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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

USDA Forest Products Laboratory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Products Laboratory Forest Products Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name USDA Forest Products Laboratory Place Madison, WI Website http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/ References USDA Forest Products Laboratory [1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! USDA Forest Products Laboratory is a company located in Madison, WI. References ↑ "USDA Forest Products Laboratory" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USDA_Forest_Products_Laboratory&oldid=381741" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

2

Forest Products: Long Wavelength Catalytic Infrared Drying System for Wood Fiber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Order this fact sheet to read about the innovative new system, which can be used in a variety of industries in addition to forest products, including agriculture, chemical processing, brewing and distilling, animal products, and horticulture.

Blazek, S.

1999-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers

4

Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Christian veneer dryer: Forest products fact sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new closed rotary drum dryer for the forest products industry.

NREL

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

7

Carbon Supply From Changes in Management of Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals for Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Optimal taxation with joint production of agriculture and rural amenities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of agriculture and rural amenities 1 Georgesof an agricultural good and rural amenities, the ?rst-besthenceforth use the generic term rural amenities to refer to

Casamatta, Georges; Rausser, Gordon C.; Simon, Leo K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Forest Service -U.S. Department of Agriculture Prescribed Burning in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Service - U.S. Department of Agriculture Prescribed Burning in the Interior Ponderosa Pine, California 94701 #12;Gordon, Donald T. 1967. Prescribed burning in the interior ponderosa pine type., illus. (U. S. Forest Serv. Res. Paper PSW- 45 ) Three prescribed burns, made in 1959-62, in the in

Standiford, Richard B.

11

Classifying forest productivity at different scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Derived Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com...

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Agriculture and Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

14

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Weed Seeds of A

15

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Minerals of Agric

16

Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Main sources of information · Forest Products Annual Market Review, UNECE/FAOUNECE/FAO · Importance Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

17

Agricultural Investment Risk Relationship to National Domestic Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This empirical case study investigated the uncertainty of agricultural investment schemes in Nigeria and their relationship to national domestic production. Government administrations have invested a substantial amount of money into the agricultural ... Keywords: Agriculture, Bank Credit, Investment, National Domestic Production, Risk, Uncertainty

Alex Ehimare Omankhanlen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Based Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

19

Critical Nanotechnology Needs in the Forest Products Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the Forest Products Industry White Paper ... allow substitution of sustainable light weight materials ... wood based composites, paper and paperboard ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

20

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements American Forest & Paper Association Logo The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and voluntary efforts from all sectors of the American economy. The members of AF&PA have undertaken a series of programs through which they are collectively committed to meeting the President's intensity reduction goals. These programs include inventorying and reporting on greenhouse gases, actions to enhance sequestration in managed forests and products, development and implementation of improved technologies, efforts to improve energy efficiency, use of cogeneration and increased use of renewable energy, and recycling. AF&PA expects that these programs will

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Forest Products: Acoustic Humidity Sensor  

SciTech Connect

The new acoustic sensor, designed as a humidity-control system for the paper and textile industries, can both eliminate overdrying and improve product quality by measuring humidity precisely. This new fact sheet explains how the process works.

Poole, L.; Recca, L.

1999-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 1 Methods of Agricultural Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 97C1C49A76ADD9BFEBDE5FF95381F911 Press Downloadable pdf...

23

Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)  

SciTech Connect

Pre-extractionkraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called near neutral pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the near-neutral green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for both production staff who need advice on specific problems and development personnel who seek directions. Microscopic Analysis of Agricultural Products, 4th Edition Methods and Analyses Methods - Analyses Books Soft Bound Books Methods - An

25

Forest Products Industry of the Future  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EXISTING YAKAMA FOREST PRODUCTS TO DEKKER SERVICE LINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L USDA Soils Information L USDA Soils Information United States Department of Agriculture A product of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies, State agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local participants Custom Soil Resource Report for Yakama Nation Irrigated Area, Washington, Part of Yakima County WIP Drop 4 Vicinity

27

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom capital projects: $0.25/kWh, up to 50% of cost; $2/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Custom operation and maintenance projects: $0.08/kWh or $0.40/Therm, up to 50% of project cost Lighting projects: custom lighting incentives get 35% of project cost; prescriptive incentives also available. Total incentive capped at

28

Internet Business Opportunities in the Forest Products Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Forest Products Marketing Interim Director-Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory School of Renewable Natural KINGDOM 26.0 5% 5 FRANCE 21.8 4% 6 ITALY 17.5 3% 7 CANADA 16.0 3% 8 CHINA 15.9 3% 9 AUSTRALIA 10.6 2% 10

29

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy-related impacts on Great Plains agricultural productivity in the next quarter century, 1976--2000. Great plains agricultural council publication  

SciTech Connect

Contents: The food demand dimension; Agriculture's relationship to national energy goals; Assumptions relating to great plains agriculture; Agricultural energy usage in perspective; The emerging energy usage transition agenda; General energy related agricultural adjustment concepts; Operational and technological adjustments in energy intense components; Agribusiness impacts and adjustments; Forests and energy; Effects of great plains energy resource development on agriculture; Institutional and agency program demands.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Production, prices, employment and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices, employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1997. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices in stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Agenda 2020: A Compact for the Forest Products Industry The Forest Products Programs is a voluntary collaborative effort between the forest products industry and DOE. The purpose of the Compact covering forest, wood, pulp, and paper is to provide the framework for identification of appropriate areas for joint research, development, and technology demonstration. The result will be a research partnership between DOE and industry. Energy Efficiency in the Pulp and Paper Industry, ACEEE 1996 This report was originally presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry: "Partnership, Productivity, and Environment," held in Grand Island, New York, on August 1-4, 1995.

48

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for agricultural production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the paper a multidimensional data model called CULTEH is built. In the model are defined the dimensions, the hierarchies and the facts. Based on this model an OLAP cube called CUBECTH is built. The OLAP cube accepts queries on several dimensions and ... Keywords: OLAP operations, agricultural production, data cube, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP)

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Adrian Turek Rahoveanu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Forest products industry of the future: Building a sustainable technology advantage for America`s forest products industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US forest, wood, and paper industry ranks as one of the most competitive forest products industries in the world. With annual shipments valued at nearly $267 billion, it employs over 1.3 million people and is currently among the top 10 manufacturing employers in 46 out of 50 states. Retaining this leadership position will depend largely on the industry`s success in developing and using advanced technologies. These technologies will enable manufacturing plants and forestry enterprises to maximize energy and materials efficiency and reduce waste and emissions, while producing high-quality, competitively priced wood and paper products. In a unique partnership, leaders in the forest products industry have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to encourage cooperative research efforts that will help position the US forest products industry for continuing prosperity while advancing national energy efficiency and environmental goals.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 21/08/2009 - 08:27 Affected by the global financial crisis, China from customs agencies shows the total trade value of forest products in China reached about USD26

56

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

57

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways AF&PA estimates that the forest products industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity by 12% by 2012 relative to 2000 numbers. One of the main ways AF&PA anticipates that the industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity is through implementation of new technologies from research and development programs. AF&PA has been participating in DOE's Industries of the Future program, a collaborative research and development partnership between DOE and the forest products industry. Through this program, AF&PA has participated in the development of a number of technologies aimed at cutting energy use, minimizing environmental impacts, and improving productivity in industry. If fully commercialized, these technologies could make the U.S. forest

58

Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 150 (2010) 895907 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecology Research site established in 1989 in Petersham, MA. Harvard Forest (4232 N, 7211 W, elevation 340

Moorcroft, Paul R.

59

Wisconsins Forest Products Industry Business Climate Status Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsins Center for Technology Transfer (CTT) is a non-profit, non-stock corporation with a mission of accelerating investments in energy efficient, environmentally friendly technologies into Wisconsin industry clusters. CTT was awarded its mission in February of 2002 by the Focus on Energy program, which identified the energy intensive, economically important industry clusters whose needs for advanced technology transfer could be served by the CTT. These clusters are Forest Products, Metal Casting, Food Processing, Printing, Glass, Biobased Products & Energy, Water & Wastewater, and Utilities. Technology roadmaps had been developed for each industry cluster through U.S. Department of Energy grants and by Focus on Energy. However, a more in-depth understanding of critical issues facing industry clusters was still needed. CTT, in a joint effort with the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in Madison, initiated issue scoping sessions for the Forest Products cluster. One-on-one meetings with senior executives of Wisconsin forest products companies were conducted to assess the current state and future potentials of the industry group. The findings of these sessions document a litany of challenges facing the industry and are summarized at the end of this report. Many of these challenges and the potential for investments in new technologies were

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Information and its management for differentiation of agricultural products: The example of specialty coffee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prices of most of agricultural commodities show a long-term declining trend. Increasingly markets are signaling demand for differentiated products and in order to increase their incomes farmers and traders are looking to higher value options, including ... Keywords: Agricultural product differentiation, Agricultural supply chains, Information management, Internet-based, Specialty coffee

Norbert Niederhauser; Thomas Oberthr; Sibylle Kattnig; James Cock

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Use of lidar data to simulate forest net primary production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been recently presented to predict the net primary production NPP of Mediterranean forests by integrating conventional and remote-sensing data. This method was based on the use of two models, C-Fix and BIOME-BGC, whose outputs are combined ...

Fabio Maselli; Riccardo Mari; Marta Chiesi

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site, OAS-M-12-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audits and Inspections Audits and Inspections Management Alert Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site OAS-M-12-03 March 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site" IMMEDIATE CONCERN In October 2011, the Office of Inspector General received a complaint that the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service - Savannah River (Forest Service) had purchased a number of

63

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Work Plans Trees, wood and paper products are natural, renewable, and recyclable resources that help reduce greenhouse gases by removing and storing CO2 from the atmosphere and...

64

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

dioxide; manufacture products that store carbon; produce and use carbon-neutral renewable energy; continuously work to reduce our own emissions of greenhouse gases; and...

65

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Software Tools Forest Products Industry of the Future Tools & Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the forest products industry. DOE BestPractices Software Tools DOE BestPractices offers a range of software tools and databases that help manufacturers assess their plant's steam, compressed air, motor, and process heating systems. DOE Plant Energy Profiler Industry experience has shown that many plant utility personnel do not have an adequate understanding of their energy cost structure and where the major focus should be for any energy savings program. This tool will address this need and enable an engineer assigned to a plant utility to

66

California`s forest products industry: 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the findings of a survey of primary forest products industries in California for 1992. The survey included the following sectors: Lumber, pulp and board; shake and shingle; export; and post, pole, and piling. Veneer and plywood mills are not included because they could not be presented without disclosng critical details. Tables, presented by sector and for the industry as a whole, include characteristics of the industry, nature and flow of logs consumed, and disposition of mill residence.

Ward, F.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Oregon`s forest products industry: 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the findings of a survey of primary forest products industries in Oregon for 1992. The survey included the following sectors; lumber; veneer and plywood; pulp and board; shake and shingle; export; and post, pole, and piling. Tables presented by sector and for the industry as a whole, include characteristics of the industry, nature and flow of logs consumed, and disposition of mill residues.

Ward, F.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

PUBLICATIONS LIST Louisiana Forest Products Development Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#5 Sorting Lumber by Grade Prior to Rough Mill Processing. Gazo, Steele #6 RAM (Rough Mill Analysis #17 Increasing Productivity in Cabinet Shops. Gazo #18 An Analysis of State Level Economic Development International Trade Center SOUTHPIC. Smith, Granskog, Michael, Muehlenfeld, Nicholas #30 Accident Analysis

69

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management intensity, and boost equilibrium commodity prices. Later a major empirical modeling section uses the U.S. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model with Greenhouse Gases (FASOMGHG) to simulate land use and production responses to various biofuel and climate policy scenarios. Simulations are performed to assess the effects of imposing biofuel mandates in the U.S. consistent with the Renewable Fuels Standard of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2). Simulations are run for several climate mitigation policy scenarios (with varying GHG (CO2) prices and eligibility restrictions for GHG offset activities) with and without conservation land recultivation. Important simulation outputs include time trajectories for land use, GHG emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production shifts that can influence water consumption and nutrient use in regions already plagued by water scarcity and quality concerns. Results suggest that the potential magnitude of climate mitigation on commodity markets and exports is substantially higher than under biofuel expansion in isolation, raising concerns of international leakage and stimulating the Food vs. Carbon debate. Finally, a reduced-form dynamic emissions trading model of the U.S. economy is developed using simulation output from FASOMGHG and the National Energy Modeling System to test the effect of biofuel mandate expansion and domestic offset eligibility restrictions on total economy-wide GHG abatement costs. Findings are that while the RFS2 raises the marginal costs of offsets, full abatement costs depend on a number of policy factors. GHG payment incentives for forest management and non-CO2 agricultural offsets can increase full abatement costs by more than 20%.

Baker, Justin Scott

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) AF&PA's message is to provide significant value to member companies through outstanding performance in those areas that are key to members' success and where an association can be more effective than individual companies. AF&PA is the national trade association of the forest, pulp, paper, paperboard, and wood products industry. Industry Vision and Technology Partnerships: Agenda 2020 Coordinating with AF&PA to develop a technology strategy. Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) The Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) is a privately funded 501 (c)(3) graduate research university with engineering and scientific programs related to the pulp and paper industry. IPST has established

71

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Agricultural productivity potential assessment by using rainfall contribution index in Sub-Sahara Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food deficit alleviation is the most important aspect for poverty reduction in the entire Sub-Sahara African (SSA) region. This alleviation can be achieved by increasing agricultural productivity. The deficit is in one way or the other attributed to ... Keywords: agricultural water, effective rainfall, food deficit, planting period, productivity, rainfall contribution index

Yu-Min Wang; Seydou Traore; Willy Namaona; Tienfuan Kerh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

74

Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

75

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter

76

Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

Huston, M.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Procedure for the classification and characterization of farms for agricultural production planning: Application in the Northwest of Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The agricultural activity in Galicia, NW Spain, is carried out on farms that are characterized by a diversity of land uses and production models, a variety of sizes, and considerable geographical dispersion. Any attempt of agricultural production planning ... Keywords: Agricultural production planning, Farm types, Rural development, Software applications

J. A. Riveiro; M. F. Marey; J. L. Marco; C. J. Alvarez

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

Wang, Xiaodu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Or

80

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of Marine Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Feed Ingredients of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of Plant Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Feed Ingredients of

82

U.S Markets for Certified and Non-Certified Hardwood Tropical Forest Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State University Louisiana Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State, Malaysia, and Thailand. U.S. Imports of STWP were generally from China, Canada, and the EU (mainly Italy

83

Energy use in agriculture and the articulation of modes of production in Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The political economy of energy utilization in Zimbabwe's agricultural sector is analyzed. The geography of agricultural energy use is assessed by tracing the articulation of modes of production through time. It is argued that in the production process, labor mediates between humans and the environment. The level of development of the productive forces indicates the intensity that labor applies energy to a given space. Production relations influence the rate and direction of energy flows. Hence, energy is a fundamental component of a mode of production. The linkage between energy use in farming and the articulation of modes of production is made through the conceptualization of distinct agricultural production systems consisting of social relations and productive forces, the relationship to the state, and access to natural resources. After independence came changes in state-peasant relations and industrialization of African production in high potential reserves. Changing social relations on settler farms has caused a rapid displacement of labor by capital at a time when national job creation is dangerously low. In the absence of significant land transfers, a contradictory distribution of agricultural energy resources will continue. New forms of uneven agricultural development are emerging.

Weiner, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Estimating forest biomass in the USA using generalized allometric models and MODIS land products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating forest biomass in the USA using generalized allometric models and MODIS land products 2006; published 11 May 2006. [1] Spatially-distributed forest biomass components are essential to understand carbon cycle and the impact of biomass burning emissions on air quality. We estimated the density

Kuligowski, Bob

85

The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005 the highest global surface temperature ever was recorded. A virtual consensus exists today among scientists that global warming is underway and that human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a significant cause. Possible mitigation of climate change through reduction of net GHG emissions has become a worldwide concern. Under the United Nations Framework convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol was formed in 1997 and required ratifying countries to co-operate in stabilizing atmospheric GHG concentrations. The protocol took effect on February 16, 2005. The mitigation cost for reducing GHG emissions for the US economy has been argued to be high particularly through the energy sector. Agriculture and Forestry (AF) can provide some low cost strategies to help with this mitigation principally through carbon sequestration but must be competitive with mitigation costs in the rest of the economy. A general equilibrium approach is used herein to evaluate the role of AF mitigation in an economy wide setting. The results show that the AF sectors have significant mitigation potential. Higher carbon prices lead to more sequestration, less emissions, reduced consumer and total welfare, improved environmental indicators and increased producer welfare. AF mitigation increases as the carbon price increase over time. In the earlier periods, while the carbon price is low, AF emissions and sink are quite small compared to the energy sector. As carbon prices increase over time, the AF sectors mitigate about 25% of the net emissions. This verifies McCarl et al's (2001) argument that the AF sectors may be very important in a world that requires time and technological investment to develop low-cost greenhouse gas emission offsets. AF GHG emission mitigation is sensitive to saturation of sequestration sinks. This research finds that ignoring saturation characteristics leads to a severe overestimate of mitigation potential with estimates being inflated by as much as a factor of 6.

Zhu, En

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001, Texas agriculture generated $14 billion in cash receipts. The production, processing, distribution and consumption of food and fiber products contributes substantially to the economy of Texas. This publication reports the contributions of the food and fiber system and individual commodities.

Nelson, Gene

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia Tenggara (ENT), eastern Indonesia. The study was the outcome of an ACIAR scoping study undertaken through

88

Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

Luxmoore, R.J.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 2 Production and Modification of Sophorolipids from Agricultural Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 2 Production and Modification of Sophorolipids from Agricultural Feedstocks Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press &

90

A Review of Agricultural and Other Land Application Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products, especially FGD gypsum, is expected to increase substantially over the next ten to twenty years in response to clean air initiatives. There are a large number of agricultural and other land application uses of FGD products that have received previous research and development attention, but only in specific locations of the United States and under limited conditions of crops, climate and soil types. This report discusses current and potential futur...

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 9 Microchemical Spot Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 9 Microchemical Spot Tests Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 6C2FB81BF33EA47CEF1B98AD0BE2A9CB Press Downloadable pdf...

92

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 8C45832E2AA310DD11A6FEA4BDB93C6B Press Downloadable pdf...

93

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A modelling framework to support farmers in designing agricultural production systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the new challenges confronting world agriculture, innovative production systems need to be designed at the farm level. As experiments are not easy to conduct at this level, modelling is required to evaluate ex-ante the multiple impacts of proposed ... Keywords: Biophysical system, Conceptual model, Decision system, Farm, Simulation tool, Technical system

P. -Y. Le Gal; A. Merot; C. -H. Moulin; M. Navarrete; J. Wery

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for forage and rangeland production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of temperature and precipitation patterns across the United States during the next 50 years anticipate a 1.5 to 2C warming and a slight increase in precipitation as a result of global climate change. There have been relatively few studies of climate change impacts on pasture and rangeland (grazingland) species compared to those on crop species, despite the economic and ecological importance of the former. Here we review the literature on pastureland and rangeland species to rising CO2 and climate change (temperature, and precipitation) and discuss plant and management factors likely to influence pastureland and rangeland responses to change (e.g., community composition, plant competition, perennial growth habit, seasonal productivity, and management methods). Overall, the response of pasture species to increased [CO2] is consistent with the general response of C3 and C4 type vegetation, although significant exceptions exist. Both pastureland and rangeland species should exhibit an acceleration of metabolism and development due to earlier onset of spring green-up and longer growing seasons. However, in the studies reviewed here, C3 pasture species increased their photosynthetic rates by up to 40% while C4 species exhibited no increase in photosynthesis. In general, it is expected that increases in [CO2] and precipitation would enhance rangeland net primary production (NPP) while increased air temperatures would either increase or decrease NPP. Much of this uncertainty in response is due to uncertain future projections of precipitation, both globally and regionally. For example, if annual precipitation changes little or declines, rangeland plant response to warming temperatures and rising [CO2] may be neutral or may decline due to increased water stress. This review reveals the need for comprehensive studies of climate change impacts on the pasture ecosystem including grazing regimes, mutualistic relationships (e.g., plant roots-nematodes; N-fixing organisms), as well as the ecosystem carbon balance, essential nutrients, and water.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Morgan, Jack; Fay, Philip; Polley, Wayne; Hatfield, Jerry L.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Enhanced Raw Materials Forest Products Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sterility in Forest Trees................................................................................................... 2

Hq Program Managers

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

A novel framework for information technology based agricultural information dissemination system to improve crop productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indian farming community is facing a multitude of problems to maximize crop productivity. In spite of successful research on new agricultural practices concerning crop cultivation, the majority of farmers is not getting upper-bound yield due to several reasons. One of the reasons is that expert/scientific advice regarding crop cultivation is not reaching farming community in a timely manner. It is true that India possesses a valuable agricultural knowledge and expertise. However, a wide information gap exists between the research level and practice. Indian farmers need timely expert advice to make them more productive and competitive. In this paper, we made an effort to present a solution to bridge the information gap by exploiting advances in Information Technology (IT). We propose a framework of a cost-effective agricultural information dissemination system (AgrIDS) to disseminate expert agriculture knowledge to the farming community to improve the crop productivity. Some of the crucial benefits of AgrIDS are as follows. It is a scalable system which can be incrementally developed and extended to cover all the farmers (crops) of India in a cost effective manner. It enables the farmer to cultivate a crop with expertise, as that of an agricultural expert, by disseminating both crop and location specific expert advice in a personalized and timely manner. With AgrIDS, the lag period between research effort to practice can be reduced significantly. Finally, the proposed system assumes a great importance due to the trend of globalization, as it aims to provide expert advice which is crucial to for the Indian farmer to harvest different kinds of crop varieties based on the demand in the world market. 1

P. Krishna Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Presentation 2.3: The sustainable forest products industry, carbon and climate change Mikael Hannus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption within the industry. · To assist in the efforts to reduce society's energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, the forest products industry can - become more energy efficient and increase its share of biomass in energy production; - help supply society with increasing amounts of wood and fibre for use as a raw

102

Local and Regional Economic Benefits from Forest Products Production Activities at the Savannah River Site: 1955-Present  

SciTech Connect

SRS was established in 1951 as a nuclear materials production facility; however, decline in the defense mission budget at SRS has created a major economic impact on the community in the Central Savannah River Area. SRS has been offsetting these effects by producing revenue (80 million dollars to date) from the sale of forest products since 1955 primarily trees, but also pine straw. Revenue has been re-invested into the infrastructure development, restoration and management of natural resources. Total asset value of the forest-land has increased from 21 million to over 500 million dollars in the same period.

Teeter, L.; Blake, J.I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Surface Soil Changes Following Selective Logging in an Eastern Amazon Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Brazilian Amazon, selective logging is second only to forest conversion in its extent. Conversion to pasture or agriculture tends to reduce soil nutrients and site productivity over time unless fertilizers are added. Logging removes ...

Lydia P. Olander; Mercedes M. Bustamante; Gregory P. Asner; Everaldo Telles; Zayra Prado; Plnio B. Camargo

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ags ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability to readily determine the short-run effect of rising energy prices on agricultural production. The results are measured in terms of demand schedules for each input investigated, net revenue adjustments, cropping pattern shifts, and changes in agricultural output. The High Plains of Texas was selected as a study area due to the heterogeneous nature of agricultural production in the region and highly energy intensive methods of production employed. The region is associated with a diversity in crops and production practices as well as a high degree of mechanization and irrigation, which means agriculture is very dependent upon energy inputs and, in turn, is significantly affected by energy price changes. The study area was defined by the Texas Agricultural Extension subregions of High Plains II, High Plains III, and High Plains IV. The crops chosen for study were cotton, grain sorghum, wheat, corn, and soybeans. The energy and energy-related inputs under investigation were diesel, herbicide, natural gas, nitrogen fertilizer, and water. Mathematical linear programming was used as the analytical technique with parametric programming techniques incorporated into the LP model to evaluate effect of varying input price parameters over a specified range. Thus, demand schedules were estimated. The objective function was constructed using variable costs only; no fixed costs are considered. Therefore, the objective function maximizes net revenue above variable costs and thus limits the study to the short run. The data bases for the model were crop enterprise budgets developed by the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. These budgets were modified to adapt them to the study. Particularly important was the substitution of owner-operated harvesting equipment for custom-harvesting costs. This procedure made possible the delineation of fuel use by crop and production alternative which was necessary information in the accounting of costs. The completed LP model was applied to 16 alternative situations made up of various input and product price combinations which are considered as feasible in the short run future. The results reveal that diesel consumption would change very little in the short run unless commodity prices simultaneously decline below the lowest prices since 1971 or unless diesel price approaches $2.00 per gallon. Under average commodity price conditions, natural gas consumption would not decline appreciably until the price rose above $4.00 per 1000 cubic feet (mcf). Even when using the least product prices since 1971, natural gas would be consumed in substantial amounts as long as the price was below $1.28 per Mcf. The findings regarding nitrogen indicate that present nitrogen prices are within a critical range such that consumption would be immediately affected by nitrogen price increases. Water price was considered as the price a farmer can afford to pay for water above pumping and distribution costs. Application of water was defined as the price that would be paid for imported water. Under average commodity price conditions, the study results show that as water price rises from zero dollars to $22 per acre foot there would be less than a 4 percent reduction in consumption. However, as the price continues to rise, consumption would decline dramatically reaching zero at a water price of $71.75 per acre foot. This study indicates that rising input prices would cause acreage shifts from irrigated to dryland; however, with average commodity prices, these shifts do not occur until diesel reaches $2.69 per gallon, or natural gas sells for $1.92 per Mcf, or nitrogen price is $.41 per pound, or water price reaches $14.69 per acre foot. In general, the first crops that would shift out of production as energy input prices rise woul

Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers' objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers' test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

Dwyer, Brian P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results Results Results to Date Taking direct and indirect emissions intensity together, AF&PA member companies decreased their emissions intensity from 0.738 to 0.637 tons of CO2 equivalents per ton of production - a decrease of 14 percent. This total is comprised of a direct greenhouse gas emissions intensity decrease of 24 percent, from 0.513 to 0.389 tons of CO2 equivalents per ton of production and an indirect emissions intensity increase of 10 percent. Indirect emissions are those generated by suppliers of purchased electricity. From 2000 to 2006, AF&PA member companies collectively reduced their absolute direct GHG emissions 34 percent, from 61.2 to 40.5 MMTCO2-eq. Absolute indirect emissions associated with the generation of purchased electricity decreased 4 percent from 26.8 to 25.8 MMTCO2-eq from 2000 to

108

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Management Expertise Energy Management Expertise Pumping System Assessment Tool Qualification PSAT helps users assess energy savings opportunities in pumping systems, relying on field measurements of flow rate, head, and either motor power or current to perform the assessment. AIRMaster+ Qualification AirMaster+ provides comprehensive information on assessing compressed AirMaster+ air systems, including modeling, existing and future system upgrades, and savings and effectiveness of energy efficiency measures. Processing Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Qualification (PHAST) PHAST assists users to survey process heating equipment and identify the most energy-intensive equipment and to perform energy (heat) balances on furnaces to identify and reduce non-productive energy use.

109

Economic and energetic evaluation of alcohol fuel production from agriculture: Yolo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation reviews the technical aspects of alcohol fuel production and consumption, examines the set of policy-related issues that affect both the private and the public sectors, and investigates the economic and energetic feasibility of small-scale on-farm production on a representative Sacramento Valley field and vegetable crop farm. Candidate feedstocks, including both starch and sugar-rich crops, are: barley, corn, fodder beet, grain sorghum, Jerusalem artichoke, sugar beet, sweet sorghum, tomatoes, and wheat. The leading fuel crops were found to be sweet sorghum, Jerusalem artichoke, corn, fodder beet, and grain sorghum in order of declining preference. With better than average crop yields and the current mix of financial incentives, the breakeven cost of alcohol fuel is $1.03 per gallon when diesel fuel and gasoline prices are $1.30 and $1.46, respectively. Without subsidy, the breakeven cost is $1.62 per gallon. An energy analysis was calculated for each of the feedstocks under consideration. With the exception of sweet sorghum, wheat, and barley, all feedstocks showed a negative net energy balance. The use of agricultural residues as a boiler fuel, however, made a significant difference in the overall energy balance. The role of government in energy policy is reviewed and typical policy instruments are discussed. Although on-farm alcohol fuel production is not currently economically competitive with gasoline and diesel fuel, technological innovation and the return of increasing petroleum prices could alter the situation.

Meo, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Impacts of Biofuel Production and Navigation Impediments on Agricultural Transportation and Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigated the impacts of U.S. biofuel production and barge navigation impediments on agricultural transportation and markets. Both past and future impacts of U.S. biofuel production levels mandated by the Renewable Fuel Standards of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (RFS1) and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2) were examined. Examination of barge navigations impediments included analysis of the impact of lock failure and low water levels on rivers due to drought, on agricultural transportation, and on consumer welfare. All scenarios were simulated using the International Grain Transportation Model, a price endogenous mathematical programming model. The results showed that RFS-associated (RFS1 and RFS2) U.S. corn ethanol production increased the total corn supply and diverted corn from non-ethanol consumption, reduced regional grain transportation volumes, and contributed to a rise in corn prices. The results of the forward-looking scenarios indicated that grain exports and transport volumes were increased. Exports from Gulf ports increased by 41%, while grain movements by rail increased by 60%. Additional investments in the expansion of the grain handling capacities of Gulf ports and the railroad industry are needed in the near future unless a large increase in biofuel production occurs. The results of navigation impediment scenarios indicated that both lock failures and low water levels on rivers adversely affect U.S. grain exports. The Gulf ports were most negatively impacted, relative to Pacific Northwest and Atlantic ports. Truck and barge freight volume declined while rail freight volume increased. Because trucks deliver grain from grain elevators to barge locations, truck volume also decreased in response to the decline in barge volume. The scenarios imposed welfare losses on society with most accruing to consumers, while the barge industry lost $10-154 million in revenue. The low water levels were more expensive than the lock failures. Major rehabilitation of the locks is needed to avoid lock failures and more dredging of the shallow parts of the river system is required because of frequent droughts.

Ahmedov, Zafarbek

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update covers the first year of a three-year-long EPRI research project entitled Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production. The report provides a project overview and explains the preliminary results yielded from the first year of on-farm research.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Impacts of renewable fuel regulation and production on agriculture, energy, and welfare.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this dissertation is to study the impact of U.S. federal renewable fuel regulations on energy and agriculture commodity markets and welfare. We (more)

Mcphail, Lihong Lu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

NPP Tropical Forest: Kade, Ghana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972 Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Forest after clearing of secondary growth at the Kade site (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Nye, P. H., and D. J. Greenland. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a secondary tropical forest were determined in the late 1950s at the Kade Agricultural Research Station of the former University College, Ghana. Net primary production (NPP) was estimated on the basis of standing biomass accumulation and litter fall. Later studies on litter and wood fall and

114

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides background information on the agroenergetic potential of 65 countries and offers summaries of major crops planted, total area planted, yield per hectare, and total production. Total land area is categorized as to agriculture, forest, and woodland, and is discussed with demographic statistics for each country. The potential for agricultural by-products and biomass to contribute to energy availability is explored, with reference to each major crop. Vegetation and/or economic activity, or soil maps are presented for most countries, as are climatic data, with crop yields and residues which are compared with production elsewhere.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine)

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Economic Analysis of Energy Crop Production in the U.S. - Location, Quantities, Price, and Impacts on Traditional Agricultural Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

POLYSYS is used to estimate US locations where, for any given energy crop price, energy crop production can be economically competitive with conventional crops. POLYSYS is a multi-crop, multi-sector agricultural model developed and maintained by the University of Tennessee and used by the USDA-Economic Research Service. It includes 305 agricultural statistical districts (ASD) which can be aggregated to provide state, regional, and national information. POLYSYS is being modified to include switchgrass, hybrid poplar, and willow on all land suitable for their production. This paper summarizes the preliminary national level results of the POLYSYS analysis for selected energy crop prices for the year 2007 and presents the corresponding maps (for the same prices) of energy crop production locations by ASD. Summarized results include: (1) estimates of energy crop hectares (acres) and quantities (dry Mg, dry tons), (2) identification of traditional crops allocated to energy crop production and calculation of changes in their prices and hectares (acres) of production, and (3) changes in total net farm returns for traditional agricultural crops. The information is useful for identifying areas of the US where large quantities of lowest cost energy crops can most likely be produced.

Walsh, M.E.; De La Torre Ugarte, D.; Slinsky, S.; Graham, R.L.; Shapouri, H.; Ray, D.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Trends in Kenyan agricultural productivity: 19972007. Working Paper 31. Tegemeo Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Egerton University with a mandate to undertake empirical research and analysis on contemporary economic and agricultural policy issues in Kenya. The institute is widely recognized as a centre of excellence in policy analysis on the topical agricultural issues of the day, and in its wide dissemination of findings to government and other key stakeholders with a view to influencing policy direction and the decision making process. Tegemeos consistently good quality empirically-based analytical work, and its objective stance in reporting and disseminating findings has over the past decade won the acceptance of government, the private sector, civil society, academia and others interested in the performance of Kenyas agricultural

Betty Kibaara; Joshua Ariga; John Olw; T. S. Jayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

120

Modeling gross primary production of temperate deciduous broadleaf forest using satellite images and climate data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oswald, Harvard Forest, Harvard University, PO Box 68, Petersham, MA 01366, USA (tel. +1 978 724 3302

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

Jonathan Aggett

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Industry, Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1580e/i1580e00.pdf Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Screenshot References: Forestry Industry Impacts[1] "This book examines the influence of the forest products (roundwood, processed wood products and pulp and paper) value chain on atmospheric greenhouse gases. Forests managed for natural conservation, for protection

123

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Integrated description of agricultural field experiments and production: The ICASA Version 2.0 data standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural research increasingly seeks to quantify complex interactions of processes for a wide range of environmental conditions and crop management scenarios, leading to investigation where multiple sets of experimental data are examined using tools ... Keywords: ACE, ASCII, AgMIP, Climate change, Crop modeling, DSSAT, Data management, Databases, IBSNAT, ICASA, JSON, NASA/POWER, Software, WISE, XML

Jeffrey W. White, L. A. Hunt, Kenneth J. Boote, James W. Jones, Jawoo Koo, Soonho Kim, Cheryl H. Porter, Paul W. Wilkens, Gerrit Hoogenboom

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

Dr. James A. Burger

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Biological Air Emissions Control for an Energy Efficient Forest Products Industry of the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wood products industry is a leader in the production of innovative wood materials. New products are taking shape within a growth industry for fiberboard, plywood, particle board, and other natural material-based energy efficient building materials. However, at the same time, standards for clean air are becoming ever stricter. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during production of wood products (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and mercaptans) must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOC and HAP emission control techniques such as regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) and regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) require significant amounts of energy and generate secondary pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and spent carbon. Biological treatment of air emissions offers a cost-effective and sustainable control technology for industrial facilities facing increasingly stringent air emission standards. A novel biological treatment system that integrates two types of biofilter systems, promises significant energy and cost savings. This novel system uses microorganisms to degrade air toxins without the use of natural gas as fuel or the creation of secondary pollutants. The replacement of conventional thermal oxidizers with biofilters will yield natural gas savings alone in the range of $82,500 to $231,000 per year per unit. Widespread use of biofilters across the entire forest products industry could yield fuel savings up to 5.6 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year and electricity savings of 2.1 trillion Btu per year. Biological treatment systems can also eliminate the production of NOx, SO2, and CO, and greatly reduce CO2 emissions, when compared to conventional thermal oxidizers. Use of biofilters for VOC and HAP emission control will provide not only the wood products industry but also the pulp and paper industry with a means to cost-effectively control air emissions. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a novel sequential treatment technology that integrates two types of biofilter systems biotrickling filtration and biofiltration for controlling forest product facility air emissions with a water-recycling feature for water conservation. This coupling design maximizes the conditions for microbial degradation of odor causing compounds at specific locations. Water entering the biotrickling filter is collected in a sump, treated, and recycled back to the biotrickling filter. The biofilter serves as a polishing step to remove more complex organic compounds (i.e., terpenes). The gaseous emissions from the hardboard mill presses at lumber plants such as that of the Stimson Lumber Company contain both volatile and condensable organic compounds (VOC and COC, respectively), as well as fine wood and other very small particulate material. In applying bio-oxidation technology to these emissions Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) and BioReaction (BRI) evaluated the potential of this equipment to resolve two (2) control issues which are critical to the industry: First, the hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions (primarily methanol and formaldehyde) and Second, the fine particulate and COC from the press exhaust which contribute to visual emissions (opacity) from the stack. In a field test in 2006, the biological treatment technology met the HAP and COC control project objectives and demonstrated significantly lower energy use (than regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) or regenerative catalytic oxidizers (RCOs), lower water use (than conventional scrubbers) all the while being less costly than either for maintenance. The project was successfully continued into 2007-2008 to assist the commercial partner in reducing unit size and footprint and cost, through added optimization of water recycle and improved biofilm activity, and demonstration of opacity removal capabilities.

Jones, K; Boswell, J.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio Committee Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported

Victoria, University of

129

Declining global per capita agricultural production and warming oceans threaten food security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per capita production levels in 2030 similar to those of theby 14% between 2008 and 2030. Climate change is likely tocereal production by 2030. If done sustainably, raising

Funk, Chris C.; Brown, Molly E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evironmental protection in Malaysia with sustainable forest management practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malaysia has achieved a very significant development socio-economically since independent in 1957. Large tracts of forest have been converted to give way to settlements and agricultural and industrial areas. Logging is still being carried out annually. ... Keywords: environmental protection, forest certification, forest harvesting, sustainable forest management, tropical forest resources

Dato'Hj Dahlan Hj. Taha; Hj. Kamaruzaman Jusoff

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production under elevated [CO2  

SciTech Connect

Elevated atmospheric [CO2] is projected to increase forest production, which could increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, sustained forest production will depend on the nutrient balance of the forested ecosystem. Our aim was to examine the causes and consequences of increased fine-root production and mortality throughout the soil profile under elevated CO2 with respect to potential gross nitrogen (N) cycling rates. Our study was conducted in a CO2-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We used isotope pool dilution methodology to measure potential gross N cycling rates in laboratory incubations of soil from four depth increments to 60 cm. Our objectives were two-fold: (1) determine whether N is available for root acquisition in deeper soil, and (2) determine whether increased inputs of labile C from greater fine-root mortality at depth under elevated [CO2] had altered N cycling rates. While gross N fluxes declined with soil depth, we found that N is potentially available for roots to access, especially below 15 cm depth where microbial consumption of mineral N was reduced. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization, and 100% of potential net N mineralization, occurred below 15-cm depth at this site. This finding was supported by in situ measurements from ion-exchange resins, where total inorganic N availability at 55 cm depth was equal to or greater than N availability at 15 cm depth. While it is likely that trees grown under elevated [CO2] are accessing a larger pool of inorganic N by mining deeper soil, we found no effect of elevated [CO2] on potential gross or net N cycling rates. Thus, increased root exploration of the soil volume under elevated [CO2] may be more important than changes in potential gross N cycling rates in sustaining forest responses to rising atmospheric CO2.

Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Hooker, Toby [Utah State University (USU); Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Baseline soil carbon was determined for each of the eighty-one plots. Fertility analysis of soil samples was completed and these data were used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions and the pre-designated plots were fertilized. We also evaluated economic-based policy instruments that are designed to mitigate the reforestation burden borne by the owner of reclaimed mined land. Results suggest that although profitability of reforestation of these previously reclaimed mine lands may be achievable on better sites under lower interest rates, substantial payments would be required to reach ''profitability'' under many conditions.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimization-based trade-off analysis of biodiesel crop production for managing an agricultural catchment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Political agendas worldwide include increased production of biofuel, which multiplies the trade-offs among conflicting objectives, including food and fodder production, water quantity, water quality, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Quantification ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Crop rotation schemes, Genetic algorithm, Land use, River basin management, Water quality

Sven Lautenbach, Martin Volk, Michael Strauch, Gerald Whittaker, Ralf Seppelt

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Effects of soil structure destruction on methane production and carbon partitioning between methanogenic pathways in tropical rain forest soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weathered soils of Puerto Rico: 1. Morphology, formation andForest, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Interim Publica- tion),in subtropical forests in Puerto Rico, Biotropica, 27, 138

Teh, Y A; Silver, W L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sustaining the Productivity and Function of Intensively Managed Forests - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this study is to ensure sustainable management of wetland forests in the southeastern United States. The study is projected to measure soil, hydrology, and forest responses to several management scenarios across a complete forest cycle. From August 1997 to August 2000 the study has received funding as one of the Agenda 2020 projects, from the U.S. Department of Energy (Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC07-97ID13551), the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, and Westvac Corporation. Quarterly progress reports were submitted regularly to the Department and all project participants. This final report summarizes the project results and progress achieved during this 3-year period. Over the past three years all research objectives planned for this project were completed.

Burger, James A.; Xu, Yi-Jun

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Predicting Agricultural Management Influence on Long-Term Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implications for Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Long-term field experiments (LTE) are ideal for predicting the influence of agricultural management on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and examining biofuel crop residue removal policy questions. Our objectives were (i) to simulate SOC dynamics in LTE soils under various climates, crop rotations, fertilizer or organic amendments, and crop residue managements using the CQESTR model and (ii) to predict the potential of no-tillage (NT) management to maintain SOC stocks while removing crop residue. Classical LTEs at Champaign, IL (1876), Columbia, MO (1888), Lethbridge, AB (1911), Breton, AB (1930), and Pendleton, OR (1931) were selected for their documented history of management practice and periodic soil organic matter (SOM) measurements. Management practices ranged from monoculture to 2- or 3-yr crop rotations, manure, no fertilizer or fertilizer additions, and crop residue returned, burned, or harvested. Measured and CQESTR predicted SOC stocks under diverse agronomic practices, mean annual temperature (2.1 19 C), precipitation (402 973 mm), and SOC (5.89 33.58 g SOC kg 1) at the LTE sites were significantly related (r 2 = 0.94, n = 186, P < 0.0001) with a slope not significantly different than 1. The simulation results indicated that the quantities of crop residue that can be sustainably harvested without jeopardizing SOC stocks were influenced by initial SOC stocks, crop rotation intensity, tillage practices, crop yield, and climate. Manure or a cover crop/intensified crop rotation under NT are options to mitigate loss of crop residue C, as using fertilizer alone is insufficient to overcome residue removal impact on SOC stocks

Gollany, H. T. [USDA ARS; Rickman, R. W. [USDA ARS; Albrecht, S. L. [USDA ARS; Liang, Y. [University of Arkansas; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Machado, S. [Oregon State University, Corvallis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law provides a grant of a minimum $20 per bone-dry ton of qualified agricultural biomass, forest wood waste, urban wood waste, co-firing biomass, or storm-generated biomass that is provided to...

139

Publications Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2012). Economics of IPM Decisions. Stored Product Protection (1- 9). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State (1-11). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State. http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/finished- chapters/s156-ch-27 of Food and Agriculture­ Conservation Effects Assessment Project. How to Build Better Agricultural

140

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

The Northeast Forest Bio-products Puzzle David T. Damery and Jeff Benjamin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of forest communities where bio-energy businesses operate benefits include: tax revenue, direct jobs, indirect jobs, and potential for both improved silviculture and solid waste management. These benefits of support for community economic development. Recent developments in the technology of biomass gasification

Schweik, Charles M.

142

Land Application of Coal Combustion By-Products: Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Long-term climate change impacts on agricultural productivity in eastern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work examines potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in northeastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10% decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30N, 108E] to [42N, 123E]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5% for rice, 8.3% for canola, 18.6% for corn, 22.9% for potato, and 24.9% for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12%. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a clear beneficiary from among those simulated in this study.

Chavas, Daniel R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Gao, Xuejie

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

145

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio- oil to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming and shift conversion

146

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on National Forest System Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report and CD for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), evaluates the potential for renewable energy resource development on National Forest System (NFS) lands. USFS can use the report findings to consider potential for development of solar and wind energy resources on NFS lands, in land management decisions. The Geographical Information System (GIS) based analysis resulted in the following findings: (1) Ninety-nine National Forest Units have high potential for power production from one or more of these solar and wind energy sources; and (2) Twenty National Forest Units in nine states have high potential for power production from two or more of these solar and wind energy sources.

Not Available

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

3-PG Productivity Modeling of Regenerating Amazon Forests: Climate Sensitivity and Comparison with MODIS-Derived NPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential forest growth predicted by the Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth (3-PG) model was compared for forest and deforested areas in the Legal Amazon to assess potential differing regeneration associated with climate. Historical ...

Joseph D. White; Neal A. Scott; Adam I. Hirsch; Steven W. Running

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Countries' Agriculture and Electric Power Sectors Jayant A.of scale in the U.S. electric power sector was a study byof Scale in U.S. Electric Power Generation", in Journal of

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Redu ction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben; JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. A peer-reviewed journal article that identifies, describes and analyzes socio-economic factors that may encourage or inhibit farmers from participat...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Hydrological Processes 18:and productivity in Puerto-Rico's luquillo mountains.experimental forest Puerto Rico. US Forest Serv Gen Tech Rep

Templer, P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate and slow-growing forests generally have prevented wood production from becoming a major state such as climate change, renewable energy, intense recreational use, billion dollar fire suppression costs and Implementation of Forest Management in Colorado #12;Acknowledgements The Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS

157

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystems Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this quarter we worked on methodologies for analyzing carbon in mine soils. A unique property of mine soils is the presence of coal and carboniferous rock particles that are present in mine soils in various sizes, quantities, and qualities. There is no existing method in the literature that may be of use for quantitative estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in mine soils that can successfully differentiate between pedogenic and geogenic carbon forms. In this report we present a detailed description of a 16-step method for measuring SOC in mine soils designed for and tested on a total of 30 different mine soil mixtures representing a wide spectrum of mine soils in the hard-rock region of the Appalachian coalfield. The proposed method is a combination of chemical procedure for carbonates removal, a thermal procedure for pedogenic C removal, and elemental C analysis procedure at 900 C. Our methodology provides a means to correct for the carbon loss from the more volatile constituents of coal fragments in the mine soil samples and another correction factor for the protected organic matter that can also remain unoxidized following thermal pretreatment. The correction factors for coal and soil material-specific SOM were based on carbon content loss from coal and SOM determined by a parallel thermal oxidation analysis of pure ground coal fragments retrieved from the same mined site as the soil samples and of coal-free soil rock fragments of sandstone and siltstone origin.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Residential fuelwood consumption and production in South Dakota, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of the latest survey of residential fuelwood consumption and production in South Dakota. Topics examined include the geographic distribution of residential fuelwood consumption and production within the State; the species of trees used for residential fuelwood; the types of wood-burning facilities used; the reasons for burning fuelwood; and the land, ownership, and tree classes from which fuelwood was produced.

May, D.M.

1996-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the

160

Agriculture, technology, and conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized. Agriculture and its related technologies are often affected by conflict, but rarely acknowledged as a cause or solution to conflict. Literature reviews in six topic areas illustrate various facets of the relationship between agriculture and conflict. Research conducted in Santa Cruz del Quich, Guatemala illustrates the ways farmers were impacted by the countrys civil war. It also examines farmer survival strategies during the war, and reveals the presence of minor localized conflict over water resources. Conflict over land is not a major concern at present. Market access for inputs and outputs are shown to have been a problem for a number of farmers during the civil war. The poverty of Santa Cruz farmers indicates that much could be gained by rural development. Research is unable to support the hypotheses that agricultural technologies have prevented or caused conflict in Santa Cruz del Quich, or that they have played a large role in recovery from the countrys civil war. The author recommends that future research be undertaken in regions with a diverse set of agricultural technologies, and/or a recent history of significant technological change in agriculture. Policy recommendations include providing secure access to markets during war time, increasing capacity for home-based rural production, and continuing research into resilient crops. Finally, the author suggests that the responsible decision to develop, adopt, or introduce an agricultural technology must take into account the social consequences of that decision, including how the new technology may alleviate or contribute to conflict.

Zilverberg, Cody John

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Forest Resource Assessment Global Forest Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Forest Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/forestry/fra/fra2010/en/ Global Forest Resource Assessment Screenshot References: Global Forest Research Assessment[1] Overview "FAO, in cooperation with its member countries, has monitored the world's forests at 5 to 10 year intervals since 1946. These global assessments provide valuable information to policy-makers in countries, to international negotiations, arrangements and organizations related to forests and to the general public. The Global Forest Resources Assessment

162

Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

both domestically and internationally. Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured...

163

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...

164

Agriculture Residues Recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Saudi Arabia, as well as other countries in the Near East region, is characterized by erratic weather conditions, limited area of fertile arable lands, and with acute water shortage. Although agricultural residues (AGR) production in the region is huge (more than 440 million tons), most of these residues are either burned in the field or utilized in an inefficient way. Utilization of AGR as compost may contribute to expansion of arable lands through its use for reclamation of soil and reduce irrigation requirements. This study was conducted at Al Khalidiah farm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to assess compost production at large commercial scale using several types of agricultural and animal by-products with addition of a BZTCompost Activator (based mainly on microorganism, enzymes and yeast). In this study, two types of compost piles were made at the farm. The first pile of compost was made of different agriculture residues, namely: animal wastes (quail, goat and sheep manure), brownian agricultural wastes (windbreaks residues, date trees, citrus and olive trees pruning) and green landscape grasses (50%, 25 % and 25%, respectively) and was treated with a tested compost activator. The same agriculture residues combination was also made for the second pile as traditional compost

M. W. Sadik; H. M. El Shaer; H. M. Yakot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NPP Boreal Forest: Superior National Forest, U.S.A.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984 Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Hall, F. G. 1997. NPP Boreal Forest: Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a boreal forest was determined at 31 spruce and 30 aspen forest stands in the Superior National Forest (SNF) near Ely, Minnesota, U.S.A., in 1983 and 1984 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the ability of remote sensing to provide estimates of biophysical properties of ecosystems, such as leaf area index (LAI), biomass and net primary productivity (NPP). These ground-based estimates of above-ground biomass

166

Economic Impacts of Expanded Woody Biomass Utilization on the Bioenergy and Forest Products Industries in Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decentralised production of electricity, heat and cooling, and biofuels, thus supporting the diversification demonstrated impact, involving multipliers such as associations of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers to biofuels are expected to support the implementation of the RES Directive and the proposed revised Fuel

Florida, University of

167

A Research Agenda for Forest Products Marketing and Business Development in Louisiana: 2009-2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood product exports to Japan. Maness (1993) concurred that, in addition to secondary manufacturing that consists of about 930 primary and secondary manufacturing establishments (Aguilar and Vlosky, 2006 with approximately 17,000 manufacturing jobs and 8,000 jobs in the harvesting/transportation of timber (LFA 2008

168

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

169

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report we present data that show the spatial distribution of carbon in mine soils. Soil carbon data from deep soil pits from grassland minelands located in Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia were analyzed to determine the vertical distribution and variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) down to a 2-m depth. Regression analyses were used to describe and model the distribution by soil depth of C(wt%), BD{sub fines}(g cm{sup -3}), and fines (vol%) in mine soils. The volume of excavated mine soil samples was transformed in terms of costs of digging and sampling, including sample collection and preparation, and C(wt%) analysis, in order to determine the maximum cost-effective depth (MCD) for carbon inventorying on the mined sites analyzed. Based on the horizontal variation of SOC(g m{sup -2}), we determined the sampling intensity required to achieve a desired accuracy of the amount of sequestered SOC(g m{sup -2}) at certain probability levels. The MCD and sampling intensity measurements were used to determine the minimum detectable difference (MDD) of SOC(g m{sup -2}) between two consecutive carbon inventories. We also proposed a method to determine the minimum number of years before a future C inventory event is carried out so that the measured SOC(g m{sup -2}) differences were greater than MDD. We used geostatistical analyses procedures to determine spatial dependence predictability of surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) data on the minelands analyzed. Kriging techniques were used to create surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) maps for the sites in Ohio and West Virginia. The average C sequestration rate in the surface soil layer for the Ohio (age 9) sites was estimated at 124 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, and it was estimated at 107 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} for the West Virginia sites (age 4). Because of the young age of the Virginia sites, 0.2 and 1 year old, we came to a decision that C sequestration rates would be inappropriate at this stage of their development, as these soils are expected to change with time.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Comparing simulations of three conceptually different forest models with National Forest Inventory data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although they were originally introduced for different purposes, forest models are often used today for scenario development, which includes forest production as one aspect of forest development. However, studies using an independent data set to compare ... Keywords: Climate change, Ecosystem model, Forest growth, Increment, Sensitivity, Simulator

Markus O. Huber; Chris S. Eastaugh; Thomas Gschwantner; Hubert Hasenauer; Georg Kindermann; Thomas Ledermann; Manfred J. Lexer; Werner Rammer; Stefan SchRghuber; Hubert Sterba

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Agriculture | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture Agriculture Dataset Summary Description The Energy Statistics Database contains comprehensive energy statistics on the production, trade, conversion and final consumption of primary and secondary; conventional and non-conventional; and new and renewable sources of energy. The Energy Statistics dataset, covering the period from 1990 on, is available at UNdata. This dataset relates to the consumption of alcohol by the transportation industry. Source United Nations (UN) Date Released December 09th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Agriculture Alcohol consumption transportation industry UN Data application/xml icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XML (xml, 95 KiB) text/csv icon UN Data: consumption by transportation industry XLS (csv, 21.6 KiB)

173

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

174

AGRICULTURAL REPORT SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Secure America's energy future through renewable biofuels 5. Mitigate and adapt agriculture to variations will harvestprocessor will harvest and process theand process the product for wholesaleproduct for wholesale

175

A political ecology of community-based forest and wildlife management in Tanzania: politics, power and governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in perspective. Finally, to Jonathan, who is always steady as a rock and untiring in his insistence that it will all be better than alright. Thank you for joining me in my adventures and for taking me on yours. Table of Contents... management rights for natural resources to local communities, who retain full revenue from diverse income sources, including hunting, tourism and non-timber forest products (Roe et al., 2009). In 1999 a report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation...

Humphries, Kathryn

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

A GIS decision support system for regional forest management to assess biomass availability for renewable energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the use of a mix of renewable and traditional energy sources is deemed to help in solving increasing energy demands and environmental issues, thus making it particularly important to assess the availability of renewable energy sources. In ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Decision support system, Environmental sustainability, Forest residues, GIS, Harvesting techniques modelling, Renewable energy

Pietro Zambelli; Chiara Lora; Raffaele Spinelli; Clara Tattoni; Alfonso Vitti; Paolo Zatelli; Marco Ciolli

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council on Energy and Environment, for Mexico, the NationalMexico, Brazil, and Indonesia), examining long-run trends in productivity, technological change, energy andenergy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative (ecoABC) (Canada)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provides repayable contributions for the construction or expansion of transportation biofuel production facilities. Funding is conditional upon agricultural producer investment...

179

Agriculture and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effect of Pretreatment on the Properties of Agricultural Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural waste disposal is becoming a problem due to its increasing production and potential pollution. As a kind of biomass, agricultural waste can be used as a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Agricultural waste disposal is of great ... Keywords: agricultural waste, animal manure, acid washing, pyrolysis

Zhang Shouyu; Wang Jian; Wang Xiu-Jun; Peng Dingmao; Takayuki Takarada

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Black Forest Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Forest Partners Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Product San Francisco-based project developer focused on building...

182

From Coercion to Collaboration: Participatory Forest Management in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From Coercion to Collaboration: Participatory Forest Management in Indonesia A Public Seminar a recent development in Indonesia. It attempts to tackle the problem of illegal logging and provide tenure systems in Indonesia. He completed his PhD in Forest Policy at the Graduate School of Agricultural

183

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

184

Fermentative production of butanol from sorghum molasses as a potential agricultural fuel. Final report, June 26, 1981-September 25, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 4259, suitable for butanol-acetone fermentation of sorghum molasses was selected from several strains of the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It was cultivated in the composition-optimized sorghum molasses medium. The microbial growth and sugar consumption pattern in the sorghum molasses medium exhibited a typical diauxie phenomenon. The results strongly suggest that the difficulty encountered by the Weizmann type of organisms in butanol-acetone fermentation of molasses is due to the diauxie phenomenon causing a significant decrease in the solvent production rate. Acid hydrolysis of sorghum molasses minimizes the occurrence of the phenomenon, thereby remarkably increasing the solvent yield. The final solvent concentrations in the inverted molasses medium were butanol, 1.0% (w/v); acetone, 0.37% (w/v); ethanol, 0.18% (w/v); and total solvent, 1.55% (w/v). The total solvent yield in the inverted sorghum molasses medium was 30.3% based on the weight of sugar consumed. Effects of the temperature, agitation and heat-shocking were also investigated.

Fan, L.T.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Forest Road Building Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Forest Road Building Regulations Forest Road Building Regulations < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 09/2010 State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading, stormwater, and

186

Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of agricultural/podcasts.asp A series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience produced by Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Agricultural Podcasts http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/agricultural/podcasts.asp Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4043 Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 MST Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4021 Tue, 29

187

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

188

Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relations Act: Report. Sacramento, CA: Office of the AuditorLabor Relations Law. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural1975-76 and 1976-77. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural

Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ARM - Black Forest News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GermanyBlack Forest News Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update,...

190

NPP Tropical Forest: Pasoh, Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973 Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Profile of the Pasoh Forest (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Kira, T., N. Manokaran, and S. Appanah. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and productivity of a lowland tropical forest in the Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia, were determined from 1971 to 1973, under the auspices of the International Biological Programme. From 1970 to 1978, intensive research on lowland rain forest ecology and dynamics took place under a joint research project between the University of Malaya (UM) and the

191

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and improve the efficiency an energy consumptive system or determine the best utilization of an energy and economic foundations. Energy utilization-global and national. Sectoral analysis of energy consumption. Relationship of energy consumption and production to economic growth and environment. Technology for energy

Beresnev, Igor

192

Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while offering environmental benefits. Dairy farmer use of anaerobic digesters is not widespread due to various challenges, including high costs and inadequate return. A cooperative approach could address the challenges through improved negotiating strength; technical assistance for digester design, installation, and operation; management and marketing services; and/or financial guidance and assistance. Cooperative efforts may allow milk producers to remain focused on milk production

Carolyn Betts Liebr; K. Charles Ling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: gain.fas.usda.gov/Pages/Default.aspx USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) Screenshot References: GAIN[1] Overview "USDA'S Global Agriculture Information Network (GAIN) provides timely information on the agricultural economy, products and issues in foreign countries since 1995 that are likely to have an impact on United States agricultural production and trade. U.S. Foreign Service officers working at

194

Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1679e/i1679e00.pdf References: Developing Effective Forest Policy[1] Purpose "The purpose of this guide is to outline the concepts associated with forest policy development and the formulation of a formal forest policy statement, based on country experiences in recent decades. While focusing on the development and formulation of national forest policies, the guide can also be applied at subnational and local levels. Similarly, it can

195

Information Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe Information Forests, an approach to classification that generalizes Random Forests by replacing the splitting criterion of non-leaf nodes from a discriminative one -- based on the entropy of the label distribution -- to a generative one -- based on maximizing the information divergence between the class-conditional distributions in the resulting partitions. The basic idea consists of deferring classification until a measure of "classification confidence" is sufficiently high, and instead breaking down the data so as to maximize this measure. In an alternative interpretation, Information Forests attempt to partition the data into subsets that are "as informative as possible" for the purpose of the task, which is to classify the data. Classification confidence, or informative content of the subsets, is quantified by the Information Divergence. Our approach relates to active learning, semi-supervised learning, mixed generative/discriminative learning.

Yi, Zhao; Dewan, Maneesh; Zhan, Yiqiang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A study of over-production and enhanced secretion of enzymes. Quarterly report 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the over-production of ligno-cellulolytic enzymes which are relevant to the paper-pulp industry and agricultural community. Since ligno-cellulosics are components of wood, the project involves the forest, a renewable energy resource. Attention is focused on the following: over-production of polyphenol oxidase; establishment of the route of polyphenol oxidase secretion; regulation of polyphenol oxidase secretion; purification of extracellular oxidase.

Dashek, W.V.

1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.pwc.co.uk/pdf/forest_finance_toolkit.pdf Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Screenshot References: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit[1] Overview "This Toolkit has been developed jointly by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It is a globally applicable resource designed to help financial institutions support the management of forest resources through sustainable and legal timber production and processing, and markets for carbon and other

198

South Dakota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of a survey of all primary wood-using mills in South Dakota in 1993 and compares those findings with earlier surveys. Reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county. Also reports the quantity, type, and disposition of wood and bark residues generated by South Dakota`s primary wood-using industry.

Hackett, R.L.; Sowers, R.A.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road construction and

200

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1999 State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Capacity Building in Sharing Forest and Market Information Prague & Krtiny, Czech Republic, 25 October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capacity Building in Sharing Forest and Market Information Prague & Krtiny, Czech Republic, 25 Information Prague & Krtiny, Czech Republic, 25 October 2005 F A O Contents I. Forest products markets forest products market information #12;Capacity Building in Sharing Forest and Market Information Prague

202

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

204

MARKETS FOR FOREST PRODUCTS P F Olsen and Company Ltd January 2002 Warren Forestry Ltd Copyright 2002 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examined are: · predicted demand for wood products, · current sources and predicted levels of supply the demand figures are based on extrapolations of historical trends. The future supply estimates should to China. New Zealand sells wood to the USA and Chile to Western Europe. As for all commodity trading we

205

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and impact orientation need to be integrated into the agricultural research process. The R&D system should think in terms of contributing to innovation. The Improving Productivity...

206

Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document Summary: This project was an intensive remote sensing and field study of the boreal forest in the Superior National Forest (SNF). The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the ability of remote-sensing data to provide estimates of biophysical properties of ecosystems, such as leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and net primary productivity (NPP). The SNF is mostly covered by boreal forest. Boreal forests were chosen for this project because of their relative taxonomic simplicity, their great extent, and their potential sensitivity to climatic change. Information on the SNF project is available by accessing the SNF pages maintained by the ORNL DAAC at http://daac.ornl.govSNF/summary.html. Table of Contents:

207

U.S. Timber Production, Trade, Consumption, and Price Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of an annual series that presents current and historical information on the production, trade, consumption, and prices of timber products in the United States. The report focuses on national statistics, but includes some data for individual States and regions and for Canada. The data were collected from industry trade associations and government agencies. They are intended for use by forest land managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations, libraries, organizations, individuals in the major timber producing and consuming countries of the world, and the general public. A major use of the data presented here is tracking technological change over time. One of the major technology shifts occurring in the wood-using industry is the substitution of oriented strandboard (OSB) for plywood in the structural panel sector, as well as a shift in plywood production from the west to the south United States. Some data show these shifts. United States production of structural panels totaled 29.4 billion ft in 1999. Production of OSB increased from less than 3 billion ft in 1985 to 11.6 billion ft in 1999. Plywood production was 20.1 billion ft in 1985 before falling to 17.8 billion ft in 1999. The decline in plywood production reflects the continued increase in the OSB share of the traditional plywood market Keywords: production, consumption, import, export April 2001 Howard, James. L. 2001. U.S. timber production, trade consumption, and price statistics 1965 to 1999. Res. Pap. FPL-RP-595. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory. 90 p. A limited number of free copies of this publication are available to the public from the Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pi...

James Howard United; United States; Forest Service; Price Statistics; James L. Howard

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Front Range Forest Health Partnership Phase 1 feasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Front Range Forest Health Partnership is an alliance of individuals, citizen groups, federal, state, private, and nonprofit organizations that formed to promote forest health restoration and reduce fire risks on Colorado's Front Range. The partnership promotes selective thinning to restore forest health and supports economically feasible end uses for wood waste materials. The Phase I study was initiated to determine the environmental and economic feasibility of using wood wastes from forested and urban areas for the production of fuel-grade ethanol.

Volkin, P

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/climatesmart/en/ Program Start: 2010 References: Climate-Smart Agriculture[1] Logo: FAO Climate-Smart Agriculture Overview "Food security and climate change can be addressed together by transforming agriculture and adopting practices that are "climate-smart" A number of production systems are already being used by farmers and food producers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to climate change, and reduce vulnerability. This website provides examples of many of these

210

RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

212

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing volumes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum will become available for agricultural use as more utilities install forced oxidation scrubbers and the wallboard market for the resulting gypsum becomes saturated. This interim report describes work performed in 2007 and 2008 to develop a national research network to gain data and experience to support the beneficial uses of FGD products, especially FGD gypsum, in agriculture and other land applications.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Agency/Company /Organization World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, United Nations Environment Programme, International Council for Science, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land, Climate Focus Area Biomass, Forestry, Agriculture Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.fao.org/gtos/gofc-g References Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD)[1] Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Screenshot "Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) is a

214

REDD+ In Dryland Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dryland Forests Dryland Forests Jump to: navigation, search Name REDD+ In Dryland Forests: Issues and Prospects for Pro-poor REDD in the Miombo Woodlands of Southern Africa Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Namibia, Zambia, Mozambique UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

215

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

217

College of Agriculture Departments and Degree Programs Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Education Animal & Range Sciences Land Resources & Environmental Sciences Immunology & Infectious Diseases Multi Disciplinary Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Natural Resources & Rangeland Ecology Environmental Sciences Pre-Vet Program (non-degree) Biotechnology Sustainable Foods

Lawrence, Rick L.

218

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Jump to: navigation, search Name Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Partner Program on Forests Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Country Niger, Malawi, Zambia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

219

CHINA AND FOREST TRADE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORESTS AND LIVELIHOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Chinese Forest Products Exporters © 2008 Forest Trends and Sidley Austin LLP ISBN 1 Sidley Austin LLP (http://www.sidley.com): Sidley is a global law firm, with more than 1800 lawyers in 16 energy projects, as well as representing clients in climate change related litigation. The group

220

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NPP Tropical Forest: Chamela, Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995 Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Litter trap and throughfall collector in the Chamela forest (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Maass, M., and A. Martinez-Yrizar. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Net primary productivity (NPP) of a tropical dry deciduous forest was estimated, based on the integration of ecosystem data obtained in various years between 1982 and 1995, at the Chamela Biological Station of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The Biosphere Reserve Chamela-Cuixmala, Jalisco, is situated near the

222

NPP Tropical Forest: Atherton, Australia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985 Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: View across the forest canopy near Atherton (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Stocker, G. C. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Litterfall was determined over 3-4 years (1974/5-1978) for two tropical rainforest sites and for 5 years (1980-1985) for a third study site near Atherton, Queensland, in northeast Australia. Although net primary production (NPP) was not determined, the extensive site description data and the rarity of measurements on tropical forests south of the Equator

223

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

Jackson, R.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

1981 Winter Meeting - American Society of Agricultural Engineers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 13 volumes contain 372 papers presented at the meeting. Subjects covered include agricultural machinery developments and applications, irrigation, drainage, water supply, water pollution control, farm buildings, energy conservation, agricultural wastes management, biogas and other biomass fuels production, food products and good products plants, grain drying, solar energy applications, engineering economics, crop yield studies, agronomy, agrometeorology, livestock production and management, computer applications, field and laboratory studies, engineering education, and others. 108 papers are abstracted separately.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

227

Analysis of Markets for Coal Combustion By-Products Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation: Summary Report of Four Regional Marketi ng Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sites for the disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) are becoming more difficult to acquire, license, and develop. Since CCBP production may increase in the foreseeable future, reducing the reliance on disposal makes economic and environmental sense. This report summarizes the findings of four regional marketing studies, which examined barriers--both economic and regulatory-- to the land application of CCBP.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ministry of Forests Forest Science ProgramLandslide Risk Case Studies in Forest Development Planning and Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ministry of Forests Forest Science ProgramThe use of trade, firm, or corporation names in this publication is for the information and convenience of the reader. Such use does not constitute an official endorsement or approval by the Government of British Columbia of any product or service to the exclusion of any others that may also be suitable. This document should be regarded as technical information and not as government policy. National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data Main entry under title. Landslide risk case studies in forest development planning and operations (Land management handbook, ISSN 0229-1622; 56) Includes bibliographical references: p.

Mike Wise; Glenn Moore; Doug Vandine; Mike Wise; Glenn Moore; Doug Vandine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Overshooting of agricultural prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Agricultural Meteorology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nearly five weeks in China (MayJune 1981), the author visited scientific institutions and experiment stations engaged in agricultural meterology and climatology research and teaching. The facilities, studies, and research programs at each ...

Norman J. Rosenberg

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

232

Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Biomass Energy Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying &...

234

Prediction of forest canopy light interception using three-dimensional airborne LiDAR data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of light intercepted by forest canopies plays a crucial role in forest primary production. However, the photosynthetically active part of this intercepted solar radiation (IPAR) is difficult to measure using traditional ground-based techniques. ...

H. Lee; K. C. Slatton; B. E. Roth; W. P. Cropper

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Integration of agricultural and energy system models for biofuel assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a coupled modeling framework to capture the dynamic linkages between agricultural and energy markets that have been enhanced through the expansion of biofuel production, as well as the environmental impacts resulting from this expansion. ... Keywords: Agricultural markets, Biofuels, Energy systems, Environment, Modeling

A. Elobeid, S. Tokgoz, R. Dodder, T. Johnson, O. Kaplan, L. Kurkalova, S. Secchi

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Agency/Company /Organization International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://ictsd.org/downloads/201 Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China's Ag Impacts [1] Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Screenshot "The overall goal of this paper is to review and document the likely impacts of climate change on China's agricultural production, efforts

237

Sustainability the forest and paper industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

competitive with affordable products produced on a renewable basis. · provides millions of jobs and supports communities through the creation of thousands of small and large companies and millions of jobs, primarily into a renewable woody biomass. Once consumed and collected separately, many forest and paper products start a new

238

NPP Tropical Forest: Luquillo, Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Luquillo, Puerto Rico, 1963-1994 Luquillo, Puerto Rico, 1963-1994 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Lugo, A. E., F. Scatena, and C. F. Jordan. 1999. NPP Tropical Forest: Luquillo, Puerto Rico, 1963-1994. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of lower montane tropical forest has been determined at various study sites within the Luquillo Experimental Forest from 1963 to the present. The Luquillo Experimental Forest is situated in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico (18.32 N 65.82 W), about 35 km east-southeast of San Juan, and operates under the auspices of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Rio Pedras, Puerto Rico. Its total area is about 11,000

239

NPP Tropical Forest: Manaus, Brazil [Amazonas]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990 Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Piedade, M. T. F., and W. J. Junk. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and components of productivity for several types of tropical forest were determined for a number of study sites around Manaus, Brazil, from 1963 to the present. The study sites include several (0.2 ha) stands of terra firme (dry land) forest at " 64" to the northeast of Manaus, towards Itacoatiara (approximately 3.0 S 59.7 W, near the " Egler" Reserve), riverine forest in the 10 km x 10 km " Reserve" (2.95 S 59.95 W, 26 km

240

Action Plan Agricultural Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lines, and becoming an international benchmark in some of them. Incentives will be given to those (elimination of wastes genera- ted by society, decontamination of soils, clean agriculture, etc change, energy or water). Institutes and Centres that comprise the Area The Area comprises a total of 17

Fitze, Patrick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies Tad Patzek, Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering, UT Austin of Conclusions, cntd. The main energy crops I have looked at are maize, sugarcane, soybeans, and oil palms are witnessing a global move away from food to energy crops. Diverting more land to pure energy crops

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

242

Energy for agriculture. A computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

Energy may come from the sun or the earth or be the product of plant materials or agricultural wastes. Whatever its source, energy is indispensable to our way of life, beginning with the production, processing, and distribution of abundant, high quality food and fiber supplies. This specialized bibliography on the subject of energy for agriculture contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Originally issued by Michigan State University (MSU), it is being reprinted and distributed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The literature citations will be incorporated into AGRICOLA (Agricultural On-Line Access), the comprehensive bibliographic data base maintained by Technical Information Systems (TIS), a component of USDA's Science and Education Administration (SEA). The citations and the listing of research projects will be combined with other relevant references to provide a continuously updated source of information on energy programs in the agricultural field. No abstracts are included.

Stout, B.A.; Myers, C.A. (comps.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

245

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

246

Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service March 11, 2011 - 12:50pm Addthis USDA Forest Service energy champs John O'Connor, Bob Allen and Brian DeRousseau USDA Forest Service energy champs John O'Connor, Bob Allen and Brian DeRousseau April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs John O'Connor has worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service for more than 30 years. During that time, he has taken on many roles, including wastewater plant operator, forestry aid, utilities system operator and his current position as the utilities systems leader for the North Umpqua and Diamond Lake Ranger District offices of the of the Umpqua

247

NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Morrison, I. K., and N. W. Foster. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil were determined for a 30-year old pine forest in northern Ontario, Canada, and a detailed nutrient budget published. The 30-year old stand was compared with nearby 20-year old and 65-year old stands, all of which were growing on a glaciofluvial flat. Net primary productivity (NPP) was not directly estimated, but data exist on above-ground tree growth and litterfall.

248

Wind energy applications in agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstract are included for each of the papers presented concerning the use of wind turbines in agriculture.

Kluter, H.H.; Soderholm, L.H. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Health of Colorado's Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fort Collins, Colo., and Aerial Survey Coordinator, Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS. Patricia M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International, Fort Collins, Colo. Brian Howell, Aerial SurveyThe Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current

251

1 A SUMMARY OF THE GREENHOUSE GAS IMPLICATIONS OF FOREST CARBON STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the development of material-specific estimates of changes in forest carbon storage in EPAs Waste Reduction Model (WARM). It summarizes the approach used to estimate changes in forest carbon storage in managed forests resulting from source reduction and recycling of wood and paper products.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Indiana Kingman Research Station (Corn and Soybeans)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO42H2O) that is created when sulfur dioxide is removed from the exhaust gases during the combustion of coal for energy production. Research on FGDG has been conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. EPA, the United States Department of Agricultures Agricultural ...

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Economic Commission for Europe of the United Nations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Review, 2005-2006 provides general and statistical information on forest products markets and paperboard. Additional chapters discuss markets for wood energy, certified forest products, value-added wood information. Supplementary statistical tables may be found on the Market Information Service website within

254

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products July 25, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce America's reliance on imported oil and leverage our domestic energy supply, while also supporting rural economies, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy today announced a $41 million investment in 13 projects that will drive more efficient biofuels production and feedstock improvements. "If we want to develop affordable alternatives for oil and gasoline that

255

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to Drive Innovations in Biofuels and Biobased Products July 25, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce America's reliance on imported oil and leverage our domestic energy supply, while also supporting rural economies, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy today announced a $41 million investment in 13 projects that will drive more efficient biofuels production and feedstock improvements. "If we want to develop affordable alternatives for oil and gasoline that

256

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

258

The Forest Preserve District  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve District Forest Preserve District Nature Bulletin No. 109 March 29, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT Forest Preserve Districts, in Illinois, are separate municipal bodies governed by a Board of Forest Preserve Commissioners consisting of the elected county commissioners, as in Cook County, or by a committee of the county board of supervisors, as in 7 other counties. The legislative act which provided for such a district, if authorized by referendum vote of the people, became a law on July 1, 1914. Under that act, the commissioners are empowered to levy taxes, issue bonds, and to acquire lands containing forests "for the purpose of protecting and preserving the flora, fauna and scenic beauties.... and to restore, restock, protect and preserve the natural forests and said lands with their flora and fauna, as nearly as may be in their natural state and condition for the purpose of the education, pleasure and recreation of the public". A limit of 35,000 acres was set; later increased to 39,000.

259

Measuring and Monitoring Plans for Baseline Development and Estimation of Carbon Benefits for Change in Forest Management in Two Reg ions: Changing from Clearcut to Group Selection Harvests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Horticultural Society of South Australia and Horticultural Society of South Australia Jump to: navigation, search Name Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia Place South Australia, Australia Zip SA 5034 Sector Buildings, Solar Product South-Australia-based agricultural and horticultural society. The society is installing 1MW solar power systems on six separate buildings. References Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia is a company located in South Australia, Australia . References ↑ "Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

World Production, Markets, and Trade Reports | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

World Production, Markets, and Trade Reports Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities ...

262

Grazing Management in Broadleaf Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Gallandat 1996). Numerous reports also highlight damages caused by cattle grazing on trees and seedlings, and its ill effects on soil, water and environment (Bolt et al. 1978; Clary and Medin, 1990; and Kovalchik and Elmore, 1992). In Journal of Bhutan... in Broadleaf Forests 105 Rubia, Rubus and Solonum form the bulk of the cattle-feed. The number of Viola, Pilea, Elatostema and Aporosa are high but their contribution to herbage production for animal intake is very little as they are tiny...

Norbu, Lungten

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Forest Carbon Seminars SUTROFOR 2010-2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); · Forest Management (FM); · Fossil fuel substitution (Bioenergy / biofuels); · Reducing Emissions from / biofuels) · Increasing CO2 stock in off-site wood products (CHWP); · Reducing Emissions from Deforestation;Retailers/wholesalers/broker/aggregators (1/2) http://www.carbonneutral.com/ Retailers/wholesalers

Pettenella, Davide

264

Scotland's Forest Industries 1. Foreword 01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that used wood pellets for fuel, and a combined heat and power plant that used waste and wood fuels. After potential of wood products in Sweden, the technologies for harvesting are quite underdeveloped throughout, and touring Umeå's new CPH facility, which is powered primarily by forest residues. Topics of discussion

265

Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether we could get Colorado Springs to take some of it. The Mayor called the head of the electric plant Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Corrie Knapp Prepared for the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute

266

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years with the Forest Survey at the Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, he joined the Aerial Re, and is now a mathe- matical statistician. #12;C lassifying forest stand volumes on single aerial photographs is unique to the na- tionwide Forest Survey 1 -- stratifying volume on photographs is not. In fact, since

Standiford, Richard B.

267

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 638645 Forest bioenergy system to reduce the hazard of wildfires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fueling existing coal-fired power plants Forest Energy Products currently produces wood pellets for home Contract'' for utilization in small power plants (o3 MW), and a wood-heating pellet manufacturing facility its production. Forest Energy Products has produced wood pellets for wood stoves and other uses

268

AGRICULTURAL VOL. 26 NO. 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ray Miller, MAES U.P. forest properties manager, recently added forest biomass development coordinator in Webberville. He and his team turn canola oil into biodiesel in small batches and are now testing the biofuel process canola oil into biodiesel that can be used to power farm equipment, offering farmers a cash crop

Liu, Taosheng

269

Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

Scherr, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Vietnam in Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam Agency/Company /Organization Regional Community Forestry Training Center for Asia and the Pacific Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://recoftc.org/site/filead Country Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam[1] Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam Screenshot Summary "This report presents a synthesis of findings from the two surveys undertaken in Dak Lak (by Dak Lak Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD)) and Hoa Binh by VFU (See Annex A. for a list of members in the two research teams). It was prepared by Nguyen Quang Tan, Nguyen Ba

271

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info Start Date 2011 State Pennsylvania Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in

272

California Agriculture: Dimensions and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture 1959. California, Vol. 1, Part 48. ----------.of Population, California, Vol. 1, Part 6. ----------. 1990Vol. 12, No. 67, 1888. California Committee to Survey the

Siebert,, Jerome Editor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

274

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

275

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

276

Nicholas DeForest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nicholas DeForest Grid Integration Group Microgrids Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R1121 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-1139 (510) 486-6188...

277

NPP Tropical Forest: Khao Chong, Thailand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Khao Chong, Thailand, 1962-1965 Khao Chong, Thailand, 1962-1965 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Eye-level view of forest interior at Khao Chong (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Kira, T. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Khao Chong, Thailand, 1962-1965. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a tropical rain forest was determined at the Khao Chong study site, under the auspices of the Joint Thai-Japanese Biological Expedition to South-East Asia. Biomass increment within a 40 m x 40 m study area for all trees greater than 4.5 cm dbh (diameter at breast height, 130 cm) was monitored between

278

NPP Tropical Forest: Marafunga, Papua New Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971 Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Profile of tropical forest at Marafunga (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Edwards, P. J., and P. J. Grubb. 1999. NPP Tropical Forest: Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a lower montane secondary rain forest were determined in 1970-71 at Marafunga in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. The only component of net primary production (NPP) determined at Marafunga was litterfall, although

279

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Idaho Panhandle National Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Forests. The RNA features vegetation on dry cliffs that are embedded in mid-elevation moist western hemlock/western redcedar/grand fir forests. Immediately below the cliffs is riparian habitat that supports many wetland species, including a disjunct west coast moss, Ulota megalospora, whose first known occurrence in Idaho is in this RNA. This establishment report documents the boundaries of the RNA, the objectives for the RNA, its features, description of

United States; Forest Service; Priest River; Experimental Forest; Dennis E. Ferguson; Arthur C. Zack Ferguson; Dennis E. Zack

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European.E. Timo Makela, Director of Sustainable Development and Integration, Directorate General Environment

282

IMPROVING THE REPRESENTATION OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT IN LAND SURFACE MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the challenging task of increasing food production to keep up with growing population, growing per-capita consumption and the use of agricultural products as biofuels. Climate change, and the associated increases and energy. I estimated that the trend to longer-season corn cultivars over the last three decades can

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

283

Forest-based biomass supply curves for the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Nationwide county-level supply curves have been estimated for forest-based biomass in order to help evaluate their potential contributions to producing biofuels. This paper builds on the estimates of potential supply in the USDA / DOE Billion Ton supply (BTS) study. Forest biomass sources include logging residue, thinnings, other removals, unused mill residue, urban wood waste and conventional sourced wood (pulpwood size material). To make the estimates it is assumed that lower cost forest biomass will be supplied from integrated harvesting operations which also remove sawlogs and pulpwood. It is assumed that such removals can be estimated at the county level in two steps. First as a portion of recent estimates of logging residues and second by simulated thinning operations that use tops, branches and small trees for biomass. Supply from thinning dense forest stands is assumed to occur over 30 years as in the original Billion Ton Supply Study. Harvest and stumpage costs are estimated for each of these methods. Final supply estimates for each county assume supply that is half way between the two estimates. Preliminary forest and agricultural biomass supply estimates have been used to indicate that for a marginal cost of $44 per oven dry ton (odt) at forest roadside or farm gate forest and agricultural feedstocks could produce 20 billion gallons of advanced biofuels as called for under the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. Forests could provide about 40 million odt of biomass per year at about $44 per odt to produce 4 billion gallons and agricultural feedstocks could provide about 200 million odt and produce 20 billion gallons of biofuel.

Kenneth Skog; Jamie Barbour; Marilyn Buford; Dennis Dykstra; Patti Lebow; Pat Miles; Bob Perlack; Bryce Stokes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Stream Discharge in Tropical Headwater Catchments as a Result of Forest Clearing and Soil Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical Africa is affected by intense land-use change, particularly forest conversion to agricultural land. In this study, the stream discharge of four small headwater catchments located within an area of 6 km2 in western Kenya was examined for 2 ...

John W. Recha; Johannes Lehmann; M. Todd Walter; Alice Pell; Louis Verchot; Mark Johnson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions by over 90% in mills and homes. Professor Kaichang Li of OSU's Forest Research Laboratory worked, abundant soy- bean flour into a superior adhesive for bonding wood composite panels such as plywood

Tullos, Desiree

286

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In Search of the Rain Forest By Candace Slater (Candace Slater (Ed. ). In Search of the Rain Forest. Durham:

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

289

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development.

290

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Agriculture Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Energy and the National Development and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels This is the text of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two countries to share information and promote the production of biomass technologies and biofuel development. chinamou.pdf

291

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editor Janet White accepted the awards during the 2012 ACEa noxious weed. Three ACE awards for California AgricultureAgriculture team has won three awards from the Association

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

293

Sustainable Agriculture Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Sustainable Agriculture Network" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSustainableAgricultureNetwork&oldid312235" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations...

294

Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce 6.3 million for Biofuels Research July...

295

Renewable Agricultural Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Agricultural Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Agricultural Energy...

296

Solar Photovoltaics for Sustainable Agriculture and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have shown their potential in rural electrification projects around the world, especially concerning Solar Home Systems. With continuing price decreases of PV systems, other applications are becoming economically attractive and growing experience is gained with the use of PV in such areas as social and communal services, agriculture and other productive activities, which can have a significant impact on rural development. There is still a lack of information, however, on the potential and limitations of such PV applications. The main aim of this study is, therefore, to contribute to a better understanding of the potential impact and of the limitations of PV systems on sustainable agriculture and rural development (SARD), especially concerning income-generating activities. It is, in fact, of paramount importance to identify the potential contribution of PV to rural development in order to gain further financial and political commitment for PV projects and programmes and to design appropriate PV projects. One of the main lessons learnt through this study is that success of PV programmes is significantly enhanced when an integrated strategy is followed. Solar photovoltaic systems, through their flexibility in use, offer unique chances for the energy sector to provide packages of energy services to remote rural areas such as for rural health care, education, communication, agriculture, lighting and water supply. It is hoped that this document contributes to the generation of ideas and discussions among the different institutions involved in providing these services to rural areas and thereby to an "informed " decision on the PV technology option.

B. Van Campen; D. Guidi; G. Best

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices and economically impact the well-being of the agricultural sector. An U.S. agricultural sector model, a dynamic, nonlinear, mathematical program, determined the economic effects of using increased supplies of agricultural biomass for energy. The model incorporated production and use of potential biomass energy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and short rotation poplar. Also, the model introduced future biomass technologies, based on current research involving more productive biomass crops and more efficient conversion activities which produce ethanol and biomass electricity. The forced supply of new biomass crops, along with corn, involves several levels of energy production. This forced supply was based on projected ethanol demands and land capability for biomass production. The model determined the optimal mix of corn and energy crops to meet the biomass feedstock goals for energies. The resultant model appraises the effects of increasing biomass feedstocks for the years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results show that initially, fuel prices using biomass feedstocks may be as much as 50 % greater than equivalent fossil fuel supplied energy. But due to technology the price of biomass feedstocks decreases over time. The analysis predicts that the agricultural feedstock price and the price of fossil fuels may equalize between the years 201 0 and 2020. The forced production of agricultural energy crops changes cropping patterns and prices for conventional crops as well. The agricultural energy crops and corn receive a greater allocation of farm land to meet the forced biomass energy supplies. Most conventional crop prices rise and all biomass feedstock prices rise with increasing feedstock production. As a consequence, farmers receive increased profits. Consumers, however, experience a loss in well-being due to the higher cost of energy feedstock and food products. National well-being experiences a net loss.

Jerko, Christine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Business Management gives students a sound Management Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest

Watson, Craig A.

299

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

300

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

1974 FORESTER the world a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1974 FORESTER #12;#12;2 TREES make the world a better place in which to live! #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS . .... . .... . . . . . .....63 ADVERTISERS . . .. . . . . . .. ....... ....... .. 75 #12;FORESTER'S SALUTE TO DR. ERIC A. BOUROO. The Forester salutes Dean Bourdo for his accomplishments in advancing forestry at Michigan Tech, as a member

302

Special Issue: High Elevation Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources, Colorado State University William Ciesla, Aerial Survey Coordinator, U.S. Forest Service (retired material for homes. They also capture, purify, and release water for our use. Recent aerial surveys confirmSpecial Issue: High Elevation Forests 2008 The Health of Colorado's Forests Report #12;David A

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Agriculture USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Agriculture USA Clean Agriculture USA is a voluntary program that promotes the reduction of diesel exhaust emissions from agricultural equipment and vehicles by encouraging proper operations and maintenance by farmers, ranchers, and

304

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

305

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

CURRENT ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLISHED BY THE SWEDISH UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES SEPTEMBER 2006 AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); · Forest Management (FM); · Fossil fuel substitution (Bioenergy / biofuels); · Reducing Emissions from / biofuels) · Increasing CO2 stock in off-site wood products (CHWP); · Reducing Emissions from Deforestation;Retailers/wholesalers/broker/aggregators (1/2) http://www.carbonneutral.com/ Retailers/wholesalers

307

Agricultural scientists cut alcohol fuel costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists at the US Department of Agriculture have succeeded in lowering the cost of making alcohol from corn by 15 cents to $1.64 per gallon. The cost of drying distillers' solubles dropped because at the end of each cooking/fermenting/distilling run, the solubles are used for cooking, cooling and fermenting in the next run. One evaporation of solubles is required after 10 runs, so energy cost is cut from 17 cents to 1.7 cents. The protein by-products recovered, can be used as swine and poultry feeds and as human food.

Not Available

1981-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy and US agriculture: 1974 and 1978  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural production used approximately 8.5 billion gallons of liquified fuel in 1978. This was up from the nearly 8 billion gallons in 1974. Fuel oil and liquified petroleum (LP) gas usage remained relatively constant between 1974 and 1978. The most dramatic changes were in diesel and gasoline usage. Gasoline use dropped about 0.2 billion gallons and diesel fuel use increased almost 0.7 billion gallons, accounting for the net 0.5 billion gallon increase in liquid fuel usage. On farm business use of natural gas and electricity showed virtually no change between 1974 and 1978.

Torgerson, D.; Cooper, H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gas Production Tax (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax (Texas) Gas Production Tax (Texas) Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Local...

312

Population and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing the forest for the trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DB, Kremer A: Forest tree genomics: Growing resources andPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeingPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing

Eckert, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Autonomous farming: modelling and control of agricultural machinery in a unified framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant challenges faced by the farming industry, including a reduced labour workforce and a corporate style of farming. Such factors demand an increase in farming efficiency and productivity. This paper describes future autonomous farming ... Keywords: agricultural machinery, agricultural robotics, agronomy data, articulated farm vehicles, autonomous farming, autonomous robots, autonomous vehicles, intelligent systems, precision agriculture, precision farming, tracking control, trajectory tracking, uncertainty, vehicle control, vehicle modelling

Ray Eaton; Jay Katupitiya; Kheng Wah Siew; Blair Howarth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Role of Disturbance in Dry Tropical Forest Landscapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disturbance can be defined as 'any relatively discrete event in time that disrupts ecosystem, community, or population structure and changes resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment'. This definition requires that the spatial and temporal scales of the system and disturbance be determined. Disturbances are typically characterized by their size, spatial distribution, frequency or return time, predictability, and magnitude (which includes both intensity and severity). These disturbance attributes set the parameters for the suite of species, both plant and animal, that can persist within a given system. As such, an understanding of seasonally dry tropical forests in Asia requires an understanding of disturbance within the region. However, disturbances are relatively poorly understood in dry tropical forests, partly because of the weak seasonality in temperature and high tree species diversity of these forests relative to most forest systems of the world. There are about 1,048,700 km{sup 2} of dry tropical forests worldwide and that only 3% of this land is in conservation status. In other words, 97% of the world's seasonally dry tropical forest is at risk of human disturbance. About half of this forest occurs in South America, where most of the conservation lands are located. Satellite imagery based on MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data shows that only about 3.8% of the world's dry tropical forests are in Australia and South east Asia. The susceptibility of these forests to human disturbances is of great concern and is largely unstudied. Because natural disturbance regimes shape the ecosystem structure and are in many ways integral to these forest systems, it is critical to know how natural disturbance affects dry forest in order to understand the effects of human activities on these forests. Even basic information about disturbances in dry tropical forests is only recently available. Therefore this chapter brings together much of the available information from dry tropical forest throughout the world with the goal of developing an understanding of the role of disturbance in Asian dry forests. Most ecologists now recognize that disturbances, rather than being catastrophic agents of destruction, are a normal, perhaps even an integral, part of long-term system dynamics. The composition, structure, organization, and development and trophic dynamics of most forest systems are the products of disturbances. As an example, the forest composition for two disturbances in the Anaikatty Hills of Western Ghats were compared, where the low disturbance was from past logging followed by cutting and illicit felling and grazing and the high disturbance was due to human presence, past logging, and fuelwood collection. They found higher species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index for the low-disturbance forest (98 and 3.9, respectively) compared to the high-disturbance stand (45 and 2.71, respectively) as well as significant differences in mean basal area of trees, density of seedlings, number of species, density and diversity of shrubs, and number of species and diversity of herbs. Some ecological systems contain species that have evolved in response to disturbances. Adaptations typical of dry tropical forest plants are drought tolerance, seed dispersal mechanisms, and the ability to sprout subsequent to disturbance. In contrast, evidence was found that human disturbance in Kakamega Forest of western Kenya has significantly reduced allelic richness and heterozygosity, increased inbreeding, and slightly reduced gene flow in Prunus africana in the past century.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Long-Term Trends in Air Temperature Distribution and Extremes, Growing Degree?Days, and Spring and Fall Frosts for Climate Impact Assessments on Agricultural Practices in Nebraska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature influences agricultural practices and production outcomes, making detailed quantifications of temperature changes necessary for potential positive and negative effects on agricultural management practices to be exploited or ...

Kari E. Skaggs; Suat Irmak

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Long-run Implications of a Forest-based Carbon Sequestration Policy on the United States Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economic impacts of a government-funded, forest-based sequestration program were analyzed under two different payment schemes. The impacts were obtained by developing a regional, static CGE model built to accommodate a modified IMPLAN SAM for a determined region in the United States for 2008. The IMPLAN SAM was modified to accommodate the more conventional factors of production (labor, capital and land) and to account for land heterogeneity using the Major Land Resource Areas (MLRA). The regional aggregation considered included the Southern, Northeastern, Southwestern and Midwestern regions. The two policy scenarios considered consisted of two CO2-offset payment schemes: 1) the government compensates the generation of CO2-offsets only by the land converted to a carbon graveyard and 2) the government additionally compensates the CO2 offsets generated as a by-product by the existing commercial logging activity. By doing an analysis of the model with different budget magnitudes under the two scenarios, two different CO2-offset supply schedules were obtained with their respective CO2-offset price and quantity sets. For a budget allocation of $6.9 billion, approximately 1 billion metric tons of CO2 offsets (15% of U.S. 2008 total GHG emissions) were produced in the first scenario versus 0.8 billion metric tons (11% of U.S. 2008 GHG net emissions) in the second one. Fifty million acres were diverted out of agriculture and commercial forestry land to the carbon graveyard mainly in the Northern, Western and Central Great Plains in the first scenario. Twenty two million acres were diverted out of agricultural land to the carbon graveyard and commercial logging mainly in the Northern and Western Great Plains; and the Eastern and Western boundaries of the Appalachian Mountains in the second scenario. Both scenarios resulted in higher land and agricultural commodity prices, lower consumption of agricultural commodities by households, lower agricultural exports and higher imports. The payment structure of the second scenario benefited the commercial logging industry, increasing its production and exports, and decreasing its imports. The non-agricultural sectors mostly impacted by the two policy scenarios were the manufacturing, construction and government employment sectors.

Monge, Juan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $2.5 million (total credits allowed during five-year period) Program Info Start Date 01/01/2006 State Maryland Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount $0.0085/kWh ($0.005/kWh for co-fired electricity) Provider Maryland Energy Administration Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass resources include anaerobic digestion, landfill gas, wastewater-treatment gas, and non-hazardous segregated waste material derived from forest-related resources (excluding

318

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $2.5 million (total credits allowed during five-year period) Program Info Start Date 01/01/2006 State Maryland Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount $0.0085/kWh ($0.005/kWh for co-fired electricity) Provider Maryland Energy Administration Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass resources include anaerobic digestion, landfill gas, wastewater-treatment gas, and cellulosic material derived from forest-related resources (excluding old-growth timber and mill

319

Forest Lifeautumn | winter 2004 the forest!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and historical relationship with cassava has al- lowed them to develop a product used daily as a garnish on all

320

Definition and analysis of new agricultural farm energetic indicators using spatial OLAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural energy consumption is an important environmental and social issue. Several diagnoses have been proposed to define indicators for analyzing energy consumption at large scale of agricultural farm activities (year, farm, family of production, ... Keywords: energetic indicators, spatial OLAP, spatial data warehouses

Sandro Bimonte; Kamal Boulil; Jean-Pierre Chanet; Marilys Pradel

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

322

Energy for agriculture: a computerized information retrieval system  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 2613 citations to the literature for 1973 through May 1979. Some of the subjects covered include: accounting, agriculture, animal production, conservation, drying, fertilizer, food processing, greenhouses, home, international, irrigation, organic, solar, storage, tillage, and wind. Author and keyword indexes are included. (MHR)

Stout, B A; Myers, C A [comp.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of environmentally friendly and renewable energy sources, and 3) promoting industrial uses of agricultural products service). Renderers who filter out the solids and remove enough moisture to meet industry specifications soybean oil, yellow grease and fats recycled from the restaurant industry, and rendered animal fats

Radeloff, Volker C.

324

Agriculture - Sustainable biofuels Redux  

SciTech Connect

Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices - as will a 2007 legislative mandate for 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year by 2022. Similar directives elsewhere, e.g., the European Union's mandate that 10% of all transport fuel in Europe be from renewable sources by 2020, make this a global issue. The European Union's current reconsideration of this target places even more emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks (1). The need for knowledge- and science-based policy is urgent. Biofuel sustainability has environmental, economic, and social facets that all interconnect. Tradeoffs among them vary widely by types of fuels and where they are grown and, thus, need to be explicitly considered by using a framework that allows the outcomes of alternative systems to be consistently evaluated and compared. A cellulosic biofuels industry could have many positive social and environmental attributes, but it could also suffer from many of the sustainability issues that hobble grain-based biofuels, if not implemented the right way.

Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Doering, Otto C. [Purdue University; Hamburg, Steven P [Brown University; Melillo, Jerry M [ORNL; Wander, Michele M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this trend will continue, especially if the prices for fossil fuels continue to increase. Other direct, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological iomass energy is energy derived from organic matter of recent biological origin. Common forms of biomass

Lee, Dongwon

326

DIRECTORY OF FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES UPDATE FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particleboard Other: Composite Firelogs Cones Containers Cooking Wood Cooling Towers Crates Crossties Custom Particleboard Other: Composite Firelogs Cones Containers Cooking Wood Cooling Towers Crates Crossties Custom

327

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

328

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Program Office The Global Change Program Office (GCPO) serves as USDA's focal point for climate change issues and is responsible for coordinating activities with other Federal...

329

productivity by use of digital terrain analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

mechanisms for using biological sinks to offset fossil fuel emissions. It is necessary to elucidate the spatial vari- ability of forest productivity for developing

330

Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments. At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.

D.R. Coyle; J. Blake; K. Britton; M. Buford; R.G. Campbell; J. Cox; B. Cregg; D. Daniels; M. Jacobson; K. Johnsen; T. McDonald; K. McLeod; E. Nelson; D. Robison; R. Rummer; F. Sanchez; J. Stanturf; B. Stokes; C. Trettin; J. Tuskan; L. Wright; S. Wullschleger

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

NPP Boreal Forest: Jdras, Sweden  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low water storage capacity. Land use history in the region includes forest grazing, burning for crops and grazing, charcoal burning, tar-burning, logging and felling for paper...

332

Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

Standiford, Richard B.

333

Web-Based Forest Sector Communities as Drivers for Economic Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Web-Based Forest Sector Communities as Drivers for Economic Development Richard Vlosky MeetingForest Products Society Annual Meeting--June, 2005June, 2005 Outline · Overview of webCommon ties Social interactionSocial interaction What are Web-based Communities? Social network that uses

334

Food and Agriculture Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about onethird of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the

David Dawe; Of The United Nations; David Dawe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Selling Texas: an internship at the Texas Department of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"SELLING TEXAS," an overview of the Texas Department of Agriculture and its Marketing and Agribusiness Division, takes a look at how the organization promotes Texas as the best of the best, and considers what would make the campaign better. Enriched by abundant resources and industrious people, Texas is a modem worldwide leader in the export of many raw and processed agricultural products ... Your market is our market ... Supply, quality and diversity--that's Texas agriculture" (TDA, 1996a). The Texas Department of Agriculture's Marketing and Agribusiness Development Division has a unique opportunity to encourage businesses to locate in Texas (and thereby boost the Texas economy) as a result of the State's mystique. For instance, the number of brand names including "Texas" places it in the top five-among other U.S. states in terms of popularity as an advertising tool. "Savor all the flavors of Texas ... Bred to survive and flourish in the unique Texas climate ... The vast ranges and fertile soils of Texas produce the world's finest fibers..." (TDA, 1996c). The division's BLJY TEXAS cwnpaign also promotes Texas products to its residents with whom Texas pride and loyalty are an arguable second only to American patriotism. The BUY TEXAS initiative is an umbrella consumer marketing effort that "encourages ocnsumers to seek and purchase products grown, sewn, and processed in Texas" (Marketing and Agribusiness Development, 1996) including Taste of Texas foods, Vintage Texas wines, TEXAS GROAN plants, and Naturally TEXAS apparel.

Cross, Kelly D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy and Agricultural Sustainability Stephen Kaffka Department of Plant Sciences University of California, Davis & California Biomass Collaborative February 2008 #12;E x p e c t e d d u r 9 ) ---------Biomass era----------- --?????????? #12;By 2025, every source of energy

California at Davis, University of

340

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The effectiveness of forest carbon sequestration strategies with system-wide adjustments, Resources for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the effectiveness of tree planting and forest conservation strategies to increase the sink of carbon in global forests. Because forests are expected to sequester additional carbon without explicit human intervention, a baseline case is presented. The baseline predicts that forests will sequester an additional 17.9 Pg (10 15 grams) of carbon over the next 150 years, with nearly 95 % of this accruing to storage in marketed forest products. The paper then compares strategies which assume markets adjust to changes in future timber supply to an optimistic regional planner case in which no market adjustment occurs. The resulting predictions show that system wide market interactions may lead to substantial leakage of carbon from the forest system.

Brent Sohngen; Robert Mendelsohn; Roger Sedjo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Agricultural Management Decision Aids Driven by Real-Time Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a NASA-sponsored program entitled "Use of Earth and Space Science Data Over the Internet," scientists at the University of WisconsinMadison have developed a suite of products for agriculture that are based in satellite and conventional ...

George R. Diak; Martha C. Anderson; William L. Bland; John M. Norman; John M. Mecikalski; Robert M. Aune

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Europe. Current biofuel production in Brazil cannot meetthat expansion of biofuel production will expand defores-attributes to support biofuel production. The challenge is

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsone which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Before the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry By: Richard Newell, Administrator...

346

Mosquito Control in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 454-A April 22, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of...

347

Anaerobic Digesters in the Agricultural Sector: A Distributed Energy Resources Market Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory pressure is creating a need for agricultural animal operations to better handle animal organic waste products. One option available to dairies, hog farms, and other operations to address these challenges is to develop anaerobic digesters. A by-product of anaerobic digesters is a methane rich gas that can be used for electric power generation and/or meeting thermal needs. This report explores the market potential for anaerobic digesters in the agricultural sector, and the role that electric pow...

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Protected Areas Management is for students interested in managing lands for conservation and restoration purposes, usually on lands owned

Watson, Craig A.

349

Prepared as part of a Joint Venture Agreement with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is widespread recognition of the potential role forests can play in contributing to Green House Gas (GHG) reductions through carbon sequestration. Non-industrial private forests (NIPF) comprise a significant portion of forests in the U.S. (approximately 40%). Thus, it is crucial to assess the role that NIPF landowners can play in broader carbon sequestration efforts. Management actions that could increase carbon sequestration on NIPF lands include afforestation of agricultural land, longer rotations, intensive management, changing stocking density, or choosing alternative tree species. Because the resulting carbon sequestration benefits are to a large extent external to individual landowners, incentives such as carbon sequestration subsidies and carbon release taxes, carbon rental fees, or cost-sharing agreements, may be necessary to induce them to adopt these management options. A key question is how effective these different policies can be in eliciting the desired management choices by NIPF owners. In this report we assess the current state of knowledge about carbon sequestration in forests, including afforestation of agricultural land, sequestration in existing forests, and sequestration in NIPFs. We review the broader literature on the response of NIPF owners to incentives intended to promote specific forest management activities and to conserve habitat for endangered species,

Christian Langpap; Taeyoung Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009 Experiment Planning COPS Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan (PDF, 12.4M) Outreach COPS Backgrounder (PDF, 306K) Posters AMF Poster, German Vesion Researching Raindrops in the Black Forest News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany Main Site: 48° 32' 24.18" N, 08° 23' 48.72" E Altitude: 511.43 meters In March 2007, the third deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will take place in the Black Forest region of Germany, where scientists will study rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. ARM

351

Slide 1 of 19NCA -Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide 1 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Agriculture with a California Focus (NCA Draft Findings) Richard Grotjahn Professor of Climate Dynamics University of California, Davis 6 March 2013 #12;Slide 2 of 19NCA - Agriculture with a California Focus Authors of Chapter 6: Agriculture

Grotjahn, Richard

352

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Agricultural Podcasts Wind Powering America Podcasts Handout Wind Powering America provides this printable postcard as an outreach tool. Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produces a series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience. To subscribe, click on the PODCAST button below to open up the feed. Copy the URL from your browser's address bar into your podcast subscription software. For a list of podcast software, see Podcasting News' list of podcast software clients. Podcast Title: Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production

353

Radioactivity in consumer products  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research on Agricultural Information Service Platform Based on Information Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For exiting problems of information technology in agriculture, modern information technologies are used to make agricultural information service platform, which can integrate information resources, then agricultural network information service sharing ... Keywords: modern information technology, agricultural information, service platform

Zhang Yubin; Liu Zhiguo; Lin Lizhong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Interactions of woody biofuel feedstock production systems with water resources: Considerations for sustainability.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Water resources are important for the production of woody biofuel feedstocks. It is necessary to ensure that production systems do not adversely affect the quantity or quality of surface and ground water. The effects of woody biomass plantations on water resources are largely dependent on the prior land use and the management regime. Experience from both irrigated and non-irrigated systems has demonstrated that woody biofuel production systems do not impair water quality. Water quality actually improves from conversion of idle or degraded agricultural lands to woody biomass plantations. Site water balance may be altered by cultivation of woody biomass plantations relative to agricultural use, due to increases in evapostranspiration (ET) and storage. Incorporation of woody biomass production plantations within the landscape provides an opportunity to improve the quality of runoff water and soil conservation. Given the centrality of water resources to the sustainability of ecosystem services and other values derived, the experience with woody biofuels feedstock production systems is positive. Keywords. Short rotation woody crop, forest hydrology, water quality, hardwood plantation.

Trettin, Carl,C.; Amatya, Devendra; Coleman, Mark.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change and its mitigation is rapidly becoming an item of social concern. Climate change mitigation involves reduction of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations through emissions reduction and or sequestration enhancement (collectively called offsets). Many have asked how agriculture and forestry can participate in mitigation efforts. Given that over 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions arise from the energy sector, the role of agriculture and forestry depends critically on the costs of the offsets they can achieve in comparison with offset costs elsewhere in the economy. A number of researchers have examined the relative offset costs but have generally looked only at producer level costs. However there are also costs incurred when implementing, selling and conveying offset credits to a buyer. Also when commodities are involved like bioenergy feedstocks, the costs of readying these for use in implementing an offset strategy need to be reflected. This generally involves the broadly defined category of transaction costs. This dissertation examines the possible effects of transactions costs and storage costs for bioenergy commodities and how they affect the agriculture and forestry portfolio of mitigation strategies across a range of carbon dioxide equivalent prices. The model is used to simulate the effects with and without transactions and storage costs. Using an agriculture and forestry sector model called FASOMGHG, the dissertation finds that consideration of transactions and storage costs reduces the agricultural contribution total mitigation and changes the desirable portfolio of alternatives. In terms of the portfolio, transactions costs inclusion diminishes the desirability of soil sequestration and forest management while increasing the bioenergy and afforestation role. Storage costs diminish the bioenergy role and favor forest and sequestration items. The results of this study illustrate that transactions and storage costs are important considerations in policy and market design when addressing the reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in climate change related decision making.

Kim, Seong Woo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Floral Crops: Insects 5-19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In order to use a pesticide safely and effectively, the product label should be read thoroughly each time. Effective application of pesticides depends on: proper timing, favorable treatment conditions of temperature;HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 5-20 Floral Crops: Insects · Apply pesticides when foliage is dry

Liskiewicz, Maciej

358

Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team - A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) Eligibility...

359

Biogeography of Tropical Montane Cloud Forests. Part I: Remote Sensing of Cloud-Base Heights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-base heights over tropical montane cloud forests are determined using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud products and National Centers for Environmental Prediction global tropospheric final analysis (FNL) fields. ...

Ronald M. Welch; Salvi Asefi; Jian Zeng; Udaysankar S. Nair; Qingyuan Han; Robert O. Lawton; Deepak K. Ray; Vani Starry Manoharan

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Integration of remote sensing and ecosystem modelling techniques to estimate forest net carbon uptake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of forest gross primary production (GPP) can be obtained using a parametric model (C-Fix) that combines ground and remotely sensed data. A methodology is presented to convert these GPP estimates into values of net ecosystem exchange (NEE). ...

F. Maselli; M. Chiesi; L. Fibbi; M. Moriondo

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

On Farm Energy Efficiency & Production Grants | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Farm Energy Efficiency & Production Grants On Farm Energy Efficiency & Production Grants Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Savings For Other Heating & Cooling Commercial...

363

Wind Energy Production Tax Credit (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Tax Credit (Iowa) Wind Energy Production Tax Credit (Iowa) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic Utility Rural...

364

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Portal Forest Carbon Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forest Carbon Portal Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United States Agency for International Development, United Kingdom Department for International Development, Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.forestcarbonportal.com/ Forest Carbon Portal Screenshot References: FCP[1] "Ecosystem Marketplace's Forest Carbon Portal is a clearinghouse of information, feature stories, event listings, project details, 'how-to' guides, news, and market analysis on forest-based carbon sequestration projects. Deforestation and land-use change are responsible for 17% of the

366

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Quality Shale Gas Growth in Shale Gas Production In2000, shale gas production accounted for only 1.7% of U.S.driven by the boom in shale gas production will put downward

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

1CHILE'S FRONTIER FORESTS: CONSERVING A GLOBAL TREASURE FRONTIER FORESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Claes Hall Aracruz Celulose Sweden Sharon Haines International Paper United States Matti Karjula Stora; The World Bank, World Wildlife Fund; The Nature Conservancy; Aracruz Celulose; Forest and Paper Association

368

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultivar Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark b Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark c Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, USA d Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University, 2710 University Drive, Richland, WA 99354, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history:

371

Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-US Forest Service Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-US Forest Service Program AgencyCompany Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus...

372

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plantation, forest-to-acacia plantation, forest-to-rubber plantation, and forest-to-oil palm plantation. We determined annual equivalent values for each option, and the...

373

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulosic Ethanol Production Costs Other Other Feedstockand cellulosic ethanol. The role of feedstock providers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Laboratory Dynamos Professor Cary Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamos Professor Cary Forest University of Wisconsin - Madison Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a...

375

Dispersion Parameters over Forested Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique set of micrometeorological data was obtained during a 196770 multidisciplinary environmental field program in a tropical forest environment. The program was under the sponsorship of the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) and was ...

R. T. Pinker; J. Z. Holland

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Research and Development Center Agricultural Research and Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center Place Wooster, Ohio Zip OH 44691-4096 Product Its mission is to enhance the well-being of the people of Ohio, the nation and world through research on foods, agriculture, family and the environment. Coordinates 40.80566°, -81.934379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.80566,"lon":-81.934379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algae, agricultural and forest residues, and so on) and production processes (fermentation, trans-esterification, cellulosic hydrolysis/fermentation, gasification,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has been conducted under the auspices of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with individual utilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, and universities. This report describes work conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 20082012 as part of that effort. Two separate ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) This is the approved revision of this page, as...

382

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

383

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

384

Charles County - Agricultural Preservation Districts - Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type Siting & Permitting Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas...

385

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

386

Bioenergy development from agricultural waste on Northern ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary This project will convert agricultural waste, including food waste, rice straw, and other organic farm waste to bioethanol through bacterial ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loan Program Applicable Sector Agricultural Eligible Technologies Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category...

388

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a short-term or long-term ability to stimulate agriculture development and diversification in rural, urban,...

389

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with potential applications in such energy-related technologies such as production of biofuels and reduction of carbon dioxide. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures...

390

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with potential applications in such energy-related technologies such as production of biofuels and reduction of carbon dioxide. LANL Green Building Going green earns Laboratory...

391

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. 16 no. 3 Jan/Feb 2013 Shale Gas Boom: Implications forRegulation and Transboundary Water Quality Shale Gas Growthin Shale Gas Production In 2000, shale gas production

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. 16 no. 3 Jan/Feb 2013 Shale Gas Boom: Implications forWaste Regulation and Transboundary Water Quality Shale GasGrowth in Shale Gas Production In 2000, shale gas production

Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chain to provide more access to biofuel products. Ide-R&D will result in new biofuel products that can be mixedthe period of relatively low biofuel prices faced financial

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bed Solids Waste Gasifier," Forest Products Journal, Vol.BASIS IV. SUMMARY APPENDIX A - Gasifier Liquefaction Design1 - Modified Lurgi Gasifier with Liquefaction Reactor 2 -

Figueroa, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Carrot Production Texas ranks 5th in U.S. production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carrot Production · Texas ranks 5th in U.S. production. · 9,400 acres are grown in Texas; annual or alternativesfordichloropropeneandoxamylfornematodecontrol. Carrots in Texas Crop Brief on Production, Pests, & Pesticides TheAgricultureProgram The Texas A by The Agriculture Program of the Texas A&M University System on critical pest problems and pesticide needs for Texas

Wilkins, Neal

396

List of Agricultural Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Equipment Incentives Agricultural Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 90 Agricultural Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 90) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Boilers Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Dishwasher Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) State Rebate Program Vermont Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Custom/Others pending approval Lighting

397

Forest Service Special Use Authorization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Service Special Use Authorization Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Forest Service Special Use Authorization Details...

398

Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

400

Agricultural Trade Liberalization and Poverty in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural research centers that receive principal funding from governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations, most of which are members of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS AND PARTNERS IFPRIs research, capacity strengthening, and communications work is made possible by its financial contributors and partners. IFPRI gratefully acknowledges generous unrestricted funding from Australia,

Joachim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho; Joaquim Bento; Souza Ferreira Filho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Forest Resources and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of areas, such as wood energy and biomass initiatives, field experiments, monitoring and surveys, software many products, each providing income to the grower and supporting jobs in both the local and national

402

Forest Service Research Note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production, seed dispersal germination in. Old- Growth Redwood Cut and Uncut Stands Kenneth N. Boe After--cones hard to find in crown; (c) many--cones scattered throughout crown; (d) abundant--noticeably heavy crop

Standiford, Richard B.

403

International Forest Policy Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Forest Policy Database International Forest Policy Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: International Forest Policy Database Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.etfrn.org/etfrn/topics/policy/index.html International Forest Policy Database Screenshot References: GTZ International Forest Policy Database[1] Overview "This topic page is being developed in cooperation with GTZ-IWP, the International Forest Policy project of the German organisation for international cooperation. GTZ-IWP has contributed considerably to the ETFRN NEWS 41/42 on national forest programmes. During this cooperation both GTZ and ETFRN identified a need for a central point of access to information on international forest

404

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

405

Identifying the requirements of an agricultural robot for sensing and adjusting soil nutrient and pH levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nutrient requirements of soils using in agriculture for crop production were examined to determine the needs of a robotic system used to detect and regulate the nutrition levels of the soil. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and ...

Teague, Nicole (Nicole Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ON THE MOVE! The New Jersey Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health and Animal Health Di-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories (NJPHEAL) facility, located in Ewing, New residues. All Division Staff will now be located at the NJPHEAL. The Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory provides diagnostic services to support disease control programs, health management, and productivity

Delgado, Mauricio

407

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Europe. It is producing biodiesel from veg- etable oil, fromsuch as Jatropha, for biodiesel. Some industrial forestsfor the production of biodiesel. The econom- ics of algae as

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, sugarbeets, alfalfa, papaya,processed products such as canola oil, produced with GMing. In contrast, the same canola oil would have to bear a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

NPP Tropical Forest: Darien, Panama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darien, Panama, 1967-1968 Darien, Panama, 1967-1968 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Tropical moist forest near Darien (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Golley, F. B. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Darien, Panama, 1967-1968. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a transitional moist/dry tropical forest were determined in 1967-68 at Darien Province, Panama. NPP was not estimated. Situated about 160 km ESE of Panama City, close to the town of Santa Fe, the Darien study site consisted of two plots, about 8 km apart, one of

411

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil extraction in Ecuador, the appropriation and industrialization of herbal medicine in the forests of Belize, a critical history

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

College of Agriculture ASC Animal Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by departmental personnel include: Our scientific history" ­ Kelly Allred "Treated vs untreated understory forest was recognized for his 30 years of implementing sheep and wool educational programs throughout Montana. Rodney

Kim, Mi-Ok

413

SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 02 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 2, July ­ September 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Board Dr. Urs Geiser Zurich University, Switzerland Dr. Mamoona Wali Muhammad Pakistan Forest Institute

Richner, Heinz

414

SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest iii Vol. 1, No. 1, April ­ June 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 ISBN: 2218-8045 April ­ June 2010 Contents P. No Introductions: Pakistan

Richner, Heinz

415

U.S. Agriculture: structure and change from 1982 to 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, U.S. agriculture is viewed as a multidimensional phenomenon varying along three distinct axes of measurement: corporate-commercial agriculture, fanning-firm agriculture, and small-farm agriculture. Data were obtained from the U.S. Census of Agriculture for the years 1982 to 1992, and transformed to improve symmetry. Multiple-indicators of the structure of agriculture were used to replicate and extend the previous work of Wimberley (I 987). Oblique principal-axis factor analysis produced pattern matrices consistent with expected dimensional structures. Factor-scores were used to estimate scales that had high reliabilities (omega coefficients > .9) and strong inter-temporal correlations for each scale across years were observed. Although the content of each scale was consistent across the three years, structural shifts in U.S. agristructure occur-red at the county level during the 1980s. Because farming is also affected by technological and environmental elements, the relationships between farm program participation, production systems, agrochemical inputs, and geographic regions with agristructure were investigated. Bivariate correlations indicated that to accurately measure agristructure, farm program participation, production systems, agrochemical inputs, and regional variations should be considered in future studies.

Wang, Ge

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 million  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 million for Biofuels Research Energy Secretary Chu, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announce $6.3 million for Biofuels Research July 22, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today the joint selection of awards of up to $6.3 million towards fundamental genomics-enabled research leading to the improved use of plant feedstocks for biofuel production. The seven projects announced today follow the green jobs and renewable energy Rural Tour event hosted last weekend by the two cabinet Secretaries in Virginia. These investments will further the Obama Administration's efforts to broaden the nation's energy portfolio

417

U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative April 15, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, April 15, 2011- To support President Obama's goal of reducing America's oil imports by one-third by 2025, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) today jointly announced up to $30 million over three to four years that will support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will help create a diverse group of economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of

418

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

419

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

420

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California) Partial Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Agricultural Solar Power Facilities (California)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

422

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and...

423

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IDB-Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

424

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

425

Developer Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in...

426

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

427

Charles County- Agricultural Preservation Districts- Renewable Generation Allowed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Charles County provides that producing energy "from solar, wind, biomass, and farm waste and residue crops" is a permitted agricultural use in areas zoned as Agricultural Preservation Districts.

428

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency...

429

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $10,000 per account, not to exceed 20% of cost Scroll Refrigeration Compressors: $500 Variable Speed/Frequency Drive Motor: $500 Variable Speed Compressed Air Motor: $500 Energy Audit: One in Five Years Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free General Lighting: $1 - $15/unit LED Lamps: $2/bulb

430

SOLERAS: Rural/agricultural project technical overview  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Rural and Agricultural Solar Applications Projects is to enhance the quality of rural life in hot, arid climates by providing systems that use renewable or regenerable energy sources for domestic or communal, agricultural, and local industrial applications. These systems must provide domestic services such as hot water, heat for cooking, and electric power for lighting, communications, and refrigeration. In addition, agricultural applications such as water desalination, irrigation pumping, and heat and electricity for crop or food processing and local industrial functions, can become the basis for improving the villagers' standard of living. 29 refs., 82 figs., 23 tabs.

Huraib, F.S.; Adcock, J.P.; Knect, R.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

NPP Boreal Forest: Canal Flats, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canal Flats, Canada, 1984 Canal Flats, Canada, 1984 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Comeau, P. G., and J. P. Kimmins. 1999. NPP Boreal Forest: Canal Flats, Canada, 1984. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Above and below-ground biomass and productivity of four lodgepole pine stands (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) were determined near Canal Flats, Canada, during the 1984 growing season. Two stands growing on xeric sites and two stands growing on mesic sites were studied to determine the influence of soil water content on resource allocation to above-ground versus below-ground plant components. The stands were 70-78 years old, unmanaged, and had regenerated naturally following wildfire.

433

Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

Reilly, John M.

434

* Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 in the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds. * Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division division

435

Impacts of Global Change on Diseases of Agricultural Crops and Forest Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5502, USA. 5 Natural Resources on Climate Change projects rising levels of greenhouse gas and global temperature. The well-known dependence on pathogens have recently been shown in literature linking pathogen abundance to atmospheric composition. Past

Garrett, Karen A.

436

Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 151 (2011) 6069 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Petersham, MA. The author gratefully acknowledges the expert assistance of several people there, including

Chen, Jiquan

437

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thanproduce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationin global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008, associated

Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have encouraged the expansion of corn-based production andis in doubt. At this time, corn ethanol dominates the U.S.mass ethanol, relative to corn ethanol produced from the

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2011. So why did the corn-ethanol lobby let it expireUnder the expanded RFS, corn ethanol now comprises 10% ofwas used in U.S. corn- ethanol production. One-third of this

Smith, Aaron; Zilberman, David; Saitone, Tina; Sexton, Richard J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to biofuels. Raw materials, transformation processes Biodiesel production technologies plant: EHN (Sangüesa) Efficiency determination (I) Biofuels Management: prevention and protection: Combustion tests (continuation) Exam module 2 Module Title Term Titel Liquid Biofuels Summer

Noble, James S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

region, owners of lands mined for coal are increasingly interested in assuring that productive for- estsForestryReclamationApproach The Forestry Reclamation Approach (FRA) is a method for reclaiming coal-mined land to forest under SMCRA (see by coal-mining firms in past years to establish both hayland/pasture and unmanaged for- est postmining

Liskiewicz, Maciej

442

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to advances in reclamation science, Virginia coal mining operations can establish high-value, productive Success on Coal Surface Mines, describes grading practices that are recommended for use in reforestation Grading to Enhance Reforestation Success on Coal Surface Mines. Forest Reclamation Advisory No. 4

Liskiewicz, Maciej

443

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal mining became the region's economic mainstay. After the virgin timber cut, the Appalachian forest and good plant- ing stock. The FRA method has been used successfully by many coal-mining firms productivity of land mined for coal. Thus, mining firms that can dem- onstrate the capability to restore

Liskiewicz, Maciej

444

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

445

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Wisconsin Arlington Research Station Fields 295 and 27 (Alfalfa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field research in Wisconsin as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) Agricultural Network. The objective of this study, conducted during 2009-2010, was to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG as a soil amendment to improve alfalfa production. FGDG was compared to a commercially available gypsum product (C-GYP) widely sold in the U.S. Midwest and other areas. A study was established in two fields (Field 295 in 2009/2010 and Field 27 in 2010) at ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: North Dakota Sites 3, 4, and 5 (Canola)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a very pure form of gypsum that is a by-product from the combustion of coal for energy production. This report describes 2008-2009 work to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG at three sites near Langdon, North Dakota. This work was part of a national research network evaluating beneficial uses of FGDG in agriculture, in this case, fertilization of dryland canola by FGDG. The objectives of this research were to 1) determine the influence of FGD...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Environmental effects of growing short-rotation woody crops on former agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in the Southeast have been addressing the environmental effects of converting agricultural lands to biomass crop production since 1994. Erosion, surface water quality and quantity and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops are being compared. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes and crop productivity are also being monitored at the three sites. Maximum sediment losses occurred in the spring and fall. Losses were greater from sweetgum planted without a cover crop than with a cover crop. Nutrient losses of N and P in runoff and subsurface water occurred primarily after spring fertilizer application.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Index Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations Foundation Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.forestcarbonindex.org/ Web Application Link: www.forestcarbonindex.org/maps.html Cost: Free References: Forest Carbon Index [1] The Forest Carbon Index (FCI) compiles and displays global data relating to biological, economic, governance, investment, and market readiness conditions for every forest and country in the world, revealing the best places and countries for forest carbon investments. Please use this site to

449

Oil in biomass: a step-change for bioenergy production?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help meet the rapidly growing demand for biofuels, scientists and policy makers envision that a variety of agricultural, municipal, and forest-derived feedstocks will be used to produce second-generation biofuels. Oil in biomass: a step-change for bio

450

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

451

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Empire, Nevada Coordinates 40.5757352°, -119.34213° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

452

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Outreach Articles  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Articles Outreach Articles Electricity from the Wind series of articles was designed to support agricultural outreach efforts. The articles explore wind energy issues as they relate to the rural/agricultural community. These articles are available to media outlets in your state, especially agricultural media outlets. The articles may also be used as handouts when attending agricultural group meetings. Electricity from the Wind: A New Lesson for Schools Electricity from the Wind: What Landowners Should Know Electricity from the Wind: The New Cash Crop Electricity from the Wind: Wind Energy and the Natural Gas Crisis Electricity from the Wind: Economic Development for Rural Communities Electricity from the Wind: USDA Farm Bill Section 9006 Provides Funding for Farm and Ranch Wind Projects

453

28 / AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 2006-2007 AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Castillo, Steven P.

454

Agricultural Research/October 19962 6 Agricultural Pests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are controlled effectively with minimal impact on people, nontarget species, and the environment. Pesticide Crop Production Recordkeeping System PPP-19 Annual Field Records PPP-20 Pesticides & Personal Safety Pesticide Programs JOE BECOVITZ Pesticide Investigator Office of the Indiana State Chemist ARLENE BLESSING

Liskiewicz, Maciej

455

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation and is chemically similar to mined gypsum. These gypsums, used as beneficial agricultural amendments, were evaluated for their effects on earthworm populations and trace element concentrations in soils and earthworms at four field sites (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). These sites are part of a network study on agricultural uses of FGD gypsum conducted at sites across the United States. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Global carbon impacts of using forest harvest residues for district heating in Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forests in Vermont are selectively logged periodically to generate wood products and useful energy. Carbon remains stored in the wood products during their lifetime and in fossil fuel displaced by using these products in place of energy-intensive products. Additional carbon is sequestered by new forest growth, and the forest inventory is sustained using this procedure. A significant portion of the harvest residue can be used as biofuel in central plants to generate electricity and thermal energy, which also displaces the use of fossil fuels. The impact of this action on the global carbon balance was analyzed using a model derived from the Graz/Oak Ridge Carbon Accounting Model (GORCAM). The analysis showed that when forests are harvested only to manufacture wood products, more than 100 years are required to match the sequestered carbon present if the forest is left undisturbed. If part of the harvest residue is collected and used as biofuel in place of oil or natural gas, it is possible to reduce this time to about 90 years, but it is usually longer. Given that harvesting the forest for products will continue, carbon emission benefits relative to this practice can start within 10 to 70 years if part of the harvest residue is used as biofuel. This time is usually higher for electric generation plants, but it can be reduced substantially by converting to cogeneration operation. Cogeneration makes possible a ratio of carbon emission reduction for district heating to carbon emission increase for electricity generation in the range of 3 to 5. Additional sequestering benefits can be realized by using discarded wood products as biofuels.

McLain, H.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Evaluation of different agricultural biomass for bioethanol production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In our study, five different bioenergy crops: wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), forage sorghum stover (sorghum bicolor), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), miscanthus (Miscanthus giganteus) and sweet sorghum (more)

Bansal, Sunil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Expanded production of labor-intensive crops increases agricultural employment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialist, Labor Market Information Division, Cali- forniaResearch Manager, Labor Market Information Di- vision, EDD.CES). Labor Market Information Division, Sacramento, CA.

Khan, Akhtar; Martin, Philip; Hardiman, Phil

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Pretreaments of Chinese Agricultural residues to increase biogas production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Development of biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas is one approach to utilize straw comprehensively. However, high lignin contents of lignocellulosic materials results (more)

Wang, Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

ORNL DAAC NPP TEMPERATE FOREST: GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, TENNESSEE, U.S.A.,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEMPERATE FOREST: GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, TENNESSEE, U.S.A., 1978-1992 TEMPERATE FOREST: GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, TENNESSEE, U.S.A., 1978-1992 Get Data Summary: Productivity of old, unlogged stands of southern Appalachian cove forest was studied and compared to young stands. Tree growth increments and allometric relationships were the basis for estimation of net primary production (NPP). Measurements of tree diameter at 1.37 m above ground were made at the beginning the study. Radial increment cores were taken from a subset of trees. Above-ground net primary production (ANPP) was estimated using regional species-specific allometric relationships for tree mass. Estimation procedures were outlined by Busing et al. (1993). Old stands of mixed deciduous (and mixed deciduous-Tsuga) were selected for their gentle terrain, accessibility and history of study. From 1988 to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "agricultural products forest" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Agency/Company /Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Training materials Website: mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/10568/167/1/Innovation_System_Agric_LM.pdf Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Screenshot References: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module[1] Preface "Sustained agricultural growth requires, among others, increased

462

EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Agriculture Sector the Agriculture Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name EC-LEDS in the Agriculture Sector Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Partner Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Kenya, Mexico, Vietnam Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, South-Eastern Asia References Land Use Assessment Toolkit - Agriculture Resources[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include strengthening implementation of

463

NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Rencz, A. N., and A. N. D. Auclair. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada, 1974. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of a boreal ecosystem (subarctic lichen woodland) was determined at Schefferville, Canada, during the 1974 growing season. The main objective was to describe a "typical" lichen woodland, a vegetation type found in the transitional zone between boreal forest and tundra on well-drained, nutrient-poor podzolic soils. Such areas are occupied sparsely by black spruce trees (Picea mariana) with low growth

464

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications References: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research[1] "IISD's work related to climate change and agriculture has been supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada." It include the two following publications: Expanding Agriculture's Role in a Post-2012 Regime (PDF - 712 kb) and Climate Change Mitigation through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors References ↑ "IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research"

465

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California and U S AgriculturalCalifornia and U.S. Agricultural Trade Prospects with a KORUS Trade Agreement December 15, 2010 Daniel A. Sumner University of California Agricultural Issues Center d th UC D i · Korea has been a large and diversified export destination for US and California agriculture · With more

Hammock, Bruce D.

466

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

467

Governance of Forests Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests Initiative Forests Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Governance of Forests Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Resources Institute Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.wri.org/project/gov Country Brazil, Indonesia UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References WRI-Forests [1] Overview "The Governance of Forests Initiative (GFI) is a collaboration between WRI, the Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazonia (IMAZON), and the Instituto Centro de Vida (ICV) to develop a framework of indicators for assessing and improving governance in the forest sector, as an essential precursor to debating whether and how to unleash market forces to

468

NPP Tropical Forest: San Carlos De Rio Negro, Venezuela  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

San Carlos De Rio Negro, Venezuela, 1975-1984 San Carlos De Rio Negro, Venezuela, 1975-1984 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Cutting an experimental plot at San Carlos (click on the photo to view a series of images and a diagram of this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Jordan, C. F., E. Cuevas, and E. Medina. 1999. NPP Tropical Forest: San Carlos de Rio Negro, Venezuela, 1975-1984. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of tropical forest was determined for a number of vegetation-soil associations at the San Carlos de Rio Negro study site, under the auspices of an international UNESCO Man and the Biosphere (MAB) project. The San Carlos study site (1.93 N 67.05 W) is situated 4 km east of the

469

APPENDIX C Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Protect Forests From Harm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on insect and disease activity in the state. Because the current aerial survey is conducted by different1 APPENDIX C ­ Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Gaps Protect Forests From Harm o. Need updated LANDFIRE data on the current condition of Colorado's lodgepole pine forests. Need a fuel

470

Machine Learning Benchmarks and Random Forest Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Machine Learning Benchmarks and Random Forest Regressionerror on a suite of benchmark datasets. As the basethe Machine Learning Benchmark Problems package; see http://

Segal, Mark R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Discriminant Random Forest (DRF) Classification Methodology  

Jupiter Laser Facility. ... State-of-the-art methodologies that perform this type of classification include Support Vector Machines, Neural Networks, and Random Forest.

472

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding of Climate Change Daniel Hayes, shown here outside of Nome, Alaska, traveled to the Arctic in June to study climate...

473

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Name Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.forestcarbonpartner Country Argentina, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam

474

Essays on Agricultural Adaptation to Climate Change and Ethanol Market Integration in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate factors like precipitation and temperature, being closely intertwined with agriculture, make a changing climate a big concern for the entire human race and its basic survival. Adaptation to climate is a long-running characteristic of agriculture evidenced by the varying types and forms of agricultural enterprises associated with differing climatic conditions. Nevertheless climate change poses a substantial, additional adaptation challenge for agriculture. Mitigation encompasses efforts to reduce the current and future extent of climate change. Biofuels production, for instance, expands agricultures role in climate change mitigation. This dissertation encompasses adaptation and mitigation strategies as a response to climate change in the U.S. by examining comprehensively scientific findings on agricultural adaptation to climate change; developing information on the costs and benefits of select adaptations to examine what adaptations are most desirable, for which society can further devote its resources; and studying how ethanol prices are interrelated across, and transmitted within the U.S., and the markets that play an important role in these dynamics. Quantitative analysis using the Forestry and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM) shows adaptation to be highly beneficial to agriculture. On-farm varietal and other adaptations contributions outweigh a mix shift northwards significantly, implying progressive technical change and significant returns to adaptation research and investment focused on farm management and varietal adaptations could be quite beneficial over time. Northward shift of corn-acre weighted centroids observed indicates that substantial production potential may shift across regions with the possibility of less production in the South, and more in the North, and thereby, potential redistribution of income. Time series techniques employed to study ethanol price dynamics show that the markets studied are co-integrated and strongly related, with the observable high levels of interaction between all nine cities. Information is transmitted rapidly between these markets. Price seems to be discovered (where shocks originate from) in regions of high demand and perhaps shortages, like Los Angeles and Chicago (metropolitan population centers). The Maximum Likelihood approach following Spiller and Huangs model however shows cities may not belong to the same economic market and the possibility of arbitrage does not exist between all markets.

Aisabokhae, Ruth 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

476

Purdue Farm Energy Production & Innovation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and engineering approaches to convert wind, solar, and agricultural resources/wastes into energy ! Utilize broad " Environmental impact of alternative energy modules such as wind turbines on wildlife and domestic animals, wastePurdue Farm Energy Production & Innovation Center Sonny Ramaswamy Director of Agricultural Research

477

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Development Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.cgdev.org/section/initiatives/_active/forestmonitoringforactionfor Cost: Free Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Screenshot References: FORMA[1] "Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) uses freely available satellite data to generate rapidly updated online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions by paying to keep forests intact."

478

EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries, Combustors 1,2, and 3, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, Georgia EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest...

479

Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before...

480

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

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481

EIS-0442: Forest Service Reauthorization of Transmission Lines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah and Nebraska for Routine Maintenance Practices including Changes in Vegetation Management EIS-0442: Forest Service Reauthorization of Transmission Lines on Forest Service...

482

Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

483

APPROACHES TO SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT IN PARCELIZED LANDSCAPES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The holistic, landscape-based approach of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) in the United States emphasizes the importance of addressing three components of forest management: ecology, community, (more)

Baumflek, Michelle