Sample records for agricultural products forest

  1. Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

  2. Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets of possible deleterious effects of climate change on agricultural and forest productivity has been raised

  3. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Implications and challenges of decentralized China's collective forest management Heng Sok (National Forest:00-10:30 Moderator: Heng Sok (Forestry Administration, Cambodia) Session: Forests and the market for timber products

  4. Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

  5. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM): Model structure and policy applications. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.M.; Alig, R.J.; Callaway, J.M.; McCarl, B.A.; Winnett, S.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest and Agricultural Sector Opimization Model (FASOM) is a dynamic, nonlinear programming model of the forest and agricultural sectors in the United States. The FASOM model initially was developed to evaluate welfare and market impacts of alternative policies for sequestering carbon in trees but also has been applied to a wider range of forest and agricultural sector policy scenarios. The authors describe the model structure and give selected examples of policy applications. A summary of the data sources, input data file format, and the methods used to develop the input data files also are provided.

  6. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's FinancialForest Products Forest Products

  7. United States Department of Agriculture / Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    United States Department of Agriculture / Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Research Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 8 p Sciences Laboratory of the Rocky Mountain Research Station (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service

  8. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use and burning of agricultural waste in the developingsa- vanna, forest, agricultural waste, and peat fires toex- tratropics, 15%), agricultural waste burning (3%), and

  9. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  10. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  11. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader. Forest Products Case Studies Advanced Quality Control System for the Thermomechanical Pulping Process Improves Quality and Reduces...

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    versions of the calculation tools are available at the NCASI web site. Estimating Product Sequestration AF&PA, again working with the International Council of Forest and Paper...

  13. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  14. Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile Economic Sustainability and Ecological and Comparisons · Production and Processing · Sales and Markets · Economic and Ecological Contributions Sawmills · 1/4 for Roundwood (post and pole, vigas, house logs), furniture, excelsior etc. ­ Sawmill

  15. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to...

  16. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This...

  17. UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

  18. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest...

  19. Stennis Space Center Use of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center Prototypical Early Warning System (EWS) results ­ Posting of NRT results on-line for use by USFS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center

  20. Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fixen, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

  1. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesiaforest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997–2009) G. R. vanin 2004: Importance of peat burn- ing and pyroconvective

  2. U.S. Agricultural Production Affected by Mexican Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Agricultural Production Affected by Mexican Tariffs CNAS Issue Brief 2011-02 March 17, 2011 was eliminated. Mexico retaliated on March 18, 2009 by imposing tariffs on selected U.S. agricultural exports 17, 2010, with agricultural goods representing 71 percent of all products under tariff. Tariffs

  3. 10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 Wood Pellets Out of 80.9 MGT of wood expected to be consumed by viable projects, wood pellet production is expected to hold the largest share at 34.2 MGT, most10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  4. 31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the materials from the forests through the supply chain. Brian Condon, the wood procurement manager for Bio pointed out they have foresters working every day making sure the biomass plant is maintaining31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  5. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturing industry developed to track certified forest products from the forest through the supply chain management (Ozanne and Vlosky 1997). In addition to reducing negative perceptions by consumers in the wood manufacturing industry developed to verify certified forest products. CoC works as a control

  6. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest, 22 June 2011 Ed.Pepke@efi.int 1 Global forest products market trends by Dr. Ed Pepke Senior Timber European Forest Institute Contents I. Introduction II. Global market drivers III. Global trade trends IV

  7. 11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply. Biomass Power Secure is ensuring their wood supply is of high quality and environmentally the biomass is #12;11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  8. 26 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Rothschild Biomass Plant Only Getting 10 Percent of Fuel from Forest26 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR 10 percent of its fuel from logging waste, which originally was supposed to supply nearly all

  9. 2 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; and continues to be one of the top ten manufacturing sectors in the state. The report analyzes data collected products such as lumber, structural panels, paper and pulp. Manufacturing of secondary forest products like and visit TexasForestInfo.com for additional information on economic impacts of the Texas forest sector

  10. Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-extraction–kraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called “near neutral” pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 °C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the “near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the “near-neutral” green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

  11. agriculture forest service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agricultural Extension Service--Bexar County Offices, Bexar County Master Gardeners, San Antonio Water Systems and Texas A&M University Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  12. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 7690 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack covariance flux sites across China, and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and water useDirect Agricultural and Forest Meteorology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agrformet Carbon fluxes

  13. 3 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP AN OUTDOOR LIFE Green is undaunted. The youngest of seven children, he scored a 4 / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP Idaho lumberjack clings to family business as jobs fade America once had/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP When he shows up

  14. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  15. Analysis of the Forest Products Cluster in Indiana: A Framework for Improving Productivity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of the Forest Products Cluster in Indiana: A Framework for Improving Productivity Graduate Students: Silas Tora, FNR, M.S. Goals: · Suggest ways in which the forest products industry can Clustering of the Value - Added Forest Products Manufacturing industry in Indiana. (In Progress). Silas Tora

  16. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pulppaperprofile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment...

  17. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership Logging Accidents · by · Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab · Albert Lefort Agreement · 1998 & 1999 Accident Reports · 25 injuries reported · 185 loggers signed up · 8 deaths 1999

  18. 20 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 U.S. Forest Service Helps Fund Harvard Forest Green Energy Project in a recent U.S. surge in the use of this form of green energy. Since 2005, the Forest Service's woody biomass more than $1 million per year. As we look toward America's future of green energy and energy

  19. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  20. 24 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for profitable, large-scale production have failed. The second-largest U.S. oil company by market value spent24 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Chevron's Search for Plant-Based Alternative Fuels Flounders Joe Carroll

  1. Forest Products Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

  2. 2 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Webinar Archive The Transatlantic Trade in Wood for Energy Slides complex sustainability issues related to the growing trade in wood pellets between the U.S. and Europe2 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  3. Integrating agricultural pest biocontrol into forecasts of energy biomass production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratton, Claudio

    Analysis Integrating agricultural pest biocontrol into forecasts of energy biomass production T), University of Lome, 114 Rue Agbalepedogan, BP: 20679, Lome, Togo e Center for Agricultural & Energy Policy model of potential biomass supply that incorporates the effect of biological control on crop choice

  4. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    that encompasses land-use change processes such as forest regrowth resulting from abandon- ment of agricultural & Hall 1998), the sink is thought to be largely in the world's forests, which are large reservoirs

  5. Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl at Western Economics Association Meetings, July 5-8, 2001, San Francisco #12;2 Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Alterations in agricultural and forestry (AF) land use and

  6. anagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    -have the potential 10 increase biomass supply. Unlike metals, concrete, and plastic, forest products store carbon sources. Expanding forest biomass use for biofuels and energy generation will competeanagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land Management Policy

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) AF&PA's message is to provide significant value to member companies through outstanding performance in those areas...

  8. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and...

  9. Soils Management, Site Productivity and Forest Nutrition: Nutrient Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;#12;1) principals 2) strategies 3) implementation Sustainable Soil Management: #12;- maintenance of fertility soil management Strategies: #12;Examples of adaptive management models used for achieving sustainableSoils Management, Site Productivity and Forest Nutrition: Nutrient Balance and Availability

  10. Paper achieves forest certification An Independent Paper plc product story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paper achieves forest certification An Independent Paper plc product story Edited certification: News from Independent Paper plc http://www.printingtalk.com/news/inp/inp119.html 1 of 1 11

  11. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    agencies, interacting with the legislative branch on climate change issues affecting agriculture and forestry, and representing USDA on U.S. delegations to international climate...

  12. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Title: Social network media in the forest products industry: A look Manufacturers Inc. (AHMI) surveyed a group of their members to determine if social media was being used, and exporting. Seven appendixes list resources and agencies that provide assistance to wood products companies

  13. 21 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increased the most. Global Timber and Wood Products Market Update - a news brief from Wood Resources statistics for sawlogs, wood pellets and wood chips. Contact Information Wood Resources International LLC PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 3 Copyright © 2014 Wood

  14. China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 China's trade in major forest products dips in first half of 2009 21/08/2009 - 08:27 Affected by the global financial crisis, China from customs agencies shows the total trade value of forest products in China reached about USD26

  15. Updated November 1, 2013 Division of Agriculture, Forestry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Updated November 1, 2013 Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Administrative, & Aquaculture Dr. Eric Dibble (Interim) Forest Products Dr. Rubin Shmulsky Forestry Dr. Andrew Ezell Associate Turner Assistant Dean Vacant Director, Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station Dr. George Hopper

  16. 24 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Global pellet market to reach $9 billion by 2020 By Sue Retka Schill 24. The global market for pellets is expected to double in the next seven years, growing from a $4 DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 commitment to pellets to provide

  17. 10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 New study suggests ways to enhance payment for biomass fuel U Mother Nature do the job. "Working with the natural drying processes proved to be the most efficient CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 As buyers, especially in the southeast, pay

  18. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  19. MECS 2006 - Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1| DepartmentCementFood andForest

  20. agricultural production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture Physics Websites Summary: College of Agriculture, Food...

  1. agricultural production energeticky: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture Physics Websites Summary: College of Agriculture, Food...

  2. agricultural products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture Physics Websites Summary: College of Agriculture, Food...

  3. Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry Richard VloskyRichard Vlosky-Added Training in Other States · The Need for Training in Louisiana-Past Research #12;Industry Development & Adding Value #12;Value-Added Industry Development is Multi-Faceted Marketing Workforce Training Strategic

  4. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  5. Assistant Professor Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences (SAFES), within the College of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnhoff, David

    Assistant Professor ­ Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural Professor level in the area of Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering. The position is a 9-month.S. News and World Report. The successful candidate will be expected to develop a nationally

  6. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon dioxide; manufacture products that store carbon; produce and use carbon-neutral renewable energy; continuously work to reduce our own emissions of greenhouse gases; and...

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the...

  8. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Work Plans Trees, wood and paper products are natural, renewable, and recyclable resources that help reduce greenhouse gases by removing and storing CO2 from the atmosphere and...

  9. 18 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forests in mitigating climate change. Wood may be one of the world's oldest building materials PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 overall strategy to promote the use of wood as a green building material. USDA Announces Support for Innovative, Sustainable Wood Building Materials to Protect Environment and Create Jobs

  10. Notes on Forest and Ornamental Trees on the Grounds of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, H. (Helge)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38.2- ruis-lorn TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO. 105. JUNE, 1908. NOTES ON FOREST AND ORNAMENTAL TREES ON THE GROUN1)S OF THE RAL AND MECHANICAL CO LLEGE OF TTE H. NESS, ASSISTANT HORTLCULTURIST. POSTOFFICE COLLEGE... and quite luxuriant character. The annual rainfall at College varies between 36 and 40 inches, or about the same as that of the western half of the great forest belt of East Texas. The temperature has varied during the time that our trees have been under...

  11. A Blueprint for Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major Model Components - Resource Assessment - Industry Structure - Product/Market Strategy - Economic Impacts Workforce Training Network Formation Resource Assessment Government Support Financing Economic Development Technology Profitability Resource Assessment Current & projected Commercial species Lesser-used species

  12. PUBLICATIONS LIST Louisiana Forest Products Development Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Trade Center SOUTHPIC. Smith, Granskog, Michael, Muehlenfeld, Nicholas #30 Accident Analysis #5 Sorting Lumber by Grade Prior to Rough Mill Processing. Gazo, Steele #6 RAM (Rough Mill Analysis #17 Increasing Productivity in Cabinet Shops. Gazo #18 An Analysis of State Level Economic Development

  13. 16 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources, the development and expansion of a biomass industry in the U.S. will require the use of bioenergy agricultural residues from harvesting activities should be used for bioenergy production, a little more than 63 into bioenergy. Respondents were asked if they would participate in a biomass-to-bioenergy market with an option

  14. FOREST FUEL REDUCTION AND ENERGYWOOD PRODUCTION USING A CTL / SMALL CHIPPER HARVESTING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    FOREST FUEL REDUCTION AND ENERGYWOOD PRODUCTION USING A CTL / SMALL CHIPPER HARVESTING SYSTEM THESIS ABSTRACT FOREST FUEL REDUCTION AND ENERGYWOOD PRODUCTION USING A CTL / SMALL CHIPPER HARVESTING concerning mechanical forest fuel reduction. This study examined and measured the feasibility of harvesting

  15. Using E-Commerce in the Forest Products Industry Chapter 1.2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using E-Commerce in the Forest Products Industry Chapter 1.2. Using E-Commerce in the Forest The forest products industry is rapidly adopting e-commerce solutions as it advances in the information age. In this chapter, the unique e-commerce needs of this sector's small businesses are discussed. Current experience

  16. Sustainable Development in the Forest Sector: Balancing production and consumption in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development in the Forest Sector: Balancing production and consumption in a challenging Consumption Workshop, Geneva, 2011 Sustainable development · Management and conservation of the natural;Promoting Sustainable Consumption Workshop, Geneva, 2011 Sustainable development (in the forest sector

  17. Forest Products Marketing Workshop / Novi Sad / 3 6 April 2006 DAVID BILLS CBE FICFOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campaigns Reflections & Lessons Serbia UNECE 5/4/2006 #12;Forest Products Marketing Workshop / Novi Sad / 3 Opinion Leaders · Cerebral Articles in Cerebral Magazines · Energy efficiency · Forests & Climate Change

  18. agricultural biotechnology products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: in France (excluding agriculture waste) 1, the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmental, the development of the agricultural recycling of...

  19. alternative agricultural products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    230W Semester 8 Credits AEE 412 Methods of Teaching Agriculture and Environmental Science 4 AEE 313 School AEE 495 Internship in Agricultural and Extension Education 10 AEE...

  20. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoming, E-mail: xwang25@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Padgett, Jennifer M. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Powell, John S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Campus Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup ?1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than previously reported.

  1. Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

  2. Impact of in-woods product merchandizing on profitable logging opportunities in southern upland hardwood forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, D.M.; LeDoux, C.B.; Tansey, J.B.; Widmann, R.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report estimates profitable logging opportunities existing in upland hardwood forests in 14 Southern States and demonstrates the impact of three alternative product-merchandizing options on profitable logging opportunities and profit margins.

  3. Productivity and Efficiency Change in the Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Nonparametric Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Productivity and Efficiency Change in the Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Nonparametric Estimates U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. e-mails: Ruhul.Salim@cbs.curtin.edu.au #12;2 Productivity productivity of Australian broadacre agriculture. Färe- Primont indexes have some distinguishing features

  4. On the Role of Farm Size Distribution in Explaining Cross-Country Variation in Agricultural Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Productivity Oleg Firsin August 2014 Abstract In this paper, we seek to test a hypothesis regarding sources of international agricultural productivity differences that recently emerged in the literature. In accordance-level taxes and subsidies­account for a large part of the agricultural labor productivity gap between the rich

  5. Post-glacial redistribution and shifts in productivity of giant kelp forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosberg, Rick

    Post-glacial redistribution and shifts in productivity of giant kelp forests Michael H. Graham1 kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forest distribution as a function of oceanography and geomorphology suggest that kelp forest bio- mass increased up to threefold from the glacial maximum to the mid

  6. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  7. FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS Community-based tree and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS ROME, 2011 Community-based tree of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development

  8. Economic effect on agricultural production of alternative energy input prices: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Benjamin Michael

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIYE ENERGy INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAlNS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIC EFFECT ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INPUT PRICES: TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by BENJAMIN MICHAEL ADAMS Approved as to style and content...

  9. Impacts of Biofuel Production and Navigation Impediments on Agricultural Transportation and Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmedov, Zafarbek

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the impacts of U.S. biofuel production and barge navigation impediments on agricultural transportation and markets. Both past and future impacts of U.S. biofuel production levels mandated by the Renewable Fuel Standards...

  10. Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huston, M.A.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

  11. Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

  12. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  13. agricultural production landscapes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decline. Productivist and (more) Ampt, Peter 2013-01-01 4 Wildlife Habitat Use in Agriculture-Dominated Landscapes. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ?? Conservation...

  14. TIMBER COMMITTEE EUROPEAN FORESTRY COMMISSION Forest Products Marketing--from Principles to Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Practice Balkan Training Workshop, April 2006 F A O FOREST PRODUCTSFOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS & TRADE--from Principles to Practice Balkan Training Workshop, April 2006 F A O DOBFO DOSLIDOBFO DOSLI to the workshop to Practice Balkan Training Workshop, April 2006 F A O Topics of presentation I. UNECE/FAO forest products

  15. 120 Forest Products Company Gather to Combat Illegal Logging March 20, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    120 Forest Products Company Gather to Combat Illegal Logging March 20, 2005 Geneva - More than 120 wood flooring companies in China. "We all must work together to eliminate illegal logging. Government forest products company representatives, government officials and conservationists gathered this week

  16. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    . Sterilizing food containers (for example, by irradiation) without cleaning them eliminates biological hazards Resources FAPC-165 Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACT SHEET 405-744-6071 · www.fapc.bizAdding Value to Oklahoma f a p c Timothy J. Bowser Food Processing Engineer Introduction

  17. Forest biomass as a source of renewable energy in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuerker, M.F.; Ayaz, H.; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Turkey illegal cutting takes place, which cannot be controlled. Legal cuttings have also been done by several state forest enterprises. As a result, the amount of wood raw material produced by forest enterprises legally and by forest villagers illegally has exceeded the potential capacity of the forest. According to the research related to Macka and other Turkish state forests, the state forests have been decreasing day by day. This is because the amount of wood raw material taken from the forests has exceeded the production potential of the forest. That study concluded that the Macka and other Turkish forests will be exhausted after 64 and 67 years, respectively. This study also examined both establishing and exploiting energy forests near the forest villages and producing fuel briquettes manufactured using the residues of agriculture, forestry, and stock breeding to diminish the demand for illegal fuel wood cutting from the state forests.

  18. Investigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture: a choice experiment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in France (excluding agriculture waste) [1], the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmentalInvestigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture or mineral fertilizers. The paper addresses in particular 3 environmental effects: the organic waste

  19. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  20. Aboveground production in southeastern floodplain forests: A test of the subsidy-stress hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megonigal, J.P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)]|[Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Conner, W.H. [Baruch Forest Science Inst., Georgetown, SC (United States); Kroeger, S. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically flooded forests may have higher rates of aboveground net primary production than upland forests and near-continuously flooded forests, but the benefits of periodic inputs of nutrients and water may be diminished by stresses associated with anaerobic soils or drought. Groundwater table depths were measured and aboveground productivity in floodplain forests of South Carolina and Louisiana. Paired plots on locally dry, intermediate, and wet topographic positions across three hydrologic transects encompassed upland hardwood, bottomland hardwood, and cypress swamp forests. Aboveground net primary production (NPP) on wet plots was significantly lower than on intermediate and dry plots (P {le} 0.02). There was no significant difference between intermediate and dry plots. In addition, aboveground NPP on intermediate plots was not significantly different from 22 temperate upland forests in the literature. Combining data with data from the literature, aboveground NPP on wet plots was negatively related to MWD. On sites with evidence of hydrologic disturbance the slope of this line was 5 times greater. Conditions of periodic flooding and flowing water do not often lead to high rates of productivity compared with upland forests. However, extensive flooding is nearly always a significant stress on forest productivity, particularly when the flooding regime has been recently perturbed through levee construction or impoundment. The data support a more complex interaction between subsidy and stress factors. 79 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  2. Forestry building a future in the South Southern Wood Council Forest Products Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Forestry ­ building a future in the South Southern Wood Council Forest Products Scholarship attached): A written submission (no more than 1 page double sided) on why you are pursuing Forestry APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED #12; Forestry ­ building a future in the South SOUTHERN WOOD COUNCIL FOREST

  3. Summary We evaluated annual productivity and carbon fluxes over the Fontainebleau forest, a large heterogeneous for-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and water and mineral resources. The model is a physiological process-based forest ecosystem model coupled for effects of global climatic change. Recently de- veloped process-based forest ecosystem models couple water production at regional and global scales. Myneni et al. (2001) have found that the wood biomass of northern

  4. An evaluation of alternate remote sensing products for forest inventory, monitoring, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    and related attributes at a regional scale. Several sensors were evaluated, including (i) single date Landsat), a lidar sensor that di- rectly measures the height and canopy structure of forest vegetation. To evaluateAn evaluation of alternate remote sensing products for forest inventory, monitoring, and mapping

  5. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences 5 May 2010 Department of forest resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the master's program Environmental Monitoring and Assessment! Dear student, We are pleased to welcome you to the master's program Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, administered by the Faculty of Forest, please visit the following websites http://utbildning.slu.se/vara_utbildningar/Master- _och_magisterprogram/Environmental_Monitoring_and_Assessment

  6. BIOTECHNOLOGY: WORKING WITH NATURE TO IMPROVE FOREST RESOURCES AND PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    . Effective management of forested lands is central to our quality of life and the sustainability and health that can contribute to forest sustainability include genetic engineering and phytoremediation. Genetic implications is phytoremediation, the use of genetically modified trees for soil remediation. Phytoremediation

  7. Transportation Security Evaluation & Planning for Farmers, Ranchers & Production Agricultural Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    nitrate; and fuels like gasoline, diesel, and propane. Examples of Types of Materials Requiring Placards) Ammonium nitrate fertilizer (Division 5.1) Pesticides or herbicides that bear a DOT poison label (Division in a single shipment Diesel fuel (Class 3) More than 119 gallons in a single container To assist agricultural

  8. Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia Tenggara (ENT), eastern Indonesia. The study was the outcome of an ACIAR scoping study undertaken through

  9. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  10. eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry Opportunities and Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 $USTrillion Asia Pacific Latin America W estern Europe North America (Forrester & Professor Louisiana Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State

  11. AgriculturAl lAnd ApplicAtion of Biosolids in VirginiA: production And chArActeristics of Biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    AgriculturAl lAnd ApplicAtion of Biosolids in VirginiA: production And chArActeristics of Biosolids to permit these materials to be safely land-applied. The term was introduced by the wastewater treatment treatment of domestic wastewater. Biosolids comprise the solids that are removed from the wastewater

  12. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scriptinglandfill14-15,7,Deposit

  13. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scriptinglandfill14-15,7,Depositagricultural

  14. Economic Contributions of Florida Agriculture, Natural Resources, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20061 Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and W. David range of other economic sectors for food and kindred products manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input suppliers, support services, and nature-based recreation. In addition to farms, forests

  15. agricultural productivity symposium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inputs per acre on plots controlled by men. These results contradict the Pareto efficiency of resource allocation within the household. Production function estimates...

  16. agricultural productivity growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inputs per acre on plots controlled by men. These results contradict the Pareto efficiency of resource allocation within the household. Production function estimates...

  17. adapting agricultural production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inputs per acre on plots controlled by men. These results contradict the Pareto efficiency of resource allocation within the household. Production function estimates...

  18. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

  19. CO2 enhancement of forest productivity constrained by limited nitrogen availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 enhancement of forest productivity constrained by limited nitrogen availability Richard J for review May 9, 2010) Stimulation of terrestrial plant production by rising CO2 concentra- tion is projected to reduce the airborne fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Coupled climate­carbon cycle

  20. eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry: A Comparison of the United States & Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry: A Comparison of the United States & Canada Olivian Pitis products industry in the United States and Canada. Both solid and pulp/paper companies were surveyed the United States & Canada. Objectives #12;All Respondents Results #12;1 company .05% of respondents North

  1. Tree damage, allometric relationships, and above-ground net primary production in central Amazon forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    mortality; Forest fragmentation; NPP 1. Introduction Net primary production (NPP) is de®ned as the biochemical construction of new organic material over a speci®ed time interval, or gross primary production (GPP) less autotrophic respiration. The NPP of an ecosystem drives all heterotrophic activity (e

  2. Key canopy traits drive forest productivity Peter B. Reich*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    -to-ecosystem scaling and its potential application to assessing terrestrial ecosystem metabolism. Important advances. Herein, presenting data for 128 cold temperate and boreal forests across a regional gradient of 600 km the metabolism of terrestrial ecosystems [1,3,8,9,11,19,21]. Such tools are critically needed, as challenges

  3. Aboveground tree biomass on productive forest land in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarie, J.; Mead, D.R.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total aboveground woody biomass of trees on forest land that can produce 1.4 cubic meters per hectare per year of industrial wood in Alaska is 1.33 billion metric tons green weight. The estimated energy value of the standing woody biomass is 11.9 x 10 Btu's. Statewide tables of biomass and energy values for softwoods, hardwoods, and species group are presented.

  4. FOREST PRODUCTS MARKET IN 2007 AND PROSPECTS FOR 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the industrial branches with important weights, out of which: the construction materials manufacturing of the agriculture to the GDP building decreased, this generating in the first half-year 2007 only 3.4 % from national wealth (3.6 % in the first semester 2006). An important weight in the GDS building, had

  5. 11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projects, these ruminations are a sign that the forest industry in this part of the world sees the future an biofuel conglomerate at the site of the now closed pulpmill in Tofte, just south of the capital Oslo of softwood plantations worldwide, favorable global supply/demand balance for softwood pulp over hardwood pulp

  6. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MONROE, LA ­ New words like wood pellets and biomass are providing a ray of hope for forest landowners to Europe to generate electricity. Buck Vandersteen, executive director of the Louisiana Forestry discussed Drax Biomass, the electric generating industry in the United Kingdom. "They have decided to look

  7. The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy contributing to the state's economy. The food and fiber system in Texas is evolving and changing. The structure in state and local economies. Of particular interest is the relationship between the food and fiber system

  8. Sediment production and downslope sediment transport from forest roads in granitic watersheds. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketcheson, G.L.; Megahan, W.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study from highly erodible Idaho soils and provides information necessary to develop road design criteria and evaluate risks and trade-offs. Objectives of the study were to: quantify the volume of sediment deposition on slopes in relation to road features; determine the probability distribution of sediment travel distance; evaluate how sediment deposition occurs with respect to forest site conditions and downslope location of streams; determine the volume and particle size distribution of sediment deposits on slopes in relation to sediment travel distance; and investigate time trends in sediment deposition.

  9. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) in Texas: A Statewide Analysis of Sustainability in the Agricultural and Timber Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graff, Christopher P.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability of the Texas agricultural and timber sectors is measured using the ratio of human appropriation of net primary productivity (HANPP) to available net primary productivity (NPP) on a county-by-county basis for the entire state...

  10. The mission of the Research Centers is to serve the specific needs of the clientele in local production areas and the broader needs of Montana agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    production areas and the broader needs of Montana agriculture in general through applied research directed to the problems and impacts of agricultural production. New knowledge generated by Agricultural Research Center programs benefits Montana agriculture and the scientific community at local, state and national levels

  11. 26 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of solar thermal panels. The goals are to explore how to squeeze energy from agricultural waste or other from the sun's rays, like conventional solar panels, the solar thermal panels use large mirrors. "That's the bottom line. How much is it going to cost?" he said. Large solar thermal cells sit just

  12. Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    "Sustainable Production of Biofuels" Rick Gustafson "The Ever-evolving Case for a Carbon Tax" Shi-Ling Hsu

  13. Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for forage and rangeland production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Morgan, Jack; Fay, Philip; Polley, Wayne; Hatfield, Jerry L.

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of temperature and precipitation patterns across the United States during the next 50 years anticipate a 1.5 to 2°C warming and a slight increase in precipitation as a result of global climate change. There have been relatively few studies of climate change impacts on pasture and rangeland (grazingland) species compared to those on crop species, despite the economic and ecological importance of the former. Here we review the literature on pastureland and rangeland species to rising CO2 and climate change (temperature, and precipitation) and discuss plant and management factors likely to influence pastureland and rangeland responses to change (e.g., community composition, plant competition, perennial growth habit, seasonal productivity, and management methods). Overall, the response of pasture species to increased [CO2] is consistent with the general response of C3 and C4 type vegetation, although significant exceptions exist. Both pastureland and rangeland species should exhibit an acceleration of metabolism and development due to earlier onset of spring green-up and longer growing seasons. However, in the studies reviewed here, C3 pasture species increased their photosynthetic rates by up to 40% while C4 species exhibited no increase in photosynthesis. In general, it is expected that increases in [CO2] and precipitation would enhance rangeland net primary production (NPP) while increased air temperatures would either increase or decrease NPP. Much of this uncertainty in response is due to uncertain future projections of precipitation, both globally and regionally. For example, if annual precipitation changes little or declines, rangeland plant response to warming temperatures and rising [CO2] may be neutral or may decline due to increased water stress. This review reveals the need for comprehensive studies of climate change impacts on the pasture ecosystem including grazing regimes, mutualistic relationships (e.g., plant roots-nematodes; N-fixing organisms), as well as the ecosystem carbon balance, essential nutrients, and water.

  14. Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Laine

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

  15. Market-based Certification and Management of Non-Timber Forest Products in Bhutan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market-based Certification and Management of Non-Timber Forest Products in Bhutan: Organic Lemongrass Oil, Poverty Reduction, and Environmental Sustainability Karma Yangzom Irmela Krug Kesang Tshomo of an ADBI research project on contract farming and market facilitation for the rural poor. The project

  16. Forest soil characteristics under varing tree species in East Texas: implications for sustained productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David Andrew

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, and tree species may alter nutrient cycles within the same location and soil type through time. This study examined the influence of 33 years of sit occupancy by lobolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and oak (Quercus spp.) plantations on forest floor mass...

  17. Research Summary Wild Harvests Social, cultural and economic values of non-timber forest products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Wild Harvests ­ Social, cultural and economic values of non-timber forest products Scottish woodlands have special importance for people who visit them to harvest wild plant material) but the amount harvested or sold was limited wild plant material and fungi as a valuable and joyful by the manual

  18. Forest soil characteristics under varing tree species in East Texas: implications for sustained productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David Andrew

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, and tree species may alter nutrient cycles within the same location and soil type through time. This study examined the influence of 33 years of sit occupancy by lobolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and oak (Quercus spp.) plantations on forest floor mass...

  19. U.S Markets for Certified and Non-Certified Hardwood Tropical Forest Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    which approached 2 million (mainly wooden) houses (FAO/UNECE, 2004). By 1992, Latin America supplied 70 volume and 57 percent of value. Latin America was the second largest supplier of tropical hardwood veneer Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State University

  20. An Overview of the Louisiana Forest Products Development Center &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineered Wood Products #12;Thermal-bonded Wood/ Bagasse Nonwoven Thermal-bonded Wood/Bagasse Composite

  1. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. G. : Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forest fires,O. , and Merlet, P. : Emission of trace gases and aerosolsEstimating direct carbon emissions from Canadian wildland

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Converting Sustainable Forest Products...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum, NG...) Fossil Fuel Production (Coal, Petroleum, NG...) Environmental, Social, Ecological, and Economic Sustainability What are Wood Pellets? * Wood pellets are...

  3. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This abstract outlinse a project that is designing and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process, and transport woody biomass from southern pine...

  4. 1 April 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Global Timber and Wood Products Market Update - a news brief from Wood. As a consequence, the GSPI price index has move upward to reach its highest level in eight years. Log prices / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 ___________________________________________ Richard P. Vlosky, Ph

  5. Global Patterns of Ecological Productivity and Tropical Forest Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    those measurements in addition to climate data to construct a suite of empirical models of NPP productivity (NPP) on a global scale and biomass accumulation across thee tropics. Scientists have been model of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), and its simplicity and relative accuracy has led

  6. Agriculture INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    1 Agriculture INTRODUCTION 1.1 Although its share in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has declined from over half at Independence to less than one-fifth currently, agriculture remains the predominant sector in it as the principal occupation. Agriculture still contributes significantly to export earnings and is an important

  7. UNECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2011-2012 ___________________________________________________________ 1 1 Overview of forest products markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    product innovation and market growth, such as biorefining, biomass energy production, and development is made up of three subregions: Europe, North America and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). It stretches from Canada and the United States of America in the west through Europe to the Russian Federation

  8. 23 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    several clean energy tax incentives. The bill, titled the Bridge to a Clean Energy Future Act of 2014 from biomass would also be extended. The Section 45 renewable energy production tax credit would also of the production tax credit. The credit applies to several types of renewable energy projects, including wind

  9. http://earthtrends.wri.org/updates/node/156January 2007 Monthly Update: Forest Certification and the Path to Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for certified products). Importantly, certification schemes offer international standards that define: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 2005. Global Forest Resources Assessment 2005. #12;Figure 2 may be realized through various means, and there has been significant international debate

  10. Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugabe, Phanuel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photographs were digitized into an Arc/Info GIS. This was used to determine the area under crops and grazing. Range forage production figures in kilograms per hectare for the area were obtained from Agricultural Technical and Extension Services inventories...

  11. An Overview of the Louisiana Forest Products Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their companies. Each industry sub-sector in the Community has a Request For Proposal tool that facilitates allows small rural companies to have the same exposure and market opportunities as large companies. #12 Products · Equipment Mfg. and Dist. · Logging and Harvesting #12;9 #12;10 #12;11 Request for Proposal

  12. Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Brian P.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers' objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers' test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  13. 21 August 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 3D printer saves you money by using pellets instead of plastic filaments http://www.engadget.com/2014/08/21/david-3d-printer-pellet-feed/ If traditional printers use ink and toner cartridges, most commercial 3D printers use plastic filament spools to create the objects you want

  14. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), a world leader in third-party sustainability certification. ` GTFF is managed by GreenWood Resources, Inc, and benefit the community. "While biofuels for both transportation and energy production offer promise resources," said Neil Mendenhall, Manager of Supply Chain Services at SCS. "GWR is demonstrating

  15. 26 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 9.8.14 NFR BioEnergy Announces $312 Million Energy Project In South PLAQUEMINE, La. -- Today, Gov. Bobby Jindal and Chief Operating Officer Frank Randazzo of NFR BioEnergy mills. NFR BioEnergy will convert sugar cane waste, known as bagasse, into hardened energy pellets

  16. 31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    building material made from lumber might catapult Oregon wood products to the forefront of construction buildings, CLT becomes a cost-effective replacement for steel or concrete, and using it in construction there is a growing buzz around using CLT because it "meets or beats" traditional construction materials on every

  17. 31 January 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from trees that are too small, crooked or diseased to be used as lumber. The company also accepts logs, North Carolina, a steady stream of trucks arrives loaded with thick logs. The company insists though pellets a year. According to the company's website, most of this product is shipped straight to Europe

  18. 24 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 (in) Biochar used successfully to treat fracking water Post Date: 19, or fracking. Flowback water treatment is a critical sustainability issue for the oil and gas industry. One to five million gallons of water mixed with sand and chemicals are required for the fracking of each well

  19. 17 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -governmental organizations is that whole mature trees are being used to make wood pellets, and that this results in carbon to multiple negative stories in the press, resulting in public relations problems for wood pellet in manufacturing the wood, paper and energy products we all rely on. The following infographic illustrates

  20. 26 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Hancock Timber Resource Group-Summer Internship Program Each summer 10-12 weeks during the summer working as an intern with our economics research department. The focus and of interest to HTRG. By the end of the summer, the student is expected to present the results of his

  1. Managing lodgepole pine to yield merchantable thinning products and attain sawtimber rotations. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, D.M.; Koch, P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper suggests solution for a longstanding problem in managing lodgepole pine forests- that of managing individual stands to reach their planned rotation age, despite serious hazard from bark beetles and wildfire. The management regimes presented yield merchantable thinning products. The 80-year sawtimber rotation can be achieved using these management recommendation. Thinning at 30 years of age is central to achieving the recommended alternative management regimes. The authors suggest that agencies give roundwood operators a portion of the thinning stemwood as payment. Management regimes that provide attainable rotations are presented in summary tables, by three site index classes and a number of initial stand density classes.

  2. Nitrogen and sulfur emissions from the burning of forest products near large urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegg, D.A.; Radke, L.F.; Hobbs, P.V.; Brock, C.A.; Riggan, P.J.

    1987-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne measurements of trace gases and particles in the smoke from a prescribed burn of forest products in the Los Angeles basin show significantly higher emissions of NO/sub X/, SO/sub 2/, and particulate NO/sub 3//sup -/ than do measurements in smokes from the burning of biomass in rural areas. It is postulated that the high emissions are due to the revolatilization of previoulsy deposited pollutants. Implications for pollutant source inventories and the nuclear winter hypothesis are briefly discussed.

  3. Proceedings of the Seventh Walnut Council Research Symposium 15GTR-NRS-P-115 BIOREFINERY OPPORTUNITIES FOR FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capabilities to succeed with biorefineries. Most forest products companies already have the first capability the acquisition of woody residues for making new products while minimizing competition for valuable timber companies to look at the overall biorefinery effort and acquire the expertise to move thermal

  4. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment FOR Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment FOR Forestry KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 FOR 100 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY;developmentandimportance;treegrowth;principalforestregionsandimportanttimber species; forest management practices; utilization and products; state and federal forestry programs

  5. Radionuclide concentrations in agricultural products near the Hanford Site, 1982 through 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed monitoring data for agricultural products collected from 1982 through 1992 near the Hanford Site to determine radionuclide concentration trends. While samples were collected and analyzed, and results reported annual in Hanford Site environmental reports, an 11-year data set was reviewed for this report to increase the ability to assess trends and potential Hanford effects. Products reviewed included milk, chicken, eggs, beef, vegetables, fruit, wine, wheat, and alfalfa. To determine which radionuclides were detected sufficiently often to permit analysis for trends and effects, each radionuclide concentration and its associated uncertainty were ratioed. Radionuclides were considered routinely detectable if more than 50% of the ratios were between zero and one. Data for these radionuclides were then analyzed statistically, using analyses of variance. The statistical analyses indicated the following: for the most part, there were no measurable effects for Hanford operations; radionuclide concentrations in all products reviewed remained relatively low when compared to concentrations that would result in a 1-mrem effective dose equivalent to an individual; radionuclide concentrations are decreasing in general; however, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in all media and {sup 129}I in milk increased from 1982 to 1986, then decreased gradually for the remainder of the review period. The {sup 129}I concentrations may be correlated with processing of irradiated reactor fuel at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant.

  6. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General. in the aircraft nuclear propulsion department at the National Reactor Testing Station in Idaho. In 1961 Rothermel.S. Department of Agriculture, Fire Laboratory at Missoula was conceived in the aftermath of the Mann Gulch fire

  7. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  8. An Overview of World Tropical Hardwood Resources, Forest Products Trade and Environmental Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Venezuela (Butler 2001). South America accounts for 23 percent of global forests (Juslin and Hansen 2003

  9. Predicting Whole Forest Structure, Primary Productivity, and Biomass Density From Maximum Tree Size and Resource Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempes, Christopher P; Dooris, William; West, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the face of uncertain biological response to climate change and the many critiques concerning model complexity it is increasingly important to develop predictive mechanistic frameworks that capture the dominant features of ecological communities and their dependencies on environmental factors. This is particularly important for critical global processes such as biomass changes, carbon export, and biogenic climate feedback. Past efforts have successfully understood a broad spectrum of plant and community traits across a range of biological diversity and body size, including tree size distributions and maximum tree height, from mechanical, hydrodynamic, and resource constraints. Recently it was shown that global scaling relationships for net primary productivity are correlated with local meteorology and the overall biomass density within a forest. Along with previous efforts, this highlights the connection between widely observed allometric relationships and predictive ecology. An emerging goal of ecological...

  10. Determinants of export marketing strategies of forest products companies in the context of transition --The case of Slovakia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determinants of export marketing strategies of forest products companies in the context of export performance have been extensively examined in the literature. Although marketing strategy is considered to be one of the major determinants of export performance, little attention has been paid

  11. The Case for Certified Wood Forest products deemed sustainable are a growing part of today's green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and explain the need for responsible forestry practices that keep wood building materials a truly green choiceThe Case for Certified Wood Forest products deemed sustainable are a growing part of today's green buildings October 2008 Sponsored by JELD-WEN® Windows and Doors The demand in the United States

  12. Forest carbon storage in the northeastern United States: Net effects of harvesting frequency, post-harvest retention, and wood products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    26 December 2009 Keywords: Carbon sequestration Wood products Structural retention Harvesting tradeoffs among scenarios using a factorial treatment design and two-way ANOVA. Mean carbon sequestrationForest carbon storage in the northeastern United States: Net effects of harvesting frequency, post

  13. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  14. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Francesco Danuso

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jřrgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  15. Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, B.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

  16. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine) [University of Udine

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  17. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesco Danuso

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jřrgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  18. Wild coffee production in Ethiopia: the role of coffee certification for forest conservation 1 Introduction This is the html version of the file http://web.fu-berlin.de/ffu/akumwelt/bc2006/papers/Schmitt_Grote_Coffee.pdf.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wild coffee production in Ethiopia: the role of coffee certification for forest conservation 1 been highlighted: forest certification 2006 Page 1 Wild coffee production in Ethiopia: the role)9/10/2007 3:26:41 PM #12;Wild coffee production in Ethiopia: the role of coffee certification for forest

  19. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  20. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James A. Burger

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

  1. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 170 (2013) 216227 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uncertainty Early warning systems Environmental variability Environmental time series Global warming a b s t r Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK c Crop Management and Production Systems Division, International Potato Center, PO Box 1558, Lima 12, Peru d Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  2. Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasson, Leta Susanne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. S. Fuel Ethanol Production 2. 4 Dry Milling Process 2. 5 Wet Milling Process 22 27 29 30 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION A ricultural Polic Sett'n Agriculture has long been an industry of instability. Commodity surpluses along with low prices... of reducing stocks. Arguments against demand enhancement state that this sort of policy will do nothing more than increase the already large U. S. stocks of commodities. Proponents of demand enhancement see such policies as a means of reducing surpluses...

  3. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 5. Irrigated Agriculture and National Grain Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Brown, Robert A.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the next century global warming will lead to changes in weather patterns, affecting many aspects of our environment. In the United States, the one sector of the economy most likely to be directly impacted by the changes in climate is agriculture. We have examined potential changes in dryland agriculture (Part 2) and in water resources necessary for crop production (Part 3). Here we assess to what extent, under a set of climate change scenarios, water supplies will be sufficient to meet the irrigation requirement of major grain crops in the U.S. In addition, we assess the overall impacts of changes in water supply on national grain production. We applied 12 climate change scenarios based on the predictions of General Circulation Models to a water resources model and a crop growth simulator for the conterminous United States. We calculate national production in current crop growing regions by applying irrigation where it is necessary and water is available. Irrigation declines under all climate change scenarios employed in this study. In certain regions and scenarios, precipitation declines so much that water supplies are too limited; in other regions it plentiful enough that little value is derived from irrigation. Total crop production is greater when irrigation is applied, but corn and soybean production declines under most scenarios. Winter wheat production responds significantly to elevated atmospheric CO2 and appears likely to increase under climate change.

  4. A study of the effects of natural fertility, weather and productive inputs in Chinese agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.; Tso, Katherine Kit-Yan.

    This paper presents an investigation of the relations in China between farm output, the natural fertility of agricultural land, and the use of anthropogenic farm inputs. The methodology is presented as a potential increment ...

  5. Economic Effect on Agricultural Production of Alternative Energy Input Prices: Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, B. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Condra, G. D.

    The Arab oil embargo of 1973 awakened the world to the reality of energy shortages and higher fuel prices. Agriculture in the United States is highly mechanized and thus energy intensive. This study seeks to develop an evaluative capability...

  6. Managing Rangeland Watersheds for Agricultural Production, Water Quality, and Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    raw food always safe Salinas River riparian corridors wildlife habitat water quality Juxtaposition of plant agriculture and grazed rangeland Salinas Valley example Chaparral wildlife habitat Year Food flows, retention basins, constructed wetlands, etc. 2012 technical reports on waterborne pathogens

  7. Forest density mapping in the lower 48 states: A regression procedure. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) research unit conducted a project to map the distribution of forest lands for the entire United States. Forest types and forest densities were mapped, and a new forest type group map for the country was produced (Powell and others, in press; Zhu and Evans 1992). The project supported the 1993 Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Update program, by which the Forest Service was required to provide statistics on current forest land and rangeland conditions.

  8. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  9. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations · 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation · Average age

  10. Effect of chronic inhalation of inorganic arsenic on the risk of stillbirth in a community surrounding an agriculture chemical production facility: a hospital-based study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihrig, Melanie M

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF CHRONIC INHALATION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC ON THE RISK OF STILLBIRTH IN A COMMUNITY SURROUNDING AN AGRICULTURE CHEMICAL PRODUCTION FACILITY: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY A Thesis by MELANIE M. IHRIG Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  11. How to reconcile product standardization and diversity of agricultural practices? A challenge for research-action in partnership: the case of farmers' organizations in Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .) with high level risks related to price variations in international markets. Farmers' organizations play standards. In Costa Rica three stakeholders; a farmers' organization MNC (Mesa Nacional CaHow to reconcile product standardization and diversity of agricultural practices? A challenge

  12. UNECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2007-2008 ___________________________________________________________ 1 Green building drives construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2008 ___________________________________________________________ 1 Chapter 10 Green building drives construction market and forest certification: Certified forest of custody (CoC) grew by 50% in 2007, attaining 12,600 certificates worldwide in 2008. · Green building ranked. · Green purchasing policies and public procurement polices remain key drivers for certified

  13. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  14. AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles · Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies · Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture · The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

  15. University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    1 University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science DN250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production Dn Engineering Technology DN250FAM Food and Agribusiness Management #12;1 Contents Agricultural Science DN250 1

  16. Soil and vegetation response to soil compaction and forest floor removal after aspen harvesting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alban, D.H.; Host, G.E.; Elioff, J.D.; Shadis, D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced soil porosity and organic matter removal have been identified as common factors associated with loss of forest productivity (Powers et al. 1990). In both agriculture and forestry, management activities can modify soil porosity and organic matter with resultant impacts on vegetative growth. As part of a nationwide long-term soil productivity (LTSP) study soil porosity and organic matter are being experimentally manipulated on large plots to determine the impacts of such manipulations on growth and species diversity for a wide range of forest types.

  17. ABE Agricultural and Biological Engineering F9 ADDL Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab G10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerospace Science Laboratory C11 AGAD Agricultural Administration Building G8 AHF Animal Holding Facility G Pete Dye Clubhouse C1 EE Electrical Engineering Building H6 EEL Entomology Environmental Laboratory G8 F9 FOPN Flight Operations Building B11 FORS Forestry Building G8 FPRD Forest Products Building G8

  18. Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Peace Corps | Agriculture Agriculture Volunteers Agriculture is the primary economic activity Volunteers contribute sustain- able solutions to a community's agricultural issues and help preserve natural resources. Programs and Sample Projects Agriculture and Forestry Extension · Collaborate with farmers

  19. Life-cycle energy and GHG emissions of forest biomass harvest and transport for biofuel production in Michigan

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Fengli; Johnson, Dana M.; Wang, Jinjiang

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High dependence on imported oil has increased U.S. strategic vulnerability and prompted more research in the area of renewable energy production. Ethanol production from renewable woody biomass, which could be a substitute for gasoline, has seen increased interest. This study analysed energy use and greenhouse gas emission impacts on the forest biomass supply chain activities within the State of Michigan. A life-cycle assessment of harvesting and transportation stages was completed utilizing peer-reviewed literature. Results for forest-delivered ethanol were compared with those for petroleum gasoline using data specific to the U.S. The analysis from a woody biomass feedstock supply perspective uncoveredmore »that ethanol production is more environmentally friendly (about 62% less greenhouse gas emissions) compared with petroleum based fossil fuel production. Sensitivity analysis was conducted with key inputs associated with harvesting and transportation operations. The results showed that research focused on improving biomass recovery efficiency and truck fuel economy further reduced GHG emissions and energy consumption.« less

  20. Life-cycle energy and GHG emissions of forest biomass harvest and transport for biofuel production in Michigan

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Fengli [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China); Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Johnson, Dana M. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Wang, Jinjiang [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High dependence on imported oil has increased U.S. strategic vulnerability and prompted more research in the area of renewable energy production. Ethanol production from renewable woody biomass, which could be a substitute for gasoline, has seen increased interest. This study analysed energy use and greenhouse gas emission impacts on the forest biomass supply chain activities within the State of Michigan. A life-cycle assessment of harvesting and transportation stages was completed utilizing peer-reviewed literature. Results for forest-delivered ethanol were compared with those for petroleum gasoline using data specific to the U.S. The analysis from a woody biomass feedstock supply perspective uncovered that ethanol production is more environmentally friendly (about 62% less greenhouse gas emissions) compared with petroleum based fossil fuel production. Sensitivity analysis was conducted with key inputs associated with harvesting and transportation operations. The results showed that research focused on improving biomass recovery efficiency and truck fuel economy further reduced GHG emissions and energy consumption.

  1. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lead to a more efficient model to achieve and document high levels of forest stewardship by Oregon comes from well-managed forests. For wood products companies that do business with the likes of Home by the State of Oregon to be less competent or protective of forest resources than those landowners who become

  2. Agricultural and Forest Entomology (2011), 13, 197204 DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-9563.2010.00511.x Arthropod food webs in organic and conventional wheat farming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arthropod food webs in organic and conventional wheat farming systems of an agricultural long, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstraße, 5070 Frick, Switzerland, Department (15N/14N and 13C/12C) of fertilizers, plants, prey and generalist predators in organic

  3. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  4. Sustaining the Productivity and Function of Intensively Managed Forests - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A.; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this study is to ensure sustainable management of wetland forests in the southeastern United States. The study is projected to measure soil, hydrology, and forest responses to several management scenarios across a complete forest cycle. From August 1997 to August 2000 the study has received funding as one of the Agenda 2020 projects, from the U.S. Department of Energy (Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC07-97ID13551), the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, and Westvac Corporation. Quarterly progress reports were submitted regularly to the Department and all project participants. This final report summarizes the project results and progress achieved during this 3-year period. Over the past three years all research objectives planned for this project were completed.

  5. Agricultural and Forest Entomology (2013), 15, 212226 DOI: 10.1111/afe.12007 Predicting the distribution of a novel bark beetle and its pine hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Steven E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    role in coniferous forest dynamics in Central and North America (Bentz et al., 2010; Salinas-Moreno et al., 2010; Evangelista et al., 2011). Under certain conditions, such as extreme drought and where

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  7. Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Region, 1911-2012 Dan Loeffler Nathaniel Anderson Keith Stockmann Ken Skog Sean Healey J. Greg Jones, Missoula, MT. and cooperator with the Rocky Mountain Research Station, Missoula, MT. Nathaniel Anderson down stand on the Chippewa National Forest in north central Minnesota. Photo courtesy of Mary Nordeen

  8. Agricultural Research for Development Innovations & Incentives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research for Development Innovations & Incentives The Swedish research network Agricultural Research for Development (Agri4D) organises an annual multi/inter-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder conference on agriculture, livestock and forest research in an international development context. Since

  9. ESTIMATION OF FOREST CARBON VOLUME AND VALUE IN TENNESSEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ¨ Acknowledgement INTRODUCTION ¨ U.S. Forest ¤188 Million Acres ¤16% carbon sequestration occurred in forest ¤310Carl. 2001. "The Economics of Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils." Department of Agricultural of The Potential for Carbon Sequestration by Forests: Evidence from Southern Mexico." Ecological Economics 33

  10. For Immediate Release: January 30, 2008 Sustaining Virginia's Forests through Forest Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and products processed in ways that sustain forest health, minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and the people and communities that depend upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services

  11. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  12. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

  14. SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP Biomass Outlook 2014: Is Biomass About To Go Bang?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Biomass Outlook 2014: Is Biomass About To Go Bang? Biomass offers a multitude can bio go? David Appleyard, Contributing Editor February 06, 2014 LONDON -- Traditional biomass renewables collectively. Nonetheless, modern renewables, and modern biomass with it, is catching up fast

  15. United States Department of Agriculture Office of Communications (202) 720-4623

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Reports Synthesize Literature on Climate Change Effects and Adaptation Strategies for U.S. Agriculture strategies for U.S. agriculture and forests. The reports, entitled Climate Change and Agriculture: Effects.S. agriculture and forests will face in this century from global climate change," said William Hohenstein

  16. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    by discussions with Brigid Barry, David Bowden, Lauren Coad, Nigel Collar, Paul Donald, Rob Ewers, Vicky Jones, Val Kapos, Eric Keys, Deborah Lawrence, Tasso Leventis, Ken Norris, Debbie Pain, Hugo Rainey, B. L. Turner and Juliet Vickery. Thanks to John... in a wildlife protected area, although I ended up working only in forest reserves. I thank Moses Sam and Phil Marshall for interesting discussions, and Kofi Affum-Baffo, Francis Agurgo, Edward Obiaw and Oheneba Amponsah Agyemang of the Resource...

  17. agricultural research center: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leistikow, Bruce N. 4 GENERAL MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (MAFES) Forest & Wildlife Research Center (FWRC) Environmental...

  18. agricultural soil revisited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of logged forests is essential to conserving Vermont, University of 3 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Environmental Sciences and...

  19. Introduction Agriculture/Agricultural Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    38 Introduction Guide Entrance Life Career Inquiries Agriculture/Agricultural Science Mission and goal of the Graduate School of Agricultural Science The mission of agricultural science organization which aims to realize this agricultural ideal, the Graduate School of Agricultural Science's basic

  20. Economics issues in global climate change: Agriculture forestry and natural resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.; Anderson, M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a collection of 26 papers from a 1990 conference concerning the interface between greenhouse warming and agriculture and forestry. Areas of particular emphasis include methane's importance as a greenhouse gas and agricultural production of methane; agriculture's importance as a response to climatic change; forestry as a potentially powerful abatement method, because forests sequester carbon as part of their natural growth. The book is divided into three parts. First, the implications of examining the full set of greenhouse gases versus just looking at carbon dioxide are discussed. Second, the role of agriculture and forestry in producing greenhouse gases is covered. Third, a series of articles tackles the difficult task of measuring the damages to agriculture that would result if climates do change.

  1. The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. agricultural policy, on the global food system, and on technological change in agricultural production. Greg. Thilmany's specialty is in the economics of value-added market differentiation of food products, such as local, organic, and specialty products. At CSU she teaches courses on agricultural finance, agricultural

  2. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  3. Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form rate of 4.4 million Nm3 , the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $9.50/GJ. The production

  4. Forest products markets badly hit by the crisis but use of wood energy on the rise -UNECE/FAO http://www.portofentry.com/site/root/resources/industry_news/8067.html[10/1/2009 8:21:58 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , albeit from a low level. The fall in demand has pushed real prices of building materials to their lowest driven by the sharp decline in the construction of new houses in North-America and Europe. Housing construction is the main driver of forest products markets, especially for the main forest product: sawn

  5. Conservation Agriculture and its Role in Soil Health, Sustainable Food Production and Food Security. A topical lunch on October 4th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Conservation Agriculture and its Role in Soil Health, Sustainable Food Production and Food Security community more involved in the larger picture of sustainable land management to meet future food security Management will need involvement of soil science, agronomy, plant pathology, natural resource management

  6. Economic Contributions of Florida's Agricultural, Natural Resource, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20081 Alan W. Hodges and Mohammad Rahmani2 1 economic sectors for food and kindred product manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input supplies, support services, and nature-based recreation/eco-tourism. In addition to farming, forestry

  7. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    November 5, 2008 (received for review May 22, 2008) Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity has driven a rapid expansion of the corn ethanol industry in the United States. Continuing growth

  8. Long-term climate change impacts on agricultural productivity in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavas, Daniel R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Gao, Xuejie

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work examines potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in northeastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10% decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30şN, 108şE] to [42şN, 123şE]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5% for rice, 8.3% for canola, 18.6% for corn, 22.9% for potato, and 24.9% for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12%. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a clear beneficiary from among those simulated in this study.

  9. MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODERN AGRICULTURAL DIGITAL MANAGEMENT NETWORK INFORMATION SYSTEM OF HEILONGJIANG RECLAMATION AREA@126.com Abstract: To meet the need of agriculture management modernization of Heilongjiang reclamation area, further boost large-scale integration level of modern agriculture production and boost management

  10. Agricultural Research for Development Scales & Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research for Development Scales & Diversity SLU, Uppsala 28-29 September 2011 28th September 2011 (morning) Agricultural Investments ..... Shenggen Fan, IFPRI Livestock production­ Global and local importance and development John McDermott, ILRI Smallholder agricultural intensification ­ means

  11. Plant Breeding Program COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    Plant Breeding Program COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Office of the Dean Cereal Breeding Program 51 Acknowlegements 51 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Office in production agriculture, which included plant breeding, was necessary for California farmers to thrive

  12. An aggregate production function for U. S. agriculture: an alternative to the Tyner-Tweeten approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornforth, Gerald Charles

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time? The Tyner and Tweeten decade elasticity estimates were determined independently using distributed-lag factor- share ad)ustment models, whereas ridge regression was used in this study to directly and simultaneously estimate these elasticities.... A Cobb-Douglas production function employing nine input variables [assumed by Tyner and Tweeten (1965, 1966)] was fit using ordinary least squares and ridge regression. The ridge results appeared to be statistically reliable. A time trend model...

  13. Competition for light and water play contrasting roles in driving diversity-productivity relationships in Iberian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jucker, Tommaso; Bouriaud, Olivier; Avacaritei, Daniel; D?nil?, Iulian; Duduman, Gabriel; Valladares, Fernando; Coomes, David A.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in Mediterranean forests. Whether or not managing for mixed pine-oak forests proves to be beneficial for AWP is likely to depend on how climate changes in the Iberian Peninsula....

  14. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  15. Presentation 2.7: Energy and the Forest Products Industry in Malaysia Zulkifli Bin Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    balanced utilization of oil, gas, hydro & coal To prolong lifespan of Malaysia's oil reserves for future in the production of wood products are collected to be used as raw materials to produce fibre boards

  16. Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University College of Agriculture & Life Sciences l Business Management and Entrepreneurship Marketing Ag. Products Agricultural Law Advanced Agribusiness Marketing Agricultural Financial Management Agricultural Management and Problem Solving Monetary and Global

  17. Expanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Forest Service research on recycling is being led by scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPLExpanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology Theodore L. Laufenberg, Program Manager Forest Products Conservation and Recycling Said Abubakr

  18. 188 Forest health surveillance in Victoria Australian Forestry 2008 Vol. 71 No. 3 pp. 188195

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available for sustainable timber production (VictorianAssociation of Forest Industries 2008). Native forestForests. While several companies manage plantations in Victoria, HVP Plantations (formerly Hancock Victoria

  19. The Future of Forest Certification in A Roundtable Discussion by Forest Stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and respect people's rights. · Multiple forest certification upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services they provide. Rather than remain mired in win

  20. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol that the minimum cost of petrol and diesel production is 0.86 $ litre-1 when a bio-oil feedstock is upgraded

  1. Acorn production in northern red oak stands in northwestern Pennsylvania. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auchmoody, L.R.; Smith, H.C.; Walters, R.S.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern red oak acorn production was measured in 21 maturing stands on good sites in northwestern Pennsylvania. The number of acorns produced per acre varied from a low of 7,000 to nearly 273,000. Acorns were produced in all years. In no year was there consistently good acorn production at all areas, nor was there a good crop for more than two consecutive years at any location. Freezing temperatures when oaks were in flower was a major factor affecting acorn production on the Allegheny Plateau.

  2. Mixed plantations of eucalyptus and leguminous trees enhance biomass production. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBell, D.S.; Whitesell, C.D.; Schubert, T.H.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Eucalyptus species--E. Saligna and E. grandis--are especially favored in Hawaii for wood, fiber, and fuel production because of their quick growth and high yields. Their growth is limited, however, on many sites by low levels of available nitrogen. Supplemental nitrogen can be provided by nitrogen-fixing plants, such as legumes. A test was conducted to determine whether planting two leguminous species--Acacia melanoxylon and Albizia falcataria Fosberg--could increase biomass production. Total biomass production was much greater in the mixed-species plantations than in the pure Eucalyptus plantation.

  3. ForestDevelopment Community Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    in Africa as a basis for developing applied integrated, multiple use forest resource management for timber and non-timber forest products from these systems, and for forest rehabilitation af- ter degradation from to Fusarium circinatum. Forestry companies worldwide have tried to hybridise P. radiata with other Pinus

  4. Sea Urchin Gonad Index a Key to Understanding Secondary Production in the Restoration of Giant Kelp Forests off Palos Verdes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Tom; Pondella, Dan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    project would be applicable in other areas with kelp forestsand kelp- dependent fisheries.NA KEYWORDS: sea urchin, kelp forest, urchin barren, gonad

  5. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campiche, Jody L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biofuel technologies in a CGE framework. However, most of these studies do not include both an explicit sector for agricultural biomass feedstocks and allow for joint products. The specific methods of this dissertation include: ii. Incorporate...% more energy than is produced. The net energy balance of biofuels is highly dependent on the particular biomass feedstock used to produce the biofuel. However, it is important to note that cellulosic ethanol is not currently produced on a large...

  6. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campiche, Jody L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biofuel technologies in a CGE framework. However, most of these studies do not include both an explicit sector for agricultural biomass feedstocks and allow for joint products. The specific methods of this dissertation include: ii. Incorporate...% more energy than is produced. The net energy balance of biofuels is highly dependent on the particular biomass feedstock used to produce the biofuel. However, it is important to note that cellulosic ethanol is not currently produced on a large...

  7. author research productivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 -Forest industry production Authorities Renewable Energy Websites Summary: FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities...

  8. Six-year beechnut production in New Hampshire. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leak, W.B.; Graber, R.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beechnut production and losses were studied over a 6-year period in 41 northern hardwood stands ranging in age from 10 to 140 years in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Beechnut production increased consistently with stand age or diameter at base height of dominant trees and percentage of basal area composed of beech. Losses to insects, rodents, and birds before the seed reached the ground ranged from 24 to 100 percent; insects caused the greatest losses. Good seed years occurred about every third year.

  9. Southern pulpwood harvesting productivity and cost changes between 1979 and 1987. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, D.R.; Cubbage, F.W.; Stokes, B.J.; Jakes, P.J.

    1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern U.S. pulpwood harvesting industry experienced substantial changes in productivity and logging costs from 1979 to 1987. The research measures physical and economic changes in southern timber harvesting and the degree of industry shifting between different levels of harvesting mechanization.

  10. Sugar maple seed production in northern New Hampshire. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, P.W.; Graber, R.E.

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Large numbers of sugar maple seed are dispersed every second or third year. Very little seed was damaged by insects or mammals to dispersal. The trapping methods used prevented major losses following seed fall. Seed production was positively correlated with tree diameter but not with age of seed trees.

  11. Understorey diversity in southern boreal forests is regulated by productivity and its indirect impacts on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    positively related to above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP), consistent with the species-energy exclusion from the most limiting resource, light. As expected, light pre-emption increased with total basal area, dominant understorey species, and resource supply to the under- storey can also influence

  12. The Value Chain of Colorado Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. agricultural policy, on the global food system, and on technological change in agricultural production. Greg University. Dr. Thilmany's specialty is in the economics of value-added market differentiation of food products, such as local, organic, and specialty products. At CSU she teaches courses on agricultural

  13. amazon forest biomass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as wind, solar - and biomass. Part of Our Rural Economy - forest product companies now can 162 Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Environmental Sciences...

  14. Three Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Weather Extremes on the United States' Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Phu Viet

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes on California Agriculture”, California ClimateProductivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture,” Economic BriefClimate, Water, and Agriculture,” Land Economics, Vol.79(3),

  15. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 December 2012 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0806 J............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

  16. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical Documentation Version 0604 BREC Report # 2008-17 June 2008 #12;2 Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender Model Theoretical............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation

  17. Product recovery of ponderosa pine in Arizona and New Mexico. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahey, T.D.; Ayer Sachet, J.K.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mill recovery of ponderosa pine in Arizona and New Mexico showed wide variation in quality within the resource. Lumber grade ranged widely by log grade and diameter, with a major difference within grade 5 logs between old growth and young growth. Old growth produced mostly Shop and Selects grades of lumber while young growth produced mostly Dimension grades of lumber; small-diameter young growth developed severe problems of warpage. Log grades separated logs into distinct value classes, and separating young-growth timber (as an additional grade) allowed better segregation of logs by product type and expected value.

  18. ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACRONYMS ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs BLM Bureau of Land Wetlands Inventory ODA Oregon Department of Agriculture ODEQ Oregon Department of Environmental Quality ODF Department of Agriculture USDI United States Department of the Interior USFS United States Forest Service

  19. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  20. Assessing the interactions among U.S. climate policy, biomass energy, and agricultural trade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy from biomass is potentially an important contributor to U.S. climate change mitigation efforts. However, an important consideration to large-scale implementation of bioenergy is that the production of biomass competes with other uses of land. This includes traditionally economically productive uses, such as agriculture and forest products, as well as storage of carbon in forests and non-commercial lands. In addition, in the future, biomass may be more easily traded, meaning that increased U.S. reliance on bioenergy could come with it greater reliance on imported energy. Several approaches could be implemented to address these issues, including limits on U.S. biomass imports and protection of U.S. and global forests. This paper explores these dimensions of bioenergy’s role in U.S. climate policy and the relationship to these alternative measures for ameliorating the trade and land use consequences of bioenergy. It first demonstrates that widespread use of biomass in the U.S. could lead to imports; and it highlights that the relative stringency of domestic and international carbon mitigation policy will heavily influence the degree to which it is imported. Next, it demonstrates that while limiting biomass imports would prevent any reliance on other countries for this energy supply, it would most likely alter the balance of trade in other agricultural products against which biomass competes; for example, it might turn the U.S. from a corn exporter to a corn importer. Finally, it shows that increasing efforts to protect both U.S. and international forests could also affect the balance of trade in other agricultural products.

  1. 2014-2015Series College of Agriculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    2014-2015Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment University of Kentucky is accredited of University of Kentucky. Agricultural Economics The Agricultural Economics program enables graduates to pursue and production. Opportunities are also available in public policy for agriculture and rural America

  2. Agricultural&Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINMADISON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    College of Agricultural&Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON 2012-2014 128th year #12;Farm Reunion, back cover 1 The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, home of the Farm and Industry Short in agriculture for individuals planning careers in production agriculture and related agribusinesses." Objectives

  3. ATCF-GRADFORM-01-011 Arthur Temple College of Forestry & Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coble, Theresa G.

    ATCF-GRADFORM-01-011 Arthur Temple College of Forestry & Agriculture Master of Science (MS courses: Forestry Biology, Forest Res. Inventory, Social Forestry, Forestry Ecosystem Mgt, Forest Resource

  4. Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply System for Lignocellulosic Bioenergy Production Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply...

  5. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from agriculture, and analyze how these efforts would in turn impact agricultural productivity and trade. In order to realize this goal, we have the following specific...

  6. Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis of agricultural performance focused on trends in output, factor use, and productivity. Analysis of agricultural policy featured measurement of domestic and international...

  7. agricultural landscapes challenges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural...

  8. College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Agricultural Technology Applied Agricultural Management Option Checksheet for Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2013 Associate of Agriculture Degree Required Agricultural Technology Core Courses (31 credits) 3 AT 0104 Computer Applications 3 AT 0114 Applied

  9. Adaptation Options for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. A Report to the UNFCCC Secretariat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Climate change effects on agriculture, forestry, and fisheries...................................12 3 adaptation employed to offset climate change effects in an agricultural, forest and fisheries (AFF 4 Basic forms of Climate change adaptation

  10. Agriculture Taxes in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Lonnie L.; Stallmann, Judith I.

    2002-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    farmers, ranchers and agribusiness firms, including: a73 Exemption from state and local sales and use taxes on purchased farm inputs and products. a73 The provision for local property tax pro- ductivity valuation for open space land. a73 Exemption from... and local level and the provision for open space productivity valuation of land used in agriculture, timber or wildlife production. Sales tax exemptions Farmers and ranchers are exempt from state and local sales taxes for several items, including most...

  11. Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant neodomestication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant. Based on recent findings, new trajectories for agriculture and plant breeding which take into account symbiosis in an innovative ecologically intensive agriculture. A sustainable food production ? Feeding

  12. Institutional change in the forest sector : the Russian experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulybina, Olga

    of corporate responsibility, forest certification, model forests, foreign forest management practices and visions of sustainability. The results of both state and non-state activities aimed at reforming the forest sector are debatable and yet to be seen... ecological crisis of his day’, namely the problem of soil fertility within capitalist agriculture, the antagonism of town and country, and the necessity of ecological sustainability. Idealist Structuralism Similarly to materialist structuralists, Emile...

  13. Forest Products Market Snapshot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    worked through the higher cost log inventories from logs purchased in 2006, during periods of higher with a rebound, supported by a stronger economy, absorption of new home inventories, and continued population fallen in many regions of the country and are expected to continue to be soft, while inventories of homes

  14. Forest Products News Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    declines. High labor costs and 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998* 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 1 to China and Hong Kong are expected to remain at the current level of $140 million, with high import

  15. Managing Sierra Nevada Forests Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees with decay, hollows or brooms, snags, and brush. 1 Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Eldorado--Live tree with hollow structure. The tree has an old dead top with cavity nests and a new healthy top

  16. Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsĺr: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

  17. Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: Conduct research related to the prevention of occu- pational disease and injury of agricultural workers and their families. Develop, implement, and evaluate educational and outreach programs for promoting health and safety for agricultural

  18. Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    Organic agriculture cannot replace conventional agriculture Sina Adl , David Iron and Theodore Agriculture | Pathogen Dispersal Introduction Organic farming [1, 2] is gaining in popularity in Eu- rope, because or- ganic agriculture avoids using environmentally harmful chem- icals that pollute soil

  19. AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply will shape the future of the agricultural industry. We will discuss each in turn. Ethanol and energy Ethanol will be using almost 30% of the U.S. corn crop by 2009 with total ethanol production reaching almost 14 billion gallons. Numerous analysts have suggested that total demand for ethanol longer

  20. AGRICULTURAL REPORT OCTOBER 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as Indiana agriculture enters the energy business in a big way. The advent of four new Indiana ethanol plants. Ethanol means theres a monstrous increase in the need for corn production in 2007, and beyond. Acres have of the process to produce ethanol from cellulose (plant material). Indiana biofuels are both ethanol (corn

  1. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  2. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Center brought artwork and clients to the event. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Fresh Food Mississippians Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry

  3. Wisconsin Agriculture SPECIAL ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2009 · SPECIAL ARTICLE: Bioenergy and Agriculture in Wisconsin Economy Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2009 An annual report by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department

  4. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  5. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;7/30/2006 IGARSS_2006 Integrated Systems for Agriculture 2 Convergence of Evidence, All Gov't Policy Makers Reference Model: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service PECAD:Production Estimates

  6. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

  7. Extension Note Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based harvesting systems led to the development of the "Site Degradation Guidelines for the Vancouver Forest Region to validate soil disturbance guidelines, were lacking at that time. Early attempts had been made to assess, and to measure tree growth over the longer term as an indication of site productivity. The first trial

  8. Discounts, Fungibility and Agricultural GHG Offset projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    in MMT of Carbon Equivalents Soil Carbon Sequestration Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting of Carbon Equivalents Carbon Sequestration from Trees Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting 0.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration," 2003. #12;FungibilityFungibility A number of concepts have

  9. 2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    renew- able natural resources, including forests, soils, water, and wildlife. These missions involve.Theresearchgoalofthedepartmentistoobtainbasicandapplied information leading to wise and effective management of our natural resources. Forestry extension seeks2012-2013 Series College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University

  10. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity of a boreal aspen forest during and followingarea index of a boreal aspen-hazelnut forest in relation toPursh), TA: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. ),

  11. LAI, fAPAR and fCover CYCLOPES global products derived1 from VEGETATION. Part 1: Principles of the algorithm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    description of the VEGETATION sensors, radiometric calibration19 process, based on vicarious desertic targets24 red, near infrared and short wave infrared bands used to the remaining cloud free observations25 and climate modelling, resource evaluation (water, agriculture or forest3 production). Surface process models

  12. Effects of Habitat Characteristics on Occupancy and Productivity of a Forest-Dependent Songbird in an Urban Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Dianne Hali

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    determined minimum patch-size thresholds for productivity measurements, and also monitored effects on productivity from canopy cover, woodland composition, distance to and size of the nearest habitat patch, and distance to the nearest habitat patch >100 ha. I...

  13. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, The

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Form 3579” to California Agriculture at the address above. ©Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewour Writing CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 66 , NUMBER 4

  14. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 2Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  15. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 1Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  16. Pennsylvania Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    - mental regulations cover industrial pollution as well as pollution controls for agriculture. Two of PA but must be kept on the farm and made available upon request. Plans NPDES Permits The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is a requirement for construction activities that disturb 1 acre

  17. A study of over-production and enhanced secretion of enzymes. Quarterly report 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dashek, W.V.

    1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the over-production of ligno-cellulolytic enzymes which are relevant to the paper-pulp industry and agricultural community. Since ligno-cellulosics are components of wood, the project involves the forest, a renewable energy resource. Attention is focused on the following: over-production of polyphenol oxidase; establishment of the route of polyphenol oxidase secretion; regulation of polyphenol oxidase secretion; purification of extracellular oxidase.

  18. FOREST CERTIFICATION IN BRAZIL: TRADE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of traded goods is evident from Brazil's experience with forest certification by both businesses of appropriate logging practices, further deflating prices and quality. Much of Brazil's tropical timber originates from deforestation: about 2.3 million hectares of forests are cut annually for agricultural

  19. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  20. Condition and fate of logged forests in the Brazilian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305; U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest resulted in high levels of canopy damage suffi- cient to leave forests susceptible to drought and fire. We the management regimes in effect at the time of our study in the Brazilian Amazon, selective logging would

  1. AGRICULTURE, 2004 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2004 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook Situation: Implications for U.S. Agriculture · The Evolution and Current Status of Livestock Production and Meat Processing in Wisconsin Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural

  2. Economic Value of Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Value of Agricultural Research Public Investment in Texas Agricultural Research Yields Significant Economic Returns #12;Texas agricultural producers and especially consumers benefit directly from public investment in agricultural research. According to a 2006 study (Huffman and Evenson), the overall

  3. Federal and state forestry cost-share assistance programs: Structure, accomplishments, and future outlook. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, T.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost-share assistance programs have been an effective policy mechanism for increasing productivity on nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) lands. In light of reduced harvests from Federal lands, timber productivity on these lands has become increasingly important to ensure sufficient timber supplies in the future. Productivity of other forest resources has also been enhanced through these programs. Four Federal programs, the Forestry Incentives Program, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the Stewardship Incentives program, and the Conservation Reserve Program, provided cost-share assistance for tree planting on 467,000 acres in 1993. During the course of this study, the provisions of the individual State programs, funding levels, accomplishments, and outlook for continuation or expansion, were examined. Federal programs were reviewed as well, with respect to their interaction with State-level programs. The results of the study are presented in this paper.

  4. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Most estimates also indicate that climate change is likely to reduce agricultural productivity, production stability and incomes in some areas that already have high levels of...

  5. Agriculture and the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

  6. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 1. Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    , but measurements of the runoff and erosion at the rill scale are uncommon. Simulated rill erosion experiments were and agricultural use, and forest disturbances that increase erosion have a broad human impact. [3] Various forms of agriculture, timber harvest, wildfire, and construction. Ero- sion experiments under natural

  7. automated plant production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of NTFPs to forest farming practices focused on particular marketable products. Non-timber forest products Fall 2014 Webinar Series Liskiewicz, Maciej 204 Automated design of...

  8. Department of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    ; harvesting and supply; biomass conversion; energy production; marketing of bio-energy; economicsDepartment of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014 Postgraduate Diploma Enquiries: Head of Department Contact details: Department of Forest and Wood Science Stellenbosch University

  9. Evalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Environmental Life cycle assessment (LCA) to understand impacts of forest productsEvalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment Hosted in the industrial sphere, with addiKonal effects 6 #12;Life Cycle Assessment Method

  10. Forests and The Texas Economy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in tree mortality caused by pine bark beetles and the con version of timberland to other uses. The effects of pro jected land use changes are illustrated in Figure 10-1. The future of the forest industry sector depends on the sol ution to timber growth... organizations interested in forestry in Texas. As an indication of the economic and social importance of forests, both the public and private sectors are well represented. The forest products industry, an important component of the forestry sector...

  11. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Science Equine UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Horticulture Environmental Horticulture

  12. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences Office in Shepardson Building MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Education Animal Science Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Agricultural Literacy Entomology

  13. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    College of Agricultural Sciences _______________ 2.5 Page 1 College of Agricultural Sciences Office for Research UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS Agricultural Business Agricultural Economics Agricultural Education Animal Sciences UNDERGRADUATE MINORS Agricultural and Resource Economics Entomology Environmental Horticulture

  14. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  15. Forest Service Patrol Captains and Patrol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means and public property. Nationally, a successful program was characterized as one with sufficient resources of Agriculture is dedicated to the principle of multiple use management of the Nation's forest resources

  16. Status and Trends of Irrigated Agriculture in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and available water. As shown in Figure 4, most agricultural irrigation is in West and South Texas, far fromStatus and Trends of Irrigated Agriculture in Texas Irrigation is critical to our food production and food security and is a vital component of Texas' productive agricultural economy.Texas ranks third

  17. Capacity Building in Sharing Forest and Market Information Prague & Krtiny, Czech Republic, 25 October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /FAO Forest products annual market review, 2004-2005 · Global Forest Products Model, by Buongiorno, et al. · UNECE/FAO European Forest Sector Outlook Study · FAO State of the World's Forests, 2005 · UN Comtrade ­ Cooking · Mostly in developing countries · Low value · Modern wood energy ­ Small international trade

  18. U.S. Timber Production, Trade, Consumption,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    and Technology Assessment Unit at the Forest Products Laboratory. Chris McKeever created computer files managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations

  19. February 6, 2001 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    February 6, 2001 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON AGRICULTURE Bruce A McCarl, Texas A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Agriculture and Climate Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.1 Climate Change Effects on Agricultural Productivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2

  20. agricultural sciences university: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ?born Dep. of Crop Production Ecology, SLU Gert Nyberg Dep. of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU Participatory soil and water 8 Minor Field Studies No 353 Swedish...

  1. Wisconsin Agriculture Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF Wisconsin Agriculture 2010 · Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy · Current Outlook: Farm Products, Farm Inputs and the General Economy · Framing the Financial Crisis for Wisconsin Agriculture Farm Economy . . . . . . 1 II. Current Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

  2. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  3. Adding Value to Agricultural Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and some of the viscera into menudo or tripas. Booker Packing Company, Caviness Packing Company and J&B Foods are some of the compa- nies adding value to meat successfully in spite of processing costs. A recent survey of such companies indicated...

  4. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

  5. Agricultural Leadership, Education, & Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Leadership, Education, & Communications ALEC 102 Fall 2006 Course Title: Critical Issues in Agricultural Leadership and Education Credit: 1 Hour Instructors: Ms. Summer Felton; 119A! This introductory course is designed for students entering in the Agricultural Leadership & Development degree

  6. RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

  7. Genetic Engineering for Modern Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    reserved 1543-5008/10/0602-0443$20.00 Key Words abiotic stress, climate change, field conditions, global warming, stress combination, stress tolerance, transgenic crops Abstract Abiotic stress conditions such as drought, heat, or salinity cause exten- sive losses to agricultural production worldwide. Progress

  8. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (virtual- nity and Economic Development Concentration; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization

  9. Creating Value Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

  10. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  11. Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1977. Nutrients and production of giant kelp, Macrocystisof nutrients to the forest and surface of the kelp), wave

  12. Food sovereignty and agricultural trade policy commitments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in Agricultural, Food and Bioenergy Trade (AGFOODTRADE)" (Grant Agreement No. 212036) research project, funded production with enough barrier protection to shelter it from world price fluctuations and unfair trading

  13. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  14. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;88 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers aims to offer specialized training in a variety of fields in food and agriculture, and to prepare

  15. environment and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

  16. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers-level courses in agriculture were offered by the School of Arts and Sciences at AUB as early as 1914. Between

  17. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ALS 3133 Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry://lss.at.ufl.edu Overview: Analysis of the effects of agriculture on environmental quality with emphasis on agricultural wastes and practices, the potential for using agricultural systems for disposal of other wastes

  18. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ALS 3133 Agriculture and Environmental Quality 3 credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry Website is through E-Learning: http://lss.at.ufl.edu Overview: Analysis of the effects of agriculture on environmental quality with emphasis on agricultural wastes and practices, the potential for using agricultural

  19. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    , attended the Cloverbud Caper Camp, sponsored by the MSU Extension Service. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4. Jackson Director, MSU Extension Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director, Mississippi

  20. adjacent natural forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sectors?" Louisiana's Forests Louisiana ranks 10th nationally in total production of sawn timber compared Associate Dr. Richard P. Vlosky Assistant Professor December 19. 1995...

  1. araucaria angustifolia forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as lumber, wood-based panel, pulp, paper and packaging productsBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial;...

  2. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  3. Forest Fuels ReductionForest Fuels Reduction Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    the initial fuels reduction treatments leave the site with regard to long-term forest vegetation and soil are the productivity and cost rates for alternative choices of equipment for mechanical fuels reduction; what reduction operations for existing markets and new markets? (eg. biomass energy) Research Rationale

  4. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Grain & Oilseed Production Peace Region snapshot report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri

  5. Solano and Yolo County Agriculture Current Basis for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and production ­ What counties can do to support agriculture in Solano and Yolo Counties · Climate Change Change Project Title: Agricultural Mitigation and Adaptation to Climate Change in Yolo County, CA · Agricultural profiles of Yolo County and Solano Counties ­ Trends and anticipated changes in land use

  6. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  7. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  8. Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Undergraduate Education The College of Agricultural Sciences will provide undergraduate degrees in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Animal Sciences, Equine Sciences, economics, business, and communications. The program in Agricultural Education recently has been renovated

  9. Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Profitable Biodiesel Potential from Increased Agricultural Yields Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters) Total Export Profits ($) HDI Rank GDP/ cap Corrupt Rank FDI

  10. agricultural commodities opportunities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012). Water is a key production input for irrigated Hill, Jeffrey E. 4 Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Energy Storage, Conversion and...

  11. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  12. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  13. Patterns of Habitat Use By California Spotted Owls in Logged Forests of the Northern Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and private timber companies. This information. Methods The cutting history within the study area was determined using records and timber sale maps from

  14. Structural Reforms and Agricultural Export Performance: An Empirical Analysis Dwi Susanto, C. Parr Rosson, and Rafael Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structural Reforms and Agricultural Export Performance: An Empirical Analysis By Dwi Susanto, C Reforms and Agricultural Export Performance: An Empirical Analysis Abstract This study empirically investigates the effects of structural reforms on bilateral trade flows of agricultural products. Specifically

  15. FACT SHEETUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM SERVICE AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    and forest lands will be rededicated to new shrub willow planting for biomass purposes. To support shrub enrollment. The 3,500 acres will be planted in 2013 and 2014 to provide a steady supply of this biomassFACT SHEETUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM SERVICE AGENCY Page 1 June 2012 Biomass Crop

  16. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    for Organic Agriculture 7 Center for Remote Sensing 7 Center for Renewable Chemicals and Fuels 7 Center Nutrition 16 Forest Resources and Conservation, School of 16 Horticultural Sciences 17 Microbiology and Cell ­ Diagnostic Laboratories 19 Florida Extension Plant Disease Clinic ­ Gainesville 19 Florida Extension Mycology

  17. 2013-2014Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    sustained management of our renew- able natural resources, including forests, soils, water, and wildlife.Theresearchgoalofthedepartmentistoobtainbasicandapplied information leading to wise and effective management of our natural resources. Forestry extension seeks2013-2014Series College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and School of Human Environmental

  18. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    forests and trees are to our state's economy. While the statistics in this publication focus on economic Acknowledgements: Funding for this report was provided by the Public Service Company of NH and the U.S. Endowment products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  19. Effects of afforestation and forest management on soil carbon dynamics and trace gas emissions in a Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong) Carr.) forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zerva, Argyro

    The establishment and intensive management of forests for the production of timber can have significant effects on the soil carbon dynamics. The establishment of forest on organic soils under grasslands may lead to ...

  20. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  1. Immigration reform and California agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Philip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reform and California agriculture Philip Martin Professor,proposals for California agriculture. Immigration reformCenter. 196 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4

  2. Networks, Local Institutions and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udry, Chris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working Paper Series Agriculture for Development Paper No.Institutions and Agriculture. Chris Udry Yale UniversityMay 2009 Conference on “Agriculture for Development in Sub-

  3. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  4. Regulating forest practices in Texas: a problem analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreesen, Alan D

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practices law. Attitudes about the best administrative structure. . . Could a forest practices act help meet future wood needs?. Miscellaneous Section. Su~mary. 30 30 31 34 42 44 52 55 56 56 57 60 74 75 79 Chapter V. Conclusions...) National Forest Products Association (NFPA) (Industry) Southern Forest Products Association (SFPA) (Industry) Ovens-Illinois Corporation (Industry) Louisiana-Pacific Corporation (Industry) Champion International Corporation (Industry) Kirby Lumber...

  5. Statewide Forest Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Assessment (assessment). The assessment and strategy identify important forest lands and provideColorado Statewide Forest Resource Strategy #12;June 2010 Acknowledgments The Colorado State Forest Forest Resource Strategy. We also offer our thanks and acknowledgement to Greg Sundstrom, assistant staff

  6. Inventory-Measurements Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Inventory-Measurements 289 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Hardwood Inventory or region, or developing statewide hardwood policy guidelines. A physical inventory, while by no means

  7. Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  8. Forest Research ISSUE 7 The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission1 | SERG Newsletter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Agriculture and Rural Development invited SERG to lead Key Action 12 of the European Union Forest Action Plan, the Forestry Commission has long played leadership and facilitation roles enabling private, community and third. These priorities are now a key element of both European policies (EU Forest Action Plan, theme 3) and national

  9. Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Russell Ranch Sustainable Agriculture Facility Agricultural Sustainability Institute College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University of California, Davis Kate Scow, Deputy Director of Agricultural Sustainability Institute Professor, Department of LAWR With input from Steve Kaffka, Ford Denison

  10. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEC Agricultural Economics KEY: # = new course THE ECONOMICS OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE. (3 of agriculture in both a national and international dimension. Students who have completed ECO 201

  11. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment GEN General Agriculture KEY: # = new course * = course IN AGRICULTURE. (3) Anintroductorycourserequiringcriticalanalysisofthemajorsocial. Prereq: Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture; freshmen only in fall semesters and transfers

  12. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment SAG Sustainable Agriculture KEY: # = new course INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. (3) Broad introduction to the environmental, economic and cultural agriculture are discussed along with pertinent soil, crop and livestock management practices. Relationships

  13. Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    #12;Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), Library Avenue, Pusa, New Delhi-110012 : July 2011 All Rights Reserved 2011, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), New Delhi

  14. European Commission Agriculture and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Commission Agriculture and Rural Development Good practice guidance on the sustainable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5. Sustainable mobilisation of wood: good practices Commission (EC) DG Agriculture and Rural Development 130, Rue de la Loi B ­ 1049 Brussels, Belgium Phone: +32

  15. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... forests can be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence...

  16. Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

  17. International Programs in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

  18. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

  19. Division of Agriculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

  20. AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Prepare... yourself for a career in integrating life and engineering for systems in agriculture, food, environment, and energy, and to contribute to the world's largest industry. COLLEGE OF ACES COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL

  1. Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

  2. Process Manual Biological & Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    · · · · ·t t ·t ·t t t ·t . ~ t · · Process· Manual Biological & Agricultural Engineering MANUAL FOR THE BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TexasA&MUniversity Article I. NAME The name ofthis organization shall be the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (abbreviated

  3. Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    COLLEGE OF Agriculture KENNETH L. KOONCE Dean M. E. GARRISON Associate Dean JACQUELINE M. MALLET BAKER Recruitment Coordinator 104 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2362 FAX 225/578-2526 Student Services 138 Agricultural Administration Building 225/578-2065 FAX 225/578-2526 The College

  4. Funding Source Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Funding Source General Research Agricultural Experiment Station Instruction Public Service,145,610$ 3,716,162DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE $ 1,799,873 $ 8,322,303 $ 30,128,910 $ 0$ 85,000$ 2,127 $ 0$ 4,920,977$ 0US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / HATCH $ 0 $ 0 $ 4,920,977 $ 15,348,823FOUNDATION

  5. 2, 485518, 2006 Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CPD 2, 485­518, 2006 Agricultural sustainability F. Hole Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate of the Past Agricultural sustainability (frank.hole@yale.edu) 485 #12;CPD 2, 485­518, 2006 Agricultural sustainability F. Hole Title Page

  6. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Curriculum Checksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    \\ AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Curriculum Checksheet 123 Credits This checksheet describes the curricular requirements for both the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Education with a concentration in "Teaching" and for the teacher licensing program in agricultural education. The courses listed are courses

  7. Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

  8. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Economics • University of California Animal WasteAgricultural and Food Markets Gordon Rausser..4 Animal Waste

  9. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forecasting drought effects on agriculture based on waterEffects of 2009 Drought on San Joaquin Valley Agriculture

  10. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery* Department of Earth and Space conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1­2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production indicates that, considered globally, hill- slope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic

  11. Climate Change, Agriculture and Poverty Vulnerabilityand Poverty Vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change, Agriculture and Poverty Vulnerabilityand Poverty Vulnerability Presentation by-Medium-High productivity ­ Implications for agricultural production, trade and poverty · The issue of climate volatility ­ Impact of extreme climate events on poverty #12;Climate Science Debate Detection: - Little doubt about

  12. AgriculturalScience MagruderHall3132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    , PhD (University of Missouri) Teaching Areas: Marketing; Ag. Policy; Sustainable Agriculture ResearchD (University of Tennessee) Teaching Areas: Beef Production, Nutrition, Meat Science Research Interests: Energy and mineral nutrition of grazing cow/calf pairs and its impact on milk production and conception rates; visual

  13. Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  14. Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Collaboration Case Study #12;Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  15. Forest Inventory and Analysis Research The Nation's Forest Census

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census The U.S. Forest Inventory Monitoring Symposium November 4, 2008 #12;Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census FIA Program Perspectives · Only comprehensive forest inventory for each of the 50 States, Puerto

  16. Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

  17. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was with the General Electric Co. and worked on thermal and nuclear instrumentation from 1951 to 1961. His B.S. degree Station Ogden, UT 84401 General Technical Report INT-122 April 1982 Aids to Determining Fuel Models Forest Service Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Ogden, UT 84401 General Technical Report

  18. GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF REFLECTANCE AND NDVI VALUES IN THE ANGELINA FOREST Peter P. Siska and I. K. Hung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF REFLECTANCE AND NDVI VALUES IN THE ANGELINA FOREST ECOSYSTEM* Peter P. Siska International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry, Denver, Colorado, 5-7 November

  19. GMP- Biomass Electricity Production Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green Mountain Power Corporation (GMP), Vermont's largest electric utility, offers a production incentive to farmers who own systems utilizing anaerobic digestion of agricultural products,...

  20. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  1. Selecting a Consulting Forester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-038 5-06 Selecting a Consulting Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent... forest management experience does the for- ester have and in what capacity? ? In what professional or forestry-related organizations is the forester an active member? Recognized professional organizations include the Association of Consulting...

  2. Wisconsin Agriculture Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    Wisconsin Agriculture 2012 STATUS OF Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics · Status­Extension College of Agricultural & Life Sciences UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON #12;#12;Status of Wisconsin Agriculture, 2012 An annual report by the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, UW

  3. Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

  4. Forest Lifeautumn | winter 2004 the forest!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valley, near the spectacular Cornish coast Outdoor delights on your doorstep Come to the heart of Britain, rivers and streams, dramatic mountains, deep valleys and peaceful forest glades - they're all of exciting news, events, information and a great competition. Happy reading! In this issue of Forest Life we

  5. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Working Party 1.01.08 ­ Ecology and Silviculture of Spruces; co-hosted by the EU Interreg Project Forest of Alberta, Canada "Ecology and Silviculture of White Spruce in the Canadian Boreal Forest for Multiple Forest Integrity; Why Spruce is a Good Option" Kristina Blennow, SLU, Sweden "Perception of Risks

  6. Forest ecology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

  7. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  8. agricultural university wageningen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ?born Dep. of Crop Production Ecology, SLU Gert Nyberg Dep. of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU Participatory soil and water 12 Montana State University 1 M.S. in...

  9. Essays on Agricultural Adaptation to Climate Change and Ethanol Market Integration in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aisabokhae, Ruth 1980-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce the current and future extent of climate change. Biofuels production, for instance, expands agriculture’s role in climate change mitigation. This dissertation encompasses adaptation and mitigation strategies as a response to climate change...

  10. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  11. Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Solar radiation management impacts on agriculture in China: A case study in the Geoengineering-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan Abstract Geoengineering via solar radiation management could affect agricultural productivity due to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

  12. Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Agricultural Sector in Northern Namibia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Charles Russell

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In agrarian societies, HIV/AIDS extends far beyond the realm of healthcare into agricultural production and food security as well. Namibia is a developing country with a large portion of its population involved in agriculture; the average HIV...

  13. Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, R.B.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

  14. P3.2. Climate change and agricultural production risks PI: P. Calanca1), J. Fuhrer (Deputy PI)1), Co-PI: B. Lehmann2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    residues, soils may turn from a C sink to a source of atmospheric CO2. SOM stabilization depends on residue directly by more frequent and persistent dry spells and high temperatures, and indirectly through shifts (frequency/persistence) increase crop production risks by affecting physical and chemical properties

  15. Administration ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty ............................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty .............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

  16. Administration....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty..............................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................17 Research Projects School of Agriculture

  17. Administration....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty..............................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................3 School of Agriculture Faculty.............................................................................................................4 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY .............................................................................................................18 Research Projects School of Agriculture

  18. Administration ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................2 School of Agriculture Faculty .........................................................................................3 Agricultural and Biological Engineering ­ ABE Agricultural Economics ­ AG ECON Agronomy ­ AGRY Research Projects School of Agriculture

  19. Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Aravind

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change on Indian agriculture. ” Manuscript,study of climate change impacts on Indian agriculture hasclimate change on agricultural output, because of the relevance of agriculture

  20. Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla Grundy (University of Zimbabwe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla and a variety of other ecosystem services. However the expansion of agricultural land and the curing of tobacco is accelerating deforestation and forest degradation rates. These structural changes to the ecosystem threaten

  1. agriculture agricultural knowledge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: May 2011 New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling: Relating Enegy and Farm of Education, Office of Civil Rights. 12;1 New Challenges in Agricultural...

  2. Public Parking > Agriculture Building Parkade**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY > Agriculture Building Parkade** > Pay Parking Lots** > Stadium Parkade** > Diefenbaker Lot > Health Sciences Parkade** Disabled Persons' Parking* Motorcyle Parking* Faculty & Sta Parking Lots* Student Parking Lots

  3. Oregon Agriculture and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

  4. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Crop production Ecology Treatment and utilization of pulp industry residues using Short Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Crop production Ecology #12; Treatment and utilization and paper, mining and metal processing, food processing industry and communal sewage plants. Paper industry

  5. School of Forest Resources and Conservation 2009 Unit Review Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    School of Forest Resources and Conservation UF/IFAS 2009 Unit Review Document October, 2009; Revised January, 2010 #12;School of Forest Resources and Conservation UF/IFAS 2009 Unit Review Document that encompass sustainable conservation, production and management. Mission To deliver integrated programs

  6. United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products market developments in 2002 and 2003 Highlights · Availability on world markets of wood products for a policy response from Governments. · Energy markets and international biofuel trade are developing rapidly consequences in the long term for wood supply and for the market position of forest products. · Changes

  7. The Canadian Boreal Forest, which stretches across most of the country, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber Companies in Landmark Environmental Deal A coalition of the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC)-- representing 21 Canadian forest companies--and nine environmental organizations has signed forest management for an area roughly the size of Texas. The plan immediately halts all logging on nearly

  8. WWF -Australian companies join WWF's forest and trade network q About WWF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    timber companies have signed on to WWF's forest and trade network in Australia. The signatories include forest products companies ITC Limited and Timbercorp, timber importer and wholesaler Simmonds LumberWWF - Australian companies join WWF's forest and trade network q About WWF q How You Can Help q

  9. MINIMUM COST STRATEGIES FOR SEQUESTERING CARBON IN FORESTS Darius M. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    )1 . The potential for expanded rates of forest carbon sequestration or net carbon flux beyond 10 Mmt annually in forests and forest products is a potentially useful mechanism in global efforts to offset expanding of attaining higher rates.2 In most of these studies, the sole vehicle for expanding flux is the afforestation

  10. Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs J A R R E T T E . B Y R in the diversity and complexity of food webs of giant kelp forests, one of the most productive habitats on Earth. We demonstrate this by linking natural variation in storms with measured changes in kelp forest food

  11. MSU at Work in Africa: Food and Agricultural Export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSU at Work in Africa: Food and Agricultural Export Value Chain Development The Challenge Global, and other high-value export products, small- and medium-scale producers have struggled to access these markets. Paving the way for these producers to supply high-value food and agricultural export markets

  12. Richard N. Arnold College Professor, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    establishment, and erosion control in the intermountain region of northwestern New Mexico; the use of coalRichard N. Arnold College Professor, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, New Mexico State-1979 Experience: Technical Service Director for the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry, Farmington, New Mexico

  13. acid production units: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A guide to selected non-timber forest products of the Hayfork Adaptive Management for non-timber forest products (NTFPs) is increasing, and growing numbers of people are enhancing...

  14. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

  15. FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    ;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research funds and income from service contracts amounted to 3,885,726 US$. Research funds)/Initiative for Biodiversity Studies in Arid Regions (IBSAR) at AUB, Service Contracts and International Agencies accounted and wild life. Service contracts involved agricultural extension, crop production, dairy stock improvement

  16. Presentation 2.4: Forest biorefining and implications for future wood energy scenarios Jack N. Saddler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germ Corn oil 152 #12;Forest Products Biotechnology at UBC Bioethanol Production 0 5,000 10,000 15 (000,000 litres/a) Brazil World Bioethanol Production USA & Canada Asia EU Sources: (1) FO Licht. 2005

  17. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  18. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

  19. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    43 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Scienc- es (CAFLS) supports Clemson University's land-grant mission to provide education, research and service to the public. The College of Agriculture

  20. ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    ABT Agricultural Biotechnology College of Agriculture, Food and Environment KEY: # = new course or first semester transfer students in Agricultural Biotechnology. ABT 120 GENETICS AND SOCIETY. (3 with the common experimental methods used in agricultural biotechnology. Students will be presented with several

  1. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    46 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 46 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

  2. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    44 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences offers graduate programs in 17 traditional disciplines in agriculture, forestry, and a wide variety of biological sciences, from

  3. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    42 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  4. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  5. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    39 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sci- ences (www.clemson.edu/CAFLS) offers a broad. The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics with a Community and Economic

  6. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    20 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research and service in agriculture, forestry and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  7. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    40 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences 40 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  8. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    41 College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens of South

  9. College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences AGRICULTURE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    20 College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences 20 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES The mission of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences is to provide teaching, research, and service in agriculture, forestry, and life sciences that will benefit the citizens

  10. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment AEN Agricultural Engineering KEY: # = new course of engineering systems, earthwork computations, and introduction to boundary surveys for Agriculture students in the College of Agriculture and/or consent of instructor. AEN 220 FARM TRACTORS AND ENGINES. (3) Principles

  11. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  12. Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Public Lands for Cannabis Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallery, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Forest • Mallery hemp including fibers, oil, andthe government encouraged hemp production, a fibrous form ofdeferment, for farmers to grow hemp to meet wartime fiber

  13. Kentucky Department of Agriculture

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer & Environmental Protection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture) described Biofuel Quality Testing in Kentucky.

  14. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment A Foundation for Strategic Discussion and Private Forestry Redesign Initiative 2 National Guidance for Statewide Forest Resource Assessments 4 The Colorado Statewide Resource Assessment and all appendices are available online on the Colorado State Forest

  15. Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy 2007 ­ 2012 November 2006 #12;Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOOTHILLS MODEL FOREST Business Strategy for April 2007 to March 2012 1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................... 4 2.4 Foothills Model Forest Values

  16. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  17. Opportunities for Future Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .V.Birnie * Forest Research 1 #12;This document has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the ISO 9001

  18. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  19. AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Challenges Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

  20. Communication Factors Affecting African Policymakers' Decisions about Agricultural Biotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begashaw, Belay Ejigu

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for impacting decisions on agricultural biotechnology practices in food production among African policymakers. The research focused on three African countries, namely, South ...

  1. AGRICULTURE, 2005 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2005 Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy Situation and Outlook: Farm Products, Farm Inputs and the General Economy Special Articles · Expansion, Modernization..............................................................................................................................v I. Status of the Wisconsin Farm Economy

  2. Post-DiplomaBachelorofArts AgriculturalStudies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Management: Production, Finance, and Marketing Animal Health Technology EnvironmentalHorticulture:Arboricultureand Grande Prairie Regional College Animal Health Technology Lakeland College Agri-Business Agro-Environmental train in the interrelationships among agricultural, social, economic and environmental systems. Approved

  3. Post-DiplomaBachelorofArts AgriculturalStudies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Health Technology Lakeland College Agri-Business Agro-Environmental Technology Animal Health Technology train in the interrelationships among agricultural, social, economic and environmental systems. Approved Animal Science Technology Crop Technology Diversified Livestock Production (prior to 2004) Herd Health

  4. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  5. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  6. Purdue Agriculture Annual Statistical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue Agriculture Research Works Annual Statistical Report 2005-2006 Purdue AGrICuLTure Read the full report on the Web www.ag.purdue.edu/arp/stat_report_05-06 #12;Purdue AGrICuLTure Purdue Agriculture Research Works Here's why. We are riding the wave of revolutionary changes brought about

  7. Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974- Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in agricultural and forest reserve areas.

  8. By Rebecca Barnard, Forest Certification Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - administered land. Third party and annual surveillance audits maintain or improve the DNR's forest management that their products Continued on page 4 Chain of Custody Market Outlook 2 Certification Web sites 5 Stumpage Prices 6 percent long-run trend level by mid-2009. However, energy and fuel prices have increased to levels well

  9. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

  10. July 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    new #12;source of industrial demand in agricultural markets (Energy Information Agency 2010). To compound matters, water, a key input into agricultural production, is rapidly diminishing in availabilityJuly 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050: A Perfect Storm

  11. The Role and Use of Water in Agriculture in the Western Balkans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and understand the interaction between agriculture and the other sectors, an environmental input-output model sectors (other mining, food and beverages, and energy production). It is confirmed that the agriculturalThe Role and Use of Water in Agriculture in the Western Balkans: The Case of Macedonia Jordan

  12. Roshna Maharjan Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Roshna Maharjan Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures A Case in agricultural production. 4. Respondents are aware about the change in climate and they have been adopting

  13. Draft for Public Comment Chapter 6 Agriculture (v. 11 Jan 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grotjahn, Richard

    climate change.30 6. Climate change effects on agriculture will have consequences for food security both31 increasing pressures from pests37 and pathogens that will benefit from a changing climate. Agriculture and efficiency of production across the U.S.2 Climate change poses a major challenge to U.S. agriculture, because

  14. The Economic Impact from the Extension of Unemployment Insurance to Texas Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritsch, Conrad F.; Ruesink, David C.; Nergart, Karen J.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    here. 1) Agricultural employers with agricultural product sales of $40,000 or more in 1969, paid out two-thirds of the total agricultural wages. These employers were less than one-third of the total agricultural employers in the state and about 6... percent of all farmers. 2) Livestock operations paid out 30 percent of total agricultural wages in 1969, cash grain operations 27 percent and cotton operations 19 percent. 3) Legislation bringing agricultural employers with 4 or more workers for 20...

  15. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Land Reclamation (DMLR) regulations. Important Considerations The language in this publication to advances in reclamation science, Virginia coal mining operations can establish high-value, productive by conventional reclamation practices. Mine reclamation practices capable of re-establishing productive forests

  16. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  17. An Evaluation of the Perceived Effectiveness of the Municipal Forester Institute on its Participants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie Rena'

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE ON ITS PARTICIPANTS A Dissertation by MELANIE RENA? KIRK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications AN EVALUATION OF THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MUNICIPAL FORESTER INSTITUTE...

  18. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    1976 . Disturbance during logging stimulates re- generation of koa. USDA Forest Servo Res. Note PSW-306 and distribution of Acacia koa re- genera tion after logging were studied on a 500-acre (202-ha) tract of koa forest heavily infested with Passi- /1ora mol/issima vines on the island of Hawaii. Koa seedling density

  19. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  20. Forests and historic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  1. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  2. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  3. Tongass National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two long-term timber contracts in the Tongass National Forest require private companies to harvest prescribed amounts of timber within agreed upon time frames during the 50-year contract life. This report has reviewed the accuracy of Forest Service figures for the volume of timber actually harvested under the two contracts, timber deleted from the private companies' operating plans, and backlogged timber. The author was unable to verify the first two figures because the Forest Service had not complied with all of its internal controls and because documentation and records were incomplete. The author was able to verify the figure for backlogged timber. While the Forest Service has tried to better account for timber prepared for harvesting through improved internal controls, this report believes additional actions are needed to ensure that forest supervisors comply with the internal controls for documenting harvested timber volumes and the information needed to support and report changes in timber sale activities is accurately reported.

  4. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agricultural production" (World Food Conference, 1974). At a meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) held at CIMMYT in Mexico during October, 1975, the consensus of those...TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term management strategies and management options for sustaining ecosystems and preserving high-value trees are presented. This information provides forest managers with knowledge and resources needed to detect WPBR Technical Report RMRS-GTR-206 March 2008 Options for the Management of White Pine Blister Rust in the Rocky

  6. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    RMRS-P-61 December 2010 Integrated Management of Carbon Sequestration and Biomass Utilization management of carbon sequestration and biomass utilization opportunities in a changing climate: Proceedings Forests are important for carbon sequestration and how they are manipulated either through natural

  7. ECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2000-2001 __________________________________________________________ 1 Note: the basis of information in this chapter is not the UNECE TIMBER database built on country-supplied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    competitive advantage, market access, image building and environmental pressure. · On the supply side the area are actively promoting CFPs. · Public procurement plays an important role as a driver of demand in several and Forest Discussion Paper2 on the status of certification of sustainable forest management in the UNECE

  8. ECOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE SOLAR ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    products or urban and agricultural wastes could provide amay use urban and agricultural waste biomass, or energywill have to be found. agricultural and forest waste, or for

  9. nAturAl resources School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    the opportunity to focus on the multi-resource manage- ment of forests and associated ecosystems for the sustainednAturAl resources MAnAgeMent School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences 907-474-7083 www.uaf.edu/snras/ Bs Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 130 credits Natural resources management involves making

  10. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Steven Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Steven Anderson. In Oklahoma, bottomland hardwood forests are good examples of riparian areas. Riparian areas have many, and suggest appropriate management practices to help maintain them. Riparian Areas in Oklahoma A diversity

  11. Indigenous livelihoods, slash-and-burn agriculture, and carbon stocks in Eastern Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    , and agricultural intensification. Based on soil and biomass carbon measurements, estimated annual sequestration aimed at sequestration of carbon in the community are likely to be rather unequally distributed within., 2001; FAO, 1996). Annual carbon (C) sequestration rates in tropical forest fallow are estimated

  12. Creating a Consortium to Increase minority and Low-Income Community Participation in Alternative Energy Development, Production and Management Melinda Downing, United States Department of Energy Geraldine Herring, United States Department of Agriculture John Rosenthall, Environmental Justice Conference, Inc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, M. [Company United States Department of Energy (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    America's desire for energy independence places a new demand on alternative fuel production. Additional interest and emphasis are being placed on alternatives such as solar, wind, biofuels and nuclear energy. The nuclear fuel production option brings a new look at risk and residual waste management for a number of communities that have traditionally remained outside the energy debate. With the Federal requirements for environmental justice and public participation in energy and environmental decision-making, proponents of alternative energy production facilities will find themselves participating in discussions of risk, production, storage and disposal of hazardous materials and waste matters with low income and minority members in communities where these facilities are located or wish to locate. The fundamental principal of environmental justice is that all residents should have meaningful and intelligent participation in all aspects of environmental decision-making that could affect their community. Impacted communities must have the resources and ability to effectively marshall data and other information in order to make informed and intelligent decisions. Traditionally, many low-income and minority communities have lacked access to the required information, decision-makers and technical advisers to make informed decisions with respect to various risks that accompany alternative energy production, hazardous materials storage and nuclear waste management. In order to provide the necessary assistance to these communities, the Departments of Energy and Agriculture have teamed with others to cerate the Alternative Energy Consortium. The Alternative Energy Consortium is a collaboration of non-profit organizations, Federal agencies, Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Serving Institutions (HBCU/MSIs), and private sector corporations (energy industry specialists) designed to explore and develop opportunities that empower minorities to own and work in all aspects of the field of alternative energy. The Consortium's primary objectives are to find ways to: - Include minorities in the development and ownership of infrastructure in the alternative energy industry; - Promote research and education programs to inform the public about risks and benefits of various forms of alternative energy; - Build a Mentor/Protege Program between HBCU/MSIs and industry leaders to enhance minority participation in ownership and career success in alternative energy production and distribution. The Consortium will work together to create a process whereby minorities and low income individuals will be recruited, educated, and mentored to maximize alternative energy ownership and job opportunities. Industry specialists and government representatives will work with academicians and others to: 1. research areas and methods where minorities and rural communities can engage in the industry; 2. invest in minorities by serving as mentors to minority serving institutions by offering hands-on experience through apprenticeships; 3. work to identify ownership opportunities for minorities; and 4. work to develop legislation that supports economic development and participation for minorities and rural communities in the industry. To accomplish this goal, the Consortium has set out a three-phase plan. Phase I organized a meeting of professionals to discuss the concept, explore the fundamentals, identify key players, and draft next steps. The group took a critical look at the energy industry: 1) trends, 2) economics, 3) limited number of minorities; and 4) infrastructure. Through that process the group identified four areas that would greatly impact economic development for minorities and rural communities: I Energy; II Broadband Communications; III Education; IV Labor Resources. Phase II presented a roundtable panel discussion that continued to refine the Consortium. The goal of these discussions is to produce a well-balanced Consortium committed to working together to produce effective solutions that bridge the gap between alternative energy

  13. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  14. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

  15. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    /schedule, language, safety and health, and time away from home; finally, benefits included experience in international agriculture and natural resources, culture, international travel, global perspective, and education. This study found that international agriculture...

  16. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  17. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

  18. Essays on Development, Ownership Structure, and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorthy, Aravind

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change on Indian agriculture. ” Manuscript, Department ofJ. Parikh. “Indian agriculture and climate sensitivity. ”3):353–368, 1979. Food and Agriculture Organization of the

  19. Farm Workers and Unions in California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Unions in California Agriculture Philip Martin June 30,unions and immigration in California agriculture 2. scanningbargaining agreements signed in CA agriculture (http://

  20. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, by

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012): Can Cali- fornia Agriculture disprove the allegedweed. Three ACE awards for California Agriculture TheCalifornia Agriculture team has won three awards from the