arkansas - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Feasibility Study: 25% of cost Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Small Business Energy Solutions (under 100kW): $0.21 - $0.50/kwh first year savings Large Commercial/Industrial (Prescriptive): $0.09/kwh first year savings Large Commercial/Industrial (Custom): $0.07 - $0.15/kwh first year savings

412

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Grant Program Industry Recruitment/Support Loan Program Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and technologies. The Office of Energy is currently working on developing the supply chains for the wind,

413

EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom Industrial Project: 70% of incremental project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Clothes Washer: $75 - $180 Lighting: Varies, see program worksheet on web site Custom Industrial Projects: $0.25/kWh of verified energy savings Energy Smart Grocer Program Auto-Closers: $25 - $170 Gaskets: $35 - $70 Cases: $30 - $173.25 +Case Lighting: $12.75 - $22.50/lamp or $5 - $25/ln ft Motion Sensors: $2/ln ft Refrigerators/Freezers: $100 - $700

414

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation and is chemically similar to mined gypsum. These gypsums, used as beneficial agricultural amendments, were evaluated for their effects on earthworm populations and trace element concentrations in soils and earthworms at four field sites (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). These sites are part of a network study on agricultural uses of FGD gypsum conducted at sites across the United States. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing volumes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum will become available for agricultural use as more utilities install forced oxidation scrubbers and the wallboard market for the resulting gypsum becomes saturated. This interim report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to develop a national research network to gain data and experience to support the beneficial uses of FGD products, especially FGD gypsum, in agriculture and other land applications.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

417

Energy use in agriculture and the articulation of modes of production in Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The political economy of energy utilization in Zimbabwe's agricultural sector is analyzed. The geography of agricultural energy use is assessed by tracing the articulation of modes of production through time. It is argued that in the production process, labor mediates between humans and the environment. The level of development of the productive forces indicates the intensity that labor applies energy to a given space. Production relations influence the rate and direction of energy flows. Hence, energy is a fundamental component of a mode of production. The linkage between energy use in farming and the articulation of modes of production is made through the conceptualization of distinct agricultural production systems consisting of social relations and productive forces, the relationship to the state, and access to natural resources. After independence came changes in state-peasant relations and industrialization of African production in high potential reserves. Changing social relations on settler farms has caused a rapid displacement of labor by capital at a time when national job creation is dangerously low. In the absence of significant land transfers, a contradictory distribution of agricultural energy resources will continue. New forms of uneven agricultural development are emerging.

Weiner, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two years ago I summarized 20 years of experience on Industrial Heat Recovery for the Energy-source Technology Conference and Exhibition held in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the end of that paper I concluded with brief advice on 'How to specify heat recovery equipment.' The two years which have elapsed since then have convinced me that proper specification assures the most reliable equipment at the lowest price. The most economical specification describes the operating and site data but leaves the design details for the supplier. A true specialist will be able to provide you with the latest technology at the best possible price. This paper explores the impact of specifications on heat recovery equipment and its associated cost.

Csathy, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Industrial Wastes as a Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the advent of scarce supplies and rising costs for traditional industrial fuels such as natural gas and fuel oil, a large amount of technical data has been collected and published to encourage their efficient use. This same data is readily available for coal since it was at one time a major industrial fuel and is still used extensively for electric power generation. However, combustion data for other fuels such as wood and solid materials typically generated as industrial wastes can only be found in widely scattered and more obscure sources. Therefore, this information is not always easily accessible to operating personnel at plants where these type fuels are being utilized. The resulting lack of proper information many times leads to poor fuel utilization because of less than optimum combustion efficiencies. Operational and maintenance problems may also be caused by a misunderstanding of combustion characteristics.

Richardson, G.; Hendrix, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Construction Industry Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in one of our country's most vital industries. ... An industry-led program to disseminate practical ... fire-proofing materials, connections, and steel trusses; ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

423

Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources ...

424

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Agency/Company /Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Training materials Website: mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/10568/167/1/Innovation_System_Agric_LM.pdf Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Screenshot References: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module[1] Preface "Sustained agricultural growth requires, among others, increased

425

EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Agriculture Sector the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Kenya, Mexico, Vietnam Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, South-Eastern Asia References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of

426

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications References: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research[1] "IISD's work related to climate change and agriculture has been supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada." It include the two following publications: Expanding Agriculture's Role in a Post-2012 Regime (PDF - 712 kb) and Climate Change Mitigation through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors References ↑ "IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research"

427

Ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

429

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS Trade Agreement December 15, 2010 Daniel A. Sumner University of California Agricultural Issues Center d th UC D i · Korea has been a large and diversified export destination for US and California agriculture · With more

Hammock, Bruce D.

430

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 97C1C49A76ADD9BFEBDE5FF95381F911 Press Downloadable pdf...

431

Biomass energy conversion workshop for industrial executives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rising costs of energy and the risks of uncertain energy supplies are increasingly familiar problems in industry. Bottom line profits and even the simple ability to operate can be affected by spiralling energy costs. An often overlooked alternative is the potential to turn industrial waste or residue into an energy source. On April 9 and 10, 1979, in Claremont, California, the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), the California Energy Commission (CEC), and the Western Solar Utilization Network (WSUN) held a workshop which provided industrial managers with current information on using residues and wastes as industrial energy sources. Successful industrial experiences were described by managers from the food processing and forest product industries, and direct combustion and low-Btu gasification equipment was described in detail. These speakers' presentations are contained in this document. Some major conclusions of the conference were: numerous current industrial applications of wastes and residues as fuels are economic and reliable; off-the-shelf technologies exist for converting biomass wastes and residues to energy; a variety of financial (tax credits) and institutional (PUC rate structures) incentives can help make these waste-to-energy projects more attractive to industry. However, many of these incentives are still being developed and their precise impact must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Climate VISION: Industry Associations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Aluminum Aluminum Association (Coordinating aluminum industry Climate VISION activities) The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum products, as well as suppliers to the industry. The Association provides leadership to the industry through its programs and services which aim to enhance aluminum's position in a world of proliferating materials, increase its use as the "material of choice," remove impediments to its fullest use, and assist in achieving the industry's environmental, societal, and economic objectives. Automobile Manufacturers Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Coordinating automobile industry Climate VISION activities) The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. is a trade association

433

Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented Sandia decontamination chemistry were developed and tested against a few surrogate pathogens under conditions of relatively heavy organic load. Tests were conducted on surfaces commonly found in agricultural environments. Wide spectrum decontamination efficacy, low corrosivity, and biodegradability issues were addressed in developing an enhanced detergency formulation. A method for rapid assessment of loss of pathogenic activity (inactivation) was also assessed. This enhanced technology will enable rapid assessment of contamination following an intentional event, and will also be extremely useful in routine assessment of agricultural environments. The primary effort during the second year was progress towards a demonstration of both decontamination and viral inactivation technologies of Foot and Mouth virus (FMDv) using the modified SNL chemistry developed through this project. Lab studies using a surrogate virus (bovine enterovirus) were conducted using DF200, modified DF200 chemistry, and decontaminants currently recommended for use in heavily loaded organic, agricultural environments (VirkonS, 10% bleach, sodium hydroxide and citric acid). Tests using actual FMD virus will be performed at the Department of Homeland Security's Plum Island facilities in the fall of 2005. Success and the insight gained from this project will lead to enhanced response capability, which will benefit agencies such as USDA, DHS, DOD, and the agricultural industry.

Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick) Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick) Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider New Brunswick Energy and Mines Beginning January 1, 2012 the Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program allows NB Power to purchase renewable energy generated by its largest customers at a rate of $95/MWh. This renewable energy will count towards meeting the Province's renewable energy targets at a purchase

435

Training For Industry Program (TIP) (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training For Industry Program (TIP) (Oklahoma) Training For Industry Program (TIP) (Oklahoma) Training For Industry Program (TIP) (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1968 State Oklahoma Program Type Training/Technical Assistance Provider Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education runs the Training For Industry Program (TIP) is a no-cost/low-cost way for new or

436

Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System ...  

Wind power generators ; Industrial power generators; More Information John S. Hsu. Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Invertor Drive System, U.S ...

437

Radioactive Neutron Sources Emission Rates (44010C and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Safe handling of neutron sources and the industrial safety aspects are taught through an apprentice-type relationship with each new handler. ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Photovoltaic industry progress through 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of the US photovoltaics (PV) industry over the past decade has been impressive. First designed to provide power for satellites using high-cost production techniques, PV is now the economical choice in many remote terrestrial applications. The remarkable growth of PV in terms of quality of cells and modules, production techniques, and system design, was initiated by a cooperative effort of the US Government and the domestic PV manufacturers. European and Japanese firms entered the PV industry later, but are also growing rapidy. The Europeans continue to supply PV systems for village electrification and water pumping to many Third World countries. The Japanese have been developing the amorphous silicon (A-Si) technology by expanding its use in consumer goods. The world PV industry saw dramatic changes in industry ownership and in the emphasis on developing new and improved technology during 1984. The objective of this report is to present information on the developments of the world PV industry and focuses on developments occurring in 1984. Information is presented on a regional basis (US, Europe, Japan, other) to avoid disclosing company-confidential data. All information was gleaned from several sources, including a review of the technical literature and direct contacts with PV manufacturers. Prior to publishing the regional totals, all numbers were compared with those of other sources. The information contained in this report is prepared for use by the Department of Energy for their use in long-term R and D planning. However, this information should also be of interest by PV manufacturers and to those who may be contemplating entering the PV market. PV shipments for 1984, government supports for PV, and various PV market sectors are discussed.

Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

440

Composition and utilization of cellulose for chemicals from agricultural residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken for several reasons. Firstly, because of the scarcity of data on the composition of certain agricultural residues generated predominantly in California, it could only be inferred from the published composition of agricultural grains and wood what the carbohydrate composition of the residue straw, stems, and roots might be. Published methods of analysis on wood and grains were adapted or modified to suit these materials, resulting in an analytical system applicable to these residues. Secondly, a series of chemical pretreatments were studied to see if sugar production by enzymatic hydrolysis might be improved. Also these studies are used as a basis of generating the data for chemical engineering parameters of the Berkeley process. Since lignin is ultimately used as a feed back energy source in the Berkeley process, it is not necessary for it to be in the form of a relatively low weight polymer. Therefore, a study on the use of recoverable chemical solvents for dilignification by solution, rather than by a depolymerization reaction is indicated.

Sciamanna, A.F.; Freitas, R.P.; Wilke, C.R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE...

442

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Report on Competitive Sourcing Results Fiscal Year 2006 May 2007 Executive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ...................................................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................................................. 4 I. The big picture ......................................................................................... 4 II. How public-private competition was used in FY 2006 .................................... 6 A. Anticipated benefits from competition in FY 2006

443

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

444

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

445

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: gain.fas.usda.gov/Pages/Default.aspx USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Screenshot References: GAIN[1] Overview "USDA'S Global Agriculture Information Network (GAIN) provides timely information on the agricultural economy, products and issues in foreign countries since 1995 that are likely to have an impact on United States agricultural production and trade. U.S. Foreign Service officers working at

446

The Industrial Tools of the Trade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized by R&D Applications Centers/Offices, this handbook provides TechCommentaries (including a description of a technology, technical considerations, economic considerations, applications, advantages), TechApplications (featuring case study information on an attractive technology), and Industry Briefs (describing a particular industry with data and trends on energy use, employment, revenue, manufacturing methods, demand-side management methods, trade associations, and information sources).

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Industrial Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic industrial investment has declined due to unfavorable energy prices, and external markets. Investment behavior has changed over the past few years, and will continue due to high labor costs, tight markets and an unstable U.S. economy although, freight costs, favorable exchange rates and high capacity utilization will encourage future industrial investment. Industry will eventually enter a new period of major investment. Future industrial investment will be an opportunity to influence the energy efficiency of these facilities for generations to come. Program managers must begin engaging industrial customers now, in order to exploit this unprecedented opportunity to change future energy use patterns. This paper reviews recent market trends and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: • Why has industrial investment declined? • What is the outlook for industrial investment? • How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?

Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

450

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The energy-intensive industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow accounting procedure, whereas the nonenergy-intensive and the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 14). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data.

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Derived Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com...

452

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

453

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

454

A Brief History of the Electricity Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data and evaluating electricity data and evaluating electricity restructuring James Bushnell University of California Energy Inst. www.ucei.berkeley.edu Outline * Shameless flattery - Why EIA data are so important * Why are people so unhappy? - With electricity restructuring * What EIA data have helped us learn - Production efficiencies - Market efficiency - Market competition - Environmental compliance Why EIA is so important * Important industries undergoing historic changes - Restructuring/deregulation - Environmental regulation and markets * We know much more about these industries than others where data are not collected - And much more than the europeans know about their energy industries * Academics and economists flock to data - Much more "open source" knowledge about the functioning of these markets

455

Evaluation of the Strategic Alliance for Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

local entrepreneurship, agribusiness cluster formation and the development of competitive value chains Evaluation of the Strategic Alliance for Agricultural Development in Africa (SAADA program) 2006-20092 | SAADA Evaluation 2006-2009Local entrepreneurship, agribusiness cluster formation and the development of competitive value chains

Moussiliou Alidou; Marjolein Lem; Ted Schrader; Fons De Zeeuw; Moussiliou Alidou; Marjolein Lem; Ted Schrader; Fons De Zeeuw

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management..............................................................................................10­67 (b) Gravity flow pipes Waste Management Field Handbook 10­2 (210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) 651.1006 Utilization 10­71 (a

Mukhtar, Saqib

457

Sources of methane in China: A program to estimate emissions from rice paddy fields, bio-gas pits, and urban areas: Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are measuring methane from rice paddy fields and bio-gas pits. The project has produced new results that we are using to sharply focus the present study. We measured ambient concentrations at Minqin, Beijing, and Chendu. We obtained flux measurements from bio-gas pits, and flux measurements from rice paddy fields. Minqin is a background site with no large local sources of methane such as rice fields or urban areas. It serves as control for the experiment. Beijing is representative of a large industrialized Chinese city not affected by rice agriculture but heavily dependent on burning coal for cooking and heating. Chendu is in the heart of the rice producing areas of China where rice paddies cover millions of acres and methane from bio-gas pits is an important source of energy. Further progress was impeded by a lack of a formal agreement between the US and PRC, which was not signed until August 1987. 9 figs.

Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy...

459

Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

Jain, R.C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Sourcing Competitive Sourcing The Department of Energy's (DOE) Competitive Sourcing program is a management initiative aimed at improving DOE's performance and reducing the Department's operational costs. The program is governed by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A- 76, Performance of Commercial Activities, dated May 29, 2003. The commercial activities selected for review and competition include functions performed by government employees that are readily available in the private sector, and where the potential for efficiencies, regardless of the winning provider, are highly likely. The candidate functions are chosen from the Department's annual Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory and subjected to a feasibility review to determine if a prudent business case can be made to enter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

Leland, W.T.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Copper Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...These products are sold to a wide variety of industrial users. Certain mill productsâ??chiefly wire, cable, and most

464

NIST Industry Day 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at www.fedbizopps.gov. Search NIST-AMD-INDUSTRY-DAY-2012 in the Quick Search engine. Deadline for registration ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Industrial Development Projects (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes municipalities and counties to issue bonds or interest coupons to finance industrial projects, including energy generation facilities.

466

America's Booming Wind Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sharing key findings from two new Energy Department reports that highlight the record growth of America's wind industry.

467

The Greening of Capitalist Agriculture in Nigeria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

political line. Wheat and flour: In 1981, wheat imports werewheat occupies a key position in Nigerian industrialization. There are s ix flour

Dunmoye, R. Ayo

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/climatesmart/en/ Program Start: 2010 References: Climate-Smart Agriculture[1] Logo: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Overview "Food security and climate change can be addressed together by transforming agriculture and adopting practices that are "climate-smart" A number of production systems are already being used by farmers and food producers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to climate change, and reduce vulnerability. This website provides examples of many of these

469

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Agriculture and Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

470

Use of Weather Information for Agricultural Decision Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data from a special subsample of the National Agricultural, Food, and Public Policy Preference Survey to assess use of weather data for agricultural decision making. Responses from 284 Arizona farmers and ranchers were used to ...

George B. Frisvold; Anand Murugesan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Agricultural Advisors: A Receptive Audience for Weather and Climate Information?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the climate in the midwestern United States becomes increasingly variable because of global climate change, it is critical to provide tools to the agricultural community to ensure adaptability and profitability of agricultural cropping systems. ...

Linda Stalker Prokopy; Tonya Haigh; Amber Saylor Mase; Jim Angel; Chad Hart; Cody Knutson; Maria Carmen Lemos; Yun-Jia Lo; Jean McGuire; Lois Wright Morton; Jennifer Perron; Dennis Todey; Melissa Widhalm

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Importance of Agricultural Weather Information: A Michigan Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey was conducted across Michigan in early 1986 in an attempt to better understand the needs of the agricultural community for weather information. The sample analyzed represented 318 respondents in agricultural professions. A smaller sample ...

J. D. Carlson

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

475

Source- and Age-Resolved Mechanistic Air Quality Models: Model Development and Application in Southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM) existing in the atmosphere have adverse effects to human and environment. Southeast Texas experiences high O3 and PM events due to special meteorological conditions and high emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Quantitative knowledge of the contributions of different emissions sources to O3 and PM is helpful to better understand their formation mechanisms and develop effective control strategies. Tagged reactive tracer techniques are developed and coupled into two chemical transport models (UCD/CIT model and CMAQ) to conduct source apportionment of O3, primary PM, secondary inorganic PM, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and aging distribution of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM) existing in the atmosphere have adverse effects to human and environment. Southeast Texas experiences high O3 and PM events due to special meteorological conditions and high emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Quantitative knowledge of the contributions of different emissions sources to O3 and PM is helpful to better understand their formation mechanisms and develop effective control strategies. Tagged reactive tracer techniques are developed and coupled into two chemical transport models (UCD/CIT model and CMAQ) to conduct source apportionment of O3, primary PM, secondary inorganic PM, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and aging distribution of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Models successfully reproduce the concentrations of gas phase and PM phase species. Vehicles, natural gas, industries, and coal combustion are important O3 sources. Upwind sources have non-negligible influences (20-50%) on daytime O3, indicating that regional NOx emission controls are necessary to reduce O3 in Southeast Texas. EC is mainly from diesel engines while majority of primary OC is from internal combustion engines and industrial sources. Open burning, road dust, internal combustion engines and industries are the major sources of primary PM2.5. Wildfire dominates primary PM near fire locations. Over 80% of sulfate is produced in upwind areas and coal combustion contributes most. Ammonium ion is mainly from agriculture sources. The SOA peak values can be better predicted when the emissions are adjusted by a factor of 2. 20% of the total SOA is due to anthropogenic sources. Solvent and gasoline engines are the major sources. Oligomers from biogenic SOA account for 30-58% of the total SOA, indicating that long range transport is important. PAHs from anthropogenic sources can produce 4% of total anthropogenic SOA. Wild fire, vehicles, solvent and industries are the major sources. EC and OC emitted within 0-3 hours contribute approximately 70-90% in urban Houston and about 20-40% in rural areas. Significant diurnal variations in the relative contributions to EC are predicted. Fresh particles concentrations are high at morning and early evening. The concentrations of EC and OC that spend more than 9 hours in the air are low over land but almost accounts for 100% of the total EC and OC over the ocean.

Zhang, Hongliang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation and lets industry pick winning technologies. TheTransforming the Oil Industry intothe Energy Industry BY DANIEL SPERLING AND SONIA YEH A C C E

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

From Industry Protection to Industry Promotion: IT Policy in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazilian banking automation industry. Science, TechnologyBrazilian liberalisation of the IT industry on technologicalWorking paper. Computer Industry Almanac, Inc. (1999).

Botelho, Antonio Jose Junqueira; Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Tigre, Paulo Bastos

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative (ecoABC) (Canada)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provides repayable contributions for the construction or expansion of transportation biofuel production facilities. Funding is conditional upon agricultural producer investment...

479

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Perennial grasses for energy and conservation: Evaluating some ecological agricultural, and economic issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; Walsh, M.; McLaughlin, S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural sources industrial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Shares of U.S. Deliveries State Shares of U.S. Deliveries Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered (Gas) The physical transfer of natural, synthetic, and/or supplemental gas from facilities operated by the responding company to facilities operated by others or to consumers. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

483

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Topic: Delivered for the Account of Others Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered for the Account of Others Gas that is not owned by the company that delivers it to the consumer. These deliveries include quantities covered by long-term contracts and gas involved in short-term or spot market sales. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

484

Dynamics of Evolution in the Global Fuel-Ethanol Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

noticed that their pre-entry backgrounds are very diverse. They come from not only agricultural and fossil fuel chains but also technology companies and de novo firms of new entrepreneurial start-ups as illustrated in Figure 5. We investigate... Dynamics of Evolution in the Global Fuel-Ethanol Industry Jin Hooi Chan and David Reiner March 2011 CWPE 1129 & EPRG 1111 www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EP RG W OR KI NG P AP ER Abstract Dynamics...

Chan, Jin Hooi; Reiner, David

485

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion in cash receipts in 2010. California has been the nation's top agricultural state in cash receipts every in 1960 to about 12 percent in 2010. UniversityofCalifornia AgriculturalIssuesCenter The Measure

Ishida, Yuko

486

Agricultural Investment Risk Relationship to National Domestic Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This empirical case study investigated the uncertainty of agricultural investment schemes in Nigeria and their relationship to national domestic production. Government administrations have invested a substantial amount of money into the agricultural ... Keywords: Agriculture, Bank Credit, Investment, National Domestic Production, Risk, Uncertainty

Alex Ehimare Omankhanlen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Facts and Distinctions 2012 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facts and Distinctions 2012 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University, and an improved standard of living for everyone. Distinctions National Program Ranking Agricultural sciences program 1 1 Agriculture / Agronomy 1 1 Entomology program 3 1 Environment / Ecology 1 1 Food science

Hammock, Bruce D.

488

The Venezuelan natural gas industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Venezuela's consumption energy of comes from three primary sources: hydroelectricity, liquid hydrocarbons and natural gas. In 1986, the energy consumption in the internal market was 95.5 thousand cubic meters per day of oil equivalent, of which 32% was natural gas, 46% liquid hydrocarbons and 22% hydroelectricity. The Venezuelan energy policy established natural gas usage after hydroelectricity, as a substitute of liquid hydrocarbons, in order to increase exports of these. This policy permits a solid development of the natural gas industry, which is covered in this paper.

Silva, P.V.; Hernandez, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry banner Industry banner Neutron scattering research has applications in practically every field, and neutron research at ORNL is leading to productive partnerships with the industrial and business communities. We welcome proposals for all types of research, including those involving proprietary work. Recent studies have led to discoveries with potential applications in fields such as medicine, energy, and various metals technologies. For more information, please see our recent research highlights. Research Collaborations Industry-Driven Research Benefits Plastics Manufacturing Corning uses VULCAN to test limits of ceramic material for car emission controls, filtration devices Neutrons Probe Inner Workings of Batteries Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match

490

Organizational adoption of open source software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations and individuals can use open source software (OSS) for free, they can study its internal workings, and they can even fix it or modify it to make it suit their particular needs. These attributes make OSS an enticing technological choice ... Keywords: Industrial practice, Open source software, Technology adoption

Diomidis Spinellis; Vaggelis Giannikas

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. Th